2013

  • Andre, J. A., & Graves, R.. (2013). Writing requirements across nursing programs in Canada. The Journal of nursing education, 52(2), 91-97.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The emphasis on scholarship in nursing, demands for evidence-based practice, and attention to writing have raised the profile of academic writing within nursing curricula. This article provides a comprehensive review of English and writing course requirements across 81 English-language baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada. The data were gathered from a review of nursing programs and curriculum information from university and college Web sites. Of the 81 programs, 39 (48.1%) require neither an English literature course nor a writing course, 15 (18.5%) require an English literature course, and 32 (39.5%) require a writing course, including five programs that require a discipline-specific writing course. Discipline-specific writing courses appear to be useful adjuncts to writing-across-the-curriculum initiatives in nursing and will help students to develop the research and writing skills needed to succeed both academically and in a career in which nursing scholarship and evidence-informed practice are increasingly valued and expected.

    @article{RefWorks:198,
      author={J. A. Andre and R. Graves},
      year={2013},
      month={Feb},
      title={Writing requirements across nursing programs in Canada},
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={52},
      number={2},
      pages={91-97},
      note={CI: Copyright 2013; JID: 7705432; 2011/08/24 [received]; 2012/08/23 [accepted]; 2013/01/14 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={The emphasis on scholarship in nursing, demands for evidence-based practice, and attention to writing have raised the profile of academic writing within nursing curricula. This article provides a comprehensive review of English and writing course requirements across 81 English-language baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada. The data were gathered from a review of nursing programs and curriculum information from university and college Web sites. Of the 81 programs, 39 (48.1%) require neither an English literature course nor a writing course, 15 (18.5%) require an English literature course, and 32 (39.5%) require a writing course, including five programs that require a discipline-specific writing course. Discipline-specific writing courses appear to be useful adjuncts to writing-across-the-curriculum initiatives in nursing and will help students to develop the research and writing skills needed to succeed both academically and in a career in which nursing scholarship and evidence-informed practice are increasingly valued and expected.},
      keywords={Canada; Clinical Nursing Research/education; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Humans; Literature; Writing/standards},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Annette, M. B., & Crabtree, K.. (2013). The Development of Practice Scholarship in Dnp Programs: a Paradigm Shift. Journal of Professional Nursing, 29(6), 330-337.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Doctoral education in nursing is undergoing a paradigm shift. The doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree was conceived to improve practice expertise and accelerate the translation of evidence into practice. The need for doctoral preparation that focuses on both expert practice and practice inquiry acknowledges the complexity of evidence-based practice. The DNP prepares graduates to practice at the most advanced level of nursing and to evaluate current practice approaches, to appraise evidence, and to use this knowledge to create clinical strategies that improve practice and health outcomes. DNP curricula need to evolve through shared best practices grounded in financial sustainability. Because of the evolutionary nature of new programs, there is a need for continuous rapid adjustment of the DNP curriculum. Ideas presented here have evolved with student, faculty, and agency input. Many elements of DNP curricula represent a shared world view of faculty across the county. However, consensus about the DNP project has not been reached and is urgently needed to promote acceptance of the DNP-prepared advanced practice registered nurse. The DNP project allows synthesis of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing DNP Essentials through "real world" translation of evidence Into practice. This article proposes that DNP projects be defined as practice improvement partnerships between academia and community agencies. This "win-win" collaboration can improve care while preparing the next generation of nurses for the demands of increasingly complex healthcare environments.

    @article{RefWorks:216,
      author={Marie Brown  Annette and Katherine Crabtree},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={The Development of Practice Scholarship in Dnp Programs: a Paradigm Shift},
      journal={Journal of Professional Nursing},
      volume={29},
      number={6},
      pages={330-337},
      note={ID: 2012397315},
      abstract={Doctoral education in nursing is undergoing a paradigm shift. The doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree was conceived to improve practice expertise and accelerate the translation of evidence into practice. The need for doctoral preparation that focuses on both expert practice and practice inquiry acknowledges the complexity of evidence-based practice. The DNP prepares graduates to practice at the most advanced level of nursing and to evaluate current practice approaches, to appraise evidence, and to use this knowledge to create clinical strategies that improve practice and health outcomes. DNP curricula need to evolve through shared best practices grounded in financial sustainability. Because of the evolutionary nature of new programs, there is a need for continuous rapid adjustment of the DNP curriculum. Ideas presented here have evolved with student, faculty, and agency input. Many elements of DNP curricula represent a shared world view of faculty across the county. However, consensus about the DNP project has not been reached and is urgently needed to promote acceptance of the DNP-prepared advanced practice registered nurse. The DNP project allows synthesis of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing DNP Essentials through "real world" translation of evidence Into practice. This article proposes that DNP projects be defined as practice improvement partnerships between academia and community agencies. This "win-win" collaboration can improve care while preparing the next generation of nurses for the demands of increasingly complex healthcare environments.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Doctoral; Research, Nursing -- Education; Nursing Skills -- Education; Scholarship; Paradigms; Curriculum; Mentorship},
      isbn={8755-7223},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012397315&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Black, A. T., Clauson, M., & Fraser, S.. (2013). Nursing education and research rounds: evaluation of a webinar-based education strategy to engage nurses and support practice. Journal for nurses in professional development, 29(5), 249-254.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nursing Education and Research Rounds (NEARR), a webinar-based series of continuing education presentations focused on nursing research, was developed to engage nurses in discussion about evidence-based practice. Evaluation of NEARR indicated a large majority of participants considered the information provided useful in their practice and planned to attend future NEARR sessions. Nursing professional development specialists can use this approach to support evidence-based practice.

    @article{RefWorks:193,
      author={A. T. Black and M. Clauson and S. Fraser},
      year={2013},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Nursing education and research rounds: evaluation of a webinar-based education strategy to engage nurses and support practice},
      journal={Journal for nurses in professional development},
      volume={29},
      number={5},
      pages={249-254},
      note={JID: 101603887; ppublish},
      abstract={Nursing Education and Research Rounds (NEARR), a webinar-based series of continuing education presentations focused on nursing research, was developed to engage nurses in discussion about evidence-based practice. Evaluation of NEARR indicated a large majority of participants considered the information provided useful in their practice and planned to attend future NEARR sessions. Nursing professional development specialists can use this approach to support evidence-based practice.},
      isbn={2169-981X; 2169-9798},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Blakeman, J. R.. (2013). Never change answers on examinations: evidence-based practice in nursing education?. The Journal of nursing education, 52(8), 421-422.
    [BibTeX]
    @article{RefWorks:195,
      author={J. R. Blakeman},
      year={2013},
      month={Aug},
      title={Never change answers on examinations: evidence-based practice in nursing education?},
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={52},
      number={8},
      pages={421-422},
      note={JID: 7705432; ppublish},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Educational Measurement/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Humans; Students, Nursing},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bloom, K. C., Olinzock, B. J., Radjenovic, D., & Trice, L. B.. (2013). Leveling EBP content for undergraduate nursing students. Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 29(4), 217-224.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Integration of evidence into practice is an essential outcome for baccalaureate nursing students in this era of health care reform. Cultivation of a spirit of inquiry and appreciation for the role of evidence in shaping nursing practice is central to the development of requisite knowledge and skills. A baccalaureate nursing program curricular redesign placed a higher emphasis on evidence-based practice. The evidence-based practice focus of the undergraduate curriculum is a sequence of 3 undergraduate research courses designed to prepare the graduate to identify, locate, read, and critically appraise evidence at the individual study, systematic review, and clinical practice guideline levels. This curriculum lays the foundation for evidence-based practice in the clinical arena and in graduate nursing programs.

    @article{RefWorks:194,
      author={K. C. Bloom and B. J. Olinzock and D. Radjenovic and L. B. Trice},
      year={2013},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Leveling EBP content for undergraduate nursing students},
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={29},
      number={4},
      pages={217-224},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2013; JID: 8511298; OTO: NOTNLM; 2011/09/13 [received]; ppublish},
      abstract={Integration of evidence into practice is an essential outcome for baccalaureate nursing students in this era of health care reform. Cultivation of a spirit of inquiry and appreciation for the role of evidence in shaping nursing practice is central to the development of requisite knowledge and skills. A baccalaureate nursing program curricular redesign placed a higher emphasis on evidence-based practice. The evidence-based practice focus of the undergraduate curriculum is a sequence of 3 undergraduate research courses designed to prepare the graduate to identify, locate, read, and critically appraise evidence at the individual study, systematic review, and clinical practice guideline levels. This curriculum lays the foundation for evidence-based practice in the clinical arena and in graduate nursing programs.},
      keywords={Baccalaureate nursing education; Teaching evidence-based practice},
      isbn={1532-8481; 8755-7223},
      language={eng}
    }

  • E., N. C., & A., P. T.. (2013). RN-BSN completion programs: Equipping nurses for the future. Nursing outlook, 61(6), 458-465.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Abstract: The Institute of Medicine has outlined important components needed in nursing education to prepare the nursing workforce of the future. Previously published work on RN to BSN education has focused mainly on mode of delivery. The purpose of this paper is to examine RN to BSN program components for the facilitation of academic progression, innovative mechanisms of student engagement, and the curricular components that prepare graduates to meet future nursing challenges. Academic progression factors discussed include those relevant to recruiting RNs to BSN completion programs and factors important to retaining them through graduation. Recommendations for student engagement include the creation of honors programs, ethics teams, and practicum and service learning experiences. Suggestions for curriculum possibilities specifically address meeting the call of the Institute of Medicine report including content in community/public health, informatics, evidence-based practice, ethics, and health policy.

    @article{RefWorks:215,
      author={Norma Conner  E. and Patricia Thielemann  A.},
      year={2013},
      month={11},
      title={RN-BSN completion programs: Equipping nurses for the future},
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={61},
      number={6},
      pages={458-465},
      note={ID: 2012378776},
      abstract={Abstract: The Institute of Medicine has outlined important components needed in nursing education to prepare the nursing workforce of the future. Previously published work on RN to BSN education has focused mainly on mode of delivery. The purpose of this paper is to examine RN to BSN program components for the facilitation of academic progression, innovative mechanisms of student engagement, and the curricular components that prepare graduates to meet future nursing challenges. Academic progression factors discussed include those relevant to recruiting RNs to BSN completion programs and factors important to retaining them through graduation. Recommendations for student engagement include the creation of honors programs, ethics teams, and practicum and service learning experiences. Suggestions for curriculum possibilities specifically address meeting the call of the Institute of Medicine report including content in community/public health, informatics, evidence-based practice, ethics, and health policy.},
      keywords={Institute of Medicine (U.S.); Education, Post-RN; Students, Post-RN; Curriculum; United States},
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012378776&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Finotto, S., Carpanoni, M., Turroni, E. C., Camellini, R., & Mecugni, D.. (2013). Teaching evidence-based practice: developing a curriculum model to foster evidence-based practice in undergraduate student nurses. Nurse education in practice, 13(5), 459-465.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    For the nature of the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and its relevance to nursing, the skills that it requires should be a component in the basic Nursing degree courses. For this reason, the EBP process should be introduced early on in nursing education to develop students’ independence and ability to self-learning. AIM: the aim of this study is to describe the perception that newly graduated nurses have relative to the benefits of the skills learned during the laboratory’s three-year EBP in consideration of the construction of the thesis, the research of evidence and usefulness of the EBP process for the development of their professional career. METHODS: A descriptive study with a sample of 300 newly graduated nurses from the Degree Course in Nursing of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, venue of Reggio Emilia. The data collection instrument was an anonymous questionnaire. It was possible to answer through a 10 Likert scale. RESULTS: The sample considers effective the research of evidence carried out (mean 6, SD 2), related to the problems of patients (mean 7, SD 2); the sample considered the skills acquired during the laboratory’s three-year EBP to be useful for career development (mean 7, SD 2). CONCLUSIONS: the decision to include the laboratory’s three-year EBP in the curriculum of the Nursing degree promotes the development of skills relating to the use of the EBP process, competence that in the literature is indicated as one of the core competencies that all health professionals should develop and maintain throughout their professional career.

    @article{RefWorks:196,
      author={S. Finotto and M. Carpanoni and E. C. Turroni and R. Camellini and D. Mecugni},
      year={2013},
      month={Sep},
      title={Teaching evidence-based practice: developing a curriculum model to foster evidence-based practice in undergraduate student nurses},
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      volume={13},
      number={5},
      pages={459-465},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2013; JID: 101090848; OTO: NOTNLM; 2012/08/03 [received]; 2013/02/06 [revised]; 2013/03/22 [accepted]; 2013/04/23 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={For the nature of the Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and its relevance to nursing, the skills that it requires should be a component in the basic Nursing degree courses. For this reason, the EBP process should be introduced early on in nursing education to develop students' independence and ability to self-learning. AIM: the aim of this study is to describe the perception that newly graduated nurses have relative to the benefits of the skills learned during the laboratory's three-year EBP in consideration of the construction of the thesis, the research of evidence and usefulness of the EBP process for the development of their professional career. METHODS: A descriptive study with a sample of 300 newly graduated nurses from the Degree Course in Nursing of the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, venue of Reggio Emilia. The data collection instrument was an anonymous questionnaire. It was possible to answer through a 10 Likert scale. RESULTS: The sample considers effective the research of evidence carried out (mean 6, SD 2), related to the problems of patients (mean 7, SD 2); the sample considered the skills acquired during the laboratory's three-year EBP to be useful for career development (mean 7, SD 2). CONCLUSIONS: the decision to include the laboratory's three-year EBP in the curriculum of the Nursing degree promotes the development of skills relating to the use of the EBP process, competence that in the literature is indicated as one of the core competencies that all health professionals should develop and maintain throughout their professional career.},
      keywords={Curriculum; Education; Evidence-based practice; Nursing},
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Friberg, F., & Dahlborg, E. L.. (2013). Changing Essay Writing in Undergraduate Nursing Education Th rough Action Research: A Swedish Example. Nursing Education Perspectives, 34(4), 226-232.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Aim. This article describes the development of literature-based models for bachelor degree essays in Swedish undergraduate nursing education. Students’ experiences in a course with literature-based models for bachelor degree essays are discussed. Background. The ever-growing body of nursing research and specialized and complex health care practices make great demands on nursing education in terms of preparing students to be both skilled practitioners and users of research. Teaching to help students understand evidence-based practice is a challenge for nursing education. Methods. Action research was used to generate knowledge of and practical solutions to problems in everyday locations. Results. Six models were developed: concept analysis, contributing to evidence-based nursing by means of quantitative research, contributing to evidence-based nursing by means of qualitative research, discourse analysis, analysis of narratives, and literature review. Conclusions. Action research was found to be a relevant procedure for changing ways of working with literature-based, bachelor degree essays. The models that were developed increased students’ confidence in writing essays and preparedness for the nursing role.

    @article{RefWorks:214,
      author={Febe Friberg and Elisabeth Lyckhage  Dahlborg},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={Changing Essay Writing in Undergraduate Nursing Education Th rough Action Research: A Swedish Example},
      journal={Nursing Education Perspectives},
      volume={34},
      number={4},
      pages={226-232},
      note={ID: 2012322106},
      abstract={Aim. This article describes the development of literature-based models for bachelor degree essays in Swedish undergraduate nursing education. Students' experiences in a course with literature-based models for bachelor degree essays are discussed. Background. The ever-growing body of nursing research and specialized and complex health care practices make great demands on nursing education in terms of preparing students to be both skilled practitioners and users of research. Teaching to help students understand evidence-based practice is a challenge for nursing education. Methods. Action research was used to generate knowledge of and practical solutions to problems in everyday locations. Results. Six models were developed: concept analysis, contributing to evidence-based nursing by means of quantitative research, contributing to evidence-based nursing by means of qualitative research, discourse analysis, analysis of narratives, and literature review. Conclusions. Action research was found to be a relevant procedure for changing ways of working with literature-based, bachelor degree essays. The models that were developed increased students' confidence in writing essays and preparedness for the nursing role.},
      keywords={Writing; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Human; Action Research; Sweden; Concept Analysis; Quantitative Studies; Qualitative Studies; Discourse Analysis; Narratives; Literature Review; Field Notes; Reflection; Interviews; Diaries; Content Analysis; Seminars and Workshops; Confidence},
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012322106&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Jakubec, S. L., & Astle, B. J.. (2013). Students connecting critical appraisal to evidence-based practice: a teaching-learning activity for research literacy. The Journal of nursing education, 52(1), 56-58.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes the implementation of an innovative research literacy teaching-learning activity. The Research in Practice Challenge activity promoted the importance and relevance of evidence-based practice with second-year nursing students in an undergraduate research course. Students appraised the evidence within policies and practice guidelines identified by managers in practice. Collaboration among students, faculty, managers, and the librarian enabled completion of the activity. Essential skills of identifying research problems in practice, searching the literature, and critically evaluating evidence were applied. Ultimately, students were asked to respond to the question: "Does this policy or guideline need revision, and how, based upon current evidence?" Effectiveness of this activity was garnered from the students’ responses to course evaluations and analysis of teaching notes. Course evaluation revealed that students valued how the activity highlighted the relevance of research literacy for their practice. Further recommendations for research literacy teaching and learning are suggested.

    @article{RefWorks:200,
      author={S. L. Jakubec and B. J. Astle},
      year={2013},
      month={Jan},
      title={Students connecting critical appraisal to evidence-based practice: a teaching-learning activity for research literacy},
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={52},
      number={1},
      pages={56-58},
      note={CI: Copyright 2012; JID: 7705432; 2012/06/27 [received]; 2012/08/23 [accepted]; 2012/11/21 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={This article describes the implementation of an innovative research literacy teaching-learning activity. The Research in Practice Challenge activity promoted the importance and relevance of evidence-based practice with second-year nursing students in an undergraduate research course. Students appraised the evidence within policies and practice guidelines identified by managers in practice. Collaboration among students, faculty, managers, and the librarian enabled completion of the activity. Essential skills of identifying research problems in practice, searching the literature, and critically evaluating evidence were applied. Ultimately, students were asked to respond to the question: "Does this policy or guideline need revision, and how, based upon current evidence?" Effectiveness of this activity was garnered from the students' responses to course evaluations and analysis of teaching notes. Course evaluation revealed that students valued how the activity highlighted the relevance of research literacy for their practice. Further recommendations for research literacy teaching and learning are suggested.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods/standards; Evidence-Based Nursing/education/methods/standards; Humans; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Research/education; Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Nickerson, C. J., & Thurkettle, M. A.. (2013). Cognitive maturity and readiness for evidence-based nursing practice. The Journal of nursing education, 52(1), 17-23.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Individual factors are known to influence engagement in research utilization and evidence-based practice (EBP). Cognitive maturity is one factor that may enhance interest in and willingness to engage in clinical inquiry, research utilization, and EBP. Adult cognitive development theory explains why research training alone may not suffice to prepare nurses for EBP. Epistemic assumptions held by pre-reflective and quasireflective thinkers interfere with openness to uncertainty and ambiguity in practice and accurate understanding of the value of research for practice. Nurses may use good formal logic, but they also believe in authority, or revealed truth, as the criterion for knowledge and sometimes fail to perceive the need to evaluate evidence. Developmentally oriented educational efforts informed by the reflective judgment model have the potential to foster the cognitive development required in students of EBP. Further inquiry into the relationship between cognitive maturity and EBP will enhance these educational efforts.

    @article{RefWorks:199,
      author={C. J. Nickerson and M. A. Thurkettle},
      year={2013},
      month={Jan},
      title={Cognitive maturity and readiness for evidence-based nursing practice},
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={52},
      number={1},
      pages={17-23},
      note={CI: Copyright 2012; JID: 7705432; 2011/10/10 [received]; 2012/07/03 [accepted]; 2012/11/21 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Individual factors are known to influence engagement in research utilization and evidence-based practice (EBP). Cognitive maturity is one factor that may enhance interest in and willingness to engage in clinical inquiry, research utilization, and EBP. Adult cognitive development theory explains why research training alone may not suffice to prepare nurses for EBP. Epistemic assumptions held by pre-reflective and quasireflective thinkers interfere with openness to uncertainty and ambiguity in practice and accurate understanding of the value of research for practice. Nurses may use good formal logic, but they also believe in authority, or revealed truth, as the criterion for knowledge and sometimes fail to perceive the need to evaluate evidence. Developmentally oriented educational efforts informed by the reflective judgment model have the potential to foster the cognitive development required in students of EBP. Further inquiry into the relationship between cognitive maturity and EBP will enhance these educational efforts.},
      keywords={Adult; Cognition; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Judgment; Students, Nursing/psychology; Young Adult},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Sharts-Hopko, N. C.. (2013). Tackling complex problems, building evidence for practice, and educating doctoral nursing students to manage the tension. Nursing outlook, 61(2), 102-108.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The mandate for evidence-based practice (EBP) arose in response to, among other catalysts, several Institute of Medicine reports beginning in the late 1990s. At the same time, the National Institutes of Health and others have recognized that the most complex, important, and challenging problems, termed "wicked problems," are inherently transdisciplinary and require thinking beyond the limits of existing theories. When nursing students are prepared for EBP, they operate within a fairly stable set of assumptions and they exercise a past orientation. Wicked problem-solving occurs within a context that is characterized as dynamic and ambiguous and requires a future orientation to imagine potential solutions to questions of "what if?" Both skills, EBP, and wicked problem-solving, are essential within the discipline of nursing. Students at all levels need to understand when each scientific approach is required. PhD students must be prepared to participate in wicked problem-solving.

    @article{RefWorks:197,
      author={N. C. Sharts-Hopko},
      year={2013},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Tackling complex problems, building evidence for practice, and educating doctoral nursing students to manage the tension},
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={61},
      number={2},
      pages={102-108},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2013; JID: 0401075; 2012/07/03 [received]; 2012/11/02 [revised]; 2012/11/27 [accepted]; 2013/02/10 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={The mandate for evidence-based practice (EBP) arose in response to, among other catalysts, several Institute of Medicine reports beginning in the late 1990s. At the same time, the National Institutes of Health and others have recognized that the most complex, important, and challenging problems, termed "wicked problems," are inherently transdisciplinary and require thinking beyond the limits of existing theories. When nursing students are prepared for EBP, they operate within a fairly stable set of assumptions and they exercise a past orientation. Wicked problem-solving occurs within a context that is characterized as dynamic and ambiguous and requires a future orientation to imagine potential solutions to questions of "what if?" Both skills, EBP, and wicked problem-solving, are essential within the discipline of nursing. Students at all levels need to understand when each scientific approach is required. PhD students must be prepared to participate in wicked problem-solving.},
      keywords={Adaptation, Physiological; Adaptation, Psychological; Curriculum; Decision Making; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Humans; Nursing Education Research; Problem Solving; Professional Competence; Stress, Physiological; Stress, Psychological; Students, Nursing/psychology; United States},
      isbn={1528-3968; 0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

2012

  • A., C. W., & Echeverri, R.. (2012). Academic Education. Teaching Strategies to Support Evidence-Based Practice. Critical Care Nurse, 32(3), 49-54.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Evidence-based practice is an expected core competency of all health care clinicians regardless of discipline. Use of evidence-based practice means integrating the best research with clinical expertise and patient values to achieve optimal health outcomes. Evidence-based practice requires nurses to access and appraise evidence rapidly before integrating it into clinical practice. Role modeling and integrating the skills necessary to develop evidence-based practice into clinical and nonclinical courses is an important part in developing positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice, an essential first step to using evidence to guide practice decisions. The step-by-step approach to evidence-based practice proposed by Melnyk and colleagues provides an excellent organizing framework for teaching strategies specifically designed to facilitate nurses’ knowledge and skill development in evidence-based practice.

    @article{RefWorks:213,
      author={Charlene Winters  A. and Rebecca Echeverri},
      year={2012},
      month={06},
      title={Academic Education. Teaching Strategies to Support Evidence-Based Practice},
      journal={Critical Care Nurse},
      volume={32},
      number={3},
      pages={49-54},
      note={ID: 2011565265},
      abstract={Evidence-based practice is an expected core competency of all health care clinicians regardless of discipline. Use of evidence-based practice means integrating the best research with clinical expertise and patient values to achieve optimal health outcomes. Evidence-based practice requires nurses to access and appraise evidence rapidly before integrating it into clinical practice. Role modeling and integrating the skills necessary to develop evidence-based practice into clinical and nonclinical courses is an important part in developing positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice, an essential first step to using evidence to guide practice decisions. The step-by-step approach to evidence-based practice proposed by Melnyk and colleagues provides an excellent organizing framework for teaching strategies specifically designed to facilitate nurses' knowledge and skill development in evidence-based practice.},
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Education, Nursing; Critical Care Nursing -- Education; Medical-Surgical Nursing -- Education; Learning Methods; Teaching Methods; Literature Searching; Education, Clinical; Faculty, Nursing; Preceptorship; Critical Thinking},
      isbn={0279-5442},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011565265&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Badger, F. J., Daly, W., & Clifford, C.. (2012). Educating tomorrow’s clinical researchers: a review of research preparation in undergraduate education. Nurse education today, 32(7), 737-743.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: One large health region in England was experiencing difficulties in recruiting to clinical research posts which required registered nurse or allied health professional skills. OBJECTIVES: Pre-registration preparation may influence practitioners’ career choices and the study reviewed the research content in pre-registration nurse/AHP degree level programmes in the region to i) describe key features of the modules, and ii) determine the extent to which clinical research featured. DESIGN AND SETTINGS: There are eight universities in the region. We reviewed and analysed 46 research and evidence-based practice module guides from relevant pre-registration degree level programmes. Documentary analysis was used and the findings were reviewed by the project group. RESULTS: Modules aimed to produce practitioners who were aware of the principles of evidence based practice, and who could locate and evaluate research findings. There was some exposure to clinical research, though this was largely indirect, through considering research findings. Therapy students were more likely than nursing students to conduct a small clinical study for their final year assignment. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-registration programmes focused on producing practitioners who were competent users of research evidence to inform practice, rather than clinical researchers, and this was inevitably the focus of the research modules. However, feasible opportunities for increasing students’ exposure to clinical research were identified.

    @article{RefWorks:206,
      author={F. J. Badger and W. Daly and C. Clifford},
      year={2012},
      month={Oct},
      title={Educating tomorrow's clinical researchers: a review of research preparation in undergraduate education},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={32},
      number={7},
      pages={737-743},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2012; JID: 8511379; 2011/11/16 [received]; 2012/03/21 [revised]; 2012/05/12 [accepted]; 2012/05/15 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={BACKGROUND: One large health region in England was experiencing difficulties in recruiting to clinical research posts which required registered nurse or allied health professional skills. OBJECTIVES: Pre-registration preparation may influence practitioners' career choices and the study reviewed the research content in pre-registration nurse/AHP degree level programmes in the region to i) describe key features of the modules, and ii) determine the extent to which clinical research featured. DESIGN AND SETTINGS: There are eight universities in the region. We reviewed and analysed 46 research and evidence-based practice module guides from relevant pre-registration degree level programmes. Documentary analysis was used and the findings were reviewed by the project group. RESULTS: Modules aimed to produce practitioners who were aware of the principles of evidence based practice, and who could locate and evaluate research findings. There was some exposure to clinical research, though this was largely indirect, through considering research findings. Therapy students were more likely than nursing students to conduct a small clinical study for their final year assignment. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-registration programmes focused on producing practitioners who were competent users of research evidence to inform practice, rather than clinical researchers, and this was inevitably the focus of the research modules. However, feasible opportunities for increasing students' exposure to clinical research were identified.},
      keywords={Clinical Nursing Research/education; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; England; Humans; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Evaluation Research},
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Boyd, M. R., Baliko, B., Herman, J., & Polyakova-Norwood, V.. (2012). Redesigning a graduate research course for evidence-based competencies. The Journal of nursing education, 51(11), 652-655.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nursing research is critical to establish the science for the discipline and to provide a foundation for evidence-based practice. All nurses need to understand the research process and engage in research at the level for which they were prepared. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing has clearly outlined essential learning outcomes for each level of nursing education, including the competent application of research findings to clinical problems. This article describes the evolution of a graduate-level research course to provide master’s level students with a sound foundational understanding of the research process, the innovation undertaken to address identified learning needs, and the important lessons learned.

    @article{RefWorks:202,
      author={M. R. Boyd and B. Baliko and J. Herman and V. Polyakova-Norwood},
      year={2012},
      month={Nov},
      title={Redesigning a graduate research course for evidence-based competencies},
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={51},
      number={11},
      pages={652-655},
      note={CI: Copyright 2012; JID: 7705432; 2012/02/21 [received]; 2012/06/27 [accepted]; 2012/09/27 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Nursing research is critical to establish the science for the discipline and to provide a foundation for evidence-based practice. All nurses need to understand the research process and engage in research at the level for which they were prepared. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing has clearly outlined essential learning outcomes for each level of nursing education, including the competent application of research findings to clinical problems. This article describes the evolution of a graduate-level research course to provide master's level students with a sound foundational understanding of the research process, the innovation undertaken to address identified learning needs, and the important lessons learned.},
      keywords={Competency-Based Education/methods; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Graduate/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing/methods; Humans; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Christie, J., Hamill, C., & Power, J.. (2012). How can we maximize nursing students’ learning about research evidence and utilization in undergraduate, preregistration programmes? A discussion paper. Journal of advanced nursing, 68(12), 2789-2801.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: This article presents a discussion on how to maximize nursing students’ learning about research for evidence-based practice in undergraduate, preregistration programmes. BACKGROUND: Evidence-based practice may use information from many sources, including research. Research utilization concerns the translation of research findings into practice. Thus, while evidence-base practice may not be solely research-based and hence more than research utilization, research remains an important ingredient in ensuring quality and cost-effective care and an academic requirement for nursing students undertaking a science degree-level qualification. Nevertheless, how educators can best support research-related learning and application remains uncertain and requires discussion. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Social Science Citation Index, British Nursing Index, and Intute were searched for papers published 1980-2011 using the following search terms: research, research utilization, evidence-based practice, learning, teaching, education, training, nursing, health, and social care. DISCUSSION: Nursing students need to be able to value the relevance, authority, and utility of nursing research for patient care through embedding research learning in both academic and practice-based settings. Students can be supported in learning how to access, understand, and appraise the authority of research through weaving these skills into enquiry-based learning. Furthermore, encouraging students to undertake research-based practice change projects can support research utilization and development skills. CONCLUSION: Research should be fully embedded throughout nursing curricula beyond the confines of ‘research classes’, integrating learning in academic and practice-based settings. Although this requires synergistic and integrated support of student learning by nurse educators, managers, clinical practitioners, researchers and policymakers; nurse educators have a pivotal role.

    @article{RefWorks:210,
      author={J. Christie and C. Hamill and J. Power},
      year={2012},
      month={Dec},
      title={How can we maximize nursing students' learning about research evidence and utilization in undergraduate, preregistration programmes? A discussion paper},
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={68},
      number={12},
      pages={2789-2801},
      note={CI: (c) 2012; JID: 7609811; 2012/03/30 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={AIM: This article presents a discussion on how to maximize nursing students' learning about research for evidence-based practice in undergraduate, preregistration programmes. BACKGROUND: Evidence-based practice may use information from many sources, including research. Research utilization concerns the translation of research findings into practice. Thus, while evidence-base practice may not be solely research-based and hence more than research utilization, research remains an important ingredient in ensuring quality and cost-effective care and an academic requirement for nursing students undertaking a science degree-level qualification. Nevertheless, how educators can best support research-related learning and application remains uncertain and requires discussion. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Social Science Citation Index, British Nursing Index, and Intute were searched for papers published 1980-2011 using the following search terms: research, research utilization, evidence-based practice, learning, teaching, education, training, nursing, health, and social care. DISCUSSION: Nursing students need to be able to value the relevance, authority, and utility of nursing research for patient care through embedding research learning in both academic and practice-based settings. Students can be supported in learning how to access, understand, and appraise the authority of research through weaving these skills into enquiry-based learning. Furthermore, encouraging students to undertake research-based practice change projects can support research utilization and development skills. CONCLUSION: Research should be fully embedded throughout nursing curricula beyond the confines of 'research classes', integrating learning in academic and practice-based settings. Although this requires synergistic and integrated support of student learning by nurse educators, managers, clinical practitioners, researchers and policymakers; nurse educators have a pivotal role.},
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Humans; Nursing Research/education; Teaching/methods},
      isbn={1365-2648; 0309-2402},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dobratz, M. C., Primomo, J., & Delo, D.. (2012). A comparative analysis of master of nursing students’ scholarly inquiry. Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 28(6), 369-376.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Although graduates of master’s of nursing programs are expected to demonstrate competence in systematic inquiry, few reports describe how students obtain this skill. We conducted a comparative analysis of 118 scholarly projects from 2004 to 2009 with an earlier sample of 112 projects from 1996 to 2003. We examined changes in the method of scholarly inquiry, population type examined, and outcomes or products of inquiry. Data from a scholarly inquiry evaluation checklist were transcribed and analyzed. Literature review continued to be the most frequent method of scholarly inquiry, with few group differences noted between the time periods. Evidence-based clinical or practice projects increased as an inquiry method, as did health care providers as the population type. Papers of publishable quality and educational materials increased as outcomes of scholarly inquiry. Although this analysis is limited by incomplete data and a need to clarify checklist categories, the increased number of clinical-based projects supports a shift to evidence-based practice outcomes. The expansion in the number of educational scholarly projects is attributed to increasing enrollment in the nurse educator option. With new Essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing and the transition of specialty preparation to the doctoral level, revisiting scholarly outcomes for master’s degree students is recommended.

    @article{RefWorks:201,
      author={M. C. Dobratz and J. Primomo and D. Delo},
      year={2012},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={A comparative analysis of master of nursing students' scholarly inquiry},
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={28},
      number={6},
      pages={369-376},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2012; JID: 8511298; 2011/04/16 [received]; ppublish},
      abstract={Although graduates of master's of nursing programs are expected to demonstrate competence in systematic inquiry, few reports describe how students obtain this skill. We conducted a comparative analysis of 118 scholarly projects from 2004 to 2009 with an earlier sample of 112 projects from 1996 to 2003. We examined changes in the method of scholarly inquiry, population type examined, and outcomes or products of inquiry. Data from a scholarly inquiry evaluation checklist were transcribed and analyzed. Literature review continued to be the most frequent method of scholarly inquiry, with few group differences noted between the time periods. Evidence-based clinical or practice projects increased as an inquiry method, as did health care providers as the population type. Papers of publishable quality and educational materials increased as outcomes of scholarly inquiry. Although this analysis is limited by incomplete data and a need to clarify checklist categories, the increased number of clinical-based projects supports a shift to evidence-based practice outcomes. The expansion in the number of educational scholarly projects is attributed to increasing enrollment in the nurse educator option. With new Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing and the transition of specialty preparation to the doctoral level, revisiting scholarly outcomes for master's degree students is recommended.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Graduate; Students, Nursing},
      isbn={1532-8481; 8755-7223},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Florin, J., Ehrenberg, A., Wallin, L., & Gustavsson, P.. (2012). Educational support for research utilization and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills: a national survey of senior nursing students. Journal of advanced nursing, 68(4), 888-897.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate Swedish university nursing students’ experience of educational support for research utilization and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills. BACKGROUND: Nursing programmes are offered at 26 universities in Sweden and even though there are common regulations for nursing education at the national level, substantial variations are found in local curricula. Little is known about students’ capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills, particularly in comparison across universities. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey design using self-administered postal questionnaires was conducted in 2006. A total of 1440 students (from 26 different universities) participated, constituting 68% of the national population of nursing students in their 6th and final semester. RESULTS: Campus education supported the students to a greater extent than clinical education in following the development of knowledge in an area of interest, using research findings, and acquiring knowledge on how to pursue changes in clinical practice. Perceived support during campus education varied between universities. Students reported high capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills, but large differences were found between universities for: stating a searchable question, seeking out relevant knowledge and critically appraising and compiling best knowledge. CONCLUSION: The identified differences between universities concerning the students’ perceived support for research utilization and their capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills have implications for curricula, pedagogical perspectives in nursing education and the potential to implement evidence-based practice in healthcare settings. Further studies are warranted to investigate students’ individual characteristics and organizational characteristics as determinants of research utilization support and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills.

    @article{RefWorks:211,
      author={J. Florin and A. Ehrenberg and L. Wallin and P. Gustavsson},
      year={2012},
      month={Apr},
      title={Educational support for research utilization and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills: a national survey of senior nursing students},
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={68},
      number={4},
      pages={888-897},
      note={LR: 20130123; CI: (c) 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing (c) 2011; JID: 7609811; CIN: Evid Based Nurs. 2013 Jan;16(1):29-30. PMID: 23100267; CIN: J Adv Nurs. 2012 Apr;68(4):717. PMID: 22409582; 2011/09/23 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate Swedish university nursing students' experience of educational support for research utilization and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills. BACKGROUND: Nursing programmes are offered at 26 universities in Sweden and even though there are common regulations for nursing education at the national level, substantial variations are found in local curricula. Little is known about students' capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills, particularly in comparison across universities. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey design using self-administered postal questionnaires was conducted in 2006. A total of 1440 students (from 26 different universities) participated, constituting 68% of the national population of nursing students in their 6th and final semester. RESULTS: Campus education supported the students to a greater extent than clinical education in following the development of knowledge in an area of interest, using research findings, and acquiring knowledge on how to pursue changes in clinical practice. Perceived support during campus education varied between universities. Students reported high capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills, but large differences were found between universities for: stating a searchable question, seeking out relevant knowledge and critically appraising and compiling best knowledge. CONCLUSION: The identified differences between universities concerning the students' perceived support for research utilization and their capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills have implications for curricula, pedagogical perspectives in nursing education and the potential to implement evidence-based practice in healthcare settings. Further studies are warranted to investigate students' individual characteristics and organizational characteristics as determinants of research utilization support and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills.},
      keywords={Adult; Clinical Competence; Cross-Sectional Studies; Curriculum; Data Collection; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education; Organizational Culture; Students, Nursing; Sweden; Thinking; Universities/organization & administration; Young Adult},
      isbn={1365-2648; 0309-2402},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Forsman, H., Wallin, L., Gustavsson, P., & Rudman, A.. (2012). Nursing students’ intentions to use research as a predictor of use one year post graduation: a prospective study. International journal of nursing studies, 49(9), 1155-1164.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Graduating nursing students are expected to have acquired the necessary skills to provide research-based care to patients. However, recent studies have shown that new graduate nurses report their extent of research use as relatively low. Because behavior intention is a well-known predictor of subsequent behavior, this gives reasons to further investigate graduating nursing students’ intentions to use research in clinical practice after undergraduate study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate graduating nursing students’ intentions to use research in clinical practice and, furthermore, to investigate whether intention in itself and as a mediating variable can predict subsequent research use behavior in clinical practice one year post graduation. DESIGN: A follow-up study was performed of graduating nursing students in their final semester of undergraduate study (2006) and at one year post graduation (2008). Data were collected within the larger national survey LANE (Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education). PARTICIPANTS: A sample of 1319 respondents was prospectively followed. METHODS: Graduating nursing students’ intentions to use research instrumentally were studied as a predictor of their subsequent instrumental research use one year post graduation. A statistical full mediation model was tested to evaluate the effects of intention and factors from undergraduate study on subsequent research use in daily care. RESULTS: Thirty-four percent of the nursing students intended to use research on more than half or almost every working shift in their future clinical practice. Intention showed a direct effect on research use behavior. In addition, significant indirect effects on research use were shown for capability beliefs (regarding practicing the principles of evidence-based practice) and perceived support for research use (from campus and clinical education), where intention acted as a mediating factor for those effects. CONCLUSIONS: Students rated a modest level of intention to use research evidence. Intentions close to graduation acted as an essential predictor of subsequent research use behavior, both through a direct effect and as a mediating variable. These findings give support for designing future interventions aiming at influencing students’ intention to use research to improve subsequent behavior. Focusing on strengthening students’ capability beliefs and providing support for research use appear as promising target activities.

    @article{RefWorks:207,
      author={H. Forsman and L. Wallin and P. Gustavsson and A. Rudman},
      year={2012},
      month={Sep},
      title={Nursing students' intentions to use research as a predictor of use one year post graduation: a prospective study},
      journal={International journal of nursing studies},
      volume={49},
      number={9},
      pages={1155-1164},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2012; JID: 0400675; 2011/09/15 [received]; 2012/02/16 [revised]; 2012/04/06 [accepted]; 2012/05/06 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Graduating nursing students are expected to have acquired the necessary skills to provide research-based care to patients. However, recent studies have shown that new graduate nurses report their extent of research use as relatively low. Because behavior intention is a well-known predictor of subsequent behavior, this gives reasons to further investigate graduating nursing students' intentions to use research in clinical practice after undergraduate study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate graduating nursing students' intentions to use research in clinical practice and, furthermore, to investigate whether intention in itself and as a mediating variable can predict subsequent research use behavior in clinical practice one year post graduation. DESIGN: A follow-up study was performed of graduating nursing students in their final semester of undergraduate study (2006) and at one year post graduation (2008). Data were collected within the larger national survey LANE (Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education). PARTICIPANTS: A sample of 1319 respondents was prospectively followed. METHODS: Graduating nursing students' intentions to use research instrumentally were studied as a predictor of their subsequent instrumental research use one year post graduation. A statistical full mediation model was tested to evaluate the effects of intention and factors from undergraduate study on subsequent research use in daily care. RESULTS: Thirty-four percent of the nursing students intended to use research on more than half or almost every working shift in their future clinical practice. Intention showed a direct effect on research use behavior. In addition, significant indirect effects on research use were shown for capability beliefs (regarding practicing the principles of evidence-based practice) and perceived support for research use (from campus and clinical education), where intention acted as a mediating factor for those effects. CONCLUSIONS: Students rated a modest level of intention to use research evidence. Intentions close to graduation acted as an essential predictor of subsequent research use behavior, both through a direct effect and as a mediating variable. These findings give support for designing future interventions aiming at influencing students' intention to use research to improve subsequent behavior. Focusing on strengthening students' capability beliefs and providing support for research use appear as promising target activities.},
      keywords={Evidence-Based Nursing; Nursing Research; Prospective Studies; Students, Nursing; Sweden},
      isbn={1873-491X; 0020-7489},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hagler, D., Mays, M. Z., Stillwell, S. B., Kastenbaum, B., Brooks, R., Fineout-Overholt, E., Williamson, K. M., & Jirsak, J.. (2012). Preparing clinical preceptors to support nursing students in evidence-based practice. Journal of continuing education in nursing, 43(11), 502-508.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Staff nurse preceptors contribute importantly to student learning and to academic program outcomes; however, academic-clinical partnerships can offer focused learning opportunities for preceptors as well. This study addressed different interest levels in evidence-based practice across clinical settings by testing the effectiveness of a workshop designed to increase preceptor knowledge and endorsement of evidence-based practice. Nurse preceptor participants (N = 160) recruited from seven hospitals during 2009 to 2011 had an average age of 43.9 (SD = 11.5) and an average of 17.0 (SD = 11.2) years of nursing experience. Participants’ scores on the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs Scale improved significantly from pretest to posttest (M(pre) = 59.0, SD(pre) = 8.4, M(post) = 66.4, SD(post) = 6.8, p < .001), which was confirmed by subgroup analyses. At follow-up (1 to 25 months), 52% of the nurse preceptors reported increased use of evidence-based practice. This study indicates that a short collaborative, content-focused workshop can promote preceptor endorsement of evidence-based practice.

