QSEN Case Western Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing

Quality and Safety Education for Nurses

Navigation Menu

Northeast & East Central Region Summer Event

Northeast & East Central Region Summer Event

Posted by on Apr 12, 2017 in News |

SAVE THE DATE The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) Institute Regional Center  at Jacksonville University is hosting an Inaugural 2017 Patient Safety Forum The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) Institute Regional Center at Jacksonville University is hosting an Inaugural 2017 Patient Safety Forum on Friday, June 9, 2017. This half-day conference is a wonderful opportunity to network and learn more about patient safety from internationally recognized experts in the field to improve quality of care and health outcomes.  The expertise provided by these renowned speakers will promote synergy and inter-professional collaboration to enhance quality and safety education and scholarship. The scheduled presenters include: Robert Wears, MD, Ph.D., MS, Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, UF Health Science Center, Jacksonville – The Evolution of Patient Safety John James, Ph.D., DABT, Patient Safety America – The Heart and Mind of Patient Safety Mary Dolansky, Ph.D., RN, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University – The QSEN Journey – Past, Present, and Future Registration is complimentary for attendees. Continuing education hours are pending. Please use the following link to register for attendance: https://goo.gl/forms/wz4GwjPBy8CCTzlK2 Approximately 200 interdisciplinary healthcare professionals including healthcare administrators, healthcare providers, nurse leaders, academic faculty, educators, quality/risk managers, medical residents, and students from across the region are expected to attend this important event. The event will celebrate the establishment of the new QSEN Institute Regional Center at Jacksonville University which will foster an international network of nurses and other healthcare professionals who contribute to quality and safety educational resources and scholarship. The Center will provide services throughout the southeastern U.S. The Co-Directors of the Center are Dr. Teri Chenot, Associate Professor, and Dr. Roberta Christopher, Assistant Professor, at the Brooks Rehabilitation College of Healthcare Sciences. More information about the Center and the Patient Safety Forum is available by contacting Dr. Chenot at tchenot@ju.edu or Dr. Christopher...

Read More

Rapid Cycle Learning in Simulation- Utilizing a postpartum hemorrhage scenario

Posted by on Apr 12, 2017 in News |

Preparation: Students are to complete the assigned textbook reading and a case study article provided prior to the exercise on PPH; etiology, signs and symptoms, nursing assessments, and treatment options. They should also be introduced to Kolb’s Change Theory of Learning, the Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle for change, and rapid cycle learning. Pre-briefing: Students are instructed how the rapid cycle learning will be performed in the simulation lab. Students are told they will conduct an initial assessment of their patient collectively as “one’ nurse in a group format. They will be guided by the faculty facilitator in regards to vital signs with student request. Following a pre-determined time limit (approximately 10-15 minutes) the cycle will end and there will be an immediate debriefing. The students are either audio or video taped during the simulation which is reviewed together immediately following the cycle. The students are then instructed that they will proceed to the next repeat simulation cycle paired together in varied nursing roles, rather than working collectively as “one”. Lastly in the final cycle, students will individually assume an assigned nursing role as the case study continues to evolve. By utilizing rapid cycle learning, students are expected to navigate through a process of reflection and growth within a short time frame, increasing their knowledge, critical reasoning skills, collaboration, confidence, and safety in practice. A predetermined time is established for each action cycle. The cycles can be equal in time or elongated as the scenario evolves with additional complications and necessary interventions. A specified amount of time promotes the urgency of the situation and encourages the students to think and act in a more efficient manner. Lab environment set up: The simulation scenario includes a mannequin with a soft uterus and a large amount of blood on a perineal pad hidden by a coversheet. A family member, played by faculty or another student is present by the bedside. The patient has an intravenous access in upper limb. A medication cart and oxygen delivery source is available in the simulation area. Clinical groups of 4-8 students are recommended. Strategy: The Plan-Do-Study-Act model and Kolb Theory of change demonstrates how learning evolves through phases....

Read More

TCNJ Workshop with Videos

TCNJ Workshop with Videos

Posted by on Mar 23, 2017 in News |

Infusing Quality and Safety Education for Nurses into Your Curriculum: A Workshop Funded by a grant from The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality AUTHOR(S):Altmiller, Gerry; Armstrong, Gail; Durham, Carol; Kenner, Carole ABSTRACT: The QSEN Competencies include implementation of quality improvement strategies, evidence-based practice, patient safety, integration of informatics into patient care and health management, patient centeredness in care management, and strategies to improve the teamwork and collaboration required to achieve consistent positive outcomes and improve the delivery of care. Nurses must enter the workforce with these competencies, and nurse educators need support and strategies to embed these competencies into nursing education. These presentations focus specifically on providing nurse educators in the academic and practice arenas, the knowledge and resources necessary to fully and effectively integrate these competencies into teaching plans in both settings. The workshop highlights research findings related to the QSEN Competencies, as well as resources available to engage nurses and nursing students in work that promotes competency development. Nationally recognized experts in patient care, nursing education, and quality improvement provide the instruction and coaching for these presentations. The overarching goal of these presentations is to provide nurse educators with the knowledge needed to develop and implement teaching strategies that support integration of the QSEN Competencies into education programs for nurses and nursing students in order to improve quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of health care for all Americans.   View Full Workshop here (with...

