QSEN Case Western Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing

Quality and Safety Education for Nurses

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TCNJ Workshop with Videos

TCNJ Workshop with Videos

Posted by on Mar 23, 2017 in News | 0 comments

Infusing Quality and Safety Education for Nurses into Your Curriculum: A Workshop Funded by a grant from The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality AUTHOR(S):Altmiller, Gerry; Armstrong, Gail; Durham, Carol; Kenner, Carole ABSTRACT: The QSEN Competencies include implementation of quality improvement strategies, evidence-based practice, patient safety, integration of informatics into patient care and health management, patient centeredness in care management, and strategies to improve the teamwork and collaboration required to achieve consistent positive outcomes and improve the delivery of care. Nurses must enter the workforce with these competencies, and nurse educators need support and strategies to embed these competencies into nursing education. These presentations focus specifically on providing nurse educators in the academic and practice arenas, the knowledge and resources necessary to fully and effectively integrate these competencies into teaching plans in both settings. The workshop highlights research findings related to the QSEN Competencies, as well as resources available to engage nurses and nursing students in work that promotes competency development. Nationally recognized experts in patient care, nursing education, and quality improvement provide the instruction and coaching for these presentations. The overarching goal of these presentations is to provide nurse educators with the knowledge needed to develop and implement teaching strategies that support integration of the QSEN Competencies into education programs for nurses and nursing students in order to improve quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of health care for all Americans.   View Full Workshop here (with...

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Patient Safety Awareness Week

Patient Safety Awareness Week

Posted by on Mar 6, 2017 in News |

Patient Safety Awareness Week Is Less than a week away! Join Us, March 12-18, 2017 Patient Safety Awareness Week, a highlight of the United for Patient Safety Campaign , is time dedicated to raising awareness about patient safety among health professionals and the public.   Join @theNPSF and others for a Twitter chat Patient Safety: What Patients Want (and Need) to Know Tuesday, March 14, 2017 | 1:00-2:00 pm ET Use the hashtag #PSAW17chat to join the conversation! Register today for a complimentary webcast, which will focus on efforts to engage the public more actively in patient safety: The Voice of the Patient and the Public Wednesday, March 15, 2017 | 2:00-3:00 pm ET Speakers: Tejal K. Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS President and CEO National Patient Safety Foundation and the NPSF Lucian Leape Institute Rosemary Gibson Senior Advisor The Hastings Center Marshall Allen Reporter ProPublica Martin J. Hatlie, JD President and CEO Project Patient Care Register now here.     Throughout the week, NPSF is encouraging those on social media to demonstrate the fact that “We are all patients” by posting photos of themselves in hospital gowns or in patient care settings and using the hashtags #WeAreAllPatients #UnitedforPatientSafety #PSAW2017   Other Ways to Get Involved— >>  Download Free Campaign Materials >>  Visit the Online Store >>  Help Us Spread Awareness by Donating to the Cause >>  Join the Discussion >>  Share Your Plans Don’t forget to use the event hashtags #unitedforpatientsafety and #PSAW2017 to let everyone know what you are up to for the week. Interested in Becoming a Campaign Partner? Learn More Or contact Sara Valentin, Assistant Vice President, Event Management and Strategy, at svalentin@npsf.org or 617-391-9906 NPSF salutes Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals for their generous support of this year’s Patient Safety Awareness Week and their ongoing commitment to patient and workforce safety. National Patient Safety Foundation® 280 Summer Street, Ninth floor, Boston, MA 02210 • 617.391.9900 npsf.org • info@npsf.org • contact...

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Using QSEN to Get Off the Teaching Hamster Wheel

Using QSEN to Get Off the Teaching Hamster Wheel

Posted by on Jan 25, 2017 in News | 2 comments

Submitted by: Nancy Ebersole PhD, RN, Marion Frost DNP, RN and Pamela Delis PhD, RN Salem State University   The students are so excited to be going to clinical, simulation, and doing active learning projects. They have developed their own groups for studying, getting to and from clinical, etc. Life is great until they realize that they have reached the point in their academic studies where they must take their final writing course, an evidence-based practice course, in order to earn their BSN. Suddenly their enthusiasm turns to dread, and anxiety replaces their aura of confidence. We as faculty were faced with breathing new life into this writing requirement and QSEN provided the focus for identifying strategies that are presently transforming this course. A deep-dive into evidence-based practice takes place in our nursing research course. It is also the third in the required sequence of writing courses within the curriculum. Editing a paper is not met with the same enthusiasm as a clinical course and we knew we had to rethink our strategy of putting our students on this hamster wheel of writing and rewriting. We recognized that having the students work together would get them more focused on the assignments and the objective of sustained engagement in the writing process. It didn’t take long to realize that the QSEN competencies of Teamwork & Collaboration, along with Quality Improvement, would provide us with the focus to reformat this course. Teamwork and collaboration:  In keeping with the criteria for this writing intensive course we added peer reviews of each other’s writing.  This required helping the students to value not only their writing but also that of their classmates. They had to deliver their critique of someone else’s work and also figure out how to receive a critique in a way that helps them with their own writing. Additionally faculty had to collaborate with students to ensure they knew the expectations of the assignment for writing their own paper. Quality improvement: Two levels of quality improvement occurred, one at the course level, and one at the student level.  At the course level, we determined that restructuring the rubrics was in order....

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International Forum on Quality & Safety

Posted by on Dec 19, 2016 in News |

View Website  April 26-28, 2017 | London  The London 2017 program contains a number of sessions of particular interest to nurses with a focus on how a collaborative approach, involving multiprofessional teams, combined with an engaged community, can provide sustainable, patient-centered care at a reduced cost. Through the program participants will learn to identify where change needs to happen and co-produce imaginative...

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QSEN-ize it! New Blog Post

QSEN-ize it! New Blog Post

Posted by on Dec 12, 2016 in News | 2 comments

QSEN-ize it! By: Mary Jo Risetter, MSN, RN & Kathleen Szymanski, MSN, RN Lake Michigan College  Regardless of the size or location of the institution, nursing faculty struggle with the same challenges when it comes to addressing safety with nursing students. No project evokes such a feeling of dread among nurse educators as a curriculum review – except maybe an accreditation self-study! After our program’s last accreditation site visit, it became apparent that our curriculum was a little dusty. Our mission, philosophy, and program objectives were just words on a page. They didn’t drive our daily work with our students.           Many of our faculty had never participated in a curriculum review. We weren’t even sure where to start. We were confident that we already had a solidly founded and successful program, as evidenced by our accreditation status, NCLEX pass rates, graduate/employer feedback, and graduate employment rates. We didn’t want to abandon all the elements that made our program strong, but we still saw the need to modernize. Our faculty was empowered to better define our program objectives. Rather than writing more nice, yet meaningless words, we made our program objectives a living set of guidelines. They were relevant and resonated with our faculty on a personal level. It was our goal to create objectives we could actively utilize in planning our curricula. This shift in thought process got the ball rolling and made the curriculum planning process more exciting.           As we looked for guiding principles to base our curriculum upon, QSEN was the natural choice. Our faculty could easily get onboard with using QSEN since we already utilized QSEN in many parts of our curriculum, we just didn’t necessarily call it “QSEN”. Some of our faculty had already been incorporating similar teaching strategies such as “The Little Room of Errors” (http://qsen.org/little-room-of-errors/) from the QSEN website. As we did more research, we all caught the QSEN bug. But, how were we to turn this into an entire curriculum? We determined it was time to seek expert consultation in order to better integrate QSEN into our new curriculum.           This past May, four members of our faculty attended the...

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