    @article{RefWorks:204,
      author={D. Hagler and M. Z. Mays and S. B. Stillwell and B. Kastenbaum and R. Brooks and E. Fineout-Overholt and K. M. Williamson and J. Jirsak},
      year={2012},
      month={Nov},
      title={Preparing clinical preceptors to support nursing students in evidence-based practice},
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={43},
      number={11},
      pages={502-508},
      note={CI: Copyright 2012; JID: 0262321; 2012/02/03 [received]; 2012/07/16 [accepted]; 2012/08/22 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Staff nurse preceptors contribute importantly to student learning and to academic program outcomes; however, academic-clinical partnerships can offer focused learning opportunities for preceptors as well. This study addressed different interest levels in evidence-based practice across clinical settings by testing the effectiveness of a workshop designed to increase preceptor knowledge and endorsement of evidence-based practice. Nurse preceptor participants (N = 160) recruited from seven hospitals during 2009 to 2011 had an average age of 43.9 (SD = 11.5) and an average of 17.0 (SD = 11.2) years of nursing experience. Participants' scores on the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs Scale improved significantly from pretest to posttest (M(pre) = 59.0, SD(pre) = 8.4, M(post) = 66.4, SD(post) = 6.8, p < .001), which was confirmed by subgroup analyses. At follow-up (1 to 25 months), 52% of the nurse preceptors reported increased use of evidence-based practice. This study indicates that a short collaborative, content-focused workshop can promote preceptor endorsement of evidence-based practice.},
      keywords={Adult; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Female; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Staff/psychology; Preceptorship; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0022-0124; 0022-0124},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Holland, C., & Moddeman, G. R.. (2012). Transforming the journey for newly licensed registered nurses. Journal of continuing education in nursing, 43(7), 330-336.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Newly licensed nurses entering into practice experience stressors related to daily challenges. This evidence-based practice project implemented a nurse residency program designed to ease the transition during the first year of practice. Newly licensed nurses at a Midwestern health care organization were enrolled in a yearlong nurse residency program and were required to attend one 4-hour session monthly. Program outcomes included a decrease in turnover and improved confidence.

    @article{RefWorks:208,
      author={C. Holland and G. R. Moddeman},
      year={2012},
      month={Jul},
      title={Transforming the journey for newly licensed registered nurses},
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={43},
      number={7},
      pages={330-336},
      note={CI: Copyright 2012; JID: 0262321; 2011/12/31 [received]; 2012/02/28 [accepted]; 2012/04/09 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Newly licensed nurses entering into practice experience stressors related to daily challenges. This evidence-based practice project implemented a nurse residency program designed to ease the transition during the first year of practice. Newly licensed nurses at a Midwestern health care organization were enrolled in a yearlong nurse residency program and were required to attend one 4-hour session monthly. Program outcomes included a decrease in turnover and improved confidence.},
      keywords={Adult; Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods/organization & administration; Humans; Internship, Nonmedical/methods/organization & administration; Middle Aged; Models, Nursing; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration; Staff Development/methods/organization & administration; Young Adult},
      isbn={0022-0124; 0022-0124},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Myrick, F., Luhanga, F., Billay, D., Foley, V., & Yonge, O.. (2012). Putting the evidence into preceptor preparation. Nursing research and practice, 2012, 948593.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The term evidence-based practice refers to the utilization of knowledge derived from research. Nursing practice, however, is not limited to clinical practice but also encompasses nursing education. It is, therefore, equally important that teaching preparation is derived from evidence also. The purpose of this study was to examine whether an evidence-based approach to preceptor preparation influenced preceptors in a assuming that role. A qualitative method using semistructured interviews was used to collect data. A total of 29 preceptors were interviewed. Constant comparative analysis facilitated examination of the data. Findings indicate that preceptors were afforded an opportunity to participate in a preparatory process that was engaging, enriching, and critically reflective/reflexive. This study has generated empirical evidence that can (a) contribute substantively to effective preceptor preparation, (b) promote best teaching practices in the clinical setting, and (c) enhance the preceptorship experience for nursing students.

    @article{RefWorks:205,
      author={F. Myrick and F. Luhanga and D. Billay and V. Foley and O. Yonge},
      year={2012},
      title={Putting the evidence into preceptor preparation},
      journal={Nursing research and practice},
      volume={2012},
      pages={948593},
      note={LR: 20120926; JID: 101561211; OID: NLM: PMC3397207; 2012/01/10 [received]; 2012/04/01 [revised]; 2012/04/03 [accepted]; 2012/07/03 [epublish]; ppublish},
      abstract={The term evidence-based practice refers to the utilization of knowledge derived from research. Nursing practice, however, is not limited to clinical practice but also encompasses nursing education. It is, therefore, equally important that teaching preparation is derived from evidence also. The purpose of this study was to examine whether an evidence-based approach to preceptor preparation influenced preceptors in a assuming that role. A qualitative method using semistructured interviews was used to collect data. A total of 29 preceptors were interviewed. Constant comparative analysis facilitated examination of the data. Findings indicate that preceptors were afforded an opportunity to participate in a preparatory process that was engaging, enriching, and critically reflective/reflexive. This study has generated empirical evidence that can (a) contribute substantively to effective preceptor preparation, (b) promote best teaching practices in the clinical setting, and (c) enhance the preceptorship experience for nursing students.},
      isbn={2090-1437; 2090-1429},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Patterson, B. J., & Klein, J. M.. (2012). Evidence for teaching: what are faculty using?. Nursing education perspectives, 33(4), 240-245.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The benefit of engaging in evidence-based teaching practice (EBTP) is to identify and implement best practices in nursing education. Unfortunately, nursing education has made little forward movement in identifying the evidence upon which faculty base their teaching practices. A national online survey of 295 nurse educators from 86 programs revealed the evidence they use in their teaching practices as well as the facilitators and barriers to EBTP. The majority of participants indicated they used quantitative and qualitative research (94 percent) but also considered written course evaluations, conference information, class feedback, and student comments as evidence. Participants identified personal beliefs as the most frequent facilitator to EBTP with 25 percent indicating their institution as a barrier. As EBTP offers a guide to establishing best practices in nursing education, building a science of nursing education is the responsibility of all nurse educators.

    @article{RefWorks:203,
      author={B. J. Patterson and J. M. Klein},
      year={2012},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Evidence for teaching: what are faculty using?},
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={33},
      number={4},
      pages={240-245},
      note={JID: 101140025; ppublish},
      abstract={The benefit of engaging in evidence-based teaching practice (EBTP) is to identify and implement best practices in nursing education. Unfortunately, nursing education has made little forward movement in identifying the evidence upon which faculty base their teaching practices. A national online survey of 295 nurse educators from 86 programs revealed the evidence they use in their teaching practices as well as the facilitators and barriers to EBTP. The majority of participants indicated they used quantitative and qualitative research (94 percent) but also considered written course evaluations, conference information, class feedback, and student comments as evidence. Participants identified personal beliefs as the most frequent facilitator to EBTP with 25 percent indicating their institution as a barrier. As EBTP offers a guide to establishing best practices in nursing education, building a science of nursing education is the responsibility of all nurse educators.},
      keywords={Adult; Aged; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing/methods; Evidence-Based Practice; Faculty, Nursing; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Education Research; United States},
      isbn={1536-5026; 1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Schams, K. A., & Kuennen, J. K.. (2012). Clinical postconference pedagogy: exploring evidence-based practice with millennial-inspired "Building Blocks". Creative nursing, 18(1), 13-16.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article reports an innovative teaching strategy consisting of learning units whereby students come to postconference sessions prepared to share evidence-based practice (EBP) information associated with upcoming laboratory concepts, discover relationships among laboratory concepts and current nursing practice, and associate personal clinical experiences with the practice environment. This strategy, named "Building Blocks," represents one method to transform nursing education into a more active process, and also has the potential to prepare graduates who can function in a dynamic health care environment incorporating EBP.

    @article{RefWorks:209,
      author={K. A. Schams and J. K. Kuennen},
      year={2012},
      title={Clinical postconference pedagogy: exploring evidence-based practice with millennial-inspired "Building Blocks"},
      journal={Creative nursing},
      volume={18},
      number={1},
      pages={13-16},
      note={JID: 9505022; ppublish},
      abstract={This article reports an innovative teaching strategy consisting of learning units whereby students come to postconference sessions prepared to share evidence-based practice (EBP) information associated with upcoming laboratory concepts, discover relationships among laboratory concepts and current nursing practice, and associate personal clinical experiences with the practice environment. This strategy, named "Building Blocks," represents one method to transform nursing education into a more active process, and also has the potential to prepare graduates who can function in a dynamic health care environment incorporating EBP.},
      keywords={Competency-Based Education/methods/organization & administration; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Humans; Problem Solving},
      isbn={1078-4535; 1078-4535},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Zhang, Q., Zeng, T., Chen, Y., & Li, X.. (2012). Assisting undergraduate nursing students to learn evidence-based practice through self-directed learning and workshop strategies during clinical practicum. Nurse education today, 32(5), 570-575.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    To equip undergraduate nursing students with basic knowledge and skills and foster positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice (EBP), a pilot learning program during their clinical practicum was developed in a teaching hospital in China. This article describes the specific learning process through which self-directed learning and workshop strategies were used, and a pre- and post-intervention survey were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning strategies. The findings show a significant improvement in their perceptions of EBP knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and behavior levels. Beginning competencies in EBP were achieved. Participants reported great satisfaction and have found this program helpful in promoting their analytical and problem-solving abilities, independent learning ability, and cooperative and communication abilities as well.

    @article{RefWorks:212,
      author={Q. Zhang and T. Zeng and Y. Chen and X. Li},
      year={2012},
      month={Jul},
      title={Assisting undergraduate nursing students to learn evidence-based practice through self-directed learning and workshop strategies during clinical practicum},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={32},
      number={5},
      pages={570-575},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2011; JID: 8511379; 2011/03/17 [received]; 2011/05/18 [revised]; 2011/05/22 [accepted]; 2011/06/12 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={To equip undergraduate nursing students with basic knowledge and skills and foster positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice (EBP), a pilot learning program during their clinical practicum was developed in a teaching hospital in China. This article describes the specific learning process through which self-directed learning and workshop strategies were used, and a pre- and post-intervention survey were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning strategies. The findings show a significant improvement in their perceptions of EBP knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and behavior levels. Beginning competencies in EBP were achieved. Participants reported great satisfaction and have found this program helpful in promoting their analytical and problem-solving abilities, independent learning ability, and cooperative and communication abilities as well.},
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; China; Clinical Competence; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Learning; Male; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Personal Satisfaction; Pilot Projects; Self Efficacy; Students, Nursing/psychology; Young Adult},
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

2011

  • Aebersold, M.. (2011). Using Simulation to Improve the Use of Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines . Western journal of nursing research, 33(3), 296-305.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Nurses in health care today need to practice from an evidence base. There are many models to guide nurses in using the evidence in their practice; however, often nurses rely on their own mental processes to deliver care and do not rely on protocols or guidelines. The challenge often is not to teach the correct evidence-based practice guideline but to support the nurse to incorporate the guidelines into daily practice. Simulation is a method that can be used in an overall strategy to diffuse evidence-based practice guidelines at the point of care delivery. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:502,
      author={M. Aebersold},
      year={2011},
      month={04},
      title={Using Simulation to Improve the Use of Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines },
      journal={Western journal of nursing research},
      volume={33},
      number={3},
      pages={296-305},
      note={id: 5343},
      abstract={Nurses in health care today need to practice from an evidence base. There are many models to guide nurses in using the evidence in their practice; however, often nurses rely on their own mental processes to deliver care and do not rely on protocols or guidelines. The challenge often is not to teach the correct evidence-based practice guideline but to support the nurse to incorporate the guidelines into daily practice. Simulation is a method that can be used in an overall strategy to diffuse evidence-based practice guidelines at the point of care delivery. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Practice Guidelines; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Diffusion of Innovation; Simulations; Models, Theoretical; Teaching Methods, Clinical; Nursing Skills; Behavioral Objectives},
      isbn={0193-9459},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010970005&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Amend, R., & Golden, A.. (2011). Evidence-Based Practice at the Point of Care . Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 7(4), 303-308.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Abstract: Evidence-based practice at the point of care gives advance practice registered nurses and their patients immediate access to the most current evidence and research-backed information to treat the specific issue or health concern with which the patient presents. Patients without current complaints, but with questions and concerns can receive education regarding current preventive guidelines and recommendations for many illnesses, such as diabetes and obesity. Because nurses are the primary patient educators, advance practice nurses are in a unique position to impart diagnostic, treatment, and preventive education that may otherwise go unsaid. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:503,
      author={R. Amend and A. Golden},
      year={2011},
      month={04},
      title={Evidence-Based Practice at the Point of Care },
      journal={Journal for Nurse Practitioners},
      volume={7},
      number={4},
      pages={303-308},
      note={id: 5265},
      abstract={Abstract: Evidence-based practice at the point of care gives advance practice registered nurses and their patients immediate access to the most current evidence and research-backed information to treat the specific issue or health concern with which the patient presents. Patients without current complaints, but with questions and concerns can receive education regarding current preventive guidelines and recommendations for many illnesses, such as diabetes and obesity. Because nurses are the primary patient educators, advance practice nurses are in a unique position to impart diagnostic, treatment, and preventive education that may otherwise go unsaid. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Advanced Nursing Practice; Point-of-Care Testing; World Wide Web; Information Resources; Preventive Health Care},
      isbn={1555-4155},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011005825&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Arguelles, C.. (2011). Evidence-based practice mentors: taking information literacy to the units in a teaching hospital . Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 11(1), 8-22.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article describes Evidence-Based Mentors, an integrated strategy with librarian participation, aimed to motivate and assist nurses in the search and use of literature and evidence-based information for nursing practice in a teaching hospital. The librarian’s role goes beyond searching the literature to involvement in teaching critical appraisal of information. It details the evidence-based process, including the use of the PICO model, the categorization of resources, and the synthesizing that lead to the change of nursing practices that impact on outcomes directly related to patient recovery, organizational effectiveness, and nursing competency. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:504,
      author={C. Arguelles},
      year={2011},
      month={2011},
      title={Evidence-based practice mentors: taking information literacy to the units in a teaching hospital },
      journal={Journal of Hospital Librarianship},
      volume={11},
      number={1},
      pages={8-22},
      note={id: 5267},
      abstract={This article describes Evidence-Based Mentors, an integrated strategy with librarian participation, aimed to motivate and assist nurses in the search and use of literature and evidence-based information for nursing practice in a teaching hospital. The librarian's role goes beyond searching the literature to involvement in teaching critical appraisal of information. It details the evidence-based process, including the use of the PICO model, the categorization of resources, and the synthesizing that lead to the change of nursing practices that impact on outcomes directly related to patient recovery, organizational effectiveness, and nursing competency. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Academic Medical Centers -- New York; Mentorship; Information Literacy; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Patient Education; New York; Health Sciences Librarians; Computerized Literature Searching; Organizational Efficiency; Medical Literature; Collaboration; Information Needs; Magnet Hospitals; Cochrane Library; CINAHL Database; Medline},
      isbn={1532-3269},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010928846&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Bellman, L., Webster, J., & Jeanes, A.. (2011). Knowledge transfer and the integration of research, policy and practice for patient benefit . Journal of Research in Nursing, 16(3), 254-270.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Multiple routes are proposed within the nursing and healthcare literature for implementing traditional and reflexive research evidence into practice. Knowledge transfer is a relatively new field of inquiry, which, as both a process and a strategy, can lead to the utilisation of research findings and improved outcomes for patients. Nurse leaders and the public have recognised the need to ensure that evidence-based practice is introduced expeditiously. Nurses working at an advanced level of practice, such as consultant nurses, use all forms of knowledge in sophisticated ways to lead the integration of research findings into diverse practice settings. Within healthcare organisations evidence-based practice is far more likely to occur when it is linked to implementing healthcare policy in practice. The current international, collaborative knowledge transfer research agenda includes the need to learn if knowledge transfer programmes, structures, frameworks and theories are working, and if not, why not. The knowledge transfer process is illustrated by consultant nurses using the knowledge-to-action framework to underpin two recent UK policy examples: safeguarding vulnerable adults and the prevention of Clostridium difficile. For the future, clinical academic partnerships are required to foster a culture of evidence-based practice through practical engagement, and the sharing of nursing knowledge and expertise in a systematic way, both to improve patient care and address the current research—practice gap. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:506,
      author={L. Bellman and J. Webster and A. Jeanes},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Knowledge transfer and the integration of research, policy and practice for patient benefit },
      journal={Journal of Research in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={3},
      pages={254-270},
      note={id: 5626},
      abstract={Multiple routes are proposed within the nursing and healthcare literature for implementing traditional and reflexive research evidence into practice. Knowledge transfer is a relatively new field of inquiry, which, as both a process and a strategy, can lead to the utilisation of research findings and improved outcomes for patients. Nurse leaders and the public have recognised the need to ensure that evidence-based practice is introduced expeditiously. Nurses working at an advanced level of practice, such as consultant nurses, use all forms of knowledge in sophisticated ways to lead the integration of research findings into diverse practice settings. Within healthcare organisations evidence-based practice is far more likely to occur when it is linked to implementing healthcare policy in practice. The current international, collaborative knowledge transfer research agenda includes the need to learn if knowledge transfer programmes, structures, frameworks and theories are working, and if not, why not. The knowledge transfer process is illustrated by consultant nurses using the knowledge-to-action framework to underpin two recent UK policy examples: safeguarding vulnerable adults and the prevention of Clostridium difficile. For the future, clinical academic partnerships are required to foster a culture of evidence-based practice through practical engagement, and the sharing of nursing knowledge and expertise in a systematic way, both to improve patient care and address the current research—practice gap. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Trends; Nursing Knowledge -- Trends; Research, Nursing -- Trends; Patient Centered Care; Organizational Policies -- Trends; United Kingdom; Advanced Nursing Practice; Nursing Outcomes -- Evaluation; Clostridium Infections -- Prevention and Control},
      isbn={1744-9871},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011060001&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Blazeck, A., Klem, M. L., & Miller, T. H.. (2011). Building Evidence-Based Practice Into the Foundations of Practice . Nurse educator, 36(3), 124-127.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The Institute of Medicine asserts that evidence-based practice can become a reality because the tools to find the best evidence are available. However, teaching the naïve sophomore how to use these tools while ensuring that this first search experience is successful from both the student and the instructor standpoint is complex. The authors describe an assignment that ensures students will master the steps needed to locate quality evidence. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:507,
      author={A. Blazeck and M. L. Klem and T. H. Miller},
      year={2011},
      month={2011},
      title={Building Evidence-Based Practice Into the Foundations of Practice },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={36},
      number={3},
      pages={124-127},
      note={id: 5264},
      abstract={The Institute of Medicine asserts that evidence-based practice can become a reality because the tools to find the best evidence are available. However, teaching the naïve sophomore how to use these tools while ensuring that this first search experience is successful from both the student and the instructor standpoint is complex. The authors describe an assignment that ensures students will master the steps needed to locate quality evidence. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Computerized Literature Searching -- Education; Teaching Methods; Academic Achievement -- Evaluation},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011171218&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Bromirski, B. H., Cody, J. L., Coppin, K., Hewson, K., & Richardson, B.. (2011). Evidence-Based Practice Day: An Innovative Educational Opportunity . Western journal of nursing research, 33(3), 333-344.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    To maximize patient outcomes, the latest research and practice updates must be disseminated across the patient care continuum to include all members of the nursing team. The Clinical Research Council (CRC) recognized the need to bridge the gap between nursing research and practice, using evidence to decrease variation in practice. To meet this challenge, a Magnet-designated, rural community hospital developed an innovative educational program. This article describes Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) day, an interactive learning environment that engages nursing staff and strengthens their understanding of the science that guides practice. Topics for inclusion were selected based on staff requests, current research, quality improvement data, and institutional priorities. Evidence was provided in a format that supported rapid implementation into practice. Key components of the program included a clinical scenario, internal and external data, nursing interventions, patient outcomes (nursing-sensitive and organizational), and regulatory requirement updates. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:508,
      author={B. H. Bromirski and J. L. Cody and K. Coppin and K. Hewson and B. Richardson},
      year={2011},
      month={04},
      title={Evidence-Based Practice Day: An Innovative Educational Opportunity },
      journal={Western journal of nursing research},
      volume={33},
      number={3},
      pages={333-344},
      note={id: 5336},
      abstract={To maximize patient outcomes, the latest research and practice updates must be disseminated across the patient care continuum to include all members of the nursing team. The Clinical Research Council (CRC) recognized the need to bridge the gap between nursing research and practice, using evidence to decrease variation in practice. To meet this challenge, a Magnet-designated, rural community hospital developed an innovative educational program. This article describes Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) day, an interactive learning environment that engages nursing staff and strengthens their understanding of the science that guides practice. Topics for inclusion were selected based on staff requests, current research, quality improvement data, and institutional priorities. Evidence was provided in a format that supported rapid implementation into practice. Key components of the program included a clinical scenario, internal and external data, nursing interventions, patient outcomes (nursing-sensitive and organizational), and regulatory requirement updates. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Cross Infection -- Prevention and Control; Program Implementation; Program Development; Course Content; Diffusion of Innovation; Treatment Outcomes; Conceptual Framework; Nursing Interventions; Quality Improvement; Learning Environment, Clinical; Organizational Change; Teaching Methods, Clinical; Mentorship; Simulations; Program Evaluation},
      isbn={0193-9459},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010970001&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Cullen, L., G., T. M., & Rempel, G.. (2011). An Advanced Educational Program Promoting Evidence-Based Practice . Western journal of nursing research, 33(3), 345-364.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Evidence-based practice has led to improved health care quality and safety; greater patient, family, and staff satisfaction; and reduced costs. Despite these promising outcomes, use of evidence-based practice is inconsistent. The purpose of this article is to describe an advanced educational program for nurses in leadership roles responsible for guiding teams and mentoring colleagues through the challenges inherent in the evidence-based practice process. The Advanced Practice Institute: Promoting Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice is an innovative program designed to develop advanced skills essential for completing evidence-based practice projects and building organizational capacity for evidence-based practice programs. Learning is facilitated through group discussion, facilitated work time, networking, and consultation. Content includes finding and synthesizing evidence, learning effective strategies for implementation and evaluation, and discussing techniques for building an EBP program in the nurses’ organization. Program evaluations are extremely positive, and the long-term impact is described. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:509,
      author={L. Cullen and M. Titler G. and G. Rempel},
      year={2011},
      month={04},
      title={An Advanced Educational Program Promoting Evidence-Based Practice },
      journal={Western journal of nursing research},
      volume={33},
      number={3},
      pages={345-364},
      note={id: 5263},
      abstract={Evidence-based practice has led to improved health care quality and safety; greater patient, family, and staff satisfaction; and reduced costs. Despite these promising outcomes, use of evidence-based practice is inconsistent. The purpose of this article is to describe an advanced educational program for nurses in leadership roles responsible for guiding teams and mentoring colleagues through the challenges inherent in the evidence-based practice process. The Advanced Practice Institute: Promoting Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice is an innovative program designed to develop advanced skills essential for completing evidence-based practice projects and building organizational capacity for evidence-based practice programs. Learning is facilitated through group discussion, facilitated work time, networking, and consultation. Content includes finding and synthesizing evidence, learning effective strategies for implementation and evaluation, and discussing techniques for building an EBP program in the nurses' organization. Program evaluations are extremely positive, and the long-term impact is described. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Program Implementation; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Nursing Leaders -- Education; Networking, Professional; Mentorship; Group Processes; Program Evaluation; Advanced Nursing Practice; Goals and Objectives; Nurse Administrators; Curriculum; Skill Acquisition},
      isbn={0193-9459},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010970000&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Eizenberg, M. M.. (2011). Implementation of evidence-based nursing practice: nurses’ personal and professional factors? . Journal of advanced nursing, 67(1), 33-42.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Aims. This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore the relationship between nurses’ personal and professional factors and evidence-based nursing practice. Background. Like most health-related professions, nursing is shifting from the traditional intuition-based paradigm to evidence-based nursing practice. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2007 with a convenience sample of 243 nurses from northern Israel, who worked in hospitals or in the community. Associations between background variables and evidence-based nursing practice were examined. For the purpose of finding factors that predicted behaviour, a logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results. The self-reported professional behaviour of nurses with a degree was more evidence-based than that of those without a degree. Moreover, evidence-based nursing practice was more likely where there was access to a rich library with nursing and medical journals, and opportunities for working with a computer and for searching the Internet in the workplace. The variables emerging as predicting evidence-based nursing practice were: education, skills in locating various research sources, support of the organization for searching and reading professional literature, knowledge sources based on colleagues and system procedures (inhibiting variable), knowledge sources based on reading professional literature, and knowledge sources based on experience or intuition. Conclusion. The findings point to the need for research-based information, exposure to professional journals and, in particular, organizational support for evidence-based nursing practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:511,
      author={M. M. Eizenberg},
      year={2011},
      title={Implementation of evidence-based nursing practice: nurses' personal and professional factors? },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={67},
      number={1},
      pages={33-42},
      note={id: 5268},
      abstract={Aims. This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore the relationship between nurses' personal and professional factors and evidence-based nursing practice. Background. Like most health-related professions, nursing is shifting from the traditional intuition-based paradigm to evidence-based nursing practice. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2007 with a convenience sample of 243 nurses from northern Israel, who worked in hospitals or in the community. Associations between background variables and evidence-based nursing practice were examined. For the purpose of finding factors that predicted behaviour, a logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results. The self-reported professional behaviour of nurses with a degree was more evidence-based than that of those without a degree. Moreover, evidence-based nursing practice was more likely where there was access to a rich library with nursing and medical journals, and opportunities for working with a computer and for searching the Internet in the workplace. The variables emerging as predicting evidence-based nursing practice were: education, skills in locating various research sources, support of the organization for searching and reading professional literature, knowledge sources based on colleagues and system procedures (inhibiting variable), knowledge sources based on reading professional literature, and knowledge sources based on experience or intuition. Conclusion. The findings point to the need for research-based information, exposure to professional journals and, in particular, organizational support for evidence-based nursing practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Utilization; Nurse Attitudes; Research, Nursing -- Utilization; Human; Cross Sectional Studies; Surveys; Convenience Sample; Attitude Measures; Questionnaires; Content Validity; Coefficient Alpha; Data Analysis Software; Logistic Regression; Odds Ratio; Confidence Intervals; Adult; Middle Age; P-Value; T-Tests; Chi Square Test; Demography},
      isbn={0309-2402},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010892475&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Everett, L. Q., & Sitterding, M. C.. (2011). Transformational Leadership Required to Design and Sustain Evidence-Based Practice: A System Exemplar . Western journal of nursing research, 33(3), 398-426.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    In a pay-for-performance environment, implementing and sustaining evidence-based practice (EBP) is no longer a luxury but a necessity. A critical driving force for EBP is that our communities-the people we serve-expect to receive care based on the best available evidence. Transformational nursing leadership is required to create an infrastructure that influences organizational factors, processes and expectations, thus enabling the sustainability of EBP. The American Nurses Credentialing Center and the American Organization of Nurse Executives provide a framework for nursing leaders to consider when designing EBP implementation structures. This exemplar illustrates nursing leadership competencies with regard to implementation and sustainability of EBP within a multihospital system. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:512,
      author={L. Q. Everett and M. C. Sitterding},
      year={2011},
      month={04},
      title={Transformational Leadership Required to Design and Sustain Evidence-Based Practice: A System Exemplar },
      journal={Western journal of nursing research},
      volume={33},
      number={3},
      pages={398-426},
      note={id: 5334},
      abstract={In a pay-for-performance environment, implementing and sustaining evidence-based practice (EBP) is no longer a luxury but a necessity. A critical driving force for EBP is that our communities-the people we serve-expect to receive care based on the best available evidence. Transformational nursing leadership is required to create an infrastructure that influences organizational factors, processes and expectations, thus enabling the sustainability of EBP. The American Nurses Credentialing Center and the American Organization of Nurse Executives provide a framework for nursing leaders to consider when designing EBP implementation structures. This exemplar illustrates nursing leadership competencies with regard to implementation and sustainability of EBP within a multihospital system. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Leadership; Organizational Change; Nurse Administrators; Nursing Leaders; Midwestern United States; Magnet Hospitals; Professional Autonomy; Decision Making, Clinical; Needs Assessment; Job Satisfaction; Professional Competence; Professional Role; Models, Theoretical; Committees; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Mentorship; Program Implementation; Outcome Assessment},
      isbn={0193-9459},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010970008&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Majid, S., Foo, S., Luyt, B., Zhang, X., Theng, Y. L., Chang, Y. K., & Mokhtar, I. A.. (2011). Adopting evidence-based practice in clinical decision making: nurses’ perceptions, knowledge, and barriers . Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 99(3), 229-236.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based practice (EBP) provides nurses with a method to use critically appraised and scientifically proven evidence for delivering quality health care to a specific population. The objective of this study was to explore nurses’ awareness of, knowledge of, and attitude toward EBP and factors likely to encourage or create barriers to adoption. In addition, information sources used by nurses and their literature searching skills were also investigated. METHOD: A total of 2,100 copies of the questionnaire were distributed to registered nurses in 2 public hospitals in Singapore, and 1,486 completed forms were returned, resulting in a response rate of 70.8%. RESULTS: More than 64% of the nurses expressed a positive attitude toward EBP. However, they pointed out that due to heavy workload, they cannot keep up to date with new evidence. Regarding self-efficacy of EBP-related abilities, the nurses perceived themselves to possess moderate levels of skills. The nurses also felt that EBP training, time availability, and mentoring by nurses with EBP experience would encourage them to implement EBP. The top three barriers to adopting EBP were lack of time, inability to understand statistical terms, and inadequate understanding of the jargon used in research articles. For literature searching, nurses were using basic search features and less than one-quarter of them were familiar with Boolean and proximity operators. CONCLUSION: Although nurses showed a positive attitude toward EBP, certain barriers were hindering their smooth adoption. It is, therefore, desirable that hospital management in Southeast Asia, particularly in Singapore, develop a comprehensive strategy for building EBP competencies through proper training. Moreover, hospital libraries should also play an active role in developing adequate information literacy skills among the nurses. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:516,
      author={S. Majid and S. Foo and B. Luyt and X. Zhang and Y. L. Theng and Y. K. Chang and I. A. Mokhtar},
      year={2011},
      month={Jul},
      title={Adopting evidence-based practice in clinical decision making: nurses' perceptions, knowledge, and barriers },
      journal={Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA},
      volume={99},
      number={3},
      pages={229-236},
      note={id: 5258; JID: 101132728; OID: NLM: PMC3133901; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based practice (EBP) provides nurses with a method to use critically appraised and scientifically proven evidence for delivering quality health care to a specific population. The objective of this study was to explore nurses' awareness of, knowledge of, and attitude toward EBP and factors likely to encourage or create barriers to adoption. In addition, information sources used by nurses and their literature searching skills were also investigated. METHOD: A total of 2,100 copies of the questionnaire were distributed to registered nurses in 2 public hospitals in Singapore, and 1,486 completed forms were returned, resulting in a response rate of 70.8%. RESULTS: More than 64% of the nurses expressed a positive attitude toward EBP. However, they pointed out that due to heavy workload, they cannot keep up to date with new evidence. Regarding self-efficacy of EBP-related abilities, the nurses perceived themselves to possess moderate levels of skills. The nurses also felt that EBP training, time availability, and mentoring by nurses with EBP experience would encourage them to implement EBP. The top three barriers to adopting EBP were lack of time, inability to understand statistical terms, and inadequate understanding of the jargon used in research articles. For literature searching, nurses were using basic search features and less than one-quarter of them were familiar with Boolean and proximity operators. CONCLUSION: Although nurses showed a positive attitude toward EBP, certain barriers were hindering their smooth adoption. It is, therefore, desirable that hospital management in Southeast Asia, particularly in Singapore, develop a comprehensive strategy for building EBP competencies through proper training. Moreover, hospital libraries should also play an active role in developing adequate information literacy skills among the nurses. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1558-9439; 1536-5050},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Makic, M. B., VonRueden, K. T., Rauen, C. A., & Chadwick, J.. (2011). Evidence-Based Practice Habits: Putting More Sacred Cows Out to Pasture . Critical Care Nurse, 31(2), 38-62.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    For excellence in practice to be the standard for care, critical care nurses must embrace evidence-based practice as the norm. Nurses cannot knowingly continue a clinical practice despite research showing that the practice is not helpful and may even be harmful to patients. This article is based on 2 presentations on evidence-based practice from the American Association for Critical-Care Nurses’ 2009 and 2010 National Teaching Institute and addresses 7 practice issues that were selected for 2 reasons. First, they are within the realm of nursing, and a change in practice could improve patient care immediately. Second, these are areas in which the tradition and the evidence do not agree and practice continues to follow tradition. The topics to be addressed are (1) Trendelenburg positioning for hypotension, (2) use of rectal tubes to manage fecal incontinence, (3) gastric residual volume and aspiration risk, (4) restricted visiting policies, (5) nursing interventions to reduce urinary catheter-associated infections, (6) use of cell phones in critical care areas, and (7) accuracy of assessment of body temperature. The related beliefs, current evidence, and recommendations for practice related to each topic are outlined. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:517,
      author={M. B. Makic and K. T. VonRueden and C. A. Rauen and J. Chadwick},
      year={2011},
      month={04},
      title={Evidence-Based Practice Habits: Putting More Sacred Cows Out to Pasture },
      journal={Critical Care Nurse},
      volume={31},
      number={2},
      pages={38-62},
      note={id: 5266},
      abstract={For excellence in practice to be the standard for care, critical care nurses must embrace evidence-based practice as the norm. Nurses cannot knowingly continue a clinical practice despite research showing that the practice is not helpful and may even be harmful to patients. This article is based on 2 presentations on evidence-based practice from the American Association for Critical-Care Nurses' 2009 and 2010 National Teaching Institute and addresses 7 practice issues that were selected for 2 reasons. First, they are within the realm of nursing, and a change in practice could improve patient care immediately. Second, these are areas in which the tradition and the evidence do not agree and practice continues to follow tradition. The topics to be addressed are (1) Trendelenburg positioning for hypotension, (2) use of rectal tubes to manage fecal incontinence, (3) gastric residual volume and aspiration risk, (4) restricted visiting policies, (5) nursing interventions to reduce urinary catheter-associated infections, (6) use of cell phones in critical care areas, and (7) accuracy of assessment of body temperature. The related beliefs, current evidence, and recommendations for practice related to each topic are outlined. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Critical Care Nursing; Hypotension -- Nursing; Fecal Incontinence -- Therapy; Patient Positioning; Gastric Acid -- Analysis; Aspiration -- Risk Factors; Visitors to Patients; Hospital Policies; Urinary Tract Infections -- Prevention and Control; Catheter-Related Infections -- Prevention and Control; Wireless Communications -- Utilization; Body Temperature Determination; Nursing Interventions; Education, Continuing (Credit); Fecal Incontinence -- Risk Factors; Nursing Assessment; Bowel and Bladder Management; Gastrointestinal Motility -- Evaluation; Tube Placement Determination; Nasoenteral Tubes; Enteral Nutrition; Inpatients; Critically Ill Patients; Family; Patient Advocacy; Catheters, Urinary; Urinary Catheterization; Electromagnetic Fields; Patient Safety},
      isbn={0279-5442},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010994801&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Oermann, M. H.. (2011). Toward Evidence-Based Nursing Education: Deliberate Practice and Motor Skill Learning . Journal of Nursing Education, 50(2), 63-64.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The development of motor skills and the ability to perform procedures in the clinical setting are critical outcomes of nursing education programs. Yet the instruction of these skills in nursing has received minimal attention recently, even though nurse managers and new graduates themselves often report a lack of skills for entry into practice. Students learn multiple skills in their beginning nursing course, typically in a laboratory setting; they observe the skill, practice it until they can perform it accurately, and are assessed on their competency. Although students may be able to perform the skill at the time of assessment, skills are retained only if they are practiced. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:519,
      author={M. H. Oermann},
      year={2011},
      month={02},
      title={Toward Evidence-Based Nursing Education: Deliberate Practice and Motor Skill Learning },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={50},
      number={2},
      pages={63-64},
      note={id: 5333},
      abstract={The development of motor skills and the ability to perform procedures in the clinical setting are critical outcomes of nursing education programs. Yet the instruction of these skills in nursing has received minimal attention recently, even though nurse managers and new graduates themselves often report a lack of skills for entry into practice. Students learn multiple skills in their beginning nursing course, typically in a laboratory setting; they observe the skill, practice it until they can perform it accurately, and are assessed on their competency. Although students may be able to perform the skill at the time of assessment, skills are retained only if they are practiced. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Education, Nursing; Nursing Skills; Nursing Knowledge},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011166939&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Shirey, M. R., Hauck, S. L., Embree, J. L., Kinner, T. J., Schaar, G. L., Phillips, L. A., Ashby, S. R., Swenty, C. F., & McCool, I. A.. (2011). Showcasing Differences Between Quality Improvement, Evidence-Based Practice, and Research . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 42(2), 57-70.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The literature confirms that much confusion exists regarding the terms quality improvement (QI), evidence-based practice (EBP), and research. A multifaceted approach was used to provide clarity regarding these three equally important concepts. First, the authors present a synthesis of the literature that discusses differences between QI, EBP, and research. Second, the authors introduce a newly created comparative table that synthesizes current literature and showcases differences between QI, EBP, and research. Finally, the authors highlight uses of the comparative table within multiple settings. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:522,
      author={M. R. Shirey and S. L. Hauck and J. L. Embree and T. J. Kinner and G. L. Schaar and L. A. Phillips and S. R. Ashby and C. F. Swenty and I. A. McCool},
      year={2011},
      month={02},
      title={Showcasing Differences Between Quality Improvement, Evidence-Based Practice, and Research },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={42},
      number={2},
      pages={57-70},
      note={id: 5270},
      abstract={The literature confirms that much confusion exists regarding the terms quality improvement (QI), evidence-based practice (EBP), and research. A multifaceted approach was used to provide clarity regarding these three equally important concepts. First, the authors present a synthesis of the literature that discusses differences between QI, EBP, and research. Second, the authors introduce a newly created comparative table that synthesizes current literature and showcases differences between QI, EBP, and research. Finally, the authors highlight uses of the comparative table within multiple settings. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Quality Improvement; Research; Education, Continuing (Credit); Medline; CINAHL Database; Literature Review},
      isbn={0022-0124},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011173107&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Solomons, N. M., & Spross, J. A.. (2011). Evidence-based practice barriers and facilitators from a continuous quality improvement perspective: an integrative review . Journal of nursing management, 19(1), 109-120.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Solomons N.M. & Spross J.A. (2011) Journal of Nursing Management 19, 109-120 Evidence-based practice barriers and facilitators from a continuous quality improvement perspective: an integrative review Aims The purpose of the present study is to examine the barriers and facilitators to evidence-based practice (EBP) using Shortell’s framework for continuous quality improvement (CQI). Background EBP is typically undertaken to improve practice. Although there have been many studies focused on the barriers and facilitators to adopting EBP, these have not been tied explicitly to CQI frameworks. Methods CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Medline, Psych Info, ABI/Inform and LISTA databases were searched using the keywords: nurses, information literacy, access to information, sources of knowledge, decision making, research utilization, information seeking behaviour and nursing practice, evidence-based practice. Shortell’s framework was used to organize the barriers and facilitators. Results Across the articles, the most common barriers were lack of time and lack of autonomy to change practice which falls within the strategic and cultural dimensions in Shortell’s framework. Conclusions Barriers and facilitators to EBP adoption occur at the individual and institutional levels. Solutions to the barriers need to be directed to the dimension where the barrier occurs, while recognizing that multidimensional approaches are essential to the success of overcoming these barriers. Implications for nursing management The findings of the present study can help nurses identify barriers and implement strategies to promote EBP as part of CQI. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:498,
      author={N. M. Solomons and J. A. Spross},
      year={2011},
      month={Jan},
      title={Evidence-based practice barriers and facilitators from a continuous quality improvement perspective: an integrative review },
      journal={Journal of nursing management},
      volume={19},
      number={1},
      pages={109-120},
      note={id: 4825; CI: (c) 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2010; JID: 9306050; 2010/12/13 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Solomons N.M. & Spross J.A. (2011) Journal of Nursing Management 19, 109-120 Evidence-based practice barriers and facilitators from a continuous quality improvement perspective: an integrative review Aims The purpose of the present study is to examine the barriers and facilitators to evidence-based practice (EBP) using Shortell's framework for continuous quality improvement (CQI). Background EBP is typically undertaken to improve practice. Although there have been many studies focused on the barriers and facilitators to adopting EBP, these have not been tied explicitly to CQI frameworks. Methods CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Medline, Psych Info, ABI/Inform and LISTA databases were searched using the keywords: nurses, information literacy, access to information, sources of knowledge, decision making, research utilization, information seeking behaviour and nursing practice, evidence-based practice. Shortell's framework was used to organize the barriers and facilitators. Results Across the articles, the most common barriers were lack of time and lack of autonomy to change practice which falls within the strategic and cultural dimensions in Shortell's framework. Conclusions Barriers and facilitators to EBP adoption occur at the individual and institutional levels. Solutions to the barriers need to be directed to the dimension where the barrier occurs, while recognizing that multidimensional approaches are essential to the success of overcoming these barriers. Implications for nursing management The findings of the present study can help nurses identify barriers and implement strategies to promote EBP as part of CQI. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2834; 0966-0429},
      language={eng}
    }

