QSEN Case Western Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing

Quality and Safety Education for Nurses

Navigation Menu

International Forum on Quality & Safety

Posted by on Dec 19, 2016 in News |

View Website  April 26-28, 2017 | London  The London 2017 program contains a number of sessions of particular interest to nurses with a focus on how a collaborative approach, involving multiprofessional teams, combined with an engaged community, can provide sustainable, patient-centered care at a reduced cost. Through the program participants will learn to identify where change needs to happen and co-produce imaginative...

Read More

Heath Informatics and Technology: Professional Responsibilities

Posted by on Dec 14, 2016 in News | 1 comment

This learning program is a an online self-paced module created for pre-licensure ADN/Diploma/BSN nursing students. The program provides a general introduction to health informatics including the benefits of health informatics as well as the professional responsibilities related to privacy and confidentiality. In addition, the program explores the use of social health care technology/media and its potential impact on professional relationships with patients, colleagues, and employers. The program is interactive and includes links to a short video clip and professional...

Read More

QSEN-ize it! New Blog Post

QSEN-ize it! New Blog Post

Posted by on Dec 12, 2016 in News | 2 comments

QSEN-ize it! By: Mary Jo Risetter, MSN, RN & Kathleen Szymanski, MSN, RN Lake Michigan College  Regardless of the size or location of the institution, nursing faculty struggle with the same challenges when it comes to addressing safety with nursing students. No project evokes such a feeling of dread among nurse educators as a curriculum review – except maybe an accreditation self-study! After our program’s last accreditation site visit, it became apparent that our curriculum was a little dusty. Our mission, philosophy, and program objectives were just words on a page. They didn’t drive our daily work with our students.           Many of our faculty had never participated in a curriculum review. We weren’t even sure where to start. We were confident that we already had a solidly founded and successful program, as evidenced by our accreditation status, NCLEX pass rates, graduate/employer feedback, and graduate employment rates. We didn’t want to abandon all the elements that made our program strong, but we still saw the need to modernize. Our faculty was empowered to better define our program objectives. Rather than writing more nice, yet meaningless words, we made our program objectives a living set of guidelines. They were relevant and resonated with our faculty on a personal level. It was our goal to create objectives we could actively utilize in planning our curricula. This shift in thought process got the ball rolling and made the curriculum planning process more exciting.           As we looked for guiding principles to base our curriculum upon, QSEN was the natural choice. Our faculty could easily get onboard with using QSEN since we already utilized QSEN in many parts of our curriculum, we just didn’t necessarily call it “QSEN”. Some of our faculty had already been incorporating similar teaching strategies such as “The Little Room of Errors” (http://qsen.org/little-room-of-errors/) from the QSEN website. As we did more research, we all caught the QSEN bug. But, how were we to turn this into an entire curriculum? We determined it was time to seek expert consultation in order to better integrate QSEN into our new curriculum.           This past May, four members of our faculty attended the...

Read More

New Teaching Strategy Posted!

New Teaching Strategy Posted!

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in News | 1 comment

TIC TAC TOE ABGS: INTERPRETATION AND PATIENT SAFETY By: Dr. Nancy Jaskowak Cresse, DNP, MS, ANP-BC, Rutgers University School of Nursing-Camden & Dr. Marian Nowak, DNP, MPH, RN, DNP, MPH, RN, Rowan University School of Nursing  Learning Objectives: Through participation in this class student will: • Review how respiratory physiology impacts ABG measurement (K) • Identify three variables that may affect readings (K) • Enable rapid ABG interpretation to minimize risk of harm to patients (K,S). To read the full teaching strategy, visit our teaching strategy homepage...

Read More

Tic Tac Toe ABGs: Interpretation and Patient Safety

Posted by on Nov 28, 2016 in News |

Introduction to Arterial Blood Gases An arterial blood gas (ABG) test measures the acidity (pH), levels of oxygen, and carbon dioxide in arterial blood. ABG’s are often used in conjunction with other tests to check how well the lungs are able to move oxygen into the blood and remove carbon dioxide from the blood. Lets look at ABG values, and what the ABG measures: • pH. This value measures the hydrogen ions (H+) in the blood. The normal pH of blood is between 7.35 and 7.45. A pH of less than 7.35 is called acidotic, and a pH of greater than 7.45 is considered alkalotic. • Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2). A measure of the pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood and how well carbon dioxide is able to move out of the body. Remember, CO2 is an acid, so the higher the pCO2, the more acidic the value is. • Bicarbonate (HCO3). Bicarbonate serves as a buffer that keeps the pH of blood from becoming too acidic. The higher the bicarbonate (HCO3) the more alkaline the value. • Oxygen saturation (O2Sat). O2 saturation measures how much of the hemoglobin in the red blood cells is carrying oxygen. • Partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2). The pressure of oxygen in the blood and how well oxygen is able to move from the airspace of the lungs into the blood. Although it is included in arterial blood gas values, oxygen values have no role in diagnosing an ABG. If oxygenation is not normal, consider supplementing with oxygen, per clinical evaluation. So, when looking at the bullets above, only three (3) items influence the blood gas diagnosis: the pH, pCO2, and HCO3. Implications of ABG An arterial blood gas (ABG) test is done to: • Assess presence of respiratory diseases. • Assess how treatment for lung disease is working • Determine if oxygen or mechanical ventilation is needed. • Determine if the right amount of oxygen is being adminisered. • Measure the acid-base level in patients with heart failure, kidney failure, uncontrolled diabetes, sleep disorders, severe infections, or after a drug overdose. Results To calculate ABG’s we use the normal...

Read More

New Program: Using Games for Training to Improve Patient Outcomes

New Program: Using Games for Training to Improve Patient Outcomes

Posted by on Nov 10, 2016 in News |

Using Games for Training to Improve Patient Outcomes UNC-CH School of Nursing Center for Lifelong Learning In the year 2000, the Institute of Medicine published its report To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, which found that 44,000 to 98,000 people died each year from preventable medical errors in the U.S. In 2013, James examined additional data and estimated that more than 400,000 people died from preventable harm yearly in the U.S. Educators are challenged to rethink how to better train healthcare teams. In order to improve patient safety and outcomes, systems thinking and interprofessional collaboration are essential (Runion, 2016).Interactive games (serious gaming) are learner-centered, create space for reflection and insight, and provide the platform to teach complex concepts. Serious gaming has been shown to improve skill acquisition and retention compared to traditional learning (James, 2013; and Ricciardi & Tommaso De Paolis, 2014). This two (2) day program will provide hands on interactive strategies using a variety of serious gaming examples to educate interprofessional healthcare teams in communication, teamwork, and systems thinking. Attendees will also earn a certification of completion as a trainer for Friday Night at the ER, which is a serious gaming strategy in the format of a table top systems simulation. Click here for more information Interactive Learning State of Healthcare: Errors Discovering implicit bias Quality improvement simulation (Mr. Potato Head) Communication simulation (Dominoes) Tabletop simulation (Friday Night at the ER) Earn a certificate of completion from FNER Presenters Carol Durham, EdD, RN, ANEF, FAAN UNC-CH School of NursingBette Gardner Breakthrough Learning and HealthWorksJeff Heil Team Learning SimulationGrace Hubbard, MS, BS, RN, ANA UNC-CH School of NursingBetty Nance-Floyd, PhD, RN, CNE, CNL UNC-CH School of Nursing Hugh Waters, MS, PhD UNC-CH School of Nursing Thank you for your interest! Your participation helps to make continuing education possible. REGISTER HERE ...

Read More