Read More

Patient Safety Awareness Week

Patient Safety Awareness Week

Posted by on Mar 6, 2017 in News |

Patient Safety Awareness Week Is Less than a week away! Join Us, March 12-18, 2017 Patient Safety Awareness Week, a highlight of the United for Patient Safety Campaign , is time dedicated to raising awareness about patient safety among health professionals and the public.   Join @theNPSF and others for a Twitter chat Patient Safety: What Patients Want (and Need) to Know Tuesday, March 14, 2017 | 1:00-2:00 pm ET Use the hashtag #PSAW17chat to join the conversation! Register today for a complimentary webcast, which will focus on efforts to engage the public more actively in patient safety: The Voice of the Patient and the Public Wednesday, March 15, 2017 | 2:00-3:00 pm ET Speakers: Tejal K. Gandhi, MD, MPH, CPPS President and CEO National Patient Safety Foundation and the NPSF Lucian Leape Institute Rosemary Gibson Senior Advisor The Hastings Center Marshall Allen Reporter ProPublica Martin J. Hatlie, JD President and CEO Project Patient Care Register now here.     Throughout the week, NPSF is encouraging those on social media to demonstrate the fact that “We are all patients” by posting photos of themselves in hospital gowns or in patient care settings and using the hashtags #WeAreAllPatients #UnitedforPatientSafety #PSAW2017   Other Ways to Get Involved— >>  Download Free Campaign Materials >>  Visit the Online Store >>  Help Us Spread Awareness by Donating to the Cause >>  Join the Discussion >>  Share Your Plans Don’t forget to use the event hashtags #unitedforpatientsafety and #PSAW2017 to let everyone know what you are up to for the week. Interested in Becoming a Campaign Partner? Learn More Or contact Sara Valentin, Assistant Vice President, Event Management and Strategy, at svalentin@npsf.org or 617-391-9906 NPSF salutes Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals for their generous support of this year’s Patient Safety Awareness Week and their ongoing commitment to patient and workforce safety. National Patient Safety Foundation® 280 Summer Street, Ninth floor, Boston, MA 02210 • 617.391.9900 npsf.org • info@npsf.org • contact...

Read More

SAFETY Bundle Simulation Day

Posted by on Feb 14, 2017 in News |

At conclusion of junior year, students completed course theory in Nursing Foundations and Adult Health and Illness pertaining to but not limited to peri-operative nursing, SBAR communication, patient safety risks, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and medication delivery. Students had one semester of medical surgical clinical and also completed their foundation skills competencies through-out the year in labs. Safety Bundle Day was constructed to apply a full day simulation experience in lieu of the last clinical day for the entire junior class. The purpose was to apply the culmination of content learned to clinical practice in a safe controlled environment, provide an opportunity to apply new skills in the mock code, collaborate with one another and with interdisciplinary persons. In a cost effective planning approach, faculty organized the simulation utilizing available materials in lab, and resources within the college at large, and personnel, i.e.: simulation operating room facility The activity ran multiple times through-out the day with student groups pre-assigned. 1. Operating room: Surgeon (interdisciplinary teamwork and collaboration) provided group of students’ discussion on various nursing roles in operating room, circulating nurse, scrub nurse, nurse anesthetist and/or anesthesiologist. Students scrubbed and gowned, maintaining sterility (safety and QI) Students opened sterile drapes and equipment, identified safety concerns in operating room, patient positioning, oxygenation, and fluid volume. Surgeon role play of time out procedure (QI and EBP) and discussed sutures, dressings, specimen collection, and blood loss. Students role played SBAR report to one another for recovery room transport (Communication, Safety). Recommend utilization of unique resource opportunities, facilities, and interdisciplinary care providers to enrich simulation experience and student interaction. This exercise can be basic or further developed according to available resources and learning objectives. Additional interdisciplinary roles could include medical techs, surgical techs, medical residents, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, certified nurse anesthetists, anesthesiologist, for further elaborate simulation scenario. 2. Patient Bedside Environment: Similar to “House of Horror, or “Little Room of Errors” students enter lab to find 4 patient rooms with various safety risks for patient, self, and others. One section relates to intravenous tubing, central line dressing, oxygen, and tracheostomy risks on a mannequin. Another section has basic patient safety risks related to side-rails,...

Read More

QSEN TEACHING STRATEGY: USING AN AQUARIUM AND PUMP TO DEMONSTRATE CARDIAC FUNCTION

Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in News |

Students were asked to troubleshoot cardiac function problems demonstrated with an aquarium and pump. The following principles were demonstrated: First, the aquarium pump is electrical. Therefore, the pump must be plugged in to receive an electrical charge. Positive cations (such as magnesium, potassium, calcium, and sodium) provide the electrical charge to the heart, which is represented by the plugging the pump into the electrical outlet. To help students retain normal laboratory values, students were taught the 2X4 Rule: representing ideal serum magnesium and potassium levels for cardiac electrical function being a serum magnesium 2 mg/dL and serum potassium 4 mEq/L. The extension cord was labeled with “K” and “MG” for demonstration. Second, the pump requires sufficient volume (preload) to produce cardiac output. This is demonstrated by adding water from a container marked preload. The pump cannot function effectively or efficiently with a volume deficit or fluid overload. This is demonstrated by either submerging the pump or lifting the pump out of the water. Third, the pump must be able to accommodate resistance (afterload) that is demonstrated by using an obstacle to obstruct outflow. Follow-up discussion addressed the effects of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor medications. Finally, the (plastic) fish do not die from lack of water, but lack of oxygen (due to low perfusion). Follow-up discussion addressed cardiac perfusion, including differences in ventilation and perfusion, which were identified as difficult concepts for the...

Read More