2010

  • Balakas, K., & Sparks, L.. (2010). Teaching research and evidence-based practice using a service-learning approach . The Journal of nursing education, 49(12), 691-695.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Because nurses are expected to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP), nursing students must learn to critically evaluate and apply research findings to prepare for professional practice. To connect research and EBP, the focus of a baccalaureate research course was changed from a traditional format to one of evidence appraisal and synthesis. Using an approach that incorporated service-learning and collaborative learning resulted in a new hybrid course that provided students with an opportunity to apply concepts in the real world. Working with a community partner, students were able to develop PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome) questions and critically appraise the literature to establish the evidence base for three pediatric programs. Students reported that working with a community partner was a meaningful experience because course assignments had a direct impact on current practice. Research courses taught from an EBP perspective can provide motivation for students to incorporate research into their practice as professional nurses. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:485,
      author={K. Balakas and L. Sparks},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec},
      title={Teaching research and evidence-based practice using a service-learning approach },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={12},
      pages={691-695},
      note={id: 4841; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 7705432; 2009/08/25 [received]; 2010/02/11 [accepted]; 2010/08/31 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Because nurses are expected to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP), nursing students must learn to critically evaluate and apply research findings to prepare for professional practice. To connect research and EBP, the focus of a baccalaureate research course was changed from a traditional format to one of evidence appraisal and synthesis. Using an approach that incorporated service-learning and collaborative learning resulted in a new hybrid course that provided students with an opportunity to apply concepts in the real world. Working with a community partner, students were able to develop PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome) questions and critically appraise the literature to establish the evidence base for three pediatric programs. Students reported that working with a community partner was a meaningful experience because course assignments had a direct impact on current practice. Research courses taught from an EBP perspective can provide motivation for students to incorporate research into their practice as professional nurses. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Community Health Nursing/education; Community-Institutional Relations; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Evidence-Based Practice/education; Humans; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Research/education; Philosophy, Nursing; Problem-Based Learning/methods; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; Research Personnel/education/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology; Teaching/methods},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Barnsteiner, J. H., Reeder, V. C., Palma, W. H., Preston, A. M., & Walton, M. K.. (2010). Promoting evidence-based practice and translational research . Nursing administration quarterly, 34(3), 217-225.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an evolutionary step in the nursing model of excellence in professional practice at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A healthcare culture focused on excellence and world-class patient care requires that nursing research and EBP are integrated into the professional practice model and nursing care delivery. To achieve this, it requires the development of staff expertise, time allocation for staff to participate in scholarly activities, resources that support EBP and research, and expert consultants in EBP and nursing translational research. This article describes the systems and structures in place to provide staff with resources in order to translate research and deliver EBP and the multiple initiatives in disseminating evidence to the point of care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:486,
      author={J. H. Barnsteiner and V. C. Reeder and W. H. Palma and A. M. Preston and M. K. Walton},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Promoting evidence-based practice and translational research },
      journal={Nursing administration quarterly},
      volume={34},
      number={3},
      pages={217-225},
      note={id: 4817; JID: 7703976; ppublish },
      abstract={Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an evolutionary step in the nursing model of excellence in professional practice at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A healthcare culture focused on excellence and world-class patient care requires that nursing research and EBP are integrated into the professional practice model and nursing care delivery. To achieve this, it requires the development of staff expertise, time allocation for staff to participate in scholarly activities, resources that support EBP and research, and expert consultants in EBP and nursing translational research. This article describes the systems and structures in place to provide staff with resources in order to translate research and deliver EBP and the multiple initiatives in disseminating evidence to the point of care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Governance/organization & administration; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Practice/education/organization & administration; Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration; Hospitals, University/organization & administration; Humans; Information Dissemination; Interinstitutional Relations; Internet/organization & administration; Mentors; Models, Nursing; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration; Philadelphia; Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration; Research Support as Topic/organization & administration; Schools, Nursing/organization & administration; Teaching Rounds/organization & administration; Translational Research/education/organization & administration},
      isbn={1550-5103; 0363-9568},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bloomfield, J., Roberts, J., & While, A.. (2010). The effect of computer-assisted learning versus conventional teaching methods on the acquisition and retention of handwashing theory and skills in pre-qualification nursing students: a randomised controlled trial . International journal of nursing studies, 47(3), 287-294.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: High quality health care demands a nursing workforce with sound clinical skills. However, the clinical competency of newly qualified nurses continues to stimulate debate about the adequacy of current methods of clinical skills education and emphasises the need for innovative teaching strategies. Despite the increasing use of e-learning within nurse education, evidence to support its use for clinical skills teaching is limited and inconclusive. OBJECTIVES: This study tested whether nursing students could learn and retain the theory and skill of handwashing more effectively when taught using computer-assisted learning compared with conventional face-to-face methods. DESIGN: The study employed a two group randomised controlled design. The intervention group used an interactive, multimedia, self-directed computer-assisted learning module. The control group was taught by an experienced lecturer in a clinical skills room. Data were collected over a 5-month period between October 2004 and February 2005. Knowledge was tested at four time points and handwashing skills were assessed twice. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Two-hundred and forty-two first year nursing students of mixed gender; age; educational background and first language studying at one British university were recruited to the study. Participant attrition increased during the study. RESULTS: Knowledge scores increased significantly from baseline in both groups and no significant differences were detected between the scores of the two groups. Skill performance scores were similar in both groups at the 2-week follow-up with significant differences emerging at the 8-week follow-up in favour of the intervention group, however, this finding must be interpreted with caution in light of sample size and attrition rates. CONCLUSION: The computer-assisted learning module was an effective strategy for teaching both the theory and practice of handwashing to nursing students and in this study was found to be at least as effective as conventional face-to-face teaching methods. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:487,
      author={J. Bloomfield and J. Roberts and A. While},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar},
      title={The effect of computer-assisted learning versus conventional teaching methods on the acquisition and retention of handwashing theory and skills in pre-qualification nursing students: a randomised controlled trial },
      journal={International journal of nursing studies},
      volume={47},
      number={3},
      pages={287-294},
      note={id: 4919; LR: 20100924; CI: Copyright 2009; JID: 0400675; CIN: Evid Based Nurs. 2010 Oct;13(4):118-9. PMID: 20855339; 2008/12/16 [received]; 2009/08/07 [revised]; 2009/08/13 [accepted]; 2009/09/16 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: High quality health care demands a nursing workforce with sound clinical skills. However, the clinical competency of newly qualified nurses continues to stimulate debate about the adequacy of current methods of clinical skills education and emphasises the need for innovative teaching strategies. Despite the increasing use of e-learning within nurse education, evidence to support its use for clinical skills teaching is limited and inconclusive. OBJECTIVES: This study tested whether nursing students could learn and retain the theory and skill of handwashing more effectively when taught using computer-assisted learning compared with conventional face-to-face methods. DESIGN: The study employed a two group randomised controlled design. The intervention group used an interactive, multimedia, self-directed computer-assisted learning module. The control group was taught by an experienced lecturer in a clinical skills room. Data were collected over a 5-month period between October 2004 and February 2005. Knowledge was tested at four time points and handwashing skills were assessed twice. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Two-hundred and forty-two first year nursing students of mixed gender; age; educational background and first language studying at one British university were recruited to the study. Participant attrition increased during the study. RESULTS: Knowledge scores increased significantly from baseline in both groups and no significant differences were detected between the scores of the two groups. Skill performance scores were similar in both groups at the 2-week follow-up with significant differences emerging at the 8-week follow-up in favour of the intervention group, however, this finding must be interpreted with caution in light of sample size and attrition rates. CONCLUSION: The computer-assisted learning module was an effective strategy for teaching both the theory and practice of handwashing to nursing students and in this study was found to be at least as effective as conventional face-to-face teaching methods. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adolescent; Adult; Chi-Square Distribution; Clinical Competence; Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Educational Measurement; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Handwashing; Humans; London; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Theory; Program Evaluation; Statistics, Nonparametric; Students, Nursing/psychology; Teaching/methods},
      isbn={1873-491X; 0020-7489},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Brown, C. E., Kim, S. C., Stichler, J. F., & Fields, W.. (2010). Predictors of knowledge, attitudes, use and future use of evidence-based practice among baccalaureate nursing students at two universities . Nurse education today, 30(6), 521-527.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nursing students are strategically positioned to influence adoption of evidence-based practice within the nursing profession. The purpose of this study was to identify the predictors of knowledge, attitudes, use and future use of evidence-based practice among baccalaureate nursing students at two universities. A cross-sectional survey design was used to study a convenience sample of 436 nursing students (response rate of 63.3%) enrolled at two baccalaureate nursing programs at the beginning of 2007 fall semester in the United States. The surveys included demographic questionnaire and knowledge, attitudes and behaviors questionnaire for evidence-based practice. EBP Knowledge, Attitudes toward EBP and Future Use of EBP subscales demonstrated statistically significant increase in mean scores with advancing academic levels. Confidence in clinical decision-making and clinical preparedness had moderate positive correlation with EBP Use and Future use of EBP. Simultaneous multiple regression analyses indicated that the clinical preparedness and confidence in clinical decision-making were statistically significant predictor variables for EBP use and Future use of EBP. Clinically well-prepared nursing students with high confidence in clinical decision-making are most likely to use evidence-based practice, both in the present and the future. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:488,
      author={C. E. Brown and S. C. Kim and J. F. Stichler and W. Fields},
      year={2010},
      month={Aug},
      title={Predictors of knowledge, attitudes, use and future use of evidence-based practice among baccalaureate nursing students at two universities },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={30},
      number={6},
      pages={521-527},
      note={id: 4848; CI: Published by Elsevier Ltd.; JID: 8511379; 2009/03/31 [received]; 2009/10/19 [revised]; 2009/10/29 [accepted]; 2009/11/30 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Nursing students are strategically positioned to influence adoption of evidence-based practice within the nursing profession. The purpose of this study was to identify the predictors of knowledge, attitudes, use and future use of evidence-based practice among baccalaureate nursing students at two universities. A cross-sectional survey design was used to study a convenience sample of 436 nursing students (response rate of 63.3%) enrolled at two baccalaureate nursing programs at the beginning of 2007 fall semester in the United States. The surveys included demographic questionnaire and knowledge, attitudes and behaviors questionnaire for evidence-based practice. EBP Knowledge, Attitudes toward EBP and Future Use of EBP subscales demonstrated statistically significant increase in mean scores with advancing academic levels. Confidence in clinical decision-making and clinical preparedness had moderate positive correlation with EBP Use and Future use of EBP. Simultaneous multiple regression analyses indicated that the clinical preparedness and confidence in clinical decision-making were statistically significant predictor variables for EBP use and Future use of EBP. Clinically well-prepared nursing students with high confidence in clinical decision-making are most likely to use evidence-based practice, both in the present and the future. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Analysis of Variance; Attitude of Health Personnel; California; Clinical Competence; Cross-Sectional Studies; Curriculum; Decision Making; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Practice/education/organization & administration; Female; Forecasting; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Regression Analysis; Self Efficacy; Students, Nursing/psychology/statistics & numerical data},
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Caramanica, L., & Feldman, H. R.. (2010). Postbaccalaureate nurse residency: EBP in action . Research & Theory for Nursing Practice, 24(2), 97-100.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The Postbaccalaureate Nurse Residency Program grew out of an interest in improving patient care by providing additional training and support to new baccalaureate graduates. The goal of the program is to develop competent professionals to provide patient care leadership at the bedside. The residency builds on the The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice. During the program, nurse residents develop skills in decision-making, EBP, clinical leadership, and lifelong career planning as they advance their commitment to professional nursing practice. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:559,
      author={L. Caramanica and H. R. Feldman},
      year={2010},
      month={06},
      title={Postbaccalaureate nurse residency: EBP in action },
      journal={Research & Theory for Nursing Practice},
      volume={24},
      number={2},
      pages={97-100},
      note={id: 4777},
      abstract={The Postbaccalaureate Nurse Residency Program grew out of an interest in improving patient care by providing additional training and support to new baccalaureate graduates. The goal of the program is to develop competent professionals to provide patient care leadership at the bedside. The residency builds on the The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice. During the program, nurse residents develop skills in decision-making, EBP, clinical leadership, and lifelong career planning as they advance their commitment to professional nursing practice. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Graduate; Internship and Residency; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate},
      isbn={1541-6577},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010669928&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Cronje, R. J., & Moch, S. D.. (2010). Part III. Reenvisioning undergraduate nursing students as opinion leaders to diffuse evidence-based practice in clinical settings . Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 26(1), 23-28.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Rogers’s claims about the importance of social networks to the diffusion of innovations are reviewed in light of efforts to promote evidence-based practice (EBP) among nursing students and practicing nurses. We argue that nursing educators can take more deliberate advantage of the essentially social nature of the diffusion process by devising opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful social interactions with practicing nurses. We recommend curricular reforms that reenvision undergraduate nursing students as opinion leaders throughout the curriculum. Rogers’s theory predicts that such ongoing interactions between nursing students and practicing nurses will better integrate EBP among both populations. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:560,
      author={R. J. Cronje and S. D. Moch},
      year={2010},
      month={Jan},
      title={Part III. Reenvisioning undergraduate nursing students as opinion leaders to diffuse evidence-based practice in clinical settings },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={1},
      pages={23-28},
      note={id: 4769; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 8511298; RF: 40; 2008/03/08 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Rogers's claims about the importance of social networks to the diffusion of innovations are reviewed in light of efforts to promote evidence-based practice (EBP) among nursing students and practicing nurses. We argue that nursing educators can take more deliberate advantage of the essentially social nature of the diffusion process by devising opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful social interactions with practicing nurses. We recommend curricular reforms that reenvision undergraduate nursing students as opinion leaders throughout the curriculum. Rogers's theory predicts that such ongoing interactions between nursing students and practicing nurses will better integrate EBP among both populations. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Curriculum; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Practice/education/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Leadership; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff/education/psychology; Nursing Theory; Organizational Innovation; Social Behavior; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={1532-8481; 8755-7223},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dawley, K., Bloch, J. R., Suplee, P. D., McKeever, A., & Scherzer, G.. (2010). Using a Pedagogical Approach to Integrate Evidence-Based Teaching in an Undergraduate Women’s Health Course . Worldviews on evidence-based nursing, 8(2), 116-123.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted as a foundation for nursing practice. However, the 2005 U.S. Survey of Nurses revealed that they do not have requisite skills for EBP. Purpose and Goals: To evaluate a pedagogical approach aimed at (1) fostering undergraduate nursing students EBP competencies, and (2) identifying gaps in the literature to direct future women’s health research. Methods: A secondary analysis of data abstracted from required EBP clinical journals for an undergraduate women’s health course in which students (n= 198) were asked to find evidence to answer their clinical questions. Content analysis was used to identify main themes of the topics of inquiry. Results: Students identified 1,808 clinical questions and 30.3% (n= 547) of these could not be answered or supported by evidence in the literature. Conclusions: This assignment was an important teaching and assessment tool for EBP. Questions reflected critical thinking and quest for in-depth knowledge to support nursing practice. Some students lacked skills in searching databases and a significant number of knowledge gaps were identified that can direct women’s health research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:510,
      author={K. Dawley and J. R. Bloch and P. D. Suplee and A. McKeever and G. Scherzer},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec 13},
      title={Using a Pedagogical Approach to Integrate Evidence-Based Teaching in an Undergraduate Women's Health Course },
      journal={Worldviews on evidence-based nursing},
      volume={8},
      number={2},
      pages={116-123},
      note={id: 4826; CI: (c)2010; JID: 101185267; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted as a foundation for nursing practice. However, the 2005 U.S. Survey of Nurses revealed that they do not have requisite skills for EBP. Purpose and Goals: To evaluate a pedagogical approach aimed at (1) fostering undergraduate nursing students EBP competencies, and (2) identifying gaps in the literature to direct future women's health research. Methods: A secondary analysis of data abstracted from required EBP clinical journals for an undergraduate women's health course in which students (n= 198) were asked to find evidence to answer their clinical questions. Content analysis was used to identify main themes of the topics of inquiry. Results: Students identified 1,808 clinical questions and 30.3% (n= 547) of these could not be answered or supported by evidence in the literature. Conclusions: This assignment was an important teaching and assessment tool for EBP. Questions reflected critical thinking and quest for in-depth knowledge to support nursing practice. Some students lacked skills in searching databases and a significant number of knowledge gaps were identified that can direct women's health research. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1741-6787; 1545-102X},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Fineout-Overholt, E., Melnyk, B. M., Stillwell, S. B., & Williamson, K. M.. (2010). Evidence-based practice, step by step: critical appraisal of the evidence: part II: digging deeper–examining the "keeper" studies . The American Journal of Nursing, 110(9), 41-48.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This is the sixth article in a series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation’s Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved. The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:489,
      author={E. Fineout-Overholt and B. M. Melnyk and S. B. Stillwell and K. M. Williamson},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep},
      title={Evidence-based practice, step by step: critical appraisal of the evidence: part II: digging deeper--examining the "keeper" studies },
      journal={The American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={110},
      number={9},
      pages={41-48},
      note={id: 4842; LR: 20101102; JID: 0372646; EIN: Am J Nurs. 2010 Nov;110(11):12; ppublish },
      abstract={This is the sixth article in a series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved. The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Checklist; Evidence-Based Nursing/methods; Hospital Rapid Response Team; Humans; Research Design},
      isbn={1538-7488; 0002-936X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Goode, C. J., Fink, R. M., Krugman, M., Oman, K. S., & Traditi, L. K.. (2010). The Colorado Patient-Centered Interprofessional Evidence-Based Practice Model: A Framework for Transformation . Worldviews on evidence-based nursing.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) models provide a framework to guide organizations and their clinicians to implement evidence-based policies, protocols, and guidelines. A historical review of evidence-based models is presented. The revised Colorado Patient-Centered Interprofessional EBP Model supports use of research evidence and nonresearch evidence and adopts a patient-centered approach to EBP. Aim: The purpose of this article is to present a framework that can be used to transform an organization and foster the use of evidence by interdisciplinary team members. Approach: An evidence-based intervention to decrease catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) is presented to show how the model is operationalized. The EBP model is supported by the five steps that clinicians should use as they identify a clinical problem, gather the evidence, and move the evidence into practice. Ideas for dissemination of new models to clinicians throughout the organization are presented. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:513,
      author={C. J. Goode and R. M. Fink and M. Krugman and K. S. Oman and L. K. Traditi},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec 6},
      title={The Colorado Patient-Centered Interprofessional Evidence-Based Practice Model: A Framework for Transformation },
      journal={Worldviews on evidence-based nursing},
      note={id: 4827; CI: (c)2010; JID: 101185267; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Background: Evidence-based practice (EBP) models provide a framework to guide organizations and their clinicians to implement evidence-based policies, protocols, and guidelines. A historical review of evidence-based models is presented. The revised Colorado Patient-Centered Interprofessional EBP Model supports use of research evidence and nonresearch evidence and adopts a patient-centered approach to EBP. Aim: The purpose of this article is to present a framework that can be used to transform an organization and foster the use of evidence by interdisciplinary team members. Approach: An evidence-based intervention to decrease catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) is presented to show how the model is operationalized. The EBP model is supported by the five steps that clinicians should use as they identify a clinical problem, gather the evidence, and move the evidence into practice. Ideas for dissemination of new models to clinicians throughout the organization are presented. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1741-6787; 1545-102X},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Johansson, B., Fogelberg-Dahm, M., & Wadensten, B.. (2010). Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership . Journal of nursing management, 18(1), 70-77.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Aim To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors. Background Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance. Method All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire. Results The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities. Conclusions The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Implications for nursing management Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:561,
      author={B. Johansson and M. Fogelberg-Dahm and B. Wadensten},
      year={2010},
      title={Evidence-based practice: the importance of education and leadership },
      journal={Journal of nursing management},
      volume={18},
      number={1},
      pages={70-77},
      note={id: 4776},
      abstract={Aim To describe evidence-based practice among head nurses and to explore whether number of years of duty is associated with such activities. Further to evaluate the effects of education on evidence-based practice and perceived support from immediate superiors. Background Registered nurses in Sweden are required by law to perform care based on research findings and best experiences. In order to achieve this, evidence-based practice (EBP) is of key importance. Method All 168 head nurses at two hospitals were asked to participate. Ninety-nine (59%) completed the survey. Data were collected using a study-specific web-based questionnaire. Results The majority reported a positive attitude towards EBP, but also a lack of time for EBP activities. A greater number of years as a head nurse was positively correlated with research utilization. Education in research methods and perceived support from immediate superiors were statistically and significantly associated with increased EBP activities. Conclusions The present study highlights the value of education in research methods and the importance of supportive leadership. Implications for nursing management Education is an important factor in the employment of head nurses. We recommend interventions to create increased support for EBP among management, the goal being to deliver high-quality care and increase patient satisfaction. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Head Nurses; Leadership; Nurse Attitudes; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Research, Nursing -- Education; Academic Medical Centers; Descriptive Statistics; Exploratory Research; Human; P-Value; Questionnaires; Self Report; Statistical Significance; Surveys; Sweden},
      isbn={0966-0429},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010551260&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Johnson, N., List-Ivankovic, J., Eboh, W. O., Ireland, J., Adams, D., Mowatt, E., & Martindale, S.. (2010). Research and evidence based practice: using a blended approach to teaching and learning in undergraduate nurse education . Nurse Education in Practice, 10(1), 43-47.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    AIM: The following paper provides insights into the challenges of teaching research and evidence based practice to undergraduate student nurses. It provides a critical discussion as to the factors driving the inclusion of this subject area in pre-registration nurse education curricula as well as the reported challenges in teaching research at this level. The authors of this paper offer their own approaches to overcoming such barriers and as such provide some innovative means by which student engagement and interest can be enhanced. APPROACH: Work to date which looks at evaluating approaches to teaching and learning in the field of research and evidence based practice has offered a number of approaches, which address traditional problems relating to student attitudes toward the subject, knowledge and understanding and appreciating the application of evidence in practice. However, from theories of teaching and learning it is known that solutions to these problems are not straightforward and educationalists must develop content and delivery carefully to encompass the needs of what is often a heterogeneous group of learners. CONCLUSIONS: The paper concludes that the application of a blended approach to teaching and learning may offer a solution to the reported problems to date. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:514,
      author={N. Johnson and J. List-Ivankovic and W. O. Eboh and J. Ireland and D. Adams and E. Mowatt and S. Martindale},
      year={2010},
      title={Research and evidence based practice: using a blended approach to teaching and learning in undergraduate nurse education },
      journal={Nurse Education in Practice},
      volume={10},
      number={1},
      pages={43-47},
      note={id: 5339},
      abstract={AIM: The following paper provides insights into the challenges of teaching research and evidence based practice to undergraduate student nurses. It provides a critical discussion as to the factors driving the inclusion of this subject area in pre-registration nurse education curricula as well as the reported challenges in teaching research at this level. The authors of this paper offer their own approaches to overcoming such barriers and as such provide some innovative means by which student engagement and interest can be enhanced. APPROACH: Work to date which looks at evaluating approaches to teaching and learning in the field of research and evidence based practice has offered a number of approaches, which address traditional problems relating to student attitudes toward the subject, knowledge and understanding and appreciating the application of evidence in practice. However, from theories of teaching and learning it is known that solutions to these problems are not straightforward and educationalists must develop content and delivery carefully to encompass the needs of what is often a heterogeneous group of learners. CONCLUSIONS: The paper concludes that the application of a blended approach to teaching and learning may offer a solution to the reported problems to date. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum Development; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate -- Trends; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Computer Assisted Instruction; Course Content; Faculty, Nursing; Faculty-Student Relations; Learning Methods; Learning Styles; Learning Theory; Nursing Knowledge; Student Attitudes; Student Knowledge; Student Performance Appraisal; Students, Midwifery; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={1471-5953},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010552242&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Jones, K. R.. (2010). Rating the level, quality, and strength of the research evidence . Journal of nursing care quality, 25(4), 304-312.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Improving patient safety and quality requires more consistent application of best practices based on the strongest scientific evidence available. Although evidence-based practice initiatives are increasingly being implemented in healthcare settings, clinicians may not have had the necessary preparation to accurately determine the overall strength of evidence supporting specific practice change recommendations. A particular issue is lack of clarity in use of the terms level of evidence, quality of evidence, and strength of evidence. This article clarifies the important differences among these terms. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:491,
      author={K. R. Jones},
      year={2010},
      month={Oct-Dec},
      title={Rating the level, quality, and strength of the research evidence },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={25},
      number={4},
      pages={304-312},
      note={id: 4839; JID: 9200672; ppublish },
      abstract={Improving patient safety and quality requires more consistent application of best practices based on the strongest scientific evidence available. Although evidence-based practice initiatives are increasingly being implemented in healthcare settings, clinicians may not have had the necessary preparation to accurately determine the overall strength of evidence supporting specific practice change recommendations. A particular issue is lack of clarity in use of the terms level of evidence, quality of evidence, and strength of evidence. This article clarifies the important differences among these terms. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Evidence-Based Nursing/methods; Humans; Research/standards; Research Design/standards; Review Literature as Topic},
      isbn={1550-5065; 1057-3631},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lehna, C., Love, P., Holt, S., Stokley, B., Vissman, A., Kupiec, T., Starks, S., Chesser, K., Karem, H., Probus, A., & Dunlap, K.. (2010). Nursing Students Apply Evidence-Based Research Principles in Primary Burn Prevention Projects . Journal of pediatric nursing, 25(6), 477-481.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The purpose of this project was for registered nursing students in a baccalaureate nursing program to look at different prevention strategies that could be utilized in the community to impact change in a family”s burn prevention knowledge. The prevention strategies and their corresponding interventions were written in a narrative form, and then a poster was created to serve as a supplemental visual aid for the information. Firefighters from a local fire department evaluated posters and their abstracts based on criteria developed by the students. Five posters were revised and submitted to a national burn prevention contest. Students gained valuable experience in developing and revising evidence-based research (EBR) projects to promote community education in primary burn prevention with firefighter collaboration. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:515,
      author={C. Lehna and P. Love and S. Holt and B. Stokley and A. Vissman and T. Kupiec and S. Starks and K. Chesser and H. Karem and A. Probus and K. Dunlap},
      year={2010},
      month={12},
      title={Nursing Students Apply Evidence-Based Research Principles in Primary Burn Prevention Projects },
      journal={Journal of pediatric nursing},
      volume={25},
      number={6},
      pages={477-481},
      note={id: 5338},
      abstract={The purpose of this project was for registered nursing students in a baccalaureate nursing program to look at different prevention strategies that could be utilized in the community to impact change in a family''s burn prevention knowledge. The prevention strategies and their corresponding interventions were written in a narrative form, and then a poster was created to serve as a supplemental visual aid for the information. Firefighters from a local fire department evaluated posters and their abstracts based on criteria developed by the students. Five posters were revised and submitted to a national burn prevention contest. Students gained valuable experience in developing and revising evidence-based research (EBR) projects to promote community education in primary burn prevention with firefighter collaboration. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Burns -- Prevention and Control; Health Education; Fires -- Prevention and Control; Safety -- Education; Firefighters; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Students, Post-RN; Abstracts; Posters; Camping; Child Safety; Collaboration},
      isbn={0882-5963},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010845228&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Levin, R. F., Keefer, J. M., Marren, J., Vetter, M., Lauder, B., & Sobolewski, S.. (2010). Evidence-Based Practice Improvement: Merging 2 Paradigms . Journal of nursing care quality, 25(2), 117-126.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article presents a new model, Evidence-Based Practice Improvement, for improving patient care. The model merges 2 extant paradigms currently used for quality improvement initiatives-evidence-based practice and practice or performance improvement. The literature expounds on the virtues of each of these approaches, yet no authors have moved beyond parallel play between them. The merged model, Evidence-Based Practice Improvement, may provide a more effective and practical approach to reach our quality goals. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:552,
      author={R. F. Levin and J. M. Keefer and J. Marren and M. Vetter and B. Lauder and S. Sobolewski},
      year={2010},
      month={Aug 11},
      title={Evidence-Based Practice Improvement: Merging 2 Paradigms },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={25},
      number={2},
      pages={117-126},
      note={id: 4263; JID: 9200672; aheadofprint },
      abstract={This article presents a new model, Evidence-Based Practice Improvement, for improving patient care. The model merges 2 extant paradigms currently used for quality improvement initiatives-evidence-based practice and practice or performance improvement. The literature expounds on the virtues of each of these approaches, yet no authors have moved beyond parallel play between them. The merged model, Evidence-Based Practice Improvement, may provide a more effective and practical approach to reach our quality goals. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1550-5065},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • McCurry, M. K., & Martins, D. C.. (2010). Teaching undergraduate nursing research: a comparison of traditional and innovative approaches for success with millennial learners . The Journal of nursing education, 49(5), 276-279.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Historically, nursing students have questioned the value of a nursing research course and have not appreciated the research-practice link. These are important concerns in light of the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative strategies for teaching undergraduate nursing research that engage millennial learners and emphasize the relationship between evidence-based practice and clinical outcomes. Innovative assignments were developed that included interactive learning, group work, and practical applications preferred by these learners. Using a Likert scale, students’ perceived effectiveness of innovative assignments and more traditional assignments were compared. Results indicated a preference for active learning assignments, reading quizzes, clinical nurse researcher presentations, and collaboration with clinical course assignments. By combining traditional assignments with innovative strategies and nursing practice applications, millennial learners were engaged and able to clearly articulate the value of the research-practice link vital to evidence-based nursing practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:564,
      author={M. K. McCurry and D. C. Martins},
      year={2010},
      month={May},
      title={Teaching undergraduate nursing research: a comparison of traditional and innovative approaches for success with millennial learners },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={5},
      pages={276-279},
      note={id: 4765; JID: 7705432; 2009/02/22 [received]; 2009/04/20 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={Historically, nursing students have questioned the value of a nursing research course and have not appreciated the research-practice link. These are important concerns in light of the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative strategies for teaching undergraduate nursing research that engage millennial learners and emphasize the relationship between evidence-based practice and clinical outcomes. Innovative assignments were developed that included interactive learning, group work, and practical applications preferred by these learners. Using a Likert scale, students' perceived effectiveness of innovative assignments and more traditional assignments were compared. Results indicated a preference for active learning assignments, reading quizzes, clinical nurse researcher presentations, and collaboration with clinical course assignments. By combining traditional assignments with innovative strategies and nursing practice applications, millennial learners were engaged and able to clearly articulate the value of the research-practice link vital to evidence-based nursing practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Stillwell, S. B., & Williamson, K. M.. (2010). Evidence-based practice: step by step. The seven steps of evidence-based practice: following this progressive, sequential approach will lead to improved health care and patient outcomes . American Journal of Nursing, 110(1), 51-53.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This is the second article in a new series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation’s Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved.The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we’ve scheduled "Ask the Authors" calls every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:565,
      author={B. M. Melnyk and E. Fineout-Overholt and S. B. Stillwell and K. M. Williamson},
      year={2010},
      title={Evidence-based practice: step by step. The seven steps of evidence-based practice: following this progressive, sequential approach will lead to improved health care and patient outcomes },
      journal={American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={110},
      number={1},
      pages={51-53},
      note={id: 4775},
      abstract={This is the second article in a new series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved.The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we've scheduled "Ask the Authors" calls every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Research, Nursing; Computerized Literature Searching, End User; Decision Making, Clinical; Outcome Assessment; Reference Databases, Health},
      isbn={0002-936X},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010518192&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Giggleman, M., & Cruz, R.. (2010). Correlates among cognitive beliefs, EBP implementation, organizational culture, cohesion and job satisfaction in evidence-based practice mentors from a community hospital system . Nursing outlook, 58(6), 301-308.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Evidence from research and outcomes management projects strongly supports the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) in improving quality of health care and patient outcomes as well as reducing hospital costs. In addition, published anecdotal reports have indicated that clinicians who use an evidence-based approach to care and practice in cultures that support EBP feel more empowered and satisfied in their roles. However, research is lacking that has specifically examined the relationships among beliefs about and implementation of EBP by hospital staff, organizational culture for EBP, group cohesion and job satisfaction. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationships among these variables in 58 health professionals, prior to their participation in a 12-month EBP mentorship program as part of implementing the Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration (ARCC) Model in a community hospital system. Findings indicated that participants’ EBP beliefs were significantly correlated with perceived organizational culture for EBP, the extent to which they implemented EBP, group cohesion, and job satisfaction. Organizational culture for EBP was significantly and positively related to EBP beliefs and EBP implementation. Findings support the need for hospitals to establish cultures that support EBP and to implement strategies to strengthen individuals’ cognitive beliefs about the value of EBP and their ability to implement it for the ultimate purpose of improving quality of care and enhancing job satisfaction. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:492,
      author={B. M. Melnyk and E. Fineout-Overholt and M. Giggleman and R. Cruz},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Correlates among cognitive beliefs, EBP implementation, organizational culture, cohesion and job satisfaction in evidence-based practice mentors from a community hospital system },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={58},
      number={6},
      pages={301-308},
      note={id: 4831; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; JID: 0401075; 2010/03/07 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Evidence from research and outcomes management projects strongly supports the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) in improving quality of health care and patient outcomes as well as reducing hospital costs. In addition, published anecdotal reports have indicated that clinicians who use an evidence-based approach to care and practice in cultures that support EBP feel more empowered and satisfied in their roles. However, research is lacking that has specifically examined the relationships among beliefs about and implementation of EBP by hospital staff, organizational culture for EBP, group cohesion and job satisfaction. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the relationships among these variables in 58 health professionals, prior to their participation in a 12-month EBP mentorship program as part of implementing the Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration (ARCC) Model in a community hospital system. Findings indicated that participants' EBP beliefs were significantly correlated with perceived organizational culture for EBP, the extent to which they implemented EBP, group cohesion, and job satisfaction. Organizational culture for EBP was significantly and positively related to EBP beliefs and EBP implementation. Findings support the need for hospitals to establish cultures that support EBP and to implement strategies to strengthen individuals' cognitive beliefs about the value of EBP and their ability to implement it for the ultimate purpose of improving quality of care and enhancing job satisfaction. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1528-3968; 0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Missal, B., Schafer, B. K., Halm, M. A., & Schaffer, M. A.. (2010). A university and health care organization partnership to prepare nurses for evidence-based practice . The Journal of nursing education, 49(8), 456-461.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes a partnership model between a university and health care organizations for teaching graduate nursing research from a framework of evidence-based practice. Nurses from health care organizations identified topics for graduate students to search the literature and synthesize evidence for guiding nursing practice. Nurse educators mentored graduate students in conducting critical appraisals of the literature. Students learned how to search for the evidence, summarize the existing research findings, and translate the findings into practice recommendations. Through presenting and discussing their findings with key stakeholders, students learned how nurses planned to integrate the evidence into practice. Nurses used the evidence-based results to improve their practice in the two partner hospitals. The partnership stimulated action for further inquiry into best practices. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:493,
      author={B. Missal and B. K. Schafer and M. A. Halm and M. A. Schaffer},
      year={2010},
      month={Aug},
      title={A university and health care organization partnership to prepare nurses for evidence-based practice },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={8},
      pages={456-461},
      note={id: 4853; JID: 7705432; 2008/11/17 [received]; 2009/10/25 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={This article describes a partnership model between a university and health care organizations for teaching graduate nursing research from a framework of evidence-based practice. Nurses from health care organizations identified topics for graduate students to search the literature and synthesize evidence for guiding nursing practice. Nurse educators mentored graduate students in conducting critical appraisals of the literature. Students learned how to search for the evidence, summarize the existing research findings, and translate the findings into practice recommendations. Through presenting and discussing their findings with key stakeholders, students learned how nurses planned to integrate the evidence into practice. Nurses used the evidence-based results to improve their practice in the two partner hospitals. The partnership stimulated action for further inquiry into best practices. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Advanced Practice Nursing/education/organization & administration; Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Practice/education/organization & administration; Hospitals, Community/organization & administration; Humans; Interinstitutional Relations; Interprofessional Relations; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology; Trauma Centers/organization & administration; Universities/organization & administration},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Moch, S. D., & Cronje, R. J.. (2010). Part II. Empowering grassroots evidence-based practice: a curricular model to foster undergraduate student-enabled practice change . Journal of professional nursing : Official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 26(1), 14-22.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article presents evidence collected over the past 15 years that attests to the success of curricular innovations conducted to foster socially meaningful contact between nursing students and practicing nurses as a means to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). Action research data collected as these pedagogical strategies have evolved suggest that such student-staff partnerships offer promise not only to encourage commitment to EBP among nursing students but also to surmount most of the barriers that prevent the widespread diffusion of EBP among practicing nurses in clinical settings. Based upon our successful experiences with student-staff interactions, we propose a curricular model-the Student-Enabled Practice Change model-that suffuses the undergraduate nursing school curriculum with opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful partnerships with practicing nurses. The Student-Enabled Practice Change Curricular Model relocates the power to drive practice change to the grassroots level of students and practicing nurses. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:566,
      author={S. D. Moch and R. J. Cronje},
      year={2010},
      month={Jan},
      title={Part II. Empowering grassroots evidence-based practice: a curricular model to foster undergraduate student-enabled practice change },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : Official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={1},
      pages={14-22},
      note={id: 4768; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 8511298; 2008/03/08 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={This article presents evidence collected over the past 15 years that attests to the success of curricular innovations conducted to foster socially meaningful contact between nursing students and practicing nurses as a means to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). Action research data collected as these pedagogical strategies have evolved suggest that such student-staff partnerships offer promise not only to encourage commitment to EBP among nursing students but also to surmount most of the barriers that prevent the widespread diffusion of EBP among practicing nurses in clinical settings. Based upon our successful experiences with student-staff interactions, we propose a curricular model-the Student-Enabled Practice Change model-that suffuses the undergraduate nursing school curriculum with opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful partnerships with practicing nurses. The Student-Enabled Practice Change Curricular Model relocates the power to drive practice change to the grassroots level of students and practicing nurses. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Curriculum; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Practice/education/organization & administration; Health Services Research; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Leadership; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Organizational Innovation; Power (Psychology); Program Evaluation; Students, Nursing/psychology; Wisconsin},
      isbn={1532-8481; 8755-7223},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Morris, J., & Maynard, V.. (2010). Pilot study to test the use of a mobile device in the clinical setting to access evidence-based practice resources . Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 7(4), 205-213.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Aim: To test the feasibility and acceptability of the use of a mobile device to access evidence-based practice (EBP) resources in the clinical setting. Methods: A pretest/posttest design was used with a convenience sample of 2nd- and 3rd-year preregistration undergraduate health care students in the United Kingdom. Questionnaires were used to measure (1) feasibility and acceptability of the mobile device and (2) perceptions of the development of EBP knowledge and skills. The study took place during the students’ clinical practice and involved two meetings at the beginning and end of the placement period. A Web page was developed to support the process and provide links to key EBP resources. Results: Nineteen undergraduate physiotherapy and nursing students took part in the study. The main findings indicated a generally low level of utilisation of the mobile device in the clinical setting, primarily due to practical difficulties associated with accessing the Internet and the small size of the screen. Consequently, the majority of the students used personal computers (PCs) to access EBP resources. Through the process, students reported improvements in their knowledge and skills in relation to EBP and the appraisal of clinical guidelines. Conclusions: Students were able to complete the EBP activity using either the mobile device or PC and reported improvements in their knowledge and skills in relation to EBP and the appraisal of clinical guidelines. Findings suggest that for undergraduate health care students, rapid access to online evidence in the clinical environment is not necessarily essential for the integration of the EBP process into practice, or for the development of EBP knowledge and skills, provided there is easy access to such evidence at some point during the placement period. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:518,
      author={J. Morris and V. Maynard},
      year={2010},
      month={12},
      title={Pilot study to test the use of a mobile device in the clinical setting to access evidence-based practice resources },
      journal={Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing},
      volume={7},
      number={4},
      pages={205-213},
      note={id: 5269},
      abstract={Aim: To test the feasibility and acceptability of the use of a mobile device to access evidence-based practice (EBP) resources in the clinical setting. Methods: A pretest/posttest design was used with a convenience sample of 2nd- and 3rd-year preregistration undergraduate health care students in the United Kingdom. Questionnaires were used to measure (1) feasibility and acceptability of the mobile device and (2) perceptions of the development of EBP knowledge and skills. The study took place during the students' clinical practice and involved two meetings at the beginning and end of the placement period. A Web page was developed to support the process and provide links to key EBP resources. Results: Nineteen undergraduate physiotherapy and nursing students took part in the study. The main findings indicated a generally low level of utilisation of the mobile device in the clinical setting, primarily due to practical difficulties associated with accessing the Internet and the small size of the screen. Consequently, the majority of the students used personal computers (PCs) to access EBP resources. Through the process, students reported improvements in their knowledge and skills in relation to EBP and the appraisal of clinical guidelines. Conclusions: Students were able to complete the EBP activity using either the mobile device or PC and reported improvements in their knowledge and skills in relation to EBP and the appraisal of clinical guidelines. Findings suggest that for undergraduate health care students, rapid access to online evidence in the clinical environment is not necessarily essential for the integration of the EBP process into practice, or for the development of EBP knowledge and skills, provided there is easy access to such evidence at some point during the placement period. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Access to Information; Computers, Hand-Held; Education, Health Sciences; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Convenience Sample; Descriptive Statistics; Education, Clinical; England; Funding Source; Human; Pilot Studies; Pretest-Posttest Design; Questionnaires; Scales; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Students, Physical Therapy},
      isbn={1545-102X},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010881409&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Neumann, J. A., Brady-Schluttner, K. A., Attlesey-Pries, J. M., & Twedell, D. M.. (2010). Designing nursing excellence through a National Quality Forum nurse scholar program . Journal of nursing care quality, 25(4), 327-333.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Closing the knowledge gap for current practicing nurses in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) core competencies is critical to providing safe patient care. The National Quality Forum (NQF) nurse scholar program is one organization’s journey to close the gap in the IOM core competencies in a large teaching organization. The NQF nurse scholar program is positioned to provide a plan to assist current nurses to accelerate their learning about quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and informatics, 3 of the core competencies identified by the IOM, and focus on application of skills to NQF nurse-sensitive measures. Curriculum outline, educational methodologies, administrative processes, and aims of the project are discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:494,
      author={J. A. Neumann and K. A. Brady-Schluttner and J. M. Attlesey-Pries and D. M. Twedell},
      year={2010},
      month={Oct-Dec},
      title={Designing nursing excellence through a National Quality Forum nurse scholar program },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={25},
      number={4},
      pages={327-333},
      note={id: 4840; JID: 9200672; ppublish },
      abstract={Closing the knowledge gap for current practicing nurses in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) core competencies is critical to providing safe patient care. The National Quality Forum (NQF) nurse scholar program is one organization's journey to close the gap in the IOM core competencies in a large teaching organization. The NQF nurse scholar program is positioned to provide a plan to assist current nurses to accelerate their learning about quality improvement, evidence-based practice, and informatics, 3 of the core competencies identified by the IOM, and focus on application of skills to NQF nurse-sensitive measures. Curriculum outline, educational methodologies, administrative processes, and aims of the project are discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Competency-Based Education; Education, Distance/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Humans; Midwestern United States; Nursing Informatics/education; Program Development; Quality Improvement; Telecommunications},
      isbn={1550-5065; 1057-3631},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Newhouse, R. P., & Spring, B.. (2010). Interdisciplinary evidence-based practice: moving from silos to synergy . Nursing outlook, 58(6), 309-317.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Despite the assumption that health care providers work synergistically in practice, professions have tended to be more exclusive than inclusive when it comes to educating students in a collaborative approach to interdisciplinary evidence-based practice (EBP). This article explores the state of academic and clinical training regarding interdisciplinary EBP, describes efforts to foster interdisciplinary EBP, and suggests strategies to accelerate the translation of EBP across disciplines. Moving from silos to synergy in interdisciplinary EBP will require a paradigm shift. Changes can be leveraged professionally and politically using national initiatives currently in place on improving quality and health care reform. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:495,
      author={R. P. Newhouse and B. Spring},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Interdisciplinary evidence-based practice: moving from silos to synergy },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={58},
      number={6},
      pages={309-317},
      note={id: 4830; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; GR: N01-LM-6-3512/LM/NLM NIH HHS/United States; JID: 0401075; NIHMS236875; OID: NLM: NIHMS236875 [Available on 11/01/11]; OID: NLM: PMC2998190 [Available on 11/01/11]; 2010/02/09 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Despite the assumption that health care providers work synergistically in practice, professions have tended to be more exclusive than inclusive when it comes to educating students in a collaborative approach to interdisciplinary evidence-based practice (EBP). This article explores the state of academic and clinical training regarding interdisciplinary EBP, describes efforts to foster interdisciplinary EBP, and suggests strategies to accelerate the translation of EBP across disciplines. Moving from silos to synergy in interdisciplinary EBP will require a paradigm shift. Changes can be leveraged professionally and politically using national initiatives currently in place on improving quality and health care reform. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1528-3968; 0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Oh, E. G., Kim, S., Kim, S. S., Kim, S., Cho, E. Y., Yoo, J. S., Kim, H. S., Lee, J. H., You, M. A., & Lee, H.. (2010). Integrating Evidence-Based Practice into RN-to-BSN Clinical Nursing Education . The Journal of nursing education, 49(7), 387-392.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study examines the effects of integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into clinical practicum on EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization among Korean RN-to-BSN students. A one-group pretest-posttest design was used. Eighty-one students were recruited from a school of nursing in Korea. Evidence-based practice clinical practicum was composed of two consecutive programs during one semester. Lectures, individual mentoring on EBP practicum, small group, and wrap-up conferences were provided. Outcomes of EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization were analyzed using paired t tests for 74 final participants. Evidence-based practice efficacy scores increased significantly (p

    @article{RefWorks:568,
      author={E. G. Oh and S. Kim and S. S. Kim and S. Kim and E. Y. Cho and J. S. Yoo and H. S. Kim and J. H. Lee and M. A. You and H. Lee},
      year={2010},
      month={Apr 1},
      title={Integrating Evidence-Based Practice into RN-to-BSN Clinical Nursing Education },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={7},
      pages={387-392},
      note={id: 4754; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 7705432; 2009/05/20 [received]; 2009/10/27 [accepted]; aheadofprint; SO: J Nurs Educ. 2010 Apr 1:1-6. doi: 10.3928/01484834-20100331-02. },
      abstract={This study examines the effects of integrating evidence-based practice (EBP) into clinical practicum on EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization among Korean RN-to-BSN students. A one-group pretest-posttest design was used. Eighty-one students were recruited from a school of nursing in Korea. Evidence-based practice clinical practicum was composed of two consecutive programs during one semester. Lectures, individual mentoring on EBP practicum, small group, and wrap-up conferences were provided. Outcomes of EBP efficacy and barriers to research utilization were analyzed using paired t tests for 74 final participants. Evidence-based practice efficacy scores increased significantly (p },
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Pennington, K., Moscatel, S., Dacar, S., & Johnson, C.. (2010). EBP partnerships: building bridges between education and practice . Nursing management, 41(4), 19-23.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    In an effort to combine resources and build bridges between education and practice, a university nursing instructor and a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) at a local medical center developed a collaborative partnership between their respective institutions to apply evidence-based practice (EBP) principles in the workplace. Within the honors nursing program at the university, a clinical component was developed for the junior year EBP course and carried over into the senior year leadership course. By teaming nursing students with staff nurses working on EBP projects, students were able to learn how evidence is utilized in the practice setting, while staff nurses were able to gain assistance in the gathering of evidence for these projects. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:569,
      author={K. Pennington and S. Moscatel and S. Dacar and C. Johnson},
      year={2010},
      month={04},
      title={EBP partnerships: building bridges between education and practice },
      journal={Nursing management},
      volume={41},
      number={4},
      pages={19-23},
      note={id: 4771},
      abstract={In an effort to combine resources and build bridges between education and practice, a university
    nursing instructor and a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) at a local medical center developed a collaborative partnership between their respective institutions to apply evidence-based practice (EBP) principles in the workplace. Within the honors nursing program at the university, a clinical component was developed for the junior year EBP course and carried over into the senior year leadership course. By teaming nursing students with staff nurses working on EBP projects, students were able to learn how evidence is utilized in the practice setting, while staff nurses were able to gain assistance in the gathering of evidence for these projects. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Mentorship; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Research, Nursing; Students, Nursing; Teamwork; Collaboration; Planning Techniques},
      isbn={0744-6314},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010626177&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Putnam, J. M., & Riggs, C. J.. (2010). Involving students in the real world of evidence-based practice . The Journal of nursing education, 49(7), 423-424.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Faculty at one midwestern university have developed a teaching-learning strategy for use in our online graduate nursing program that provides students with the opportunity to participate in an ongoing faculty-directed research project while addressing several ACE EBP competencies. The goal of this innovative teaching strategy is to involve all graduate nursing students in an ongoing faculty-directed EBP research project. This annual evaluation project involves longitudinal evaluation of selected health care that has been provided to offenders incarcerated in state prisons. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:496,
      author={J. M. Putnam and C. J. Riggs},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul},
      title={Involving students in the real world of evidence-based practice },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={7},
      pages={423-424},
      note={id: 4851; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={
    Faculty at one midwestern university have developed a teaching-learning strategy for use in our online graduate nursing program that provides students with the opportunity to participate in an ongoing faculty-directed research project while addressing several ACE EBP competencies. The goal of this innovative teaching strategy is to involve all graduate nursing students in an ongoing faculty-directed EBP research project. This annual evaluation project involves longitudinal evaluation of selected health care that has been provided to offenders incarcerated in state prisons. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Practice/education/organization & administration; Humans; Midwestern United States; Nursing Evaluation Research/education/organization & administration; Prisons; Quality Indicators, Health Care; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rolloff, M.. (2010). A constructivist model for teaching evidence-based practice . Nursing education perspectives, 31(5), 290-293.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Institute of Medicine has reported that it takes roughly 17 years for evidence generated through research to move into clinical practice. Bridging that gap is an urgent need and will require educators to rethink how nurses are prepared for evidence-based practice. The constructivist theory for learning–in which it is assumed that students construct knowledge and meaning for themselves as they learn–may provide a framework for a redesigned baccalaureate curriculum, one that supports evidence-based practice throughout a nursing student’s education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:497,
      author={M. Rolloff},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={A constructivist model for teaching evidence-based practice },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={31},
      number={5},
      pages={290-293},
      note={id: 4849; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={The Institute of Medicine has reported that it takes roughly 17 years for evidence generated through research to move into clinical practice. Bridging that gap is an urgent need and will require educators to rethink how nurses are prepared for evidence-based practice. The constructivist theory for learning--in which it is assumed that students construct knowledge and meaning for themselves as they learn--may provide a framework for a redesigned baccalaureate curriculum, one that supports evidence-based practice throughout a nursing student's education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Practice/education/organization & administration; Humans; Knowledge; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Practice Patterns/organization & administration; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Postmodernism; Professional Competence; Teaching/organization & administration},
      isbn={1536-5026; 1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ruskjer, B.. (2010). A Real-World Experience to Engage Students in Evidence-Based Practice . Journal of Nursing Education, 49(11), 660-660.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article describes how one college of nursing effectively engages students in evidence-based practice (EBP). Throughout the baccalaureate curriculum, students are expected to apply evidence to practice. However, faculty and senior student evaluations revealed students needed help solidifying their learning and preparing them to be leaders using evidence in practice. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:520,
      author={B. Ruskjer},
      year={2010},
      month={11},
      title={A Real-World Experience to Engage Students in Evidence-Based Practice },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={49},
      number={11},
      pages={660-660},
      note={id: 4816},
      abstract={This article describes how one college of nursing effectively engages students in evidence-based practice (EBP). Throughout the baccalaureate curriculum, students are expected to apply evidence to practice. However, faculty and senior student evaluations revealed students needed help solidifying their learning and preparing them to be leaders using evidence in practice. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010854707&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Schnall, R., Velez, O., John, R. M., & Bakken, S.. (2010). Psychometric Evaluation of the Attitudes Toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale in a Sample of Nursing Students . Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Valid measures of attitudes are an important component of developing and testing educational interventions aimed at improving technology acceptance. The aim of this study was to assess the construct validity (factor analysis and discriminant validity), internal consistency reliability (Cronbach alpha), and responsiveness (independent-samples t test) of the Attitudes toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale in a sample of 103 nursing students engaged in a set of curricular activities focused on enabling safe and evidence-based nursing practice through the use of information technology. Principal components factor analysis resulted in three factors (ease of use and usefulness, clinical support, and barriers to use) that explained 55.49% of the variance. Internal consistency reliability estimates ranged from.61 to.82. Factor scores did not discriminate between nursing students who owned a PDA and those who did not. There were no significant changes in factors scores over time (responsiveness). This study provides preliminary evidence for the factorial structure of the Handheld Decision Support Software Scale and internal consistency of two of the three factor scales. Further exploration of the construct validity, internal consistency, and responsiveness is warranted. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:521,
      author={R. Schnall and O. Velez and R. M. John and S. Bakken},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov 23},
      title={Psychometric Evaluation of the Attitudes Toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale in a Sample of Nursing Students },
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      note={id: 4828; JID: 101141667; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Valid measures of attitudes are an important component of developing and testing educational interventions aimed at improving technology acceptance. The aim of this study was to assess the construct validity (factor analysis and discriminant validity), internal consistency reliability (Cronbach alpha), and responsiveness (independent-samples t test) of the Attitudes toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale in a sample of 103 nursing students engaged in a set of curricular activities focused on enabling safe and evidence-based nursing practice through the use of information technology. Principal components factor analysis resulted in three factors (ease of use and usefulness, clinical support, and barriers to use) that explained 55.49% of the variance. Internal consistency reliability estimates ranged from.61 to.82. Factor scores did not discriminate between nursing students who owned a PDA and those who did not. There were no significant changes in factors scores over time (responsiveness). This study provides preliminary evidence for the factorial structure of the Handheld Decision Support Software Scale and internal consistency of two of the three factor scales. Further exploration of the construct validity, internal consistency, and responsiveness is warranted. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Stiffler, D., & Cullen, D.. (2010). Evidence-based practice for nurse practitioner students: a competency-based teaching framework . Journal of professional nursing : Official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 26(5), 272-277.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become increasingly important in nursing. It has become a dominant philosophy in teaching research courses and it brings a new definition to the translation of science. As more has become known about EBP, it has continued to grow in its importance and significance. EBP is the foundation to many doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs in both the advanced practice nursing and organizational foci. The purpose of this article is to define evidence-based practice competencies for advanced practice nurses, especially nurse practitioners. A corresponding teaching framework is presented. Additionally, competencies related to the DNP with aggregate systems and organizational foci are suggested. Practical experiences emanating from working within the NP competency development and framework are highlighted and described. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:499,
      author={D. Stiffler and D. Cullen},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Evidence-based practice for nurse practitioner students: a competency-based teaching framework },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : Official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={5},
      pages={272-277},
      note={id: 4836; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; JID: 8511298; 2008/07/07 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become increasingly important in nursing. It has become a dominant philosophy in teaching research courses and it brings a new definition to the translation of science. As more has become known about EBP, it has continued to grow in its importance and significance. EBP is the foundation to many doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs in both the advanced practice nursing and organizational foci. The purpose of this article is to define evidence-based practice competencies for advanced practice nurses, especially nurse practitioners. A corresponding teaching framework is presented. Additionally, competencies related to the DNP with aggregate systems and organizational foci are suggested. Practical experiences emanating from working within the NP competency development and framework are highlighted and described. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Curriculum; Education, Nursing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing; Nurse Practitioners},
      isbn={1532-8481; 8755-7223},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Stillwell, S. B., Fineout-Overholt, E., Melnyk, B. M., & Williamson, K. M.. (2010). Evidence-based practice, step by step: searching for the evidence . American Journal of Nursing, 110(5), 41-47.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This is the fourth article in a series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation’s Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved. The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we’ve scheduled "Chat with the Authors" calls every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:570,
      author={S. B. Stillwell and E. Fineout-Overholt and B. M. Melnyk and K. M. Williamson},
      year={2010},
      month={05},
      title={Evidence-based practice, step by step: searching for the evidence },
      journal={American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={110},
      number={5},
      pages={41-47},
      note={id: 4774},
      abstract={This is the fourth article in a series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved. The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we've scheduled "Chat with the Authors" calls every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computerized Literature Searching -- Methods; Databases, Health; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Research, Nursing; Systematic Review; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Intervention Trials; PubMed; Vocabulary, Controlled},
      isbn={0002-936X},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010650517&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Vandermause, R. K., & Townsend, R. P.. (2010). Teaching thoughtful practice: narrative pedagogy in addictions education . Nurse education today, 30(5), 428-434.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Preparing practitioners for this rapidly changing and demanding health care environment is challenging. A surge in knowledge development and scientific advancement has placed a priority on technical skill and a focus on content driven educational processes that prepare students for evidence-based practice. However, the most difficult health care scenarios require thinking-in-action and thoughtfulness as well as didactic knowledge. It is our contention that interpretive educational methods, like narrative pedagogy, will promote judgment-based practice that includes use of evidence and delivery of thoughtful care. In this article, we describe and interpret a narrative approach to addictions content and teaching thoughtful practice. We present our pedagogical process, including observations and field notes, to show how interpretive pedagogies can be introduced into nursing curricula. By presenting this process, the reader is invited to consider interpretive methods as a way to inspire and habituate thoughtful practice and judgment-based care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:500,
      author={R. K. Vandermause and R. P. Townsend},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul},
      title={Teaching thoughtful practice: narrative pedagogy in addictions education },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={30},
      number={5},
      pages={428-434},
      note={id: 4856; CI: Copyright 2009; JID: 8511379; 2009/05/16 [received]; 2009/09/19 [revised]; 2009/09/24 [accepted]; 2009/11/03 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Preparing practitioners for this rapidly changing and demanding health care environment is challenging. A surge in knowledge development and scientific advancement has placed a priority on technical skill and a focus on content driven educational processes that prepare students for evidence-based practice. However, the most difficult health care scenarios require thinking-in-action and thoughtfulness as well as didactic knowledge. It is our contention that interpretive educational methods, like narrative pedagogy, will promote judgment-based practice that includes use of evidence and delivery of thoughtful care. In this article, we describe and interpret a narrative approach to addictions content and teaching thoughtful practice. We present our pedagogical process, including observations and field notes, to show how interpretive pedagogies can be introduced into nursing curricula. By presenting this process, the reader is invited to consider interpretive methods as a way to inspire and habituate thoughtful practice and judgment-based care. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Vandijck, D. M., Labeau, S. O., Vogelaers, D. P., & Blot, S. I.. (2010). Prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care patients . Nursing in critical care, 15(5), 251-256.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Changes in patient profile, and in the health care environment, altering socioeconomic conditions and advances in science and information technology challenge the nursing profession, in particular intensive care nursing. All these changes will undoubtedly affect the way we will practice in the (near) future. A comprehensive understanding of these factors is therefore essential if nursing is to meet the challenges presented by tomorrow’s critical care environment. Precisely because of the often expensive high-tech evolutions that have occurred at a rapid pace and are to be further expected, a continued focus on the basics of nursing, the core role of care, as well as maintaining confidence in the capacity to deliver safe, high-quality, and evidence-based patient care will increasingly be a challenge to critical care nurses. In particular, basic nursing skills and knowledge remain a key prerequisite in the prevention of nosocomial infections, which is a continuing major complication and threat to intensive care unit patients. However, critical care nurses’ knowledge about the evidence-based consensus recommendations for infection prevention and control has been found to be rather poor. It has nevertheless been demonstrated that a meticulous implementation of such preventive bundles may result in significantly better patient and process outcomes. Moreover, many preventive strategies are considered to be easy to implement and inexpensive. As such, a first and critical step should be to increase critical care nurses’ adherence to the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. AIM: In this article, an up-to-date assessment of evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of nosocomial infections, with special focus on catheter-related bloodstream infections and strategies relevant for nurses working in critical care environments, will be provided. Additionally, we will detail on a number of approaches advocated to translate the internationally accepted consensus recommendations to the needs and expectations of critical care nurses, and to consequently enhance the likelihood of successful implementation and adherence. These steps will help critical care nurses in their striving towards excellence in their profession. SUMMARY: Intensive care nurses can make a significant contribution in preventing nosocomial infections by assuming full responsibility for quality improvement measures such as evidence-based infection prevention and control protocols. However, as general knowledge of the preventive measures has been shown to be rather poor, nurses’ education should include supplementary support from evidence-based recommendations. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:501,
      author={D. M. Vandijck and S. O. Labeau and D. P. Vogelaers and S. I. Blot},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep},
      title={Prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care patients },
      journal={Nursing in critical care},
      volume={15},
      number={5},
      pages={251-256},
      note={id: 4898; JID: 9808649; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Changes in patient profile, and in the health care environment, altering socioeconomic conditions and advances in science and information technology challenge the nursing profession, in particular intensive care nursing. All these changes will undoubtedly affect the way we will practice in the (near) future. A comprehensive understanding of these factors is therefore essential if nursing is to meet the challenges presented by tomorrow's critical care environment. Precisely because of the often expensive high-tech evolutions that have occurred at a rapid pace and are to be further expected, a continued focus on the basics of nursing, the core role of care, as well as maintaining confidence in the capacity to deliver safe, high-quality, and evidence-based patient care will increasingly be a challenge to critical care nurses. In particular, basic nursing skills and knowledge remain a key prerequisite in the prevention of nosocomial infections, which is a continuing major complication and threat to intensive care unit patients. However, critical care nurses' knowledge about the evidence-based consensus recommendations for infection prevention and control has been found to be rather poor. It has nevertheless been demonstrated that a meticulous implementation of such preventive bundles may result in significantly better patient and process outcomes. Moreover, many preventive strategies are considered to be easy to implement and inexpensive. As such, a first and critical step should be to increase critical care nurses' adherence to the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. AIM: In this article, an up-to-date assessment of evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of nosocomial infections, with special focus on catheter-related bloodstream infections and strategies relevant for nurses working in critical care environments, will be provided. Additionally, we will detail on a number of approaches advocated to translate the internationally accepted consensus recommendations to the needs and expectations of critical care nurses, and to consequently enhance the likelihood of successful implementation and adherence. These steps will help critical care nurses in their striving towards excellence in their profession. SUMMARY: Intensive care nurses can make a significant contribution in preventing nosocomial infections by assuming full responsibility for quality improvement measures such as evidence-based infection prevention and control protocols. However, as general knowledge of the preventive measures has been shown to be rather poor, nurses' education should include supplementary support from evidence-based recommendations. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Bacteremia/prevention & control; Catheters, Indwelling/adverse effects; Cross Infection/prevention & control; Evidence-Based Medicine; Humans; Intensive Care Units; Nurse's Role; Practice Guidelines as Topic},
      isbn={1478-5153; 1362-1017},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Waxman, K. T.. (2010). The development of evidence-based clinical simulation scenarios: guidelines for nurse educators . Journal of Nursing Education, 49(1), 29-35.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Clinical simulation has been recognized as a teaching method using learning exercises that closely mimic real-life situations. The development of evidence-based clinical simulation scenarios and guidelines for nurses is an important step in redesigning nursing education. These scenarios are created for students to learn in a safe environment. Simulated clinical experience requires immersing students in a representative patient- care scenario, a setting that mimics the actual environment with sufficient realism to allow learners to suspend disbelief. The purpose of this article is to discuss the Bay Area Simulation Collaborative’s development of guidelines for effective evidence-based scenarios for use in hospitals and nursing schools. Six scholarly articles were reviewed and evaluated to determine whether evidence-based guidelines for scenario development exist and whether consensus in the literature regarding best practice is evident. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:571,
      author={K. T. Waxman},
      year={2010},
      title={The development of evidence-based clinical simulation scenarios: guidelines for nurse educators },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={49},
      number={1},
      pages={29-35},
      note={id: 4779},
      abstract={Clinical simulation has been recognized as a teaching method using learning exercises that closely mimic real-life situations. The development of evidence-based clinical simulation scenarios and guidelines for nurses is an important step in redesigning nursing education. These scenarios are created for students to learn in a safe environment. Simulated clinical experience requires immersing students in a representative patient- care scenario, a setting that mimics the actual environment with sufficient realism to allow learners to suspend disbelief. The purpose of this article is to discuss the Bay Area Simulation Collaborative's development of guidelines for effective evidence-based scenarios for use in hospitals and nursing schools. Six scholarly articles were reviewed and evaluated to determine whether evidence-based guidelines for scenario development exist and whether consensus in the literature regarding best practice is evident. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Faculty Role; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Simulations -- Standards; Teaching Methods; Behavioral Objectives; Checklists; CINAHL Database; Computer Simulation; Consortia; Faculty, Nursing; Human; Instrument Validation; Models, Anatomic; Models, Theoretical; Patient Simulation -- Standards; Privacy and Confidentiality},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010535734&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

2009

  • (2009). Collaborating to Integrate Evidence and Informatics into Nursing Practice and Education: An Executive Summary Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This report provides an executive summary of the TIGER activities through 2008, as well as a brief synopsis of each of the findings and recommendations of the nine collaborative teams. (Source: TIGER website)

    @techreport{RefWorks:524,
      year={2009},
      title={Collaborating to Integrate Evidence and Informatics into Nursing Practice and Education: An Executive Summary },
      institution={Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative},
      note={id: 4134},
      abstract={This report provides an executive summary of the TIGER activities through 2008, as well as a brief synopsis of each of the findings and recommendations of the nine collaborative teams. (Source: TIGER website) },
      url={http://www.tigersummit.com/uploads/TIGER_Collaborative_Exec_Summary_040509}
    }

  • Anderson, J. J., Mokracek, M., & Lindy, C. N.. (2009). A nursing quality program driven by evidence-based practice . The Nursing clinics of North America, 44(1), 83-91, xi.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston established a best-practice council as a strategy to link nursing quality to evidence-based practice. Replacing a system based on reporting quality control and compliance, this Best Practice Council formed interdisciplinary teams, charged them each with a quality issue, and directed them to change practice as needed under the guidance of the St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital Evidence Based Practice Model. This article reviews the activities of the Best Practice Council and the projects of teams assigned to study best practice in (1) preventing bloodstream infection (related to central lines), (2) preventing patient falls, (3) assessing and preventing pressure ulcers, and (4) ensuring good hand-off communication. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:525,
      author={J. J. Anderson and M. Mokracek and C. N. Lindy},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar},
      title={A nursing quality program driven by evidence-based practice },
      journal={The Nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={44},
      number={1},
      pages={83-91, xi},
      note={id: 3695; JID: 0042033; RF: 35; ppublish },
      abstract={St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Houston established a best-practice council as a strategy to link nursing quality to evidence-based practice. Replacing a system based on reporting quality control and compliance, this Best Practice Council formed interdisciplinary teams, charged them each with a quality issue, and directed them to change practice as needed under the guidance of the St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital Evidence Based Practice Model. This article reviews the activities of the Best Practice Council and the projects of teams assigned to study best practice in (1) preventing bloodstream infection (related to central lines), (2) preventing patient falls, (3) assessing and preventing pressure ulcers, and (4) ensuring good hand-off communication. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Accidental Falls/prevention & control; Benchmarking/organization & administration; Communication; Cross Infection/prevention & control; Diffusion of Innovation; Documentation; Evidence-Based Nursing/education/organization & administration; Hospitals, Religious; Humans; Infection Control; Models, Nursing; Nursing Audit; Nursing Records; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control; Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration; Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration; Texas},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Balakas, K., Potter, P., Pratt, E., Rea, G., & Williams, J.. (2009). Evidence Equals Excellence: The application of an evidence-based practice model in an academic medical center . The Nursing clinics of North America, 44(1), 1-10, ix.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    An evidence-based practice (EBP) program that is designed to develop mentors in both clinical and academic settings has the potential for transforming a health care organization. This article describes an innovative program, Evidence Equals Excellence, which consists of two components: a clinical practice component for health care clinicians and an academic program for baccalaureate and graduate nursing students. The development of EBP mentors creates a core group of clinicians who can assist fellow staff members apply evidence at the bedside. An academic program prepares new graduates to partner easily with clinical mentors to support and initiate successful practice changes. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:526,
      author={K. Balakas and P. Potter and E. Pratt and G. Rea and J. Williams},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar},
      title={Evidence Equals Excellence: The application of an evidence-based practice model in an academic medical center },
      journal={The Nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={44},
      number={1},
      pages={1-10, ix},
      note={id: 3698; JID: 0042033; RF: 22; ppublish },
      abstract={An evidence-based practice (EBP) program that is designed to develop mentors in both clinical and academic settings has the potential for transforming a health care organization. This article describes an innovative program, Evidence Equals Excellence, which consists of two components: a clinical practice component for health care clinicians and an academic program for baccalaureate and graduate nursing students. The development of EBP mentors creates a core group of clinicians who can assist fellow staff members apply evidence at the bedside. An academic program prepares new graduates to partner easily with clinical mentors to support and initiate successful practice changes. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration; Benchmarking/organization & administration; Clinical Competence; Curriculum; Decision Making, Organizational; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education/organization & administration; Humans; Mentors/education; Missouri; Models, Nursing; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Philosophy, Nursing; Program Development; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bruce, S. A., Scherer, Y. K., Curran, C. C., Urschel, D. M., Erdley, S., & Ball, L. S.. (2009). A collaborative exercise between graduate and undergraduate nursing students using a computer-assisted simulator in a mock cardiac arrest . Nursing education perspectives, 30(1), 22-27.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Faculty at the University at Buffalo designed and implemented a mock cardiac arrest that involved joint participation by both undergraduate and graduate students. Various instruments were developed to evaluate the effectiveness of this teaching modality, including scales that measured pre- and postsimulation knowledge and confidence. Students were also asked to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the experience especially regarding teamwork during an emergency situation. Management of the arrest by the graduate students was evaluated using a scale that included competency criteria related to assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and resource management. Undergraduate students’ performance was also evaluated. Using paired t-test statistics, postsimulation knowledge scores were significantly higher than presimulation scores (p = .000), while postsimulation confidence scores were not statistically significant (p = .177). Students at both levels reported high satisfaction with the experience and with the opportunity to participate in a simulated cardiac arrest as a member of the health team. The use of a computer-assisted human patient simulator involving different levels of nursing students appears to be an effective teaching method; more investigation into specific outcomes is needed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:527,
      author={S. A. Bruce and Y. K. Scherer and C. C. Curran and D. M. Urschel and S. Erdley and L. S. Ball},
      year={2009},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={A collaborative exercise between graduate and undergraduate nursing students using a computer-assisted simulator in a mock cardiac arrest },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={30},
      number={1},
      pages={22-27},
      note={id: 3704; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={Faculty at the University at Buffalo designed and implemented a mock cardiac arrest that involved joint participation by both undergraduate and graduate students. Various instruments were developed to evaluate the effectiveness of this teaching modality, including scales that measured pre- and postsimulation knowledge and confidence. Students were also asked to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the experience especially regarding teamwork during an emergency situation. Management of the arrest by the graduate students was evaluated using a scale that included competency criteria related to assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and resource management. Undergraduate students' performance was also evaluated. Using paired t-test statistics, postsimulation knowledge scores were significantly higher than presimulation scores (p = .000), while postsimulation confidence scores were not statistically significant (p = .177). Students at both levels reported high satisfaction with the experience and with the opportunity to participate in a simulated cardiac arrest as a member of the health team. The use of a computer-assisted human patient simulator involving different levels of nursing students appears to be an effective teaching method; more investigation into specific outcomes is needed. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Burton, M., & Dilts-Skaggs, M. K.. (2009). Teaching levels of evidence: the Santa project . The Journal of nursing administration, 39(10), 412-414.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nurses across the nation have embraced the call to seek and use the best evidence available to solve complex clinical problems in day-to-day care at the bedside. With the abundance of information available, we wanted to impress nurses with the importance of critically discriminating what evidence is acceptable to guide practice. Our Santa Project idea was inspired by reading about the success of the Great American Cookie Experiment. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:546,
      author={M. Burton and M. K. Dilts-Skaggs},
      year={2009},
      month={Oct},
      title={Teaching levels of evidence: the Santa project },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={39},
      number={10},
      pages={412-414},
      note={id: 4387; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={Nurses across the nation have embraced the call to seek and use the best evidence available to solve complex clinical problems in day-to-day care at the bedside. With the abundance of information available, we wanted to impress nurses with the importance of critically discriminating what evidence is acceptable to guide practice. Our Santa Project idea was inspired by reading about the success of the Great American Cookie Experiment. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Awareness; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing; Leadership; Ohio; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Program Evaluation},
      isbn={1539-0721},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cassata, L. C., & Cox, T. M.. (2009). Evaluation tool for clinical nursing textbooks: bridging content analysis with evidence . The Journal of nursing education, 48(6), 301-309.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    One of the challenges nurse educators face is choosing a textbook that ensures congruency within the discipline of nursing, national and global health priorities, and the mission of the university. This article discusses the development of a tool that evaluates course content concurrently with evidence. The need to critically link content analysis and evidence within clinical nursing textbooks is deemed important given the discipline’s imperative to prepare nurses to use the best evidence available for practice. The history and concept of evidence-based nursing practice is explored to develop an operational definition for the tool, which was designed to guide a realistic and expeditious process for this important faculty responsibility. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:528,
      author={L. C. Cassata and T. M. Cox},
      year={2009},
      month={Jun},
      title={Evaluation tool for clinical nursing textbooks: bridging content analysis with evidence },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={6},
      pages={301-309},
      note={id: 4095; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={One of the challenges nurse educators face is choosing a textbook that ensures congruency within the discipline of nursing, national and global health priorities, and the mission of the university. This article discusses the development of a tool that evaluates course content concurrently with evidence. The need to critically link content analysis and evidence within clinical nursing textbooks is deemed important given the discipline's imperative to prepare nurses to use the best evidence available for practice. The history and concept of evidence-based nursing practice is explored to develop an operational definition for the tool, which was designed to guide a realistic and expeditious process for this important faculty responsibility. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Faulk, D., & Morris, A.. (2009). Valuing evidence-based practice: a student-centered learning activity . The Journal of nursing education, 48(4), 232.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The valuing of student-centered learning and recognition that students have to be engaged in the learning process was one of three driving forces for the development of an application activity for students enrolled in both medical-surgical nursing and research data management courses. Using student-centered learning principles, the selection of an application activity promoted engagement of the students’ interest in topics that had personal influence or relevance for them. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:530,
      author={D. Faulk and A. Morris},
      year={2009},
      month={Apr},
      title={Valuing evidence-based practice: a student-centered learning activity },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={4},
      pages={232},
      note={id: 4091; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={The valuing of student-centered learning and recognition that students have to be engaged in the learning process was one of three driving forces for the development of an application activity for students enrolled in both medical-surgical nursing and research data management courses. Using student-centered learning principles, the selection of an application activity promoted engagement of the students' interest in topics that had personal influence or relevance for them. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Halcomb, E. J., & Peters, K.. (2009). Nursing student feedback on undergraduate research education: implications for teaching and learning . Contemporary nurse : a journal for the Australian nursing profession, 33(1), 59-68.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Teaching research to undergraduate students presents many challenges to nurse academics. Yet facilitating students to develop skills in critically analysing and interpreting research is vital if we are to achieve evidence-based nursing practice. This paper explores student feedback from a research unit undertaken by Australian undergraduate nurses in order to highlight the challenges for academics trying to engage students in this material. Three hundred and sixty nine (83.5%) second year nursing students provided qualitative and quantitative feedback at the completion of a research unit using a standardised student feedback form. From a combination of the qualitative and quantitative feedback, the most positive aspects of the unit were the teaching staff, the group work and interaction in the class room and the online assessment item. Participants were least satisfied with the way in which the unit was presented, the written assessment items and assessment feedback and the perceived relevance of the unit. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the theoretical underpinnings of adult learning and teaching in the development of future course materials. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:547,
      author={E. J. Halcomb and K. Peters},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug},
      title={Nursing student feedback on undergraduate research education: implications for teaching and learning },
      journal={Contemporary nurse : a journal for the Australian nursing profession},
      volume={33},
      number={1},
      pages={59-68},
      note={id: 4392; JID: 9211867; ppublish },
      abstract={Teaching research to undergraduate students presents many challenges to nurse academics. Yet facilitating students to develop skills in critically analysing and interpreting research is vital if we are to achieve evidence-based nursing practice. This paper explores student feedback from a research unit undertaken by Australian undergraduate nurses in order to highlight the challenges for academics trying to engage students in this material. Three hundred and sixty nine (83.5%) second year nursing students provided qualitative and quantitative feedback at the completion of a research unit using a standardised student feedback form. From a combination of the qualitative and quantitative feedback, the most positive aspects of the unit were the teaching staff, the group work and interaction in the class room and the online assessment item. Participants were least satisfied with the way in which the unit was presented, the written assessment items and assessment feedback and the perceived relevance of the unit. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the theoretical underpinnings of adult learning and teaching in the development of future course materials. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1037-6178},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Heye, M. L., & Stevens, K. R.. (2009). Using new resources to teach evidence-based practice . The Journal of nursing education, 48(6), 334-339.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes an innovative strategy used to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts in an undergraduate research course and explains the underlying framework used to design the strategy. The strategy for the Evidence-Based Practice Project was based on new resources: undergraduate nursing student competencies for EBP, national health care improvement priorities, evidence rating systems, and a model of knowledge transformation for EBP. Groups of students selected a priority area, categorized and critically appraised the evidence supporting the recommendation for change in health care practice, and compared the recommendation to actual practice. An oral and poster presentation of the project provided the opportunity to discuss the significance, influence, and strength of the evidence supporting the recommendation to change health care practice. Student presentations and faculty perceptions of the project indicated beginning competencies in EBP were achieved. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:531,
      author={M. L. Heye and K. R. Stevens},
      year={2009},
      month={Jun},
      title={Using new resources to teach evidence-based practice },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={6},
      pages={334-339},
      note={id: 4090; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={This article describes an innovative strategy used to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts in an undergraduate research course and explains the underlying framework used to design the strategy. The strategy for the Evidence-Based Practice Project was based on new resources: undergraduate nursing student competencies for EBP, national health care improvement priorities, evidence rating systems, and a model of knowledge transformation for EBP. Groups of students selected a priority area, categorized and critically appraised the evidence supporting the recommendation for change in health care practice, and compared the recommendation to actual practice. An oral and poster presentation of the project provided the opportunity to discuss the significance, influence, and strength of the evidence supporting the recommendation to change health care practice. Student presentations and faculty perceptions of the project indicated beginning competencies in EBP were achieved. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Heye, M. L., & Stevens, K. R.. (2009). Educational innovations. Using new resources to teach evidence-based practice . Journal of Nursing Education, 48(6), 334-339.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article describes an innovative strategy used to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts in an undergraduate research course and explains the underlying framework used to design the strategy. The strategy for the Evidence-Based Practice Project was based on new resources: undergraduate nursing student competencies for EBP, national health care improvement priorities, evidence rating systems, and a model of knowledge transformation for EBP. Groups of students selected a priority area, categorized and critically appraised the evidence supporting the recommendation for change in health care practice, and compared the recommendation to actual practice. An oral and poster presentation of the project provided the opportunity to discuss the significance, influence, and strength of the evidence supporting the recommendation to change health care practice. Student presentations and faculty perceptions of the project indicated beginning competencies in EBP were achieved. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:548,
      author={M. L. Heye and K. R. Stevens},
      year={2009},
      month={06},
      title={Educational innovations. Using new resources to teach evidence-based practice },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={48},
      number={6},
      pages={334-339},
      note={id: 4328},
      abstract={This article describes an innovative strategy used to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) concepts in an undergraduate research course and explains the underlying framework used to design the strategy. The strategy for the Evidence-Based Practice Project was based on new resources: undergraduate nursing student competencies for EBP, national health care improvement priorities, evidence rating systems, and a model of knowledge transformation for EBP. Groups of students selected a priority area, categorized and critically appraised the evidence supporting the recommendation for change in health care practice, and compared the recommendation to actual practice. An oral and poster presentation of the project provided the opportunity to discuss the significance, influence, and strength of the evidence supporting the recommendation to change health care practice. Student presentations and faculty perceptions of the project indicated beginning competencies in EBP were achieved. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010310463&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Hockenberry, M., Brown, T., Walden, M., & Barrera, P.. (2009). Teaching evidence-based practice skills in a hospital . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 40(1), 28-32.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nurses and allied health professionals have the unique opportunity to become empowered through evidence-based practice (EBP) to make significant differences in the lives of patients and their families. Best practices in patient care occur only when staff continually ask questions about treatments and care, search for and evaluate the evidence to support or refute traditional practices, implement best evidence, and evaluate the effectiveness of the evidence as it applies to nursing care. This article presents the establishment of a formal program to teach EBP skills to pediatric nurses and other health care providers at a major children’s hospital. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:532,
      author={M. Hockenberry and T. Brown and M. Walden and P. Barrera},
      year={2009},
      month={Jan},
      title={Teaching evidence-based practice skills in a hospital },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={40},
      number={1},
      pages={28-32},
      note={id: 3693; JID: 0262321; ppublish },
      abstract={Nurses and allied health professionals have the unique opportunity to become empowered through evidence-based practice (EBP) to make significant differences in the lives of patients and their families. Best practices in patient care occur only when staff continually ask questions about treatments and care, search for and evaluate the evidence to support or refute traditional practices, implement best evidence, and evaluate the effectiveness of the evidence as it applies to nursing care. This article presents the establishment of a formal program to teach EBP skills to pediatric nurses and other health care providers at a major children's hospital. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Humans; Inservice Training/methods/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education; Organizational Culture; Program Development; Texas},
      isbn={0022-0124},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Honess, C., Gallant, P., & Keane, K.. (2009). The Clinical Scholar Model: Evidence-based practice at the bedside . The Nursing clinics of North America, 44(1), 117-30, xii.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Clinical Scholar Model serves as an effective framework for investigating and implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) changes by direct care providers. The model guides one in identifying problems and issues, key stakeholders, and the need for practice changes. It provides a framework to critique and synthesize the external and internal evidence. Three EBP projects conducted at a large tertiary care facility in northern New England illustrate the process of using the Clinical Scholar Model. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:533,
      author={C. Honess and P. Gallant and K. Keane},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar},
      title={The Clinical Scholar Model: Evidence-based practice at the bedside },
      journal={The Nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={44},
      number={1},
      pages={117-30, xii},
      note={id: 3694; JID: 0042033; RF: 25; ppublish },
      abstract={The Clinical Scholar Model serves as an effective framework for investigating and implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) changes by direct care providers. The model guides one in identifying problems and issues, key stakeholders, and the need for practice changes. It provides a framework to critique and synthesize the external and internal evidence. Three EBP projects conducted at a large tertiary care facility in northern New England illustrate the process of using the Clinical Scholar Model. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Bed Rest/nursing; Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects; Clinical Competence; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education/organization & administration; Heart Catheterization/adverse effects; Humans; Hyperglycemia/etiology/prevention & control; Maine; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration; Organizational Innovation; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Point-of-Care Systems/organization & administration; Postoperative Care/methods/nursing; Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting/etiology/prevention & control; Research Design; Time Factors},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hopp, L.. (2009). The role of systematic reviews in teaching evidence-based practice . Clinical nurse specialist CNS, 23(6), 321-322.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Clinical nurse specialists are uniquely positioned to facilitate implementation of evidence in practice. However, they must be prepared to competently identify, appraise, and interpret the best available evidence to make judgments about how best to use the information. In addition to fostering clinical expertise and the incorporation of patient preferences, CNS educators need to develop students’ knowledge and skills to enable them to genuinely broker the best available evidence into practice. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:549,
      author={L. Hopp},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={The role of systematic reviews in teaching evidence-based practice },
      journal={Clinical nurse specialist CNS},
      volume={23},
      number={6},
      pages={321-322},
      note={id: 4384; JID: 8709115; ppublish },
      abstract={Clinical nurse specialists are uniquely positioned to facilitate implementation of evidence in practice. However, they must be prepared to competently identify, appraise, and interpret the best available evidence to make judgments about how best to use the information. In addition to fostering clinical expertise and the incorporation of patient preferences, CNS educators need to develop students' knowledge and skills to enable them to genuinely broker the best available evidence into practice. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1538-9782},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ilic, D.. (2009). Assessing competency in Evidence Based Practice: strengths and limitations of current tools in practice . BMC medical education, 9(August 6), 53.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Evidence Based Practice (EBP) involves making clinical decisions informed by the most relevant and valid evidence available. Competence can broadly be defined as a concept that incorporates a variety of domains including knowledge, skills and attitudes. Adopting an evidence-based approach to practice requires differing competencies across various domains including literature searching, critical appraisal and communication. This paper examines the current tools available to assess EBP competence and compares their applicability to existing assessment techniques used in medicine, nursing and health sciences. DISCUSSION: Only two validated assessment tools have been developed to specifically assess all aspects of EBP competence. Of the two tools (Berlin and Fresno tools), only the Fresno tool comprehensively assesses EBP competency across all relevant domains. However, both tools focus on assessing EBP competency in medical students; therefore neither can be used for assessing EBP competency across different health disciplines. The Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) has been demonstrated as a reliable and versatile tool to assess clinical competencies, practical and communication skills. The OSCE has scope as an alternate method for assessing EBP competency, since it combines assessment of cognitive skills including knowledge, reasoning and communication. However, further research is needed to develop the OSCE as a viable method for assessing EBP competency. SUMMARY: Demonstrating EBP competence is a complex task – therefore no single assessment method can adequately provide all of the necessary data to assess complete EBP competence. There is a need for further research to explore how EBP competence is best assessed; be it in written formats, such as the Fresno tool, or another format, such as the OSCE. Future tools must also incorporate measures of assessing how EBP competence affects clinician behaviour and attitudes as well as clinical outcomes in real-time situations. This research should also be conducted across a variety of health disciplines to best inform practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:550,
      author={D. Ilic},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug 6},
      title={Assessing competency in Evidence Based Practice: strengths and limitations of current tools in practice },
      journal={BMC medical education},
      volume={9},
      number={August 6},
      pages={53},
      note={id: 4395; JID: 101088679; OID: NLM: PMC2728711; 2009/05/11 [received]; 2009/08/06 [accepted]; 2009/08/06 [aheadofprint]; epublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Evidence Based Practice (EBP) involves making clinical decisions informed by the most relevant and valid evidence available. Competence can broadly be defined as a concept that incorporates a variety of domains including knowledge, skills and attitudes. Adopting an evidence-based approach to practice requires differing competencies across various domains including literature searching, critical appraisal and communication. This paper examines the current tools available to assess EBP competence and compares their applicability to existing assessment techniques used in medicine, nursing and health sciences. DISCUSSION: Only two validated assessment tools have been developed to specifically assess all aspects of EBP competence. Of the two tools (Berlin and Fresno tools), only the Fresno tool comprehensively assesses EBP competency across all relevant domains. However, both tools focus on assessing EBP competency in medical students; therefore neither can be used for assessing EBP competency across different health disciplines. The Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) has been demonstrated as a reliable and versatile tool to assess clinical competencies, practical and communication skills. The OSCE has scope as an alternate method for assessing EBP competency, since it combines assessment of cognitive skills including knowledge, reasoning and communication. However, further research is needed to develop the OSCE as a viable method for assessing EBP competency. SUMMARY: Demonstrating EBP competence is a complex task - therefore no single assessment method can adequately provide all of the necessary data to assess complete EBP competence. There is a need for further research to explore how EBP competence is best assessed; be it in written formats, such as the Fresno tool, or another format, such as the OSCE. Future tools must also incorporate measures of assessing how EBP competence affects clinician behaviour and attitudes as well as clinical outcomes in real-time situations. This research should also be conducted across a variety of health disciplines to best inform practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1472-6920},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Krainovich-Miller, B., Haber, J., Yost, J., & Jacobs, S. K.. (2009). Evidence-based practice challenge: teaching critical appraisal of systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines to graduate students . The Journal of nursing education, 48(4), 186-195.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The TREAD Evidence-Based Practice Model is a framework for faculty to use in graduate research courses so students can become excellent consumers of the best available evidence to use in their clinical decision making in the practice setting. This model is based on competency in information literacy as the basis for developing evidence-based search strategies to find, appraise, and synthesize Level I evidence, including systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and evidence-based practice guidelines. This model emphasizes the use of standardized critical appraisal tools, such as the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) or Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE), to facilitate user-friendly rapid appraisal of Level I evidence. Faculty are challenged to embrace this paradigm shift, to unlearn how they learned, and to teach their graduate research course focusing on the importance of Level I evidence to enable their graduates to make informed advanced practice decisions and improve patient outcomes. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:534,
      author={B. Krainovich-Miller and J. Haber and J. Yost and S. K. Jacobs},
      year={2009},
      month={Apr},
      title={Evidence-based practice challenge: teaching critical appraisal of systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines to graduate students },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={4},
      pages={186-195},
      note={id: 3701; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={The TREAD Evidence-Based Practice Model is a framework for faculty to use in graduate research courses so students can become excellent consumers of the best available evidence to use in their clinical decision making in the practice setting. This model is based on competency in information literacy as the basis for developing evidence-based search strategies to find, appraise, and synthesize Level I evidence, including systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and evidence-based practice guidelines. This model emphasizes the use of standardized critical appraisal tools, such as the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) or Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE), to facilitate user-friendly rapid appraisal of Level I evidence. Faculty are challenged to embrace this paradigm shift, to unlearn how they learned, and to teach their graduate research course focusing on the importance of Level I evidence to enable their graduates to make informed advanced practice decisions and improve patient outcomes. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kruszewski, A., Brough, E., & Killeen, M. B.. (2009). Educational innovations. Collaborative strategies for teaching evidence-based practice in accelerated second-degree programs . Journal of Nursing Education, 48(6), 340-342.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    An important challenge for teaching in accelerated second-degree programs is how to manage essential content within a compressed curriculum format. This article describes a project that used a collaborative model for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) in a redesigned second-degree nursing program. Instructors in two courses shared responsibility for teaching basic concepts and guiding students’ implementation of EBP in a clinical setting in partnership with clinical nurses. This approach resulted in a high degree of satisfaction for students, instructors, and nursing staff in clinical agencies. The project demonstrated collaborative teaching strategies can help students achieve basic knowledge in EBP and translate that knowledge into their clinical practice. Collaboration also can achieve more efficient learning experiences, a critical element in accelerated nursing programs. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:551,
      author={A. Kruszewski and E. Brough and M. B. Killeen},
      year={2009},
      month={06},
      title={Educational innovations. Collaborative strategies for teaching evidence-based practice in accelerated second-degree programs },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={48},
      number={6},
      pages={340-342},
      note={id: 4327},
      abstract={An important challenge for teaching in accelerated second-degree programs is how to manage essential content within a compressed curriculum format. This article describes a project that used a collaborative model for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) in a redesigned second-degree nursing program. Instructors in two courses shared responsibility for teaching basic concepts and guiding students' implementation of EBP in a clinical setting in partnership with clinical nurses. This approach resulted in a high degree of satisfaction for students, instructors, and nursing staff in clinical agencies. The project demonstrated collaborative teaching strategies can help students achieve basic knowledge in EBP and translate that knowledge into their clinical practice. Collaboration also can achieve more efficient learning experiences, a critical element in accelerated nursing programs. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010310466&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Kruszewski, A., Brough, E., & Killeen, M. B.. (2009). Collaborative strategies for teaching evidence-based practice in accelerated second-degree programs . The Journal of nursing education, 48(6), 340-342.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    An important challenge for teaching in accelerated second-degree programs is how to manage essential content within a compressed curriculum format. This article describes a project that used a collaborative model for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) in a redesigned second-degree nursing program. Instructors in two courses shared responsibility for teaching basic concepts and guiding students’ implementation of EBP in a clinical setting in partnership with clinical nurses. This approach resulted in a high degree of satisfaction for students, instructors, and nursing staff in clinical agencies. The project demonstrated collaborative teaching strategies can help students achieve basic knowledge in EBP and translate that knowledge into their clinical practice. Collaboration also can achieve more efficient learning experiences, a critical element in accelerated nursing programs. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:535,
      author={A. Kruszewski and E. Brough and M. B. Killeen},
      year={2009},
      month={Jun},
      title={Collaborative strategies for teaching evidence-based practice in accelerated second-degree programs },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={6},
      pages={340-342},
      note={id: 4089; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={An important challenge for teaching in accelerated second-degree programs is how to manage essential content within a compressed curriculum format. This article describes a project that used a collaborative model for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) in a redesigned second-degree nursing program. Instructors in two courses shared responsibility for teaching basic concepts and guiding students' implementation of EBP in a clinical setting in partnership with clinical nurses. This approach resulted in a high degree of satisfaction for students, instructors, and nursing staff in clinical agencies. The project demonstrated collaborative teaching strategies can help students achieve basic knowledge in EBP and translate that knowledge into their clinical practice. Collaboration also can achieve more efficient learning experiences, a critical element in accelerated nursing programs. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Long, L. E., Burkett, K., & McGee, S.. (2009). Promotion of safe outcomes: Incorporating evidence into policies and procedures . The Nursing clinics of North America, 44(1), 57-70, x-xi.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes the process of incorporating evidence into policies and procedures, resulting in the establishment of evidence as a basis for safe practice. The process described includes use of the Rosswurm and Larrabee model for change to evidence-based practice. The model guided the work of evidence-based practice mentors in developing a template, system, and educational plan for dissemination of evidence-based policies and procedures into patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:536,
      author={L. E. Long and K. Burkett and S. McGee},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar},
      title={Promotion of safe outcomes: Incorporating evidence into policies and procedures },
      journal={The Nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={44},
      number={1},
      pages={57-70, x-xi},
      note={id: 3697; JID: 0042033; ppublish },
      abstract={This article describes the process of incorporating evidence into policies and procedures, resulting in the establishment of evidence as a basis for safe practice. The process described includes use of the Rosswurm and Larrabee model for change to evidence-based practice. The model guided the work of evidence-based practice mentors in developing a template, system, and educational plan for dissemination of evidence-based policies and procedures into patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Data Collection; Diffusion of Innovation; Documentation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education/organization & administration; Hospitals, Pediatric; Humans; Information Dissemination; Mentors; Models, Nursing; Needs Assessment/organization & administration; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Ohio; Organizational Innovation; Organizational Policy; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Point-of-Care Systems/organization & administration; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration; Research Design; Safety Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Melnyk, B. M., Fineout-Overholt, E., Stillwell, S. B., & Williamson, K. M.. (2009). Evidence-based practice: step by step: igniting a spirit of inquiry: an essential foundation for evidence-based practice . The American Journal of Nursing, 109(11), 49-52.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This is the first article in a new series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation’s Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved.The purpose of this new series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we’ll schedule "Ask the Authors" call-ins every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. Details about how to participate in the calls will be published with January’s Evidence-Based Practice: Step by Step. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:553,
      author={B. M. Melnyk and E. Fineout-Overholt and S. B. Stillwell and K. M. Williamson},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov},
      title={Evidence-based practice: step by step: igniting a spirit of inquiry: an essential foundation for evidence-based practice },
      journal={The American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={109},
      number={11},
      pages={49-52},
      note={id: 4385; JID: 0372646; ppublish },
      abstract={This is the first article in a new series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved.The purpose of this new series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we'll schedule "Ask the Authors" call-ins every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. Details about how to participate in the calls will be published with January's Evidence-Based Practice: Step by Step. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-7488},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Newhouse, R. P., & Johnson, K.. (2009). A case study in evaluating infrastructure for EBP and selecting a model . The Journal of nursing administration, 39(10), 409-411.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In this department, Dr Newhouse highlights hot topics in nursing outcomes, research, and evidence-based practice relevant to the nurse administrator. The goal was to discuss the practical implications for nurse leaders in diverse healthcare settings. Content includes evidence-based projects and decision making, locating measurement tools for quality improvement and safety projects, using outcome measures to evaluate quality, practice implications of administrative research, and exemplars of projects that demonstrate innovative approaches to organizational problems. In this article, the authors describe a case using a systematic approach to evaluating infrastructure for evidence-based practice and selecting an evidence-based practice model for application in an acute care organization, the University of Maryland Medical Center. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:554,
      author={R. P. Newhouse and K. Johnson},
      year={2009},
      month={Oct},
      title={A case study in evaluating infrastructure for EBP and selecting a model },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={39},
      number={10},
      pages={409-411},
      note={id: 4388; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={In this department, Dr Newhouse highlights hot topics in nursing outcomes, research, and evidence-based practice relevant to the nurse administrator. The goal was to discuss the practical implications for nurse leaders in diverse healthcare settings. Content includes evidence-based projects and decision making, locating measurement tools for quality improvement and safety projects, using outcome measures to evaluate quality, practice implications of administrative research, and exemplars of projects that demonstrate innovative approaches to organizational problems. In this article, the authors describe a case using a systematic approach to evaluating infrastructure for evidence-based practice and selecting an evidence-based practice model for application in an acute care organization, the University of Maryland Medical Center. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Baltimore; Decision Making, Organizational; Evidence-Based Practice; Leadership; Models, Organizational; Nursing; Outcome Assessment (Health Care)},
      isbn={1539-0721},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Overton, G. K., Kelly, D., McCalister, P., Jones, J., & MacVicar, R.. (2009). The practice-based small group learning approach: making evidence-based practice come alive for learners . Nurse education today, 29(6), 671-675.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This paper reports the study of a pilot learning programme for the Continuing Professional Development of Practice Nurses (PNs) in Scotland. Two PN groups used the practice-based small group (PBSG) approach to learning, which is designed to encourage learning relevant to patient problems faced in day-to-day practice. Learners kept a log of their experiences of engaging in PBSG learning for three consecutive meetings. Data was also collected through interviews. The findings detail the motivation for joining the PBSGs, group dynamics and the development of cohesion, factors influencing participation in group-discussions and the nature of learning that took place in the groups. PNs from both groups reported that discussions led to habitual practices being challenged but without hostility, and that various sources of information were considered. The suitability of PBSG learning to promote evidence-based nursing practice is discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:537,
      author={G. K. Overton and D. Kelly and P. McCalister and J. Jones and R. MacVicar},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug},
      title={The practice-based small group learning approach: making evidence-based practice come alive for learners },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={29},
      number={6},
      pages={671-675},
      note={id: 4093; JID: 8511379; 2008/05/13 [received]; 2009/02/15 [revised]; 2009/02/21 [accepted]; 2009/03/24 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={This paper reports the study of a pilot learning programme for the Continuing Professional Development of Practice Nurses (PNs) in Scotland. Two PN groups used the practice-based small group (PBSG) approach to learning, which is designed to encourage learning relevant to patient problems faced in day-to-day practice. Learners kept a log of their experiences of engaging in PBSG learning for three consecutive meetings. Data was also collected through interviews. The findings detail the motivation for joining the PBSGs, group dynamics and the development of cohesion, factors influencing participation in group-discussions and the nature of learning that took place in the groups. PNs from both groups reported that discussions led to habitual practices being challenged but without hostility, and that various sources of information were considered. The suitability of PBSG learning to promote evidence-based nursing practice is discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1532-2793},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Peck, S., Lester, J., Hinshaw, G., Stiles, A., & Dingman, S. K.. (2009). EBP partners: doctoral students and practicing clinicians bridging the theory-practice gap . Critical care nursing quarterly, 32(2), 99-105.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The theory-practice gap is one component of the barriers to implementing evidence-based practice. Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing and Presbyterian Hospital of Denton joined forces to bridge this gap, allowing doctoral students to provide educational offerings to practicing nurses. Through a Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need grant, doctoral students completed supervised teaching practicums at the hospital, assisting the hospital to implement evidence-based practice with the ultimate goal of applying for Magnet status. The hospital benefited from the addition of research expertise and mentoring for the staff members. The students benefited from the opportunities to teach and to share knowledge with these clinical experts. This program has been successful in meeting the needs of both parties. Recommendations are given for other institutions interested in establishing similar relationships. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:538,
      author={S. Peck and J. Lester and G. Hinshaw and A. Stiles and S. K. Dingman},
      year={2009},
      month={Apr-Jun},
      title={EBP partners: doctoral students and practicing clinicians bridging the theory-practice gap },
      journal={Critical care nursing quarterly},
      volume={32},
      number={2},
      pages={99-105},
      note={id: 3691; JID: 8704517; ppublish },
      abstract={The theory-practice gap is one component of the barriers to implementing evidence-based practice. Texas Woman's University College of Nursing and Presbyterian Hospital of Denton joined forces to bridge this gap, allowing doctoral students to provide educational offerings to practicing nurses. Through a Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need grant, doctoral students completed supervised teaching practicums at the hospital, assisting the hospital to implement evidence-based practice with the ultimate goal of applying for Magnet status. The hospital benefited from the addition of research expertise and mentoring for the staff members. The students benefited from the opportunities to teach and to share knowledge with these clinical experts. This program has been successful in meeting the needs of both parties. Recommendations are given for other institutions interested in establishing similar relationships. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1550-5111},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pierson, M. A., & Schuelke, S. A.. (2009). Strengthening the use of evidence-based practice: development of an independent study packet . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 40(4), 171-176.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Based on staff nurse input, an evidence-based practice (EBP) independent study packet augmented by one-on-one mentoring was developed to support nurses in EBP activities and utilization. The strategies for developing the packet to meet American Nurses Credentialing Center requirements for continuing education credit are discussed, including review by a content expert and piloting of the packet prior to implementation. Evaluation of the independent study pilot project and plans for educational support for continuing development of EBP knowledge and skills are described. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:539,
      author={M. A. Pierson and S. A. Schuelke},
      year={2009},
      month={Apr},
      title={Strengthening the use of evidence-based practice: development of an independent study packet },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={40},
      number={4},
      pages={171-176},
      note={id: 3689; JID: 0262321; ppublish },
      abstract={Based on staff nurse input, an evidence-based practice (EBP) independent study packet augmented by one-on-one mentoring was developed to support nurses in EBP activities and utilization. The strategies for developing the packet to meet American Nurses Credentialing Center requirements for continuing education credit are discussed, including review by a content expert and piloting of the packet prior to implementation. Evaluation of the independent study pilot project and plans for educational support for continuing development of EBP knowledge and skills are described. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0022-0124},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pipe, T. B., Timm, J. A., & et al Harris, M. R.. (2009). Implementing a health system-wide evidence-based practice educational program to reach nurses with various levels of experience and educational preparation . The Nursing clinics of North America, 44(1), 43-55, x.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes a system-wide evidence-based practice (EBP) educational initiative implemented with a geographically, educationally, and clinically diverse group of nurses with the intent of increasing their EBP skill set and efficacy as local change agents and leaders. The overall scope of the larger National Quality Forum Scholar Program is described, and then the focus is narrowed to describe the EBP components of the initiative with case examples and lessons learned. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:540,
      author={T. B. Pipe and J. A. Timm and M. R. et al Harris},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar},
      title={Implementing a health system-wide evidence-based practice educational program to reach nurses with various levels of experience and educational preparation },
      journal={The Nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={44},
      number={1},
      pages={43-55, x},
      note={id: 3696; JID: 0042033; RF: 11; ppublish },
      abstract={This article describes a system-wide evidence-based practice (EBP) educational initiative implemented with a geographically, educationally, and clinically diverse group of nurses with the intent of increasing their EBP skill set and efficacy as local change agents and leaders. The overall scope of the larger National Quality Forum Scholar Program is described, and then the focus is narrowed to describe the EBP components of the initiative with case examples and lessons learned. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Benchmarking/organization & administration; Curriculum; Data Collection; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education/organization & administration; Humans; Leadership; Mentors; Minnesota; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Needs Assessment/organization & administration; Nursing Informatics/education/organization & administration; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff/education/organization & administration; Organizational Objectives; Program Development; Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration; Quality Indicators, Health Care/organization & administration},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Schutt, M. A., & Hightower, B.. (2009). Enhancing RN-to-BSN students’ information literacy skills through the use of instructional technology . The Journal of nursing education, 48(2), 101-105.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing advocates that professional nurses have the information literacy skills essential for evidence-based practice. As nursing schools embrace evidence-based models to prepare students for nursing careers, faculty can collaborate with librarians to create engaging learning activities focused on the development of information literacy skills. Instructional technology tools such as course management systems, virtual classrooms, and online tutorials provide opportunities to reach students outside the traditional campus classroom. This article discusses the collaborative process between faculty and a library instruction coordinator and strategies used to create literacy learning activities focused on the development of basic database search skills for a Computers in Nursing course. The activities and an online tutorial were included in a library database module incorporated into WebCT. In addition, synchronous classroom meeting software was used by the librarian to reach students in the distance learning environment. Recommendations for module modifications and faculty, librarian, and student evaluations are offered. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:541,
      author={M. A. Schutt and B. Hightower},
      year={2009},
      month={Feb},
      title={Enhancing RN-to-BSN students' information literacy skills through the use of instructional technology },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={2},
      pages={101-105},
      note={id: 3706; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={The American Association of Colleges of Nursing advocates that professional nurses have the information literacy skills essential for evidence-based practice. As nursing schools embrace evidence-based models to prepare students for nursing careers, faculty can collaborate with librarians to create engaging learning activities focused on the development of information literacy skills. Instructional technology tools such as course management systems, virtual classrooms, and online tutorials provide opportunities to reach students outside the traditional campus classroom. This article discusses the collaborative process between faculty and a library instruction coordinator and strategies used to create literacy learning activities focused on the development of basic database search skills for a Computers in Nursing course. The activities and an online tutorial were included in a library database module incorporated into WebCT. In addition, synchronous classroom meeting software was used by the librarian to reach students in the distance learning environment. Recommendations for module modifications and faculty, librarian, and student evaluations are offered. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Alabama; Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods; Databases, Bibliographic; Education, Distance/methods; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval; Libraries, Digital; Nursing Informatics/education},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Scott, K., & McSherry, R.. (2009). Evidence-based nursing: clarifying the concepts for nurses in practice . Journal of clinical nursing, 18(8), 1085-1095.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: To provide a critical analysis of key concepts associated with evidence-based nursing (EBN) to substantiate an operational definition for nurses to use in practice. BACKGROUND: Despite the plethora of literature surrounding what evidence-based nursing is and is not and how it differs from its cousins, evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice, nurses still struggle to get evidence into practice. Several reasons for this have been reported, for example, a lack of understanding about what evidence-based nursing means or time to engage with and apply the evidence into practice. DESIGN: An in-depth critical review and synthesis of literature was undertaken. METHOD: Using the key words; evidence-based nursing, evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice 496 articles were yielded. These articles were limited to 83. Using Burns and Grove’s (2001) phased approach to reviewing the literature the articles were critically reviewed and categorised into key concepts and themes. RESULTS: The in-depth critical review and synthesis of the literature demonstrated that evidence-based nursing could be defined as a distinct concept. The review clearly shows that for evidence-based nursing to occur, nurses need to be aware of what evidence-based nursing means, what constitutes evidence, how evidence-based nursing differs from evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice and what the process is to engage with and apply the evidence. CONCLUSION: The in-depth critical review and synthesis of the evidence-based nursing literature reinforces the need to consolidate a position for nursing in the evidence-based field. The review confirms that evidence-based nursing can be defined and conceptualised; however, for nurses to engage and apply with the evidence-based processes they need to be informed of what these are and how to engage with them in practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This paper examines the concept of evidence-based nursing and its application to clinical practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:542,
      author={K. Scott and R. McSherry},
      year={2009},
      month={Apr},
      title={Evidence-based nursing: clarifying the concepts for nurses in practice },
      journal={Journal of clinical nursing},
      volume={18},
      number={8},
      pages={1085-1095},
      note={id: 3699; JID: 9207302; 2008/11/24 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: To provide a critical analysis of key concepts associated with evidence-based nursing (EBN) to substantiate an operational definition for nurses to use in practice. BACKGROUND: Despite the plethora of literature surrounding what evidence-based nursing is and is not and how it differs from its cousins, evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice, nurses still struggle to get evidence into practice. Several reasons for this have been reported, for example, a lack of understanding about what evidence-based nursing means or time to engage with and apply the evidence into practice. DESIGN: An in-depth critical review and synthesis of literature was undertaken. METHOD: Using the key words; evidence-based nursing, evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice 496 articles were yielded. These articles were limited to 83. Using Burns and Grove's (2001) phased approach to reviewing the literature the articles were critically reviewed and categorised into key concepts and themes. RESULTS: The in-depth critical review and synthesis of the literature demonstrated that evidence-based nursing could be defined as a distinct concept. The review clearly shows that for evidence-based nursing to occur, nurses need to be aware of what evidence-based nursing means, what constitutes evidence, how evidence-based nursing differs from evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice and what the process is to engage with and apply the evidence. CONCLUSION: The in-depth critical review and synthesis of the evidence-based nursing literature reinforces the need to consolidate a position for nursing in the evidence-based field. The review confirms that evidence-based nursing can be defined and conceptualised; however, for nurses to engage and apply with the evidence-based processes they need to be informed of what these are and how to engage with them in practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This paper examines the concept of evidence-based nursing and its application to clinical practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2702},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Stacey, D., Higuchi, K. A., & et al Menard, P.. (2009). Integrating patient decision support in an undergraduate nursing curriculum: an implementation project . International journal of nursing education scholarship, 6(1), Article10.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A 4-year curriculum project (2004-2008) to integrate patient decision support into an existing curriculum was guided by the Knowledge-to-Action process model. The purpose of this project was to integrate a patient decision support theoretical framework and associated evidence-based resources throughout a four-year baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Interventions designed to adapt knowledge to local context and overcome barriers to knowledge use included faculty workshop to increase awareness, instructional resources designed for courses and core content, curricular blueprint of key threads to be included within courses, shared resources on the school of nursing internal website, and development of decision support resources in French. Curricular change and sustained use of knowledge was evidenced by repeated use of guest lecturers, assignments, and problem-based scenarios in courses, and students’ evaluations on the tutorial and assignments. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:543,
      author={D. Stacey and K. A. Higuchi and P. et al Menard},
      year={2009},
      title={Integrating patient decision support in an undergraduate nursing curriculum: an implementation project },
      journal={International journal of nursing education scholarship},
      volume={6},
      number={1},
      pages={Article10},
      note={id: 3703; JID: 101214977; 2009/03/30 [epublish]; ppublish },
      abstract={A 4-year curriculum project (2004-2008) to integrate patient decision support into an existing curriculum was guided by the Knowledge-to-Action process model. The purpose of this project was to integrate a patient decision support theoretical framework and associated evidence-based resources throughout a four-year baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Interventions designed to adapt knowledge to local context and overcome barriers to knowledge use included faculty workshop to increase awareness, instructional resources designed for courses and core content, curricular blueprint of key threads to be included within courses, shared resources on the school of nursing internal website, and development of decision support resources in French. Curricular change and sustained use of knowledge was evidenced by repeated use of guest lecturers, assignments, and problem-based scenarios in courses, and students' evaluations on the tutorial and assignments. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1548-923X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Strickland, R. J., & O’Leary-Kelley, C.. (2009). Clinical nurse educators’ perceptions of research utilization: barriers and facilitators to change . Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization, 25(4), 164-71; quiz 172-3.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Translation of research to practice remains a challenge. The educator, as a role model and change agent, is strategically placed to facilitate staff development and organizational change, thereby helping to close the gap from research to practice. Understanding barriers to research utilization may facilitate the application of evidence-based practice. In this study, the BARRIERS scale was used to assess perceptions of research utilization in a convenience sample of 122 clinical nurse educators in California. Greatest barriers were organizational and nurse characteristics, including lack of authority to change, insufficient time, and limited research knowledge and awareness. Educators from Magnet hospitals and educators with advanced degrees perceived the organization as less of a barrier. Strategies to facilitate and implement change are discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:556,
      author={R. J. Strickland and C. O'Leary-Kelley},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Clinical nurse educators' perceptions of research utilization: barriers and facilitators to change },
      journal={Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization},
      volume={25},
      number={4},
      pages={164-71; quiz 172-3},
      note={id: 4394; JID: 9809908; ppublish },
      abstract={Translation of research to practice remains a challenge. The educator, as a role model and change agent, is strategically placed to facilitate staff development and organizational change, thereby helping to close the gap from research to practice. Understanding barriers to research utilization may facilitate the application of evidence-based practice. In this study, the BARRIERS scale was used to assess perceptions of research utilization in a convenience sample of 122 clinical nurse educators in California. Greatest barriers were organizational and nurse characteristics, including lack of authority to change, insufficient time, and limited research knowledge and awareness. Educators from Magnet hospitals and educators with advanced degrees perceived the organization as less of a barrier. Strategies to facilitate and implement change are discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Aged; Attitude of Health Personnel; California; Clinical Competence; Communication Barriers; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education/organization & administration; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Nurse Administrators/education/organization & administration/psychology; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Questionnaires; Social Support; Time Management},
      isbn={1538-9049},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Thompson, C.. (2009). A beginner’s guide to probability . Evidence-based nursing, 12(3), 67-70.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Mastering the language of probability is the key to thinking creatively about uncertainty in decision making. Without learning the rules, nurses are artificially limiting the size of their problem solving toolkit for clinical practice. Without competence in this basic building block for giving “due weight” to research evidence, clinicians will always fall back on the intuitive, the familiar, and the experiential—all of which have some severe limitations. This Notebook has provided the first step in introducing some of the key ingredients necessary for reasoning probabilistically; only by acknowledging uncertainty, making it transparent, and factoring it into our decisions can we move toward truly shared decision making with our patients. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:557,
      author={C. Thompson},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul},
      title={A beginner's guide to probability },
      journal={Evidence-based nursing},
      volume={12},
      number={3},
      pages={67-70},
      note={id: 4397; JID: 9815947; ppublish },
      abstract={Mastering the language of probability is the key to thinking creatively about uncertainty in decision making. Without learning the rules, nurses are artificially limiting the size of their problem solving toolkit for clinical practice. Without competence in this basic building block for giving “due weight” to research evidence, clinicians will always fall back on the intuitive, the familiar, and the experiential—all of which have some severe limitations. This Notebook has provided the first step in introducing some of the key ingredients necessary for reasoning probabilistically; only by acknowledging uncertainty, making it transparent, and factoring it into our decisions can we move toward truly shared decision making with our patients. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Evidence-Based Nursing; Humans; Nurse-Patient Relations; Probability},
      isbn={1468-9618},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Vanhook, P. M.. (2009). Overcoming the barriers to EBP . Nursing management, 40(8), 9-11.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nurse executives need to create an environment that supports transformation from outdated practices and traditions. It’s imperative that nurses feel empowered to question nursing practice and have available the resources to support the search for evidence to guide patient care. An environment supportive of autonomy and inquiry creates innovation to advance nursing knowledge and is one key quality of a Magnet organization that leads to exemplary professional practice and empirical outcomes. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:558,
      author={P. M. Vanhook},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug},
      title={Overcoming the barriers to EBP },
      journal={Nursing management},
      volume={40},
      number={8},
      pages={9-11},
      note={id: 4393; JID: 8219243; ppublish },
      abstract={Nurse executives need to create an environment that supports transformation from outdated practices and traditions. It's imperative that nurses feel empowered to question nursing practice and have available the resources to support the search for evidence to guide patient care. An environment supportive of autonomy and inquiry creates innovation to advance nursing knowledge and is one key quality of a Magnet organization that leads to exemplary professional practice and empirical outcomes. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Decision Making; Evidence-Based Practice/methods; Humans; Nursing; Quality of Health Care; Total Quality Management},
      isbn={1538-8670},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Waters, D., Rychetnik, L., Crisp, J., & Barratt, A.. (2009). Views on evidence from nursing and midwifery opinion leaders . Nurse education today.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    National registration standards in Australia require nurses and midwives to be educationally prepared to use an evidence-based framework for their practice. These standards assume a shared professional understanding of evidence and, an agreed approach towards educational preparation for evidence implementation. In this study, a qualitative phenomenographic approach is used to explore the ways in which nursing opinion leaders understand ‘evidence’ within the context of evidence-based practice (EBP). Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 23 nursing and midwifery opinion leaders across the state of New South Wales, Australia. The findings suggest that views of evidence are deeply imbedded within individual clinical, contextual and professional experiences, and are highly variable. Establishing basic consensus on the meaning of evidence for the nursing and midwifery context is fundamental to the successful educational preparation of nurses and midwives for EBP. It is proposed that future evaluations of EBP education in nursing and midwifery examine the assumptions on which such programs are based as individual variation may be a significant factor in both defining and measuring the success of educational interventions for evidence implementation. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:545,
      author={D. Waters and L. Rychetnik and J. Crisp and A. Barratt},
      year={2009},
      month={May 21},
      title={Views on evidence from nursing and midwifery opinion leaders },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      note={id: 4096; JID: 8511379; 2008/01/25 [received]; 2009/02/24 [revised]; 2009/04/09 [accepted]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={National registration standards in Australia require nurses and midwives to be educationally prepared to use an evidence-based framework for their practice. These standards assume a shared professional understanding of evidence and, an agreed approach towards educational preparation for evidence implementation. In this study, a qualitative phenomenographic approach is used to explore the ways in which nursing opinion leaders understand 'evidence' within the context of evidence-based practice (EBP). Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 23 nursing and midwifery opinion leaders across the state of New South Wales, Australia. The findings suggest that views of evidence are deeply imbedded within individual clinical, contextual and professional experiences, and are highly variable. Establishing basic consensus on the meaning of evidence for the nursing and midwifery context is fundamental to the successful educational preparation of nurses and midwives for EBP. It is proposed that future evaluations of EBP education in nursing and midwifery examine the assumptions on which such programs are based as individual variation may be a significant factor in both defining and measuring the success of educational interventions for evidence implementation. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1532-2793},
      language={ENG}
    }

2008

  • (2008). Patient safety and quality: An evidence-based handbook for nurses . Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This handbook prepared by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation provides a comprehensive summary of important patient safety and quality improvement concepts for frontline nurses. Experts in each topic area reviewed the latest published evidence to assemble sections on providing patient-centered care, nurses’ working conditions and work environment, critical opportunities for improving quality and safety, and practical tools for implementing patient safety interventions for practicing nurses. (Source: Publisher)

    @book{RefWorks:953,
      year={2008},
      title={Patient safety and quality: An evidence-based handbook for nurses },
      publisher={Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality},
      address={Rockville, MD},
      note={id: 2245},
      abstract={This handbook prepared by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation provides a comprehensive summary of important patient safety and quality improvement concepts for frontline nurses. Experts in each topic area reviewed the latest published evidence to assemble sections on providing patient-centered care, nurses' working conditions and work environment, critical opportunities for improving quality and safety, and practical tools for implementing patient safety interventions for practicing nurses. (Source: Publisher) },
      url={http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/nurseshdbk}
    }

  • Bremner, M. N., Aduddell, K. F., & Amason, J. S.. (2008). Evidence-based practices related to the human patient simulator and first year baccalaureate nursing students’ anxiety . Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 12(1), 10p-10p.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The use the Human Patient Simulator (HPS) as the state-of-the-art educational technology has been documented in nursing literature. The next step is to establish evidence-based practices related to this unique form of educational technology. In particular, this project investigated the impact of this type of education technology on the perception of confidence and comfort levels of nursing students entering their first clinical experience as evidenced by their anxiety level. The study provided an opportunity to further explore assumptions and findings from a previous study related to the use of HPS in promoting confidence in first level baccalaureate nursing students (Bremner, et al., 2006). The previous study documented that a majority (61%, N = 55) of the students agreed or strongly agreed that using the HPS gave them confidence with physical assessment skills. Many of the students (68%, N = 55) also felt the experience with the HPS should become a mandatory component of the nursing curriculum. This second study had three major objectives: 1) to examine specific demographic information of first year baccalaureate nursing students participating in a study using the HPS; 2) to examine the effects on a HPS session on the level of anxiety of these students as they enter their first clinical experience; and, 3) to explore the relationship of learning styles, coping styles, and anxiety levels of students using this form of educational technology. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:962,
      author={M. N. Bremner and K. F. Aduddell and J. S. Amason},
      year={2008},
      month={02},
      title={Evidence-based practices related to the human patient simulator and first year baccalaureate nursing students' anxiety },
      journal={Online Journal of Nursing Informatics},
      volume={12},
      number={1},
      pages={10p-10p},
      note={id: 2145; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Computer/Information Science; Nursing; Online; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Informatics. No. of Refs: 27 ref. NLM UID: 9806523. },
      abstract={The use the Human Patient Simulator (HPS) as the state-of-the-art educational technology has been documented in nursing literature. The next step is to establish evidence-based practices related to this unique form of educational technology. In particular, this project investigated the impact of this type of education technology on the perception of confidence and comfort levels of nursing students entering their first clinical experience as evidenced by their anxiety level. The study provided an opportunity to further explore assumptions and findings from a previous study related to the use of HPS in promoting confidence in first level baccalaureate nursing students (Bremner, et al., 2006). The previous study documented that a majority (61%, N = 55) of the students agreed or strongly agreed that using the HPS gave them confidence with physical assessment skills. Many of the students (68%, N = 55) also felt the experience with the HPS should become a mandatory component of the nursing curriculum. This second study had three major objectives: 1) to examine specific demographic information of first year baccalaureate nursing students participating in a study using the HPS; 2) to examine the effects on a HPS session on the level of anxiety of these students as they enter their first clinical experience; and, 3) to explore the relationship of learning styles, coping styles, and anxiety levels of students using this form of educational technology. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1089-9758},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1536; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009863807&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Brown, C. E., Wickline, M. A., Ecoff, L., & Glaser, D.. (2008). Nursing practice, knowledge, attitudes and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice at an academic medical center . Journal of advanced nursing.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study to describe nurses’ practices, knowledge, and attitudes related to evidence-based nursing, and the relation of perceived barriers to and facilitators of evidence-based practice. Background. Evidence-based practice has been recognized by the healthcare community as the gold standard for the provision of safe and compassionate healthcare. Barriers and facilitators for the adoption of evidence-based practice in nursing have been identified by researchers. Healthcare organizations have been challenged to foster an environment conducive to providing care based on evidence and not steeped in ritualized practice. Methods. A descriptive, cross-sectional research study was conducted in 2006-2007 with a convenience sample of 458 nurses at an academic medical center in California (response rate 44.68%). Two reliable and valid questionnaires were electronically formatted and administered using a secured website. Relationships between responses to the two instruments were examined and results compared with previously published data. Results. Organizational barriers (lack of time and lack of nursing autonomy) were the top perceived barriers. Facilitators were learning opportunities, culture building, and availability and simplicity of resources. Statistically significant correlations were found between barriers and practice, knowledge and attitudes related to evidence-based practice. Conclusion. Similar barriers to the adoption of evidence-based practice have been identified internationally. Educators must work with managers to address organizational barriers and proactively support evidence-based practice.

    @article{RefWorks:927,
      author={C. E. Brown and M. A. Wickline and L. Ecoff and D. Glaser},
      year={2008},
      month={Nov 27},
      title={Nursing practice, knowledge, attitudes and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice at an academic medical center },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      note={id: 2889; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 7609811; aheadofprint; SO: J Adv Nurs. 2008 Nov 27. },
      abstract={Aim. This paper is a report of a study to describe nurses' practices, knowledge, and attitudes related to evidence-based nursing, and the relation of perceived barriers to and facilitators of evidence-based practice. Background. Evidence-based practice has been recognized by the healthcare community as the gold standard for the provision of safe and compassionate healthcare. Barriers and facilitators for the adoption of evidence-based practice in nursing have been identified by researchers. Healthcare organizations have been challenged to foster an environment conducive to providing care based on evidence and not steeped in ritualized practice. Methods. A descriptive, cross-sectional research study was conducted in 2006-2007 with a convenience sample of 458 nurses at an academic medical center in California (response rate 44.68%). Two reliable and valid questionnaires were electronically formatted and administered using a secured website. Relationships between responses to the two instruments were examined and results compared with previously published data. Results. Organizational barriers (lack of time and lack of nursing autonomy) were the top perceived barriers. Facilitators were learning opportunities, culture building, and availability and simplicity of resources. Statistically significant correlations were found between barriers and practice, knowledge and attitudes related to evidence-based practice. Conclusion. Similar barriers to the adoption of evidence-based practice have been identified internationally. Educators must work with managers to address organizational barriers and proactively support evidence-based practice. },
      isbn={1365-2648},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • de Cordova, P. B., Collins, S., Peppard, L., Currie, L. M., Hughes, R., Walsh, M., & Stone, P. W.. (2008). Implementing evidence-based nursing with student nurses and clinicians: uniting the strengths . Applied Nursing Research : ANR, 21(4), 242-245.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) is challenging for both clinicians and students. Facilitating collaboration among students and clinicians can improve the process of both teaching EBP in the academic setting and utilizing EBP in the clinical setting. A unique and successful EBP program is described, and other schools are encouraged to emulate this model. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:529,
      author={P. B. de Cordova and S. Collins and L. Peppard and L. M. Currie and R. Hughes and M. Walsh and P. W. Stone},
      year={2008},
      month={Nov},
      title={Implementing evidence-based nursing with student nurses and clinicians: uniting the strengths },
      journal={Applied Nursing Research : ANR},
      volume={21},
      number={4},
      pages={242-245},
      note={id: 3700; JID: 8901557; 2008/05/12 [received]; 2008/06/23 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={Implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) is challenging for both clinicians and students. Facilitating collaboration among students and clinicians can improve the process of both teaching EBP in the academic setting and utilizing EBP in the clinical setting. A unique and successful EBP program is described, and other schools are encouraged to emulate this model. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing/methods; Humans; Nurse Clinicians; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Staff; Students, Nursing},
      isbn={1532-8201},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Emerson, R. J., & Records, K.. (2008). Today’s challenge, tomorrow’s excellence: the practice of evidence-based education . The Journal of nursing education, 47(8), 359-370.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nurse educators are being challenged to maintain quality in light of increasing numbers of students, declining numbers of experienced faculty, societal mandates, and rapid changes in health care. The scholarship underlying the practice of nursing education, or evidence-based education, must continue to be explored through the design, testing, and refinement of education strategies from nursing and other disciplines. The involvement of every educator in this process will help create institutional valuing that serves to retain inquisitive and reflective educators in academic settings, while expanding evidence-based education in nursing. This article describes a literature review of the scholarship of nursing education practice and suggests approaches to generate a dynamic explosion of growth in nursing education to inform our students, promote optimal client health outcomes, and challenge each of us to reach higher levels of excellence in the practice of nursing education.

    @article{RefWorks:929,
      author={R. J. Emerson and K. Records},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={Today's challenge, tomorrow's excellence: the practice of evidence-based education },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={47},
      number={8},
      pages={359-370},
      note={id: 2791; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; RF: 45; ppublish },
      abstract={Nurse educators are being challenged to maintain quality in light of increasing numbers of students, declining numbers of experienced faculty, societal mandates, and rapid changes in health care. The scholarship underlying the practice of nursing education, or evidence-based education, must continue to be explored through the design, testing, and refinement of education strategies from nursing and other disciplines. The involvement of every educator in this process will help create institutional valuing that serves to retain inquisitive and reflective educators in academic settings, while expanding evidence-based education in nursing. This article describes a literature review of the scholarship of nursing education practice and suggests approaches to generate a dynamic explosion of growth in nursing education to inform our students, promote optimal client health outcomes, and challenge each of us to reach higher levels of excellence in the practice of nursing education. },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Career Mobility; Curriculum; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Forecasting; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role; Nursing Education Research/organization & administration; Nursing Research/education; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Philosophy, Nursing; Professional Competence; Research Design; Research Support as Topic/organization & administration; Teaching/organization & administration},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Engebretson, J., Mahoney, J., & Carlson, E. D.. (2008). Cultural competence in the era of evidence-based practice . Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 24(3), 172-178.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Cultural competence has become an important concern for contemporary health care delivery, with ethical and legal implications. Numerous educational approaches have been developed to orient clinicians, and standards and position statements promoting cultural competence have been published by both the American Medical Association and the American Nurses Association. Although a number of health care regulatory agencies have developed standards or recommendations, clinical application to patient care has been challenging. These challenges include the abstract nature of the concept, essentializing culture to race or ethnicity, and the attempts to associate culture with health disparities. To make cultural competence relevant to clinical practice, we linked a cultural competency continuum that identifies the levels of cultural competency (cultural destructiveness, cultural incapacity, cultural blindness, cultural precompetence, and cultural proficiency) to well-established values in health care. This situates cultural competence and proficiency in alignment with patient-centered care. A model integrating the cultural competency continuum with the components of evidence-based care (i.e., best research practice, clinical expertise, and patient’s values and circumstances) is presented.

    @article{RefWorks:930,
      author={J. Engebretson and J. Mahoney and E. D. Carlson},
      year={2008},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Cultural competence in the era of evidence-based practice },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={24},
      number={3},
      pages={172-178},
      note={id: 2781; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511298; RF: 55; 2007/03/14 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Cultural competence has become an important concern for contemporary health care delivery, with ethical and legal implications. Numerous educational approaches have been developed to orient clinicians, and standards and position statements promoting cultural competence have been published by both the American Medical Association and the American Nurses Association. Although a number of health care regulatory agencies have developed standards or recommendations, clinical application to patient care has been challenging. These challenges include the abstract nature of the concept, essentializing culture to race or ethnicity, and the attempts to associate culture with health disparities. To make cultural competence relevant to clinical practice, we linked a cultural competency continuum that identifies the levels of cultural competency (cultural destructiveness, cultural incapacity, cultural blindness, cultural precompetence, and cultural proficiency) to well-established values in health care. This situates cultural competence and proficiency in alignment with patient-centered care. A model integrating the cultural competency continuum with the components of evidence-based care (i.e., best research practice, clinical expertise, and patient's values and circumstances) is presented. },
      keywords={Attitude to Health/ethnology; Benchmarking; Cultural Competency/education/ethics/organization & administration; Cultural Diversity; Delivery of Health Care/ethics/organization & administration; Disease Management; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/ethics/organization & administration; Government Regulation; Guidelines as Topic; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Health Status Disparities; Healthcare Disparities; Humans; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role; Patient Care Planning/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/ethics/organization & administration; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Prejudice; Principle-Based Ethics; Social Justice; Social Values; Transcultural Nursing/education/organization & administration; United States},
      isbn={1532-8481},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ewers, K. M., Coker, C. T., Bajnok, I., & Denker, A. L.. (2008). A collaborative curricular model for implementing evidence-based nursing in a critical care setting . Critical care nursing clinics of North America, 20(4), 423-434.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article discusses how a curricular model for introducing nurses to the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario Best Practice Guideline Risk Assessment and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers was used to reduce pressure ulcer prevalence in the critical care setting. This curricular model is particularly relevant to hospitals that are on the Magnet Journey or are involved in other quality improvement efforts to develop an evidence-based nursing practice culture.

    @article{RefWorks:931,
      author={K. M. Ewers and C. T. Coker and I. Bajnok and A. L. Denker},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={A collaborative curricular model for implementing evidence-based nursing in a critical care setting },
      journal={Critical care nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={20},
      number={4},
      pages={423-434},
      note={id: 2891; PUBM: Print; JID: 8912620; ppublish },
      abstract={This article discusses how a curricular model for introducing nurses to the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario Best Practice Guideline Risk Assessment and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers was used to reduce pressure ulcer prevalence in the critical care setting. This curricular model is particularly relevant to hospitals that are on the Magnet Journey or are involved in other quality improvement efforts to develop an evidence-based nursing practice culture. },
      isbn={0899-5885},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fineout-Overholt, E.. (2008). Synthesizing the evidence: how far can your confidence meter take you? . AACN advanced critical care, 19(3), 335-339.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The purpose of this article is to convey to critical care clinicians the value of evaluation and synthesis of evidence as a tool for daily decision making. The bottom line of the EBP process is improving patient outcomes. For research evidence to inform daily clinical decision making, practitioners must have confidence in the evidence. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:932,
      author={E. Fineout-Overholt},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Synthesizing the evidence: how far can your confidence meter take you? },
      journal={AACN advanced critical care},
      volume={19},
      number={3},
      pages={335-339},
      note={id: 2902; PUBM: Print; JID: 101269322; RF: 10; ppublish },
      abstract={The purpose of this article is to convey to critical care clinicians the value of evaluation and synthesis of evidence as a tool for daily decision making. The bottom line of the EBP process is improving patient outcomes. For research evidence to inform daily clinical decision making, practitioners must have confidence in the evidence. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Critical Care; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Decision Making; Diffusion of Innovation; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Professional Competence; Research Design/standards; Self Efficacy},
      isbn={1559-7768},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Jeffers, B. R., Robinson, S., Luxner, K., & Redding, D.. (2008). Nursing faculty mentors as facilitators for evidence-based nursing practice . Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization, 24(5), E8-E12.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Increasing use of evidence-based practice (EBP) within complex healthcare organizations requires the identification of individuals who will support and facilitate new practice patterns. In a large Midwestern hospital, a diverse group of academic nursing faculty functioning as mentors to develop clinical nurses’ skills in the use of EBP has demonstrated early success. This article highlights the context, challenges, and successes of faculty mentors for developing nursing staff’s involvement in and use of EBP.

    @article{RefWorks:933,
      author={B. R. Jeffers and S. Robinson and K. Luxner and D. Redding},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Nursing faculty mentors as facilitators for evidence-based nursing practice },
      journal={Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization},
      volume={24},
      number={5},
      pages={E8-E12},
      note={id: 2893; PUBM: Print; JID: 9809908; ppublish },
      abstract={Increasing use of evidence-based practice (EBP) within complex healthcare organizations requires the identification of individuals who will support and facilitate new practice patterns. In a large Midwestern hospital, a diverse group of academic nursing faculty functioning as mentors to develop clinical nurses' skills in the use of EBP has demonstrated early success. This article highlights the context, challenges, and successes of faculty mentors for developing nursing staff's involvement in and use of EBP. },
      isbn={1538-9049},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Jones, M.. (2008). Developing clinically savvy nursing students: an evaluation of problem-based learning in an associate degree program . Nursing education perspectives, 29(5), 278-283.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Faculty in an associate degree nursing program at a community college in NewYork City noted that nursing students lacked critical analysis, problem-solving, and decision-making skills and the reflective ability essential to applying nursing knowledge in clinical situations. This study reports on the use of problem-based learning as a teaching strategy and its impact on the development of critical thinking and communication skills in nursing students.

    @article{RefWorks:934,
      author={M. Jones},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Developing clinically savvy nursing students: an evaluation of problem-based learning in an associate degree program },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={29},
      number={5},
      pages={278-283},
      note={id: 2795; PUBM: Print; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={Faculty in an associate degree nursing program at a community college in NewYork City noted that nursing students lacked critical analysis, problem-solving, and decision-making skills and the reflective ability essential to applying nursing knowledge in clinical situations. This study reports on the use of problem-based learning as a teaching strategy and its impact on the development of critical thinking and communication skills in nursing students. },
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kring, D. L.. (2008). Clinical nurse specialist practice domains and evidence-based practice competencies: a matrix of influence . Clinical nurse specialist CNS, 22(4), 179-183.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to describe master’s-level evidence-based practice (EBP) competencies as determined by a national consensus panel and present an EBP matrix that illustrates the influence that the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice can have on driving EBP change. BACKGROUND: Evidence-based practice is a growing and necessary paradigm for nursing care. The ACE Star Model conceptualizes the knowledge transformation that must occur in an EBP environment as 5 distinct points: discovery, summary, translation, integration, and evaluation. Master’s-level EBP competencies based on these 5 steps were established by a national consensus panel. The CNS’s practice can be organized around 5 domains: expert practitioner, researcher, consultant, educator, and leader. The master’s-level EBP competencies can be transposed on a crosswalk of the ACE Star Model and the 5 CNS practice domains to form a matrix representing the influence that CNSs can have over the EBP process. IMPLICATIONS: Each competency falls well within the practice domains of the CNS, making the CNS an ideal person to lead the EBP movement forward, providing tangible outcomes to further demonstrate the need for the CNS role.

    @article{RefWorks:935,
      author={D. L. Kring},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Clinical nurse specialist practice domains and evidence-based practice competencies: a matrix of influence },
      journal={Clinical nurse specialist CNS},
      volume={22},
      number={4},
      pages={179-183},
      note={id: 2905; PUBM: Print; JID: 8709115; ppublish },
      abstract={PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to describe master's-level evidence-based practice (EBP) competencies as determined by a national consensus panel and present an EBP matrix that illustrates the influence that the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice can have on driving EBP change. BACKGROUND: Evidence-based practice is a growing and necessary paradigm for nursing care. The ACE Star Model conceptualizes the knowledge transformation that must occur in an EBP environment as 5 distinct points: discovery, summary, translation, integration, and evaluation. Master's-level EBP competencies based on these 5 steps were established by a national consensus panel. The CNS's practice can be organized around 5 domains: expert practitioner, researcher, consultant, educator, and leader. The master's-level EBP competencies can be transposed on a crosswalk of the ACE Star Model and the 5 CNS practice domains to form a matrix representing the influence that CNSs can have over the EBP process. IMPLICATIONS: Each competency falls well within the practice domains of the CNS, making the CNS an ideal person to lead the EBP movement forward, providing tangible outcomes to further demonstrate the need for the CNS role. },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Education, Nursing, Graduate; Evidence-Based Medicine; Models, Nursing; Specialties, Nursing},
      isbn={1538-9782},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Leasure, A. R., Stirlen, J., & Thompson, C.. (2008). Barriers and facilitators to the use of evidence-based best practices . Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing, 27(2), 74-84.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The continued use of healthcare interventions without an evidence base increases healthcare costs without positively impacting patient care outcomes. Reports disseminated by bodies such as the Institute of Medicine and initiatives such as the Institute for Health Care Improvement’s 5 Million Lives Campaign have increased emphasis on improving outcomes. Results of a descriptive correlational study indicated that 64% of the nurses surveyed read 1 or more specialty journals, 53% read 1 or more general nursing journal, 20% did not regularly read any professional journal, and none of the nurses surveyed read a journal that was primarily dedicated to the publication of original research. Almost half of the nurses indicated that the hospital library was the nearest location to conduct searches, and 34% indicated that they did not know what literature-searching capabilities were available to them. Although knowledge in itself is not sufficient for behavior change, it is an essential prerequisite. Regular reading of journals either through personal subscriptions or access through facility libraries can encourage the adoption of new evidence through lifelong learning. Modeling and skill building in use of readily available Internet resources can serve as a mechanism to increase awareness of and skill in accessing current information. Evidence-based changes can then be empirically examined, implemented, and evaluated in examining nursing’s contribution to the daily operation of the healthcare organization.

    @article{RefWorks:936,
      author={A. R. Leasure and J. Stirlen and C. Thompson},
      year={2008},
      month={03},
      title={Barriers and facilitators to the use of evidence-based best practices },
      journal={Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing},
      volume={27},
      number={2},
      pages={74-84},
      note={id: 2313; Accession Number: 2009860430. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080425. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; exam questions; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Critical Care; Evidence-Based Practice. Grant Information: Partially supported by the University of Oklahoma College of Nursing Patricia R. Forni Dean's Fund. No. of Refs: 74 ref. NLM UID: 8211489. },
      abstract={The continued use of healthcare interventions without an evidence base increases healthcare costs without positively impacting patient care outcomes. Reports disseminated by bodies such as the Institute of Medicine and initiatives such as the Institute for Health Care Improvement's 5 Million Lives Campaign have increased emphasis on improving outcomes. Results of a descriptive correlational study indicated that 64% of the nurses surveyed read 1 or more specialty journals, 53% read 1 or more general nursing journal, 20% did not regularly read any professional journal, and none of the nurses surveyed read a journal that was primarily dedicated to the publication of original research. Almost half of the nurses indicated that the hospital library was the nearest location to conduct searches, and 34% indicated that they did not know what literature-searching capabilities were available to them. Although knowledge in itself is not sufficient for behavior change, it is an essential prerequisite. Regular reading of journals either through personal subscriptions or access through facility libraries can encourage the adoption of new evidence through lifelong learning. Modeling and skill building in use of readily available Internet resources can serve as a mechanism to increase awareness of and skill in accessing current information. Evidence-based changes can then be empirically examined, implemented, and evaluated in examining nursing's contribution to the daily operation of the healthcare organization. },
      keywords={Nurse Attitudes; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based -- Utilization; Access to Information; Adult; Coefficient Alpha; Convenience Sample; Correlational Studies; Descriptive Research; Descriptive Statistics; Education, Continuing (Credit); Funding Source; Mail; Middle Age; Nurse Attitudes -- Evaluation; Nursing Knowledge; Practice Guidelines; Questionnaires; Serial Publications -- Utilization; Summated Rating Scaling},
      isbn={0730-4625},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009860430&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • MacLaren, J. E., Cohen, L. L., Larkin, K. T., & Shelton, E. N.. (2008). Training nursing students in evidence-based techniques for cognitive-behavioral pediatric pain management . The Journal of nursing education, 47(8), 351-358.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study evaluates the effects of a didactic training program for nursing students involving developmentally appropriate strategies for cognitive-behavioral pain management in children. Junior-level nursing students were assigned to one of two groups: training or control. Pretraining and posttraining knowledge and attitudes toward pain management were assessed. Implementation of cognitive-behavioral strategies was assessed via clinical role-play. Training participants had significantly more knowledge of cognitive-behavioral strategies after the training program versus before it, and they had more knowledge after the training program than did control participants. The training had no effect on attitude. In the role-play, training participants used a higher ratio of cognitive-behavioral strategies and implemented them in a higher quality manner than did control participants. These results suggest that a brief training program in cognitive-behavioral pain management can improve nursing students’ knowledge of cognitive-behavioral pain management strategies and ability to implement them.

    @article{RefWorks:937,
      author={J. E. MacLaren and L. L. Cohen and K. T. Larkin and E. N. Shelton},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={Training nursing students in evidence-based techniques for cognitive-behavioral pediatric pain management },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={47},
      number={8},
      pages={351-358},
      note={id: 2790; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={This study evaluates the effects of a didactic training program for nursing students involving developmentally appropriate strategies for cognitive-behavioral pain management in children. Junior-level nursing students were assigned to one of two groups: training or control. Pretraining and posttraining knowledge and attitudes toward pain management were assessed. Implementation of cognitive-behavioral strategies was assessed via clinical role-play. Training participants had significantly more knowledge of cognitive-behavioral strategies after the training program versus before it, and they had more knowledge after the training program than did control participants. The training had no effect on attitude. In the role-play, training participants used a higher ratio of cognitive-behavioral strategies and implemented them in a higher quality manner than did control participants. These results suggest that a brief training program in cognitive-behavioral pain management can improve nursing students' knowledge of cognitive-behavioral pain management strategies and ability to implement them. },
      keywords={Adult; Analgesia/methods/nursing; Analysis of Variance; Attitude of Health Personnel; Child; Clinical Competence/standards; Cognitive Therapy/education/methods; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Imagery (Psychotherapy)/education; Male; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Pain/diagnosis/prevention & control; Patient Simulation; Pediatric Nursing/education/methods; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; Relaxation Techniques/education; Role Playing; Students, Nursing/psychology; Videotape Recording},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Meeker, M. A., Jones, J. M., & Flanagan, N. A.. (2008). Teaching undergraduate nursing research from an evidence-based practice perspective . The Journal of nursing education, 47(8), 376-379.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    We revised the undergraduate nursing research course using levels of evidence as the template with which to organize the course content and learning activities. A primary purpose in restructuring the course using an evidence-based practice framework was to increase student interest and engagement, and to promote the development of practitioners who will continue to learn about and use research. Learning to systematically locate, evaluate, and use the best available research is the hallmark of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives. Students developed these skills as they sought the answer to a specific clinical problem. One of the most significant outcomes of this approach was students’ ability to integrate previously fragmented components of research knowledge and to see the relevance of research evidence for providing excellent patient care.

    @article{RefWorks:938,
      author={M. A. Meeker and J. M. Jones and N. A. Flanagan},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={Teaching undergraduate nursing research from an evidence-based practice perspective },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={47},
      number={8},
      pages={376-379},
      note={id: 2793; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; RF: 16; ppublish },
      abstract={We revised the undergraduate nursing research course using levels of evidence as the template with which to organize the course content and learning activities. A primary purpose in restructuring the course using an evidence-based practice framework was to increase student interest and engagement, and to promote the development of practitioners who will continue to learn about and use research. Learning to systematically locate, evaluate, and use the best available research is the hallmark of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives. Students developed these skills as they sought the answer to a specific clinical problem. One of the most significant outcomes of this approach was students' ability to integrate previously fragmented components of research knowledge and to see the relevance of research evidence for providing excellent patient care. },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Curriculum/standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Needs Assessment; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education; Organizational Objectives; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Problem Solving; Program Development; Research Design; Students, Nursing/psychology; Teaching/organization & administration},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Morris, J., & Maynard, V.. (2008). The feasibility of introducing an evidence based practice cycle into a clinical area: An evaluation of process and outcome . Nurse education in practice.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The aim was to examine the feasibility of introducing an evidence based practice (EBP) cycle into a practice area within an undergraduate pre-registration programme. The cycle involved four meetings over five weeks on a cardiac intensive care unit. Three 3rd year adult branch nursing students participated with their mentors. A web page for the project was developed to support the process. Evaluation focused on changes in EBP knowledge and skills and issues around implementation and perceived value of the EBP cycle. The findings showed that the EBP cycle was straight forward to set up and was recognised as being of value by both students and mentors. The students demonstrated modest improvements in EBP knowledge and skills. The main problems were lack of time and difficulties in accessing on-line resources.

    @article{RefWorks:939,
      author={J. Morris and V. Maynard},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug 14},
      title={The feasibility of introducing an evidence based practice cycle into a clinical area: An evaluation of process and outcome },
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      note={id: 2900; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 101090848; 2007/08/01 [received]; 2008/06/03 [revised]; 2008/06/23 [accepted]; aheadofprint; SO: Nurse Educ Pract. 2008 Aug 14. },
      abstract={The aim was to examine the feasibility of introducing an evidence based practice (EBP) cycle into a practice area within an undergraduate pre-registration programme. The cycle involved four meetings over five weeks on a cardiac intensive care unit. Three 3rd year adult branch nursing students participated with their mentors. A web page for the project was developed to support the process. Evaluation focused on changes in EBP knowledge and skills and issues around implementation and perceived value of the EBP cycle. The findings showed that the EBP cycle was straight forward to set up and was recognised as being of value by both students and mentors. The students demonstrated modest improvements in EBP knowledge and skills. The main problems were lack of time and difficulties in accessing on-line resources. },
      isbn={1873-5223},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Munroe, D., Duffy, P., & Fisher, C.. (2008). Research for practice. Nurse knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to evidence-based practice: before and after organizational supports . MEDSURG Nursing, 17(1), 55-60.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Growing interest in the Magnet Recognition Program has fostered increased awareness and use of evidence-based nursing care practices. Increasingly, nurse administrators expect nursing practice to be evidence-based within their organizations. Achieving that expectation requires strategies that simultaneously educate, stimulate, and support all nursing staff in identifying clinical nursing questions and searching for evidence-based nursing interventions to address these questions. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the effects of such strategies at a rural community hospital. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1006,
      author={D. Munroe and P. Duffy and C. Fisher},
      year={2008},
      month={02},
      title={Research for practice. Nurse knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to evidence-based practice: before and after organizational supports },
      journal={MEDSURG Nursing},
      volume={17},
      number={1},
      pages={55-60},
      note={id: 2248; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080411. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education; Perioperative Care. No. of Refs: 21 ref. NLM UID: 9300545. },
      abstract={Growing interest in the Magnet Recognition Program has fostered increased awareness and use of evidence-based nursing care practices. Increasingly, nurse administrators expect nursing practice to be evidence-based within their organizations. Achieving that expectation requires strategies that simultaneously educate, stimulate, and support all nursing staff in identifying clinical nursing questions and searching for evidence-based nursing interventions to address these questions. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the effects of such strategies at a rural community hospital. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Nurse Attitudes; Nursing Knowledge; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Staff Development; Coefficient Alpha; Comparative Studies; Content Validity; Curriculum; Descriptive Statistics; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Educational Status; Hospitals, Rural; Inferential Statistics; Interrater Reliability; Job Experience; Pretest-Posttest Design; Questionnaires; Rural Areas; Scales; Summated Rating Scaling; Surveys; T-Tests},
      isbn={1092-0811},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009820287&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Neville, K., & Horbatt, S.. (2008). Evidence-based practice: creating a spirit of inquiry to solve clinical nursing problems . Orthopaedic nursing / National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses, 27(6), 331-7; quiz 338-9.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been demonstrated to provide the highest quality of care to patients and their families, its use in nursing has not yet been widespread. Using a case-method approach, a pilot study was conducted to explore the implementation of EBP to determine the best practice for clinical issues identified in professional nurses’ practice settings. In addition, the investigator sought to determine available evidence, identify barriers described by nurses, and gain an understanding of nurses’ perceptions regarding the use of EBP in clinical practice. Findings revealed that with mentoring and support, the formulation of PICO questions (addressing population, intervention, comparison, and outcome), retrieval of evidence, interpretation of statistics, and implementation of EBP were identified by nurses as challenging, stimulating activities that dramatically enhance nursing practice.

    @article{RefWorks:940,
      author={K. Neville and S. Horbatt},
      year={2008},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Evidence-based practice: creating a spirit of inquiry to solve clinical nursing problems },
      journal={Orthopaedic nursing / National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses},
      volume={27},
      number={6},
      pages={331-7; quiz 338-9},
      note={id: 2888; PUBM: Print; JID: 8409486; ppublish },
      abstract={Although evidence-based practice (EBP) has been demonstrated to provide the highest quality of care to patients and their families, its use in nursing has not yet been widespread. Using a case-method approach, a pilot study was conducted to explore the implementation of EBP to determine the best practice for clinical issues identified in professional nurses' practice settings. In addition, the investigator sought to determine available evidence, identify barriers described by nurses, and gain an understanding of nurses' perceptions regarding the use of EBP in clinical practice. Findings revealed that with mentoring and support, the formulation of PICO questions (addressing population, intervention, comparison, and outcome), retrieval of evidence, interpretation of statistics, and implementation of EBP were identified by nurses as challenging, stimulating activities that dramatically enhance nursing practice. },
      isbn={1542-538X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ozsoy, S. A., & Ardahan, M.. (2008). Research on knowledge sources used in nursing practices . Nurse education today, 28(5), 602-609.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This paper reports a questionnaire-based investigation into the knowledge sources used by nurses in two Turkish university hospitals, and whether these knowledge sources were related to sociodemographic variables. 78.5% of the nurses said that practice should be based on evidence and 75.9% stated that this evidence should come from research. 80.7% stated that evidence-based practice was useful. However, evidence that was not based on research constituted the first three most frequently used sources of knowledge. Sources of evidence-based on research were detected as being in the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 10th positions regarding the frequency of use. The nurses expressed a belief that nursing practices should be based on evidence, but did not reflect this belief in their behavior.

    @article{RefWorks:941,
      author={S. A. Ozsoy and M. Ardahan},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul},
      title={Research on knowledge sources used in nursing practices },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={28},
      number={5},
      pages={602-609},
      note={id: 2907; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 8511379; 2006/10/26 [received]; 2007/08/22 [revised]; 2007/09/22 [accepted]; 2007/11/07 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={This paper reports a questionnaire-based investigation into the knowledge sources used by nurses in two Turkish university hospitals, and whether these knowledge sources were related to sociodemographic variables. 78.5% of the nurses said that practice should be based on evidence and 75.9% stated that this evidence should come from research. 80.7% stated that evidence-based practice was useful. However, evidence that was not based on research constituted the first three most frequently used sources of knowledge. Sources of evidence-based on research were detected as being in the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, and 10th positions regarding the frequency of use. The nurses expressed a belief that nursing practices should be based on evidence, but did not reflect this belief in their behavior. },
      keywords={Adult; Analysis of Variance; Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Computers; Computer Literacy; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Hospitals, University; Humans; Information Services; Internet; Knowledge; Middle Aged; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Research/education; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Professional Competence; Questionnaires; Socioeconomic Factors; Turkey},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pipe, T. B., Cisar, N. S., Caruso, E., & Wellik, K. E.. (2008). Leadership strategies: inspiring evidence-based practice at the individual, unit, and organizational levels . Journal of nursing care quality, 23(3), 265-271.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes innovative educational strategies used by one organization to simultaneously develop leadership skills and evidence-based practice. The methods were theory-driven and designed to positively affect the nursing culture at the individual, unit, and organizational levels. Case studies, outcomes, and lessons learned are also included.

    @article{RefWorks:942,
      author={T. B. Pipe and N. S. Cisar and E. Caruso and K. E. Wellik},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Leadership strategies: inspiring evidence-based practice at the individual, unit, and organizational levels },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={23},
      number={3},
      pages={265-271},
      note={id: 2906; PUBM: Print; JID: 9200672; ppublish },
      abstract={This article describes innovative educational strategies used by one organization to simultaneously develop leadership skills and evidence-based practice. The methods were theory-driven and designed to positively affect the nursing culture at the individual, unit, and organizational levels. Case studies, outcomes, and lessons learned are also included. },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Humans; Leadership; Libraries, Nursing/organization & administration; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Needs Assessment; Nurse Administrators/organization & administration/psychology; Nurse's Role; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Social Support},
      isbn={1057-3631},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rush, K. L.. (2008). Connecting practice to evidence using laptop computers in the classroom . CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 26(4), 190-198.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Evidenced-based practice is no longer a "frill" but a necessity, demanded by an evolving healthcare system and the needs of practice, professional nursing bodies, and American consumers who want safe, quality care. Although its importance has been touted by the profession, incorporating evidence into practice is not a skill for which nurses at point of care are ready. Preparation for evidence-based practice must begin in basic educational programs. Yet, the process of using evidence to guide practice is complex especially for undergraduate students who are only beginning to ask questions let alone answer them. Nursing schools have responded to the professional call to evidence-based practice with the use of a variety of teaching approaches. This article presents a unique approach, not previously described, involving the use of laptops in an undergraduate nursing research course to equip students for evidence-based practice, giving students hands-on experience with the process and introducing students to online resources. Student feedback and educator reflections highlight the value of the technology in expediting student learning and comfort with evidence-based practice.

    @article{RefWorks:943,
      author={K. L. Rush},
      year={2008},
      month={07},
      title={Connecting practice to evidence using laptop computers in the classroom },
      journal={CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={4},
      pages={190-198},
      note={id: 2857; Accession Number: 2009968025. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080822. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; exam questions. Journal Subset: Computer/Information Science; Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Informatics; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 27 ref. NLM UID: 101141667. },
      abstract={Evidenced-based practice is no longer a "frill" but a necessity, demanded by an evolving healthcare system and the needs of practice, professional nursing bodies, and American consumers who want safe, quality care. Although its importance has been touted by the profession, incorporating evidence into practice is not a skill for which nurses at point of care are ready. Preparation for evidence-based practice must begin in basic educational programs. Yet, the process of using evidence to guide practice is complex especially for undergraduate students who are only beginning to ask questions let alone answer them. Nursing schools have responded to the professional call to evidence-based practice with the use of a variety of teaching approaches. This article presents a unique approach, not previously described, involving the use of laptops in an undergraduate nursing research course to equip students for evidence-based practice, giving students hands-on experience with the process and introducing students to online resources. Student feedback and educator reflections highlight the value of the technology in expediting student learning and comfort with evidence-based practice. },
      keywords={Computer Assisted Instruction; Computer Literacy; Computerized Literature Searching, End User -- Education; Computers, Portable -- Utilization; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Information Literacy; Library User Education; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; CINAHL Database -- Utilization; Education, Continuing (Credit); Faculty, Nursing; Medline -- Education; Program Evaluation; Program Implementation; Student Satisfaction -- Evaluation},
      isbn={1538-2931},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009968025&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Schmidt, N. A.. (2008). Evidence-based practice in the nursing curriculum: ponderings on design and implementation . Annual Review of Nursing Education, 6, 237-254.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Author explores how EBP can be threaded through an undergraduate curriculum and describes student outcomes, curricular changes, and teaching strategies for incorporating EBP content in a nursing curriculum. She concludes with suggestions for developing expertise for teaching EBP. Many of the ideas presented regarding content, teaching strategies, and teaching expertise are appropriate for prelicensure nursing programs or could be adapted for graduate education as well. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1026,
      author={N. A. Schmidt},
      year={2008},
      title={Evidence-based practice in the nursing curriculum: ponderings on design and implementation },
      journal={Annual Review of Nursing Education},
      volume={6},
      pages={237-254},
      note={id: 2146; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 26 ref. NLM UID: 101160782. },
      abstract={Author explores how EBP can be threaded through an undergraduate curriculum and describes student outcomes, curricular changes, and teaching strategies for incorporating EBP content in a nursing curriculum. She concludes with suggestions for developing expertise for teaching EBP. Many of the ideas presented regarding content, teaching strategies, and teaching expertise are appropriate for prelicensure nursing programs or could be adapted for graduate education as well. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1542-412X},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=2931; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009811146&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Schulman, C. S.. (2008). Strategies for starting a successful evidence-based practice program . AACN advanced critical care, 19(3), 301-11; quiz 312-3.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Today’s nurses must provide care that is based on the best available evidence. Creating a program that supports the routine use of evidence-based practice (EBP) can seem complicated and time-consuming. This article provides a practical description of the critical elements to consider when starting an EBP program. A successful program includes built-in organizational supports for clinical inquiry, functional and efficient processes for EBP activities, and added details to sustain momentum and interest over time. Strategies for making EBP part of everyday care are identified, along with suggestions for overcoming barriers to change and ideas for acknowledging nurses for EBP work.

    @article{RefWorks:944,
      author={C. S. Schulman},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Strategies for starting a successful evidence-based practice program },
      journal={AACN advanced critical care},
      volume={19},
      number={3},
      pages={301-11; quiz 312-3},
      note={id: 2904; PUBM: Print; JID: 101269322; RF: 21; ppublish },
      abstract={Today's nurses must provide care that is based on the best available evidence. Creating a program that supports the routine use of evidence-based practice (EBP) can seem complicated and time-consuming. This article provides a practical description of the critical elements to consider when starting an EBP program. A successful program includes built-in organizational supports for clinical inquiry, functional and efficient processes for EBP activities, and added details to sustain momentum and interest over time. Strategies for making EBP part of everyday care are identified, along with suggestions for overcoming barriers to change and ideas for acknowledging nurses for EBP work. },
      keywords={Benchmarking/organization & administration; Decision Making, Organizational; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Humans; Models, Nursing; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Organizational Objectives; Organizational Policy; Planning Techniques; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration; Program Development/methods; Research Design; Social Support},
      isbn={1559-7768},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Selig, P. M., & Lewanowicz, W.. (2008). Translation to practice: developing an evidence-based practice nurse internship program . AACN advanced critical care, 19(3), 325-332.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Creating a culture of inquiry in which nurses are engaged in the pursuit of the best evidence to support nursing practice ultimately improves patient care and clinical outcomes. So, how do we do that? Implementation of an evidence-based practice nurse internship program has proven to be a key ingredient for success in stimulating critical thinking and subsequent analysis of the evidence behind nursing practice. A pragmatic approach to developing and sustaining an evidence-based practice nurse internship program can be a helpful guide for those who are considering a similar proposition. The recruitment process, education, clinical projects, and lessons learned are detailed in this article as a resource to nursing colleagues in the spirit of professional growth.

    @article{RefWorks:945,
      author={P. M. Selig and W. Lewanowicz},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Translation to practice: developing an evidence-based practice nurse internship program },
      journal={AACN advanced critical care},
      volume={19},
      number={3},
      pages={325-332},
      note={id: 2868; PUBM: Print; JID: 101269322; ppublish },
      abstract={Creating a culture of inquiry in which nurses are engaged in the pursuit of the best evidence to support nursing practice ultimately improves patient care and clinical outcomes. So, how do we do that? Implementation of an evidence-based practice nurse internship program has proven to be a key ingredient for success in stimulating critical thinking and subsequent analysis of the evidence behind nursing practice. A pragmatic approach to developing and sustaining an evidence-based practice nurse internship program can be a helpful guide for those who are considering a similar proposition. The recruitment process, education, clinical projects, and lessons learned are detailed in this article as a resource to nursing colleagues in the spirit of professional growth. },
      keywords={Algorithms; Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Decision Trees; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Information Dissemination; Internship, Nonmedical/organization & administration; Interprofessional Relations; Mentors; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration; Organizational Culture; Personnel Selection; Planning Techniques; Program Development; Research Design; Thinking},
      isbn={1559-7768},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Singleton, J., & Levin, R.. (2008). Strategies for learning evidence-based practice: critically appraising clinical practice guidelines . The Journal of nursing education, 47(8), 380-383.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nurse educators have a mandate to educate our students about using an evidence-based practice approach to clinical decision making. At the Lienhard School of Nursing, Pace University, faculty have successfully integrated evidence-based practice into the family nurse practitioner curriculum. This article describes one teaching-learning strategy to help students learn how to critically appraise clinical practice guidelines using the AGREE instrument. There are several steps to the learning exercise: completing preparatory reading, obtaining the guideline that forms the focus of the assignment, working as teams, using the AGREE tool to assess the guideline’s validity, and reporting team findings to the entire class. Students have found this learning activity helpful in preparing them for clinical practice.

    @article{RefWorks:946,
      author={J. Singleton and R. Levin},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={Strategies for learning evidence-based practice: critically appraising clinical practice guidelines },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={47},
      number={8},
      pages={380-383},
      note={id: 2794; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; RF: 14; ppublish },
      abstract={Nurse educators have a mandate to educate our students about using an evidence-based practice approach to clinical decision making. At the Lienhard School of Nursing, Pace University, faculty have successfully integrated evidence-based practice into the family nurse practitioner curriculum. This article describes one teaching-learning strategy to help students learn how to critically appraise clinical practice guidelines using the AGREE instrument. There are several steps to the learning exercise: completing preparatory reading, obtaining the guideline that forms the focus of the assignment, working as teams, using the AGREE tool to assess the guideline's validity, and reporting team findings to the entire class. Students have found this learning activity helpful in preparing them for clinical practice. },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence/standards; Decision Making; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Faculty, Nursing; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; New York City; Nurse's Role; Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Smith-Strom, H., & Nortvedt, M. W.. (2008). Evaluation of evidence-based methods used to teach nursing students to critically appraise evidence . The Journal of nursing education, 47(8), 372-375.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study evaluated whether students can learn to critically appraise a scientific article through evidence-based teaching methods. The course trains students in three steps of evidence-based practice–formulating a question, searching the evidence, and critically appraising the evidence. We gave the students two scientific articles. The articles were divided into sections, and 1 to 2 days were spent on each section. Every day had the same structure: a brief lecture on the relevant part of the article, group work, and interactive plenary discussions. At the end of the course, the students had a group examination in which they critically appraised a new scientific article. Most students reported that having learned steps one, two, and three involved in evidence-based practice was useful in critically appraising a scientific article. The results from the examination supported this. Knowledge about evidence-based practice can increase students’ critical attitudes toward the evidence and their own practice.

    @article{RefWorks:947,
      author={H. Smith-Strom and M. W. Nortvedt},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={Evaluation of evidence-based methods used to teach nursing students to critically appraise evidence },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={47},
      number={8},
      pages={372-375},
      note={id: 2792; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={This study evaluated whether students can learn to critically appraise a scientific article through evidence-based teaching methods. The course trains students in three steps of evidence-based practice--formulating a question, searching the evidence, and critically appraising the evidence. We gave the students two scientific articles. The articles were divided into sections, and 1 to 2 days were spent on each section. Every day had the same structure: a brief lecture on the relevant part of the article, group work, and interactive plenary discussions. At the end of the course, the students had a group examination in which they critically appraised a new scientific article. Most students reported that having learned steps one, two, and three involved in evidence-based practice was useful in critically appraising a scientific article. The results from the examination supported this. Knowledge about evidence-based practice can increase students' critical attitudes toward the evidence and their own practice. },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods/standards; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Male; Norway; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Research/education; Professional Competence/standards; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; Research Design/standards; Review Literature as Topic; Students, Nursing/psychology; Teaching/methods/standards},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Soukup, M., & McCleish, J.. (2008). Advancing evidence-based practice: a program series . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 39(9), 402-406.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The call to evidence-based practice (EBP) is evolving and empowers nurses to form innovative learning partnerships with colleagues to nourish wisdom, strengthen critical thinking, integrate research knowledge, and celebrate contributions in leading best practice. Based on clinician interest, Advancing Evidence-Based Practice: A Program Series was designed for nurses to showcase initiatives using Mercy Nursing’s EBP Model. Mentoring guides their efforts. This opportunity creates learning partnerships that encourage participants to reflect about their practice and network with colleagues about what is important for clinical excellence. It also nurtures professional growth in research development and formal presentations.

    @article{RefWorks:948,
      author={M. Soukup and J. McCleish},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep},
      title={Advancing evidence-based practice: a program series },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={39},
      number={9},
      pages={402-406},
      note={id: 2894; PUBM: Print; JID: 0262321; ppublish },
      abstract={The call to evidence-based practice (EBP) is evolving and empowers nurses to form innovative learning partnerships with colleagues to nourish wisdom, strengthen critical thinking, integrate research knowledge, and celebrate contributions in leading best practice. Based on clinician interest, Advancing Evidence-Based Practice: A Program Series was designed for nurses to showcase initiatives using Mercy Nursing's EBP Model. Mentoring guides their efforts. This opportunity creates learning partnerships that encourage participants to reflect about their practice and network with colleagues about what is important for clinical excellence. It also nurtures professional growth in research development and formal presentations. },
      keywords={Benchmarking/organization & administration; Curriculum; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Humans; Information Dissemination; Iowa; Mentors/education/psychology; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Preceptorship/organization & administration; Program Development; Program Evaluation},
      isbn={0022-0124},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Stetler, C. B., McQueen, L., Demakis, J., & Mittman, B. S.. (2008). An organizational framework and strategic implementation for system-level change to enhance research-based practice: QUERI Series (LC – add to EBP) . Implementation science : IS, 3, 30.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The continuing gap between available evidence and current practice in health care reinforces the need for more effective solutions, in particular related to organizational context. Considerable advances have been made within the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VA) in systematically implementing evidence into practice. These advances have been achieved through a system-level program focused on collaboration and partnerships among policy makers, clinicians, and researchers.The Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) was created to generate research-driven initiatives that directly enhance health care quality within the VA and, simultaneously, contribute to the field of implementation science. This paradigm-shifting effort provided a natural laboratory for exploring organizational change processes. This article describes the underlying change framework and implementation strategy used to operationalize QUERI. STRATEGIC APPROACH TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE: QUERI used an evidence-based organizational framework focused on three contextual elements: 1) cultural norms and values, in this case related to the role of health services researchers in evidence-based quality improvement; 2) capacity, in this case among researchers and key partners to engage in implementation research; 3) and supportive infrastructures to reinforce expectations for change and to sustain new behaviors as part of the norm. As part of a QUERI Series in Implementation Science, this article describes the framework’s application in an innovative integration of health services research, policy, and clinical care delivery. CONCLUSION: QUERI’s experience and success provide a case study in organizational change. It demonstrates that progress requires a strategic, systems-based effort. QUERI’s evidence-based initiative involved a deliberate cultural shift, requiring ongoing commitment in multiple forms and at multiple levels. VA’s commitment to QUERI came in the form of visionary leadership, targeted allocation of resources, infrastructure refinements, innovative peer review and study methods, and direct involvement of key stakeholders. Stakeholders included both those providing and managing clinical care, as well as those producing relevant evidence within the health care system. The organizational framework and related implementation interventions used to achieve contextual change resulted in engaged investigators and enhanced uptake of research knowledge. QUERI’s approach and progress provide working hypotheses for others pursuing similar system-wide efforts to routinely achieve evidence-based care.

    @article{RefWorks:949,
      author={C. B. Stetler and L. McQueen and J. Demakis and B. S. Mittman},
      year={2008},
      month={May 29},
      title={An organizational framework and strategic implementation for system-level change to enhance research-based practice: QUERI Series (LC - add to EBP) },
      journal={Implementation science : IS},
      volume={3},
      pages={30},
      note={id: 2315; PUBM: Electronic; DEP: 20080529; JID: 101258411; PMC2430586; 2006/08/22 [received]; 2008/05/29 [accepted]; 2008/05/29 [aheadofprint]; epublish },
      abstract={ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The continuing gap between available evidence and current practice in health care reinforces the need for more effective solutions, in particular related to organizational context. Considerable advances have been made within the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VA) in systematically implementing evidence into practice. These advances have been achieved through a system-level program focused on collaboration and partnerships among policy makers, clinicians, and researchers.The Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) was created to generate research-driven initiatives that directly enhance health care quality within the VA and, simultaneously, contribute to the field of implementation science. This paradigm-shifting effort provided a natural laboratory for exploring organizational change processes. This article describes the underlying change framework and implementation strategy used to operationalize QUERI. STRATEGIC APPROACH TO ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE: QUERI used an evidence-based organizational framework focused on three contextual elements: 1) cultural norms and values, in this case related to the role of health services researchers in evidence-based quality improvement; 2) capacity, in this case among researchers and key partners to engage in implementation research; 3) and supportive infrastructures to reinforce expectations for change and to sustain new behaviors as part of the norm. As part of a QUERI Series in Implementation Science, this article describes the framework's application in an innovative integration of health services research, policy, and clinical care delivery. CONCLUSION: QUERI's experience and success provide a case study in organizational change. It demonstrates that progress requires a strategic, systems-based effort. QUERI's evidence-based initiative involved a deliberate cultural shift, requiring ongoing commitment in multiple forms and at multiple levels. VA's commitment to QUERI came in the form of visionary leadership, targeted allocation of resources, infrastructure refinements, innovative peer review and study methods, and direct involvement of key stakeholders. Stakeholders included both those providing and managing clinical care, as well as those producing relevant evidence within the health care system. The organizational framework and related implementation interventions used to achieve contextual change resulted in engaged investigators and enhanced uptake of research knowledge. QUERI's approach and progress provide working hypotheses for others pursuing similar system-wide efforts to routinely achieve evidence-based care. },
      isbn={1748-5908},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Tanner, C. A.. (2008). Clinical judgment and evidence-based practice: toward pedagogies of integration . The Journal of nursing education, 47(8), 335-336.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Given what we know about learning and about the lack of content retention that is superficially covered and never used, perhaps we should focus on teaching these techniques really well and use our time to help students link their assessment findings with their clinical reasoning and judgment: focused assessment based on initial observations, interpretation of findings, and decisions about appropriate action. So our next generation of innovation and research is pedagogies of integration, in which students learn facts through experience with evidence-based practice, as used in the service of clinical reasoning and judgment. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:950,
      author={C. A. Tanner},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={Clinical judgment and evidence-based practice: toward pedagogies of integration },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={47},
      number={8},
      pages={335-336},
      note={id: 2898; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={Given what we know about learning and about the lack of content retention that is superficially covered and never used, perhaps we should focus on teaching these techniques really well and use our time to help students link their assessment findings with their clinical reasoning and judgment: focused assessment based on initial observations, interpretation of findings, and decisions about appropriate action. So our next generation of innovation and research is pedagogies of integration, in which students learn facts through experience with evidence-based practice, as used in the service of clinical reasoning and judgment. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Decision Making; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Education, Nursing, Graduate; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Humans; Judgment; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Problem-Based Learning},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Vessey, J. A., & DeMarco, R. F.. (2008). The undergraduate research fellows program: a unique model to promote engagement in research . Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 24(6), 358-363.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Well-educated nurses with research expertise are needed to advance evidence-based nursing practice. A primary goal of undergraduate nursing curricula is to create meaningful participatory experiences to help students develop a research skill set that articulates with rapid career advancement of gifted, young graduates interested in nursing research and faculty careers. Three research enrichment models-undergraduate honors programs, research assistant work-for-hire programs, and research work/mentorship programs-to be in conjunction with standard research content are reviewed. The development and implementation of one research work/mentorship program, the Boston College undergraduate research fellows program (UGRF), is explicated. This process included surveying previous UGRFs followed by creating a retreat and seminars to address specific research skill sets. The research skill sets included (a) how to develop a research team, (b) accurate data retrieval, (c) ethical considerations, (d) the research process, (e) data management, (f) successful writing of abstracts, and (g) creating effective poster presentations. Outcomes include evidence of involvement in research productivity and valuing of evidenced-based practice through the UGRF mentorship process with faculty partners.

    @article{RefWorks:951,
      author={J. A. Vessey and R. F. DeMarco},
      year={2008},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={The undergraduate research fellows program: a unique model to promote engagement in research },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={24},
      number={6},
      pages={358-363},
      note={id: 2890; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511298; 2007/07/23 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Well-educated nurses with research expertise are needed to advance evidence-based nursing practice. A primary goal of undergraduate nursing curricula is to create meaningful participatory experiences to help students develop a research skill set that articulates with rapid career advancement of gifted, young graduates interested in nursing research and faculty careers. Three research enrichment models-undergraduate honors programs, research assistant work-for-hire programs, and research work/mentorship programs-to be in conjunction with standard research content are reviewed. The development and implementation of one research work/mentorship program, the Boston College undergraduate research fellows program (UGRF), is explicated. This process included surveying previous UGRFs followed by creating a retreat and seminars to address specific research skill sets. The research skill sets included (a) how to develop a research team, (b) accurate data retrieval, (c) ethical considerations, (d) the research process, (e) data management, (f) successful writing of abstracts, and (g) creating effective poster presentations. Outcomes include evidence of involvement in research productivity and valuing of evidenced-based practice through the UGRF mentorship process with faculty partners. },
      isbn={1532-8481},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Zadvinskis, I. M.. (2008). Increasing knowledge level of evidence-based nursing through self-directed learning: lessons learned for staff development . Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization, 24(4), E13-9.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Recent literature and Magnet standards emphasize the promotion of evidence-based practice in nursing. Nurses prepared over 5 years ago may not necessarily have received education regarding the principles of evidence-based practice. Therefore, an independent study was developed to educate staff nurses regarding the basics of evidence-based practice. The development of a self-directed independent study is described, including the rationale, benefits, course content, and lessons learned when teaching evidence-based practice through self-directed learning.

    @article{RefWorks:952,
      author={I. M. Zadvinskis},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Increasing knowledge level of evidence-based nursing through self-directed learning: lessons learned for staff development },
      journal={Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization},
      volume={24},
      number={4},
      pages={E13-9},
      note={id: 2901; PUBM: Print; JID: 9809908; ppublish },
      abstract={Recent literature and Magnet standards emphasize the promotion of evidence-based practice in nursing. Nurses prepared over 5 years ago may not necessarily have received education regarding the principles of evidence-based practice. Therefore, an independent study was developed to educate staff nurses regarding the basics of evidence-based practice. The development of a self-directed independent study is described, including the rationale, benefits, course content, and lessons learned when teaching evidence-based practice through self-directed learning. },
      isbn={1538-9049},
      language={eng}
    }

2007

  • Aronson, B. S., Rebeschi, L. M., & Killion, S. W.. (2007). Enhancing evidence bases for interventions in a baccalaureate program . Nursing Education Perspectives, 28(5), 257-262.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Modifying the sequence, objectives, and research-based content for a nursing interventions course in a baccalaureate curriculum resulted in improved outcomes including enhancement of the evidence bases for nursing interventions. A mixed methods research study demonstrated better student preparation for clinical experiences and improved satisfaction with course content, consistency, and sequencing. Faculty reported improved integration of theory, research, and practice. Although grades were slightly lower in the new course, the positive outcomes greatly outweighed this expected finding. A foundation for improving the evidence bases for future nursing practice is guided by the curricular modifications described in this article. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:955,
      author={B. S. Aronson and L. M. Rebeschi and S. W. Killion},
      year={2007},
      title={Enhancing evidence bases for interventions in a baccalaureate program },
      journal={Nursing Education Perspectives},
      volume={28},
      number={5},
      pages={257-262},
      note={id: 2140; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080104. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. Grant Information: Supported by a Connecticut State University Learning Assessment and Improvement Grant and a research grant from Mu Beta, Sigma Theta Tau. No. of Refs: 14 ref. NLM UID: 101140025. Email: aronsonb1@southernct.edu.. },
      abstract={Modifying the sequence, objectives, and research-based content for a nursing interventions course in a baccalaureate curriculum resulted in improved outcomes including enhancement of the evidence bases for nursing interventions. A mixed methods research study demonstrated better student preparation for clinical experiences and improved satisfaction with course content, consistency, and sequencing. Faculty reported improved integration of theory, research, and practice. Although grades were slightly lower in the new course, the positive outcomes greatly outweighed this expected finding. A foundation for improving the evidence bases for future nursing practice is guided by the curricular modifications described in this article. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Nursing Interventions -- Education; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Nursing Skills -- Education; Teaching Methods -- Evaluation; Academic Achievement; Audiorecording; Behavioral Objectives; Connecticut; Content Analysis; Convenience Sample; Course Evaluation; Descriptive Research; Descriptive Statistics; Education Research; Evaluation Research; Faculty Attitudes -- Evaluation; Faculty, Nursing; Focus Groups; Funding Source; Multimethod Studies; Purposive Sample; Record Review; Schools, Nursing; Student Attitudes -- Evaluation; T-Tests; Thematic Analysis; Theory-Practice Relationship; Two-Tailed Test},
      isbn={1536-5026},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=2239&accno=2009679533; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009679533&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Brady, N., & Lewin, L.. (2007). Evidence-based practice in nursing: Bridging the gap between research and practice . Journal of pediatric health care, 21(1), 53-56.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Research indicates that the majority of nurses are not aware of the latest research findings available to optimize their nursing care. Instead of relying on research findings, nurses rely on intuition, tradition, and the authority of policies and procedures for direction in particular situations. This article presents a brief discussion of EPB in nursing and why it is critical that nurses understand the process of moving toward an evidence base for practice. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @article{RefWorks:960,
      author={N. Brady and L. Lewin},
      year={2007},
      month={01},
      title={Evidence-based practice in nursing: Bridging the gap between research and practice },
      journal={Journal of pediatric health care},
      volume={21},
      number={1},
      pages={53-56},
      note={id: 1135; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070406. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. No. of Refs: 11 ref. PMID: 17198901 NLM UID: 8709735. },
      abstract={Research indicates that the majority of nurses are not aware of the latest research findings available to optimize their nursing care. Instead of relying on research findings, nurses rely on intuition, tradition, and the authority of policies and procedures for direction in particular situations. This article presents a brief discussion of EPB in nursing and why it is critical that nurses understand the process of moving toward an evidence base for practice. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Research, Nursing--Utilization; Computerized Literature Searching, End User; History of Nursing; Nursing Knowledge; Reference Databases, Health}
    }

  • Burman, M. E., Hart, A. M., Brown, J., & Sterard, P.. (2007). Educational innovations. Use of oral examinations to teach concepts of evidence-based practice to nurse practitioner students . Journal of nursing education, 46(5), 238-242.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Evidence-based practice has become part of nurse practitioner education. One innovative approach to teaching and evaluating evidence-based practice is the implementation of oral examinations, in which students orally present their review of a research article. Prior to the examination, students are given a research article to critique and can prepare for the examination using their notes and textbooks. At a scheduled time, they meet with a faculty member to respond to both predetermined and unexpected questions requiring critique of the research and thorough explanation of how it will (or will not) influence their practice. Although this approach may produce anxiety in students, it provides another way to evaluate students’ ability to communicate about a complex topic and is an excellent complementary evaluation method to other approaches, such as case studies or written examinations. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:966,
      author={M. E. Burman and A. M. Hart and J. Brown and P. Sterard},
      year={2007},
      title={Educational innovations. Use of oral examinations to teach concepts of evidence-based practice to nurse practitioner students },
      journal={Journal of nursing education},
      volume={46},
      number={5},
      pages={238-242},
      note={id: 1347; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070615. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 11 ref. PMID: 17547349 NLM UID: 7705432. Email: mburman@uwyo.edu. },
      abstract={Evidence-based practice has become part of nurse practitioner education. One innovative approach to teaching and evaluating evidence-based practice is the implementation of oral examinations, in which students orally present their review of a research article. Prior to the examination, students are given a research article to critique and can prepare for the examination using their notes and textbooks. At a scheduled time, they meet with a faculty member to respond to both predetermined and unexpected questions requiring critique of the research and thorough explanation of how it will (or will not) influence their practice. Although this approach may produce anxiety in students, it provides another way to evaluate students' ability to communicate about a complex topic and is an excellent complementary evaluation method to other approaches, such as case studies or written examinations. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Masters; Educational Measurement; Nurse Practitioners--Education; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based--Education; Student Performance Appraisal; Clinical Trials--Evaluation; Faculty Role; Student Attitudes--Evaluation; Student Satisfaction--Evaluation}
    }

  • Burman, M. E., Hart, A. M., Brown, J., & Sherard, P.. (2007). Use of oral examinations to teach concepts of evidence-based practice to nurse practitioner students . The Journal of nursing education, 46(5), 238-242.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Evidence-based practice has become part of nurse practitioner education. One innovative approach to teaching and evaluating evidence-based practice is the implementation of oral examinations, in which students orally present their review of a research article. Prior to the examination, students are given a research article to critique and can prepare for the examination using their notes and textbooks. At a scheduled time, they meet with a faculty member to respond to both predetermined and unexpected questions requiring critique of the research and thorough explanation of how it will (or will not) influence their practice. Although this approach may produce anxiety in students, it provides another way to evaluate students’ ability to communicate about a complex topic and is an excellent complementary evaluation method to other approaches, such as case studies or written examinations. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:965,
      author={M. E. Burman and A. M. Hart and J. Brown and P. Sherard},
      year={2007},
      month={May},
      title={Use of oral examinations to teach concepts of evidence-based practice to nurse practitioner students },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={46},
      number={5},
      pages={238-242},
      note={id: 1086; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={Evidence-based practice has become part of nurse practitioner education. One innovative approach to teaching and evaluating evidence-based practice is the implementation of oral examinations, in which students orally present their review of a research article. Prior to the examination, students are given a research article to critique and can prepare for the examination using their notes and textbooks. At a scheduled time, they meet with a faculty member to respond to both predetermined and unexpected questions requiring critique of the research and thorough explanation of how it will (or will not) influence their practice. Although this approach may produce anxiety in students, it provides another way to evaluate students' ability to communicate about a complex topic and is an excellent complementary evaluation method to other approaches, such as case studies or written examinations. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Caldwell, K., Coleman, K., Copp, G., Bell, L., & Ghazi, F.. (2007). Preparing for professional practice: How well does professional training equip health and social care practitioners to engage in evidence-based practice? . Nurse education today, 27(6), 518-528.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This paper reports on the findings of a study that aimed to explore how relevant initial training is in relation to evidence-based practice, and explore the perceptions of recently qualified practitioners about their confidence to engage in evidence-based practice. A cross-sectional postal survey was used to ascertain the views of nurses, social workers, occupational therapists and physiotherapists who had been qualified no longer than two years prior to the survey, and had qualified at one of three London Universities. Fifty questionnaires were sent out to each professional group (a sample of 200 overall) and there was a 43% response rate achieved. The results show a clear discrepancy between what are generally positive attitudes towards evidence-based practice and the value of research evidence and the infrequency with which they actually do make use of research resources and engage in evidence-based practice. A number of constraints to engagement in accessing and utilising evidence were identified. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:969,
      author={K. Caldwell and K. Coleman and G. Copp and L. Bell and F. Ghazi},
      year={2007},
      month={08},
      title={Preparing for professional practice: How well does professional training equip health and social care practitioners to engage in evidence-based practice? },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={27},
      number={6},
      pages={518-528},
      note={id: 2153; Language: English. Entry Date: 20071109. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Nursing; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 38 ref. NLM UID: 8511379. },
      abstract={This paper reports on the findings of a study that aimed to explore how relevant initial training is in relation to evidence-based practice, and explore the perceptions of recently qualified practitioners about their confidence to engage in evidence-based practice. A cross-sectional postal survey was used to ascertain the views of nurses, social workers, occupational therapists and physiotherapists who had been qualified no longer than two years prior to the survey, and had qualified at one of three London Universities. Fifty questionnaires were sent out to each professional group (a sample of 200 overall) and there was a 43% response rate achieved. The results show a clear discrepancy between what are generally positive attitudes towards evidence-based practice and the value of research evidence and the infrequency with which they actually do make use of research resources and engage in evidence-based practice. A number of constraints to engagement in accessing and utilising evidence were identified. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Education, Occupational Therapy; Education, Physical Therapy; Education, Social Work; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Research -- Utilization; Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel -- Evaluation; Colleges and Universities; Cross Sectional Studies; Descriptive Research; Descriptive Statistics; Mail; Questionnaires; Random Sample; Summated Rating Scaling; United Kingdom},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009666798&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Carlock, D., & Anderson, J.. (2007). Teaching and assessing the database searching skills of student nurses . Nurse educator, 32(6), 251-255.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Critical appraisal and application of the evidence to practice cannot proceed without first finding the evidence. To teach evidence-based practice database searching skills to students, a nurse educator partnered with a librarian to design, conduct, and assess instruction. The authors describe the creation, administration, and findings from the assessments and the implications for instruction. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:971,
      author={D. Carlock and J. Anderson},
      year={2007},
      month={11},
      title={Teaching and assessing the database searching skills of student nurses },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={32},
      number={6},
      pages={251-255},
      note={id: 2150; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080222. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 18 ref. NLM UID: 7701902. },
      abstract={Critical appraisal and application of the evidence to practice cannot proceed without first finding the evidence. To teach evidence-based practice database searching skills to students, a nurse educator partnered with a librarian to design, conduct, and assess instruction. The authors describe the creation, administration, and findings from the assessments and the implications for instruction. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer Literacy -- Education; Computerized Literature Searching -- Education; Databases; Education, Nursing; Adult; Arizona; CINAHL Database; Convenience Sample; Descriptive Statistics; Education Research; Faculty, Nursing; Female; Librarians; Male; Middle Age; Prospective Studies; Schools, Nursing; Student Performance Appraisal; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=276&accno=2009742875; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009742875&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Cronenwett, L., Sherwood, G., Barnsteiner, J., Disch, J., Johnson, J., Mitchell, P., Sullivan, D. T., & Warren, J.. (2007). Quality and safety education for nurses . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 122-131.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) addresses the challenge of preparing nurses with the competencies necessary to continuously improve the quality and safety of the health care systems in which they work. The QSEN faculty members adapted the Institute of Medicine competencies for nursing (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics), proposing definitions that could describe essential features of what it means to be a competent and respected nurse. Using the competency definitions, the authors propose statements of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) for each competency that should be developed during pre-licensure nursing education. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) faculty and advisory board members invite the profession to comment on the competencies and their definitions and on whether the KSAs for pre-licensure education are appropriate goals for students preparing for basic practice as a registered nurse. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:973,
      author={L. Cronenwett and G. Sherwood and J. Barnsteiner and J. Disch and J. Johnson and P. Mitchell and D. T. Sullivan and J. Warren},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Quality and safety education for nurses },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={122-131},
      note={id: 1093; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/02 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) addresses the challenge of preparing nurses with the competencies necessary to continuously improve the quality and safety of the health care systems in which they work. The QSEN faculty members adapted the Institute of Medicine competencies for nursing (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics), proposing definitions that could describe essential features of what it means to be a competent and respected nurse. Using the competency definitions, the authors propose statements of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) for each competency that should be developed during pre-licensure nursing education. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) faculty and advisory board members invite the profession to comment on the competencies and their definitions and on whether the KSAs for pre-licensure education are appropriate goals for students preparing for basic practice as a registered nurse. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Day, L., & Smith, E. L.. (2007). Integrating quality and safety content into clinical teaching in the acute care setting . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 138-143.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Teaching the highest quality and safest practice has long been a goal of faculty members in pre-licensure nursing education programs. This article will describe innovative approaches to integrating quality and safety content into existing clinical practica. The core competencies identified by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses project-patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics-serve as the framework for the teaching/learning exercises. The strategies described require a shift in attention rather than changes in course content and can be included in any clinical rotation in an acute care setting. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:974,
      author={L. Day and E. L. Smith},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Integrating quality and safety content into clinical teaching in the acute care setting },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={138-143},
      note={id: 1091; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/03 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Teaching the highest quality and safest practice has long been a goal of faculty members in pre-licensure nursing education programs. This article will describe innovative approaches to integrating quality and safety content into existing clinical practica. The core competencies identified by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses project-patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics-serve as the framework for the teaching/learning exercises. The strategies described require a shift in attention rather than changes in course content and can be included in any clinical rotation in an acute care setting. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Distler, J. W.. (2007). Critical thinking and clinical competence: results of the implementation of student-centered teaching strategies in an advanced practice nurse curriculum . Nurse education in practice, 7(1), 53-59.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The nursing profession has advanced dramatically over the past 50 years. People are living longer, technology is advancing at a rapid rate, and patients are presenting more critically ill. The recent move in the US and other countries away from secondary and tertiary care towards primary care will have a dramatic impact on the practice of nursing as the focus of treatment is aimed at prevention and maintenance of health. Budgetary constraints and a shrinking nursing workforce have added additional strain on the ability of nurses to remain clinically competent in this fast-paced healthcare environment. In addition, the demographics of students have shifted, with more adult and ethnically diverse students entering various nursing programs. These changes have compelled schools of nursing worldwide to revise their approach to student education to keep up with the challenge associated with these influences. Terms such as problem-based learning, critical thinking, evidence-based practice, and student-centered teaching strategies have replaced traditional terminology typically linked with education and practice. However, it appears that not all centers of nursing education have embraced the need to change to new methods of teaching and continue to teach as they were taught. This article will detail the approach used to develop and implement problem-based learning in an advanced practice nurse curriculum in the US. The results and recommendations for implementation are discussed based upon student and nurse educator feedback. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:976,
      author={J. W. Distler},
      year={2007},
      month={Jan},
      title={Critical thinking and clinical competence: results of the implementation of student-centered teaching strategies in an advanced practice nurse curriculum },
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      volume={7},
      number={1},
      pages={53-59},
      note={id: 1354; PUBM: Print-Electronic; DEP: 20061009; JID: 101090848; 2006/01/31 [received]; 2006/06/26 [revised]; 2006/08/21 [accepted]; 2006/10/09 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={The nursing profession has advanced dramatically over the past 50 years. People are living longer, technology is advancing at a rapid rate, and patients are presenting more critically ill. The recent move in the US and other countries away from secondary and tertiary care towards primary care will have a dramatic impact on the practice of nursing as the focus of treatment is aimed at prevention and maintenance of health. Budgetary constraints and a shrinking nursing workforce have added additional strain on the ability of nurses to remain clinically competent in this fast-paced healthcare environment. In addition, the demographics of students have shifted, with more adult and ethnically diverse students entering various nursing programs. These changes have compelled schools of nursing worldwide to revise their approach to student education to keep up with the challenge associated with these influences. Terms such as problem-based learning, critical thinking, evidence-based practice, and student-centered teaching strategies have replaced traditional terminology typically linked with education and practice. However, it appears that not all centers of nursing education have embraced the need to change to new methods of teaching and continue to teach as they were taught. This article will detail the approach used to develop and implement problem-based learning in an advanced practice nurse curriculum in the US. The results and recommendations for implementation are discussed based upon student and nurse educator feedback. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1873-5223},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Eaton, E., Henderson, A., & Winch, S.. (2007). Enhancing nurses’ capacity to facilitate learning in nursing students: effective dissemination and uptake of best practice guidelines . International journal of nursing practice, 13(5), 316-320.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The preparation of nursing students for the real world of practice is a significant contemporary issue for health care and education institutions globally. Positive learning experiences are enabled through positive role models and attitudes which impact on ward culture. Although these best practices have been described, they have not been assimilated into the health-care system as the uptake of evidence is fraught with difficulties. Using the problem-solving approach of fitting evidence into practice––Read, Think, Do, this paper describes practical activities throughout the process to assimilate evidence. In particular, it details effective strategies that take into account the clinical context, such as displaying posters, demonstration of problem resolution in small group sessions and role modelling, and a presence in the clinical area. All of these contribute to the uptake of the guidelines to improve student experiences within the clinical setting. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:978,
      author={E. Eaton and A. Henderson and S. Winch},
      year={2007},
      month={10},
      title={Enhancing nurses' capacity to facilitate learning in nursing students: effective dissemination and uptake of best practice guidelines },
      journal={International journal of nursing practice},
      volume={13},
      number={5},
      pages={316-320},
      note={id: 2152; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080201. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Australia & New Zealand; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 11 ref. NLM UID: 9613615. },
      abstract={
    The preparation of nursing students for the real world of practice is a significant contemporary issue for health care and education institutions globally. Positive learning experiences are enabled through positive role models and attitudes which impact on ward culture. Although these best practices have been described, they have not been assimilated into the health-care system as the uptake of evidence is fraught with difficulties. Using the problem-solving approach of fitting evidence into practice––Read, Think, Do, this paper describes practical activities throughout the process to assimilate evidence. In particular, it details effective strategies that take into account the clinical context, such as displaying posters, demonstration of problem resolution in small group sessions and role modelling, and a presence in the clinical area. All of these contribute to the uptake of the guidelines to improve student experiences within the clinical setting. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Clinical; Education, Nursing; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Utilization; Practice Guidelines -- Utilization; Students, Nursing; Problem Solving; Professional-Student Relations; Queensland; Role Models},
      isbn={1322-7114},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1339&accno=2009726367; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009726367&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Ferguson, L. M., & Day, R. A.. (2007). Challenges for new nurses in evidence-based practice . Journal of nursing management, 15(1), 107-113.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The purpose of this article was to examine issues that new nurses encounter as they enter nursing practice, particularly in an evidence-based practice environment. BACKGROUND: These issues are not new. In part, these issues arise from our failure to acknowledge the developmental issues that new nurses experience on entry to practice and the lack of role models in evidence-based practice and holistic care. EVALUATION: This article synthesizes research reported over the last decade to delineate the issues of transition to practice and strategies that have proven effective in addressing them. KEY ISSUES: The key issues relate to the need to support new nurses in evidence-based and holistic practice, the strategies needed to do so, and the nurse manager’s role in this process. CONCLUSIONS: We must invest resources in assisting new nurses into practice, which may have benefits in terms of both recruitment and retention of new nurses in practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:980,
      author={L. M. Ferguson and R. A. Day},
      year={2007},
      month={Jan},
      title={Challenges for new nurses in evidence-based practice },
      journal={Journal of nursing management},
      volume={15},
      number={1},
      pages={107-113},
      note={id: 1124; PUBM: Print; JID: 9306050; RF: 28; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: The purpose of this article was to examine issues that new nurses encounter as they enter nursing practice, particularly in an evidence-based practice environment. BACKGROUND: These issues are not new. In part, these issues arise from our failure to acknowledge the developmental issues that new nurses experience on entry to practice and the lack of role models in evidence-based practice and holistic care. EVALUATION: This article synthesizes research reported over the last decade to delineate the issues of transition to practice and strategies that have proven effective in addressing them. KEY ISSUES: The key issues relate to the need to support new nurses in evidence-based and holistic practice, the strategies needed to do so, and the nurse manager's role in this process. CONCLUSIONS: We must invest resources in assisting new nurses into practice, which may have benefits in terms of both recruitment and retention of new nurses in practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Holistic Health; Humans; Inservice Training/organization & administration; Judgment; Leadership; Nurse Administrators/organization & administration/psychology; Nurse's Role; Nursing Staff/education/organization & administration/psychology; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Preceptorship/organization & administration; Social Support},
      isbn={0966-0429},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Finkelman, A. W., & Kenner, C.. (2007). Teaching IOM: Implications of the Institute of Medicine reports for nursing education . Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Teaching IOM focuses on the core competencies derived from the IOM reports on quality and health care and how to use these reports in the classroom. The companion CD-ROM provides additional material for incorporating content into curricula and teaching-learning experiences. It includes PowerPoint presentations with notes on the book’s five major topics; healthcare safety, healthcare quality, public health safety and quality, healthcare diversity, and linkage between research and evidence-based practice. The content is appropriate for graduate or undergraduate students. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @book{RefWorks:982,
      author={A. W. Finkelman and C. Kenner},
      year={2007},
      title={Teaching IOM: Implications of the Institute of Medicine reports for nursing education },
      publisher={American Nurses Association},
      address={Silver Spring, MD},
      note={id: 1040},
      abstract={Teaching IOM focuses on the core competencies derived from the IOM reports on quality and health care and how to use these reports in the classroom. The companion CD-ROM provides additional material for incorporating content into curricula and teaching-learning experiences. It includes PowerPoint presentations with notes on the book's five major topics; healthcare safety, healthcare quality, public health safety and quality, healthcare diversity, and linkage between research and evidence-based practice. The content is appropriate for graduate or undergraduate students. (Source: QSEN Team) }
    }

  • Gerrish, K., Ashworth, P., Lacey, A., Bailey, J., Cooke, J., Kendall, S., & McNeilly, E.. (2007). Factors influencing the development of evidence-based practice: a research tool . Journal of advanced nursing, 57(3), 328-338.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The paper reports a study to develop and test a tool for assessing a range of factors influencing the development of evidence-based practice among clinical nurses. BACKGROUND: Achieving evidence-based practice is a goal in nursing frequently cited by the profession and in government health policy directives. Assessing factors influencing the achievement of this goal, however, is complex. Consideration needs to be given to a range of factors, including different types of evidence used to inform practice, barriers to achieving evidence-based practice, and the skills required by nurses to implement evidence-based care. METHODS: Measurement scales currently available to investigate the use of evidence in nursing practice focus on nurses’ sources of knowledge and on barriers to the use of research evidence. A new, wider ranging Developing Evidence-Based Practice questionnaire was developed and tested for its measurement properties in two studies. In study 1, a sample of 598 nurses working at two hospitals in one strategic health authority in northern England was surveyed. In study 2, a slightly expanded version of the questionnaire was employed in a survey of 689 community nurses in 12 primary care organizations in two strategic health authorities, one in northern England and the other in southern England. FINDINGS: The measurement characteristics of the new questionnaire were shown to be acceptable. Ten significant, and readily interpretable, factors were seen to underlie nurses’ relation to evidence-based practice. CONCLUSION: Strategies to promote evidence-based practice need to take account of the differing needs of nurses and focus on a range of sources of evidence. The Developing Evidence-Based Practice questionnaire can assist in assessing the specific ‘evidencing’ tendencies of any given group of nurses. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:984,
      author={K. Gerrish and P. Ashworth and A. Lacey and J. Bailey and J. Cooke and S. Kendall and E. McNeilly},
      year={2007},
      title={Factors influencing the development of evidence-based practice: a research tool },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={57},
      number={3},
      pages={328-338},
      note={id: 1134; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070413. Publication Type: journal article; questionnaire/scale; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Evidence-Based Practice. Instrumentation: Developing Evidence-Based Practice questionnaire. No. of Refs: 44 ref. PMID: 17233652 NLM UID: 7609811. },
      abstract={AIM: The paper reports a study to develop and test a tool for assessing a range of factors influencing the development of evidence-based practice among clinical nurses. BACKGROUND: Achieving evidence-based practice is a goal in nursing frequently cited by the profession and in government health policy directives. Assessing factors influencing the achievement of this goal, however, is complex. Consideration needs to be given to a range of factors, including different types of evidence used to inform practice, barriers to achieving evidence-based practice, and the skills required by nurses to implement evidence-based care. METHODS: Measurement scales currently available to investigate the use of evidence in nursing practice focus on nurses' sources of knowledge and on barriers to the use of research evidence. A new, wider ranging Developing Evidence-Based Practice questionnaire was developed and tested for its measurement properties in two studies. In study 1, a sample of 598 nurses working at two hospitals in one strategic health authority in northern England was surveyed. In study 2, a slightly expanded version of the questionnaire was employed in a survey of 689 community nurses in 12 primary care organizations in two strategic health authorities, one in northern England and the other in southern England. FINDINGS: The measurement characteristics of the new questionnaire were shown to be acceptable. Ten significant, and readily interpretable, factors were seen to underlie nurses' relation to evidence-based practice. CONCLUSION: Strategies to promote evidence-based practice need to take account of the differing needs of nurses and focus on a range of sources of evidence. The Developing Evidence-Based Practice questionnaire can assist in assessing the specific 'evidencing' tendencies of any given group of nurses. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Instrument Construction; Instrument Validation; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Questionnaires; Academic Medical Centers; Coefficient Alpha; Community Health Nursing; Convenience Sample; Data Analysis Software; Descriptive Statistics; England; Factor Analysis; Mail; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Pearson's Correlation Coefficient; Random Sample; Spearman's Rank Correlation Coefficient; Summated Rating Scaling; Validation Studies}
    }

  • Heinzer, M. M., Bish, C., & Detwiler, R.. (2007). The move to evidence-based practice from a clinical nursing question . Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : Official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization, 23(6), 293-297.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Registered nurses on a medical unit questioned whether current practice adequately met the emotional needs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalized for acute dyspnea. The unit’s education committee surveyed nursing staff regarding priority nursing activities during dyspneic episodes. After discussion with staff development educators, several registered nurses met with the center’s nurse researcher, formed a research team, and designed a descriptive study. Findings of the study gave evidence for clinical practice change and revision of care guidelines. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:986,
      author={M. M. Heinzer and C. Bish and R. Detwiler},
      year={2007},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={The move to evidence-based practice from a clinical nursing question },
      journal={Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : Official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization},
      volume={23},
      number={6},
      pages={293-297},
      note={id: 2111; PUBM: Print; JID: 9809908; ppublish },
      abstract={Registered nurses on a medical unit questioned whether current practice adequately met the emotional needs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalized for acute dyspnea. The unit's education committee surveyed nursing staff regarding priority nursing activities during dyspneic episodes. After discussion with staff development educators, several registered nurses met with the center's nurse researcher, formed a research team, and designed a descriptive study. Findings of the study gave evidence for clinical practice change and revision of care guidelines. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Acute Disease; Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Health; Benchmarking; Clinical Competence; Diffusion of Innovation; Dyspnea/etiology/nursing/psychology; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Health Services Needs and Demand; Holistic Health; Humans; New England; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Assessment; Nursing Evaluation Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Patient-Centered Care; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications; Questionnaires; Research Design; Severity of Illness Index},
      isbn={1098-7886},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Larrabee, J. H., Sions, J., Fanning, M., Withrow, M. L., & Ferretti, A.. (2007). Evaluation of a program to increase evidence-based practice change . Journal of Nursing Administration, 37(6), 302-310.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    OBJECTIVE: The study evaluated a nursing research program designed to achieve systematic evidence-based practice change. Specifically, change in nurse attitudes about use of research and research conduct, practice change projects, and nurse participation in research-related activities were evaluated. BACKGROUND: Evidence indicates that successful evidence-based practice change in an organization requires senior leadership support and a systematic program for practice change. Evaluation of program effectiveness provides evidence about opportunities for further improvement. METHODS: Quantitative evaluation used a pretest-posttest design. The site was an academic medical center in rural West Virginia. Participants were registered nurses from all inpatients units, perioperative services, and emergency departments. Surveys used Alcock et al’s Staff Nurses and Research Activities scale. Descriptive evaluation included the number of nurses who attended the workshop, practice change projects, scholarly products disseminated, and outcome of a Magnet review. RESULTS: First, knowledge about the availability of support services increased between 1999 and 2002 and was associated with higher attitude scores about research and research utilization. Second, registered nurses who reported participating in research-related activities had more positive scores on all attitudes than registered nurses who reported not participating. CONCLUSIONS: Nurse leaders may improve participation and attitudes about research and research utilization by internally marketing the support available for research-related activities. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:995,
      author={J. H. Larrabee and J. Sions and M. Fanning and M. L. Withrow and A. Ferretti},
      year={2007},
      month={06},
      title={Evaluation of a program to increase evidence-based practice change },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Administration},
      volume={37},
      number={6},
      pages={302-310},
      note={id: 2141; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070817. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Administration. Instrumentation: Staff Nurses and Research Activities (Alcock et al). Grant Information: Nursing Division of West Virginia University Hospitals and the West Virginia University School of Nursing, Morgantown. No. of Refs: 51 ref. NLM UID: 1263116. Email: jlarrabee@hsc.wvu.edu. },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: The study evaluated a nursing research program designed to achieve systematic evidence-based practice change. Specifically, change in nurse attitudes about use of research and research conduct, practice change projects, and nurse participation in research-related activities were evaluated. BACKGROUND: Evidence indicates that successful evidence-based practice change in an organization requires senior leadership support and a systematic program for practice change. Evaluation of program effectiveness provides evidence about opportunities for further improvement. METHODS: Quantitative evaluation used a pretest-posttest design. The site was an academic medical center in rural West Virginia. Participants were registered nurses from all inpatients units, perioperative services, and emergency departments. Surveys used Alcock et al's Staff Nurses and Research Activities scale. Descriptive evaluation included the number of nurses who attended the workshop, practice change projects, scholarly products disseminated, and outcome of a Magnet review. RESULTS: First, knowledge about the availability of support services increased between 1999 and 2002 and was associated with higher attitude scores about research and research utilization. Second, registered nurses who reported participating in research-related activities had more positive scores on all attitudes than registered nurses who reported not participating. CONCLUSIONS: Nurse leaders may improve participation and attitudes about research and research utilization by internally marketing the support available for research-related activities. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nurse Attitudes; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Nursing Staff, Hospital -- Education; Research, Nursing -- Education; Staff Development; Academic Medical Centers; Adult; Analysis of Variance; Chi Square Test; Coefficient Alpha; Descriptive Statistics; Evaluation Research; Funding Source; Internal Consistency; Magnet Hospitals; Middle Age; Models, Theoretical; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Administration; P-Value; Pretest-Posttest Design; Program Evaluation; Quantitative Studies; Research Instruments; Scales; West Virginia},
      isbn={0002-0443},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=217&accno=2009618618; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009618618&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Mohide, E. A., & Matthew-Maich, N.. (2007). Implementation forum. Engaging nursing preceptor-student dyads in an evidence-based approach to professional practice . Evidence-Based Nursing, 10(2), 36-40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This paper describes a pilot project of an educational workshop designed to engage nursing preceptors and their senior undergraduate students in an evidence-based approach to practice. The educational process, content, and teaching-learning strategies are outlined, and the evaluation is discussed. The paper concludes with recommendations for the formal implementation of the workshop as an educational offering. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1004,
      author={E. A. Mohide and N. Matthew-Maich},
      year={2007},
      month={04},
      title={Implementation forum. Engaging nursing preceptor-student dyads in an evidence-based approach to professional practice },
      journal={Evidence-Based Nursing},
      volume={10},
      number={2},
      pages={36-40},
      note={id: 1358; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Online/Print; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. No. of Refs: 18 ref. NLM UID: 9815947. },
      abstract={This paper describes a pilot project of an educational workshop designed to engage nursing preceptors and their senior undergraduate students in an evidence-based approach to practice. The educational process, content, and teaching-learning strategies are outlined, and the evaluation is discussed. The paper concludes with recommendations for the formal implementation of the workshop as an educational offering. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Mohide, E. A., & Matthew-Maich, N.. (2007). Engaging nursing preceptor-student dyads in an evidence-based approach to professional practice . Evidence-based nursing, 10(2), 36-40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This paper describes a pilot project of an educational workshop designed to engage nursing preceptors and their senior undergraduate students in an evidence-based approach to practice. The educational process, content, and teaching-learning strategies are outlined, and the evaluation is discussed. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1003,
      author={E. A. Mohide and N. Matthew-Maich},
      year={2007},
      month={Apr},
      title={Engaging nursing preceptor-student dyads in an evidence-based approach to professional practice },
      journal={Evidence-based nursing},
      volume={10},
      number={2},
      pages={36-40},
      note={id: 1098; PUBM: Print; JID: 9815947; ppublish },
      abstract={This paper describes a pilot project of an educational workshop designed to engage nursing preceptors and their senior undergraduate students in an evidence-based approach to practice. The educational process, content, and teaching-learning strategies are outlined, and the evaluation is discussed. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing/methods; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Nursing Process; Preceptorship; Students, Nursing},
      isbn={1367-6539},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Morgan, P. D., Fogel, J., Hicks, P., Wright, L., & Tyler, I.. (2007). Strategic enhancement of nursing students information literacy skills: interdisciplinary perspectives . The ABNF journal : Official journal of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty in Higher Education, 18(2), 40-45.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nursing students are required to keep abreast of evolving new health care information. It is important for nursing students to develop the skills and knowledge to access nursing and medical databases for their professional growth and development to perform evidence-based practice. A collaborative approach between faculty and librarians is one way to ensure the success of students in acquiring the skills on how to access and use new health care information. The collaborators of this paper discuss strategies of how to conduct database searches for research articles. This paper is written in collaboration with faculty, librarians, and a doctoral student who have experience teaching nursing students at a historically black college and/or university, or at minority serving institutions. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1005,
      author={P. D. Morgan and J. Fogel and P. Hicks and L. Wright and I. Tyler},
      year={2007},
      month={Spring},
      title={Strategic enhancement of nursing students information literacy skills: interdisciplinary perspectives },
      journal={The ABNF journal : Official journal of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty in Higher Education},
      volume={18},
      number={2},
      pages={40-45},
      note={id: 1357; PUBM: Print; JID: 9112807; ppublish },
      abstract={Nursing students are required to keep abreast of evolving new health care information. It is important for nursing students to develop the skills and knowledge to access nursing and medical databases for their professional growth and development to perform evidence-based practice. A collaborative approach between faculty and librarians is one way to ensure the success of students in acquiring the skills on how to access and use new health care information. The collaborators of this paper discuss strategies of how to conduct database searches for research articles. This paper is written in collaboration with faculty, librarians, and a doctoral student who have experience teaching nursing students at a historically black college and/or university, or at minority serving institutions. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Education, Nursing, Graduate; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Humans; Library Science/education; Nursing Research/education; United States},
      isbn={1046-7041},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Nelson, A. L., Waters, T. R., & et al Menzel, N. N.. (2007). Effectiveness of an evidence-based curriculum module in nursing schools targeting safe patient handling and movement . International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 4(1), 1-19.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Nursing schools in the United States have not been teaching evidence-based practices for safe patient handling, putting their graduates at risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). The specific aim of this study was to translate research related to safe patient handling into the curricula of nursing schools and evaluate the impact on nurse educators and students’ intentions to use safe patient handling techniques. Nurse educators at 26 nursing schools received curricular materials and training; nursing students received the evidence-based curriculum module. There were three control sites. Questionnaires were used to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about safe patient handling for both nurse educators and students, pre- and post-training. In this study, we found that nurse educator and student knowledge improved significantly at intervention schools, as did intention to use mechanical lifting devices in the near future. We concluded that the curriculum module is ready for wide dissemination across nursing schools to reduce the risk of MSDs among nurses. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1007,
      author={A. L. Nelson and T. R. Waters and N. N. et al Menzel},
      year={2007},
      title={Effectiveness of an evidence-based curriculum module in nursing schools targeting safe patient handling and movement },
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship},
      volume={4},
      number={1},
      pages={1-19},
      note={id: 2162; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080118. Revision Date: 20080222. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. Instrumentation: Knowledge scale; Attitude scale; Beliefs scale; Social norm scale. Grant Information: Supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), American Nurses Association (ANA), and the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Patient Safety Center of Inquiry (Tampa, FL). No. of Refs: 23 ref. NLM UID: 101214977. },
      abstract={Nursing schools in the United States have not been teaching evidence-based practices for safe patient handling, putting their graduates at risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). The specific aim of this study was to translate research related to safe patient handling into the curricula of nursing schools and evaluate the impact on nurse educators and students' intentions to use safe patient handling techniques. Nurse educators at 26 nursing schools received curricular materials and training; nursing students received the evidence-based curriculum module. There were three control sites. Questionnaires were used to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about safe patient handling for both nurse educators and students, pre- and post-training. In this study, we found that nurse educator and student knowledge improved significantly at intervention schools, as did intention to use mechanical lifting devices in the near future. We concluded that the curriculum module is ready for wide dissemination across nursing schools to reduce the risk of MSDs among nurses. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Lifting -- Education; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Occupational Safety -- Education; Occupational-Related Injuries -- Prevention and Control; Adult; Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior; Attitude Measures; Chi Square Test; Coefficient Alpha; Conceptual Framework; Curriculum Development; Descriptive Statistics; Faculty Attitudes -- Evaluation; Faculty, Nursing; Female; Funding Source; Item Analysis; Item-Total Correlations; Lifting and Transfer Equipment -- Utilization; Male; Middle Age; Paired T-Tests; Pretest-Posttest Design; Quasi-Experimental Studies; Questionnaires; Research Subject Recruitment; Schools, Nursing; Student Attitudes -- Evaluation; Student Knowledge -- Evaluation; Summated Rating Scaling; Time Factors; United States; Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=2817&accno=2009745152; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009745152&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Newhouse, R. P., International, S. T. T., Hospital, J. H., & of Nursing, J. H. U. S.. (2007). Johns Hopkins nursing evidence-based practice model and guidelines . Indianapolis: Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Description:This book describes the collaborative development and implementation of the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model. The model was created and tested by a team of nurses and faculty at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Purpose:The purpose is to provide background on evidence-based practice (EBP), examples of EBP projects, and details on how to develop EBP programs. These skills are necessary as nursing develops competency in EBP. Audience:The target audience is nurses, healthcare agencies, and schools of nursing. The authors developed and tested the model and are directly involved in areas such as EBP projects, research, and the development of practice guidelines. Features:Section I introduces the concept of EBP and describes the evolution of EBP in nursing and the role of critical thinking in EBP. Section II describes the components of the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model, which emphasizes practice, education, and research. Guidelines for conducting an EBP projects using the Practice Question, Evidence, and Translation process (PET) are described. Section III focuses on the PET process in developing EBP projects. Section IV describes the supportive environment needed for successful incorporation of EBP. Examples of EBP projects at Johns Hopkins are described in Section V. Section VI contains tools used at Johns Hopkins. It is noted that these tools can be downloaded at the Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing Web site. (Source: Doody Review Services)

    @book{RefWorks:1009,
      author={R. P. Newhouse and Sigma Theta Tau International and Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing},
      year={2007},
      title={Johns Hopkins nursing evidence-based practice model and guidelines },
      publisher={Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing},
      address={Indianapolis},
      pages={224-224},
      note={id: 1611; http://www.nursingknowledge.org/Portal/main.aspx?PageID=36&SKU=72501 },
      abstract={Description:This book describes the collaborative development and implementation of the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model. The model was created and tested by a team of nurses and faculty at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.
    Purpose:The purpose is to provide background on evidence-based practice (EBP), examples of EBP projects, and details on how to develop EBP programs. These skills are necessary as nursing develops competency in EBP. 
    Audience:The target audience is nurses, healthcare agencies, and schools of nursing. The authors developed and tested the model and are directly involved in areas such as EBP projects, research, and the development of practice guidelines.
    Features:Section I introduces the concept of EBP and describes the evolution of EBP in nursing and the role of critical thinking in EBP. Section II describes the components of the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model, which emphasizes practice, education, and research. Guidelines for conducting an EBP projects using the Practice Question, Evidence, and Translation process (PET) are described. Section III focuses on the PET process in developing EBP projects. Section IV describes the supportive environment needed for successful incorporation of EBP. Examples of EBP projects at Johns Hopkins are described in Section V. Section VI contains tools used at Johns Hopkins. It is noted that these tools can be downloaded at the Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing Web site. (Source: Doody Review Services) },
      keywords={Evidence-based nursing; Nursing models; Nursing Process; Evidence-Based Medicine; Models, Nursing},
      isbn={9781930538719 (pbk.); 1930538715 (pbk.); 1930538915; 1930538197; 9781930538191; National Library: 101317443 LCCN: 2007-40291},
      language={English}
    }

  • Norton, C. K., Dimon, A., Richards, R. K., Kelly, S., & Frey, I.. (2007). The introduction of family presence evidence-based practice into a baccalaureate nursing curriculum . Critical care nursing quarterly, 30(4), 364-371.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The topic of family presence (FP) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation or invasive procedures has recently received attention and debate among healthcare professionals due to pioneering research in this field. Studies completed have included family perspectives on family presence, patients’ feelings on family presence, and healthcare providers’ views on family presence. Two key areas found to correlate with family presence acceptance among healthcare providers are education and experience. Senior nursing students in one baccalaureate program were introduced to this topic during a 3-hour class on death and dying. Comparisons between pretest and posttest scores revealed an increase in the acceptance of family presence as a priority in nursing care of the critically ill. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1010,
      author={C. K. Norton and A. Dimon and R. K. Richards and S. Kelly and I. Frey},
      year={2007},
      month={Oct-Dec},
      title={The introduction of family presence evidence-based practice into a baccalaureate nursing curriculum },
      journal={Critical care nursing quarterly},
      volume={30},
      number={4},
      pages={364-371},
      note={id: 1352; PUBM: Print; JID: 8704517; ppublish },
      abstract={The topic of family presence (FP) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation or invasive procedures has recently received attention and debate among healthcare professionals due to pioneering research in this field. Studies completed have included family perspectives on family presence, patients' feelings on family presence, and healthcare providers' views on family presence. Two key areas found to correlate with family presence acceptance among healthcare providers are education and experience. Senior nursing students in one baccalaureate program were introduced to this topic during a 3-hour class on death and dying. Comparisons between pretest and posttest scores revealed an increase in the acceptance of family presence as a priority in nursing care of the critically ill. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0887-9303},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Oermann, M. H.. (2007). Approaches to gathering evidence for educational practices in nursing . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 38(6), 250.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    There are many initiatives under way to teach nursing staff about evidence-based practice, but how many educators seek evidence as a basis for their teaching? Nursing education needs more higher quality research, teachers willing to question their current practices, and nurse educators who ask whether there is a better way of promoting learning and performance. This article provides a perspective of how nurse educators can develop an evidence-based approach to their teaching using the research that is available in nursing education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1012,
      author={M. H. Oermann},
      year={2007},
      title={Approaches to gathering evidence for educational practices in nursing },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={38},
      number={6},
      pages={250},
      note={id: 2149; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080125. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; exam questions; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 14 ref. NLM UID: 0262321. },
      abstract={There are many initiatives under way to teach nursing staff about evidence-based practice, but how many educators seek evidence as a basis for their teaching? Nursing education needs more higher quality research, teachers willing to question their current practices, and nurse educators who ask whether there is a better way of promoting learning and performance. This article provides a perspective of how nurse educators can develop an evidence-based approach to their teaching using the research that is available in nursing education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Research, Nursing -- Utilization; Teaching Methods; CINAHL Database; Computerized Literature Searching, End User; Education, Continuing (Credit); ERIC Database; Medline; Psycinfo},
      isbn={0022-0124},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=211&accno=2009721770; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009721770&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Picard, C., & Henneman, E. A.. (2007). Theory-guided evidence-based reflective practice: an orientation to education for quality care . Nursing science quarterly, 20(1), 39-42.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This column weaves a discussion of the authors’ experiences, nursing theory, evidence, and a call for a sea change in nursing education informed by knowledge from the discipline of nursing. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1014,
      author={C. Picard and E. A. Henneman},
      year={2007},
      month={Jan},
      title={Theory-guided evidence-based reflective practice: an orientation to education for quality care },
      journal={Nursing science quarterly},
      volume={20},
      number={1},
      pages={39-42},
      note={id: 1109; PUBM: Print; JID: 8805022; RF: 19; ppublish },
      abstract={This column weaves a discussion of the authors’ experiences, nursing theory, evidence, and a call for a sea change in nursing education informed by knowledge from the discipline of nursing. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Empathy; Evidence-Based Medicine/organization & administration; Health Care Reform/organization & administration; Humans; Medical Records Systems, Computerized/organization & administration; Nurse Clinicians/education/organization & administration/psychology; Nurse's Role; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Research/organization & administration; Nursing Theory; Organizational Innovation; Patient Satisfaction; Philosophy, Nursing; Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration; Safety Management/organization & administration; Thinking; United States},
      isbn={0894-3184},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Salmon, M.. (2007). Guest Editorial: Care quality and safety: Same old? . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 117-119.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Healthcare’s increasing focus on quality and safety seem like a "natural" for nursing. The profession has prided itself in being the patient’s advocate and the keeper of quality and safety. While nursing has clearly provided consistent and committed leadership in these arenas, it is also possible that exclusive professional ownership of quality and safety may actually work against the best interest of both nursing and patients. This editorial challenges nursing to reconsider its role in and approach to quality and safety improvement. Building on the important perspectives presented in this issue of Nursing Outlook, the author identifies the need for nursing to advance its own professional contributions through building on the shared values and commitments common to health professions. Establishing common ground and extending the concept of care teams to incorporate others beyond direct-care providers are explored as a fundamental component of nursing’s work in quality and safety improvement. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1023,
      author={M. Salmon},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Guest Editorial: Care quality and safety: Same old? },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={117-119},
      note={id: 1094; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2007/01/19 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Healthcare's increasing focus on quality and safety seem like a "natural" for nursing. The profession has prided itself in being the patient's advocate and the keeper of quality and safety. While nursing has clearly provided consistent and committed leadership in these arenas, it is also possible that exclusive professional ownership of quality and safety may actually work against the best interest of both nursing and patients. This editorial challenges nursing to reconsider its role in and approach to quality and safety improvement. Building on the important perspectives presented in this issue of Nursing Outlook, the author identifies the need for nursing to advance its own professional contributions through building on the shared values and commitments common to health professions. Establishing common ground and extending the concept of care teams to incorporate others beyond direct-care providers are explored as a fundamental component of nursing's work in quality and safety improvement. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Scherer, Y. K., Bruce, S. A., & Runkawatt, V.. (2007). A comparison of clinical simulation and case study presentation on nurse practitioner students’ knowledge and confidence in managing a cardiac event . International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 4(1), 1-14.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The study was designed to compare the efficacy of controlled simulation mannequin (SM) assisted learning and case study presentation on knowledge and confidence of nurse practitioner (NP) students in managing a cardiac event. Twenty-three volunteer students were randomly assigned to the experimental (simulation) or control (case study presentation) group. All participants were instructed on atrial arrhythmias, were pre- and post-tested on knowledge and confidence, and completed an evaluation of the experience. There were no statistically significant differences in knowledge test scores, although the control group scored significantly higher on post- test confidence (p=.040). Both groups rated their experience as valuable. The simulation and case study presentation had similar outcomes. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness of this teaching modality. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1024,
      author={Y. K. Scherer and S. A. Bruce and V. Runkawatt},
      year={2007},
      title={A comparison of clinical simulation and case study presentation on nurse practitioner students' knowledge and confidence in managing a cardiac event },
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship},
      volume={4},
      number={1},
      pages={1-14},
      note={id: 2264; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080118. Revision Date: 20080222. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Nursing Education. Instrumentation: Knowledge Quiz; Confidence Scale; Evaluation Instrument. No. of Refs: 12 ref. NLM UID: 101214977. Email: yscherer@buffalo.edu. },
      abstract={The study was designed to compare the efficacy of controlled simulation mannequin (SM) assisted learning and case study presentation on knowledge and confidence of nurse practitioner (NP) students in managing a cardiac event. Twenty-three volunteer students were randomly assigned to the experimental (simulation) or control (case study presentation) group. All participants were instructed on atrial arrhythmias, were pre- and post-tested on knowledge and confidence, and completed an evaluation of the experience. There were no statistically significant differences in knowledge test scores, although the control group scored significantly higher on post- test confidence (p=.040). Both groups rated their experience as valuable. The simulation and case study presentation had similar outcomes. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness of this teaching modality. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Arrhythmia, Atrial -- Education; Case Studies -- Utilization; Confidence; Models, Anatomic; Nurse Practitioners -- Education; Simulations; Student Attitudes; Student Knowledge; Adult; Advanced Cardiac Life Support; Attitude Measures; Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory; Chi Square Test; Confidence -- Evaluation; Control Group; Convenience Sample; Course Evaluation; Education Research; Middle Age; New York; Outcomes of Education -- Evaluation; Pearson's Correlation Coefficient; Pretest-Posttest Design; Quasi-Experimental Studies; Questionnaires; Random Assignment; Schools, Nursing; Student Attitudes -- Evaluation; Student Knowledge -- Evaluation; Summated Rating Scaling; T-Tests; Videorecording},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=2817&accno=2009742614; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009742614&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Schiemann, D., & Moers, M.. (2007). Expert standards in nursing as an instrument for evidence-based nursing practice . Journal of nursing care quality, 22(2), 172-179.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes the model of the German Network for Quality Development for developing, consenting, and implementing evidence-based national nursing standards. The advantages and challenges of implementing these expert standards are discussed. Finally, the influence of the national standards on the profession and quality policy is outlined. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1025,
      author={D. Schiemann and M. Moers},
      year={2007},
      title={Expert standards in nursing as an instrument for evidence-based nursing practice },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={22},
      number={2},
      pages={172-179},
      note={id: 1131; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070518. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Quality Assurance. No. of Refs: 11 ref. PMID: 17353755 NLM UID: 9200672. },
      abstract={This article describes the model of the German Network for Quality Development for developing, consenting, and implementing evidence-based national nursing standards. The advantages and challenges of implementing these expert standards are discussed. Finally, the influence of the national standards on the profession and quality policy is outlined. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice--Standards; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Accountability; Clinical Competence; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Pressure Ulcer--Nursing; Pressure Ulcer--Prevention and Control; Quality Assurance; Quality Improvement}
    }

  • Schmidt, N. A., & Brown, J. M.. (2007). Use of the innovation-decision process teaching strategy to promote evidence-based practice . Journal of Professional Nursing, 23(3), 150-156.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The purpose of this article is to describe the innovation-decision process teaching strategy (I-DPTS) based on the model of diffusion of innovations. A goal of baccalaureate nursing education is to develop competencies required for evidence-based practice. Such practice merges clinician expertise, patient preferences, and critical evaluation of the literature to improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs. Several strategies to promote evidence-based practice have appeared in the literature. However, when they are examined in light of the innovation-decision process, they do not address all the essential steps for adoption to occur. The I-DPTS allows students to achieve competencies necessary to overcome barriers associated with implementing best practices. This strategy was successfully implemented in a senior-level introductory nursing research class. Community representatives identified practice issues that could be addressed by student groups. After conducting a search of the literature, students analyzed the evidence, determined best practice based on the evidence, and developed a policy for implementation in clinical settings. At course end, representatives were invited to attend oral and poster presentations. Use of the I-DPTS better prepares students to implement best practice as they embark on their professional careers. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1027,
      author={N. A. Schmidt and J. M. Brown},
      year={2007},
      month={05},
      title={Use of the innovation-decision process teaching strategy to promote evidence-based practice },
      journal={Journal of Professional Nursing},
      volume={23},
      number={3},
      pages={150-156},
      note={id: 1348; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070817. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 26 ref. PMID: 17540318 NLM UID: 8511298. },
      abstract={The purpose of this article is to describe the innovation-decision process teaching strategy (I-DPTS) based on the model of diffusion of innovations. A goal of baccalaureate nursing education is to develop competencies required for evidence-based practice. Such practice merges clinician expertise, patient preferences, and critical evaluation of the literature to improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs. Several strategies to promote evidence-based practice have appeared in the literature. However, when they are examined in light of the innovation-decision process, they do not address all the essential steps for adoption to occur. The I-DPTS allows students to achieve competencies necessary to overcome barriers associated with implementing best practices. This strategy was successfully implemented in a senior-level introductory nursing research class. Community representatives identified practice issues that could be addressed by student groups. After conducting a search of the literature, students analyzed the evidence, determined best practice based on the evidence, and developed a policy for implementation in clinical settings. At course end, representatives were invited to attend oral and poster presentations. Use of the I-DPTS better prepares students to implement best practice as they embark on their professional careers. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Competency-Based; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based--Education; Teaching Methods; Faculty Attitudes; Faculty, Nursing; Posters; Program Implementation; Program Planning; Self Assessment; Student Attitudes; Student Performance Appraisal; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate}
    }

  • Schoenfelder, D. P.. (2007). Simply the best: teaching gerontological nursing students to teach evidence-based practice. Creating tip sheets can help achieve the goal of implementing EBP in clinical facilities. . Journal of gerontological nursing, 33(8), 6-11.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article describes a teaching strategy used in an undergraduate gerontological nursing clinical course to familiarize students with evidence-based practice. Students are required to read and summarize an assigned evidencebased practice guideline published by The University of Iowa Gerontological Nursing Interventions Research Center. They then develop a "tip sheet," based on the assigned guideline, to disseminate to health care staff at their practicum sites, which is either a long-term care facility or a hospital-based skilled nursing facility. Nursing students’ reactions to the assignment and nursing staff’s responses to the tip sheets are discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1029,
      author={D. P. Schoenfelder},
      year={2007},
      month={08},
      title={Simply the best: teaching gerontological nursing students to teach evidence-based practice. 
    Creating tip sheets can help achieve the goal of implementing EBP in clinical facilities. 
      },
      journal={Journal of gerontological nursing},
      volume={33},
      number={8},
      pages={6-11},
      note={id: 2139; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070928. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts; teaching materials. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Gerontologic Care; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 14 ref. NLM UID: 7510258. },
      abstract={This article describes a teaching strategy used in an undergraduate gerontological nursing clinical course to familiarize students with evidence-based practice. Students are required to read and summarize an assigned evidencebased practice guideline published by The University of Iowa Gerontological Nursing Interventions Research Center. They then develop a "tip sheet," based on the assigned guideline, to disseminate to health care staff at their practicum sites, which is either a long-term care facility or a hospital-based skilled nursing facility. Nursing students' reactions to the assignment and nursing staff's responses to the tip sheets are discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Gerontologic Nursing -- Education; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Teaching Methods; Communication; Education, Clinical; Iowa; Long Term Care; Skilled Nursing Facilities; Student Attitudes; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate},
      isbn={0098-9134},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=214&accno=2009647233; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009647233&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Sherriff, K. L., Wallis, M., & Chaboyer, W.. (2007). Nurses’ attitudes to and perceptions of knowledge and skills regarding evidence-based practice . International journal of nursing practice, 13(6), 363-369.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The study evaluated the effect of an evidence-based practice (EBP) educational programme on attitudes and perceptions of knowledge and skills, of registered nurses, towards EBP. The study was conducted using a quasiexperimental interrupted time series design. Participants were clinical nurses in educational and leadership roles within a Health Service District in south-east Queensland. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire at three points. Nurses’ belief in the value of EBP for practice was high prior to the programme and did not change subsequently. There was an improvement following the intervention in nurses’ attitudes to organizational support for EBP and their perceptions of their knowledge and skills in locating and evaluating research reports. Providing educational courses in a clinical setting is useful in improving clinicians’ attitudes to and perceptions of knowledge and skills related to EBP. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1031,
      author={K. L. Sherriff and M. Wallis and W. Chaboyer},
      year={2007},
      month={12},
      title={Nurses' attitudes to and perceptions of knowledge and skills regarding evidence-based practice },
      journal={International journal of nursing practice},
      volume={13},
      number={6},
      pages={363-369},
      note={id: 2137; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080125. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Australia & New Zealand; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. No. of Refs: 37 ref. NLM UID: 9613615. },
      abstract={The study evaluated the effect of an evidence-based practice (EBP) educational programme on attitudes and perceptions of knowledge and skills, of registered nurses, towards EBP. The study was conducted using a quasiexperimental interrupted time series design. Participants were clinical nurses in educational and leadership roles within a Health Service District in south-east Queensland. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire at three points. Nurses' belief in the value of EBP for practice was high prior to the programme and did not change subsequently. There was an improvement following the intervention in nurses' attitudes to organizational support for EBP and their perceptions of their knowledge and skills in locating and evaluating research reports. Providing educational courses in a clinical setting is useful in improving clinicians' attitudes to and perceptions of knowledge and skills related to EBP. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nurse Attitudes -- Evaluation; Nursing Knowledge; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; Adult; Attitude Measures; Convenience Sample; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Male; Middle Age; One-Way Analysis of Variance; Quasi-Experimental Studies; Queensland; Questionnaires; Registered Nurses; Repeated Measures; Research -- Utilization; Self Directed Learning; Seminars and Workshops; Summated Rating Scaling; Teaching Materials; Time Factors; Time Series},
      isbn={1322-7114},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1339&accno=2009721701; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009721701&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Sherwood, G., & Drenkard, K.. (2007). Quality and safety curricula in nursing education: Matching practice realities . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 151-155.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Health care delivery settings are redesigning in the wake of staggering reports of severe quality and safety issues. Sweeping changes underway in health care to address quality and safety outcomes lend urgency to the call to transform nursing curricula so new graduate competencies more closely match practice needs. Emerging views of quality and safety and related competencies as applied in practice have corresponding implications for the redesign of nursing education programs. Nurse executives and nurse educators are called to address the need for faculty development through strategic partnerships. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1032,
      author={G. Sherwood and K. Drenkard},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Quality and safety curricula in nursing education: Matching practice realities },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={151-155},
      note={id: 1089; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/03 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Health care delivery settings are redesigning in the wake of staggering reports of severe quality and safety issues. Sweeping changes underway in health care to address quality and safety outcomes lend urgency to the call to transform nursing curricula so new graduate competencies more closely match practice needs. Emerging views of quality and safety and related competencies as applied in practice have corresponding implications for the redesign of nursing education programs. Nurse executives and nurse educators are called to address the need for faculty development through strategic partnerships. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Shirey, M. R.. (2007). Educational innovations. An evidence-based solution for minimizing stress and anger in nursing students . Journal of Nursing Education, 46(12), 568-571.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Manifestations of stress and anger are becoming more evident in society. Anger, an emotion associated with stress, often affects other aspects of everyday life, including the workplace and the educational setting. Stress and irrational anger in nursing students presents a potential teaching-learning problem that requires innovative evidence-based solutions. In this article, anger in nursing students is discussed, and background information on the topic is provided. Common sources and manifestations of anger in nursing students are presented, and one evidence-based solution–mindfulness-based stress reduction–is discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1033,
      author={M. R. Shirey},
      year={2007},
      month={12},
      title={Educational innovations. An evidence-based solution for minimizing stress and anger in nursing students },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={46},
      number={12},
      pages={568-571},
      note={id: 2148; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080125. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education; Psychiatry/Psychology. No. of Refs: 20 ref. NLM UID: 7705432. },
      abstract={Manifestations of stress and anger are becoming more evident in society. Anger, an emotion associated with stress, often affects other aspects of everyday life, including the workplace and the educational setting. Stress and irrational anger in nursing students presents a potential teaching-learning problem that requires innovative evidence-based solutions. In this article, anger in nursing students is discussed, and background information on the topic is provided. Common sources and manifestations of anger in nursing students are presented, and one evidence-based solution--mindfulness-based stress reduction--is discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Anger; Anger -- Prevention and Control; Faculty-Student Relations -- Psychosocial Factors; Stress Management -- Methods; Stress, Psychological -- Prevention and Control; Students, Nursing -- Psychosocial Factors; Anger -- Etiology; Anger -- Symptoms},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=227&accno=2009736209; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009736209&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Smith, E. L., Cronenwett, L., & Sherwood, G.. (2007). Current assessments of quality and safety education in nursing . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 132-137.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Concerns about the quality and safety of health care have changed practice expectations and created a mandate for change in the preparation of health care professionals. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses project team conducted a survey to assess current levels of integration of quality and safety content in pre-licensure nursing curricula. Views of 195 nursing program leaders are presented, including information about satisfaction with faculty expertise and student competency development related to 6 domains that define quality and safety content: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. With competency definitions as the sole reference point, survey respondents indicated that quality and safety content was embedded in current curricula, and they were generally satisfied that students were developing the desired competencies. These data are contrasted with work reported elsewhere in this issue of Nursing Outlook and readers are invited to consider a variety of interpretations of the differences. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1035,
      author={E. L. Smith and L. Cronenwett and G. Sherwood},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Current assessments of quality and safety education in nursing },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={132-137},
      note={id: 1092; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/05 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Concerns about the quality and safety of health care have changed practice expectations and created a mandate for change in the preparation of health care professionals. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses project team conducted a survey to assess current levels of integration of quality and safety content in pre-licensure nursing curricula. Views of 195 nursing program leaders are presented, including information about satisfaction with faculty expertise and student competency development related to 6 domains that define quality and safety content: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. With competency definitions as the sole reference point, survey respondents indicated that quality and safety content was embedded in current curricula, and they were generally satisfied that students were developing the desired competencies. These data are contrasted with work reported elsewhere in this issue of Nursing Outlook and readers are invited to consider a variety of interpretations of the differences. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Smith, J., Donze, A., & Magliaro, B. L.. (2007). A tool for guiding clinical decisions . Neonatal network, 26(1), 63-69.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The goal of this column is to empower nurses with the skills and knowledge they need to implement EBP in everyday clinical decision making. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1036,
      author={J. Smith and A. Donze and B. L. Magliaro},
      year={2007},
      title={A tool for guiding clinical decisions },
      journal={Neonatal network},
      volume={26},
      number={1},
      pages={63-69},
      note={id: 1136; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070518. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Critical Care; Evidence-Based Practice; Pediatric Care. No. of Refs: 58 ref. PMID: 17285889 NLM UID: 8503921. },
      abstract={The goal of this column is to empower nurses with the skills and knowledge they need to implement EBP in everyday clinical decision making. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Clinical Nursing Research--Utilization; Neonatal Nursing; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Clinical Trials; Decision Making, Clinical; Information Resources; Intensive Care Units, Neonatal; Program Implementation}
    }

  • Vratny, A., & Shriver, D.. (2007). A conceptual model for growing evidence-based practice . Nursing administration quarterly, 31(2), 162-170.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nursing administration at a small medical center is developing and implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) model of care to support a culture of quality care, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth. The purpose of this article is to describe a conceptual model for EBP that addresses how to overcome barriers to implementation. Clinician expertise and values, experience, patient preference and expectation, and caring become grounded in a practice environment that must strive to become rooted in clinical research to evolve into a practice that is evidence-based. Education helps to nourish EBP, but leadership, enthusiasm, mentorship, clinical inquiry, and reflective practice make EBP thrive. The EBP ambassadors branch out to each department to grow journal clubs, EBP Web pages, EBP projects, research utilization projects, and staff-led practice reviews. The fruits are quality patient care and outcomes, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1043,
      author={A. Vratny and D. Shriver},
      year={2007},
      month={04},
      title={A conceptual model for growing evidence-based practice },
      journal={Nursing administration quarterly},
      volume={31},
      number={2},
      pages={162-170},
      note={id: 1132; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070518. Publication Type: journal article; pictorial. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Administration. No. of Refs: 57 ref. PMID: 17413511 NLM UID: 7703976. },
      abstract={Nursing administration at a small medical center is developing and implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) model of care to support a culture of quality care, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth. The purpose of this article is to describe a conceptual model for EBP that addresses how to overcome barriers to implementation. Clinician expertise and values, experience, patient preference and expectation, and caring become grounded in a practice environment that must strive to become rooted in clinical research to evolve into a practice that is evidence-based. Education helps to nourish EBP, but leadership, enthusiasm, mentorship, clinical inquiry, and reflective practice make EBP thrive. The EBP ambassadors branch out to each department to grow journal clubs, EBP Web pages, EBP projects, research utilization projects, and staff-led practice reviews. The fruits are quality patient care and outcomes, clinical excellence, cost-effectiveness, critical thinking, empowerment of staff, and professional growth. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Models, Theoretical; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Metaphor; Midwestern United States; Nursing Practice, Research-Based; Organizations, Nonprofit; Professional Development; Staff Development}
    }

  • Welk, D. S.. (2007). How to read, interpret, and understand evidence-based literature statistics . Nurse educator, 32(1), 16-20.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    To implement best practices through research utilization, nurses need to read, interpret, and understand literature formatted with evidence-based practice language and statistics. Hypothetical examples highlight 7 terms and their formulas. A scenario to personally calculate such evidence-based practice statistics can be used to enhance personal effectiveness and to teach others. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1045,
      author={D. S. Welk},
      year={2007},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={How to read, interpret, and understand evidence-based literature statistics },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={32},
      number={1},
      pages={16-20},
      note={id: 1155; PUBM: Print; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={To implement best practices through research utilization, nurses need to read, interpret, and understand literature formatted with evidence-based practice language and statistics. Hypothetical examples highlight 7 terms and their formulas. A scenario to personally calculate such evidence-based practice statistics can be used to enhance personal effectiveness and to teach others. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Comprehension; Confidence Intervals; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Humans; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Odds Ratio; Reading; Research Design; Risk; Risk Reduction Behavior; Statistics/education},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      language={eng}
    }

2006

  • Alspach, G.. (2006). Nurses’ use and understanding of evidence-based practice: some preliminary evidence . Critical care nurse, 26(6), 11-12.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This editorial reports findings from a recently reported survey conducted by Sigma Theta Tau International on evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing. The vast majority (90%) of the more than 500 registered nurses (RNs) who participated in the study reported using EBP. However, a substantial proportion (69%) of RNs also indicated they have only a low to moderate level of understanding of EBP. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @article{RefWorks:954,
      author={G. Alspach},
      year={2006},
      title={Nurses' use and understanding of evidence-based practice: some preliminary evidence },
      journal={Critical care nurse},
      volume={26},
      number={6},
      pages={11-12},
      note={id: 1138; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070119. Publication Type: journal article; editorial; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Blind Peer Reviewed; Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Critical Care; Evidence-Based Practice. No. of Refs: 2 ref. PMID: 17123947 NLM UID: 8207799. },
      abstract={This editorial reports findings from a recently reported survey conducted by Sigma Theta Tau International on evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing. The vast majority (90%) of the more than 500 registered nurses (RNs) who participated in the study reported using EBP. However, a substantial proportion (69%) of RNs also indicated they have only a low to moderate level of understanding of EBP. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      keywords={Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Electronic Mail; Registered Nurses; Surveys; World Wide Web}
    }

  • Brancato, V. C.. (2006). An innovative clinical practicum to teach evidence-based practice . Nurse educator, 31(5), 195-199.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A clinical practicum was successfully implemented for RN to BSN students to apply evidence-based practice to actual clinical problems affecting nursing practice. The author describes how this practicum was implemented and the requisite resources and support systems. This senior-level capstone course enabled students to understand and value a lifelong learning approach to evidence-based practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:961,
      author={V. C. Brancato},
      year={2006},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={An innovative clinical practicum to teach evidence-based practice },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={31},
      number={5},
      pages={195-199},
      note={id: 396; PUBM: Print; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={A clinical practicum was successfully implemented for RN to BSN students to apply evidence-based practice to actual clinical problems affecting nursing practice. The author describes how this practicum was implemented and the requisite resources and support systems. This senior-level capstone course enabled students to understand and value a lifelong learning approach to evidence-based practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Benchmarking; Clinical Competence; Clinical Nursing Research/education; Curriculum/standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Professional, Retraining/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Informatics/education; Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Innovation; Organizational Objectives; Pilot Projects; Preceptorship/organization & administration; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Harbison, J.. (2006). Clinical judgement in the interpretation of evidence: a Bayesian approach . Journal of clinical nursing, 15(12), 1489-1497.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This paper presents an argument for the use of Bayesian reasoning in considering the value of evidence in making nursing judgements. Background. Nursing has taken on board the drive towards evidence-based practice. There has been little discussion, however, of how evidence should be interpreted. There is a growing interest in health care in the use of Bayesian reasoning for evidence interpretation, both in research and in clinical practice; as yet, there is a limited discussion in the literature of relevance to nursing. Objectives. To provide a short tutorial in the application of Bayes rule to a clinical judgement. To discuss the implications for practice of adopting a Bayesian perspective. Discussion. The relationship between evidence and clinical judgement is outlined. The need to accept uncertainty, and be equipped to deal adequately with this, is discussed: some basic ideas of probability are rehearsed. An outline of Bayesian reasoning is offered and a demonstration of the application of Bayes rule to a nursing judgement is presented. Relevance to practice. A rationale for adopting a Bayesian perspective on evidence interpretation is offered: namely the changing context of practice, with the blurring of professional boundaries and the need to articulate judgements, the avoidance of error and the opportunity to identify the appropriate areas for investigation in nursing. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:985,
      author={J. Harbison},
      year={2006},
      title={Clinical judgement in the interpretation of evidence: a Bayesian approach },
      journal={Journal of clinical nursing},
      volume={15},
      number={12},
      pages={1489-1497},
      note={id: 1139; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070601. Publication Type: journal article; equations & formulas; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. No. of Refs: 40 ref. PMID: 17118071 NLM UID: 9207302. },
      abstract={This paper presents an argument for the use of Bayesian reasoning in considering the value of evidence in making nursing judgements. Background. Nursing has taken on board the drive towards evidence-based practice. There has been little discussion, however, of how evidence should be interpreted. There is a growing interest in health care in the use of Bayesian reasoning for evidence interpretation, both in research and in clinical practice; as yet, there is a limited discussion in the literature of relevance to nursing. Objectives. To provide a short tutorial in the application of Bayes rule to a clinical judgement. To discuss the implications for practice of adopting a Bayesian perspective. Discussion. The relationship between evidence and clinical judgement is outlined. The need to accept uncertainty, and be equipped to deal adequately with this, is discussed: some basic ideas of probability are rehearsed. An outline of Bayesian reasoning is offered and a demonstration of the application of Bayes rule to a nursing judgement is presented. Relevance to practice. A rationale for adopting a Bayesian perspective on evidence interpretation is offered: namely the changing context of practice, with the blurring of professional boundaries and the need to articulate judgements, the avoidance of error and the opportunity to identify the appropriate areas for investigation in nursing. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Decision Making, Clinical; Diagnostic Reasoning; Judgment; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Probability; Thinking--Methods; Uncertainty}
    }

  • Ireland, M.. (2006). Baccalaureate student participation in a faculty research project: a win-win experience . The Journal of the New York State Nurses’ Association, 37(2), 10-15.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Baccalaureate student involvement in a faculty research project is presented as an opportunity for faculty to integrate teaching, practice, and research, and as a mechanism for students to: a) meet clinical course objectives and b) increase their familiarity with, interest in, and understanding of the role of research in developing a scientific basis for practice. Fifteen senior nursing students functioned as research assistants (RAs) and collected psychological and pulmonary data in the homes of primary caretakers who had a school-aged child with asthma. A description of student preparation for the RA role, their experiences as RAs, and feelings following participation are reported. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:989,
      author={M. Ireland},
      year={2006},
      month={Fall-Winter},
      title={Baccalaureate student participation in a faculty research project: a win-win experience },
      journal={The Journal of the New York State Nurses' Association},
      volume={37},
      number={2},
      pages={10-15},
      note={id: 1355; PUBM: Print; JID: 7507218; ppublish },
      abstract={Baccalaureate student involvement in a faculty research project is presented as an opportunity for faculty to integrate teaching, practice, and research, and as a mechanism for students to: a) meet clinical course objectives and b) increase their familiarity with, interest in, and understanding of the role of research in developing a scientific basis for practice. Fifteen senior nursing students functioned as research assistants (RAs) and collected psychological and pulmonary data in the homes of primary caretakers who had a school-aged child with asthma. A description of student preparation for the RA role, their experiences as RAs, and feelings following participation are reported. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Asthma/nursing; Attitude of Health Personnel; Community Health Nursing/education/organization & administration; Cooperative Behavior; Data Collection; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; New York; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Professional Competence; Program Evaluation; Research Personnel/education/organization & administration/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0028-7644},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ironside, P. M., & Speziale, H. S.. (2006). Using evidence in education and practice: more findings from the national survey on excellence in nursing education . Nursing education perspectives, 27(4), 219-221.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The article reports on the evidence- based practice in the nursing education curricula. The results of surveys show that teaching in an evidence-based method helps prepare their students for evidence-based practice of nursing. Consistency in some of the findings also reflect the effectiveness of evidence-based teaching. Some of the findings include that technology will continue to affect and influence the learning and teaching environment, both students and faculty will keep on learning from evidence-based education and evidence plays a vital role to cope with technological changes in the environment. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:991,
      author={P. M. Ironside and H. S. Speziale},
      year={2006},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Using evidence in education and practice: more findings from the national survey on excellence in nursing education },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={27},
      number={4},
      pages={219-221},
      note={id: 397; PUBM: Print; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={The article reports on the evidence- based practice in the nursing education curricula. The results of surveys show that teaching in an evidence-based method helps prepare their students for evidence-based practice of nursing. Consistency in some of the findings also reflect the effectiveness of evidence-based teaching. Some of the findings include that technology will continue to affect and influence the learning and teaching environment, both students and faculty will keep on learning from evidence-based education and evidence plays a vital role to cope with technological changes in the environment. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Benchmarking/organization & administration; Curriculum/standards; Education, Nursing, Associate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Diploma Programs/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing; Guidelines; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Nursing Education Research/organization & administration; Nursing, Practical/education; Program Evaluation; Societies, Nursing/organization & administration; Teaching/organization & administration; United States},
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Levin, R. F., & Feldman, H. R.. (2006). Teaching evidence-based practice in nursing: a guide for academic and clinical settings . New York: Springer.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This book captures creative approaches for teaching Evidence Based Practice. It includes comprehensive and unique strategies for teaching EBP for all types of learners across a variety of educational and clinical practice settings. The concrete examples of teaching assignments provided in the book bring the content alive and serve as a useful, detailed guide for how to incorporate this material into meaningful exercises for learners. (Source: Publisher)

    @book{RefWorks:997,
      author={R. F. Levin and H. R. Feldman},
      year={2006},
      title={Teaching evidence-based practice in nursing: a guide for academic and clinical settings },
      publisher={Springer},
      address={New York},
      note={id: 343},
      abstract={This book captures creative approaches for teaching Evidence Based Practice. It includes comprehensive and unique strategies for teaching EBP for all types of learners across a variety of educational and clinical practice settings. The concrete examples of teaching assignments provided in the book bring the content alive and serve as a useful, detailed guide for how to incorporate this material into meaningful exercises for learners. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Li, S., & Kenward, K.. (2006). A national survey of nursing education and practice of newly licensed nurses . JONA’s healthcare law, ethics & regulation, 8, 110-115.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The Institute of Medicine recommended establishing evidence-based teaching methods and curricula in health professions’ education to meet the needs of the changing healthcare system. In an attempt to provide evidence-based information for nursing education, this study was designed to identify educational elements that best prepare nurses for practice. The study employed a two-tiered survey process for collecting and combining data from programs of nursing education and the graduates of those programs. Administrators of 410 nursing programs responded to questions related to elements of education in their programs (response rate = 51%), whereas 7,497 RN (76.5%) and LPN (23.5%) graduates of respondent programs answered questions related to the adequacy of educational preparation for practice, difficulty with current client care assignments, and other professional and practice issues (response rate = 45.4%). The majority of the nurses reported that their education had adequately prepared them to perform many, but not all, essential areas of the nursing functions examined. Nearly 20% of the RNs and 18% of the LPNs reported having difficulty with client care assignments. Inadequate preparation of several nursing functions were identified as predictive of difficulty with patient care assignments. These areas include working effectively within the healthcare team, administering medications to groups of patients, analyzing multiple types of data when making client-related decisions, delegating tasks to others, and understanding the pathophysiology underlying a client’s conditions. In addition, it was found that the graduates were more likely to feel adequately prepared when nursing programs taught them use of information technology and evidence-based practice; integrated pathophysiology and critical thinking throughout the curriculum; taught content related to the care of client populations as independent courses; and had a higher percentage of faculty teaching both didactic and clinical components of the curriculum. The findings of this study are significant in broadening our understanding of the relationships between educational elements and preparedness of new nurses for practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:999,
      author={S. Li and K. Kenward},
      year={2006},
      month={10},
      title={A national survey of nursing education and practice of newly licensed nurses },
      journal={JONA's healthcare law, ethics & regulation},
      volume={8},
      pages={110-115},
      note={id: 1032; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070406. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Administration. No. of Refs: 2 ref. PMID: 17149038 NLM UID: 100888423.; 4 },
      abstract={The Institute of Medicine recommended establishing evidence-based teaching methods and curricula in health professions' education to meet the needs of the changing healthcare system. In an attempt to provide evidence-based information for nursing education, this study was designed to identify educational elements that best prepare nurses for practice. The study employed a two-tiered survey process for collecting and combining data from programs of nursing education and the graduates of those programs. Administrators of 410 nursing programs responded to questions related to elements of education in their programs (response rate = 51%), whereas 7,497 RN (76.5%) and LPN (23.5%) graduates of respondent programs answered questions related to the adequacy of educational preparation for practice, difficulty with current client care assignments, and other professional and practice issues (response rate = 45.4%). The majority of the nurses reported that their education had adequately prepared them to perform many, but not all, essential areas of the nursing functions examined. Nearly 20% of the RNs and 18% of the LPNs reported having difficulty with client care assignments. Inadequate preparation of several nursing functions were identified as predictive of difficulty with patient care assignments. These areas include working effectively within the healthcare team, administering medications to groups of patients, analyzing multiple types of data when making client-related decisions, delegating tasks to others, and understanding the pathophysiology underlying a client's conditions. In addition, it was found that the graduates were more likely to feel adequately prepared when nursing programs taught them use of information technology and evidence-based practice; integrated pathophysiology and critical thinking throughout the curriculum; taught content related to the care of client populations as independent courses; and had a higher percentage of faculty teaching both didactic and clinical components of the curriculum. The findings of this study are significant in broadening our understanding of the relationships between educational elements and preparedness of new nurses for practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Curriculum; Education, Nursing; New Graduate Nurses; Descriptive Research; Descriptive Statistics; Faculty, Nursing; Interprofessional Relations; P-Value; Practical Nurses; Registered Nurses; Surveys; Teaching Methods; United States},
      url={Executive Summary of survey is available https://www.ncsbn.org/RB24_06ElementsofNursing.pdf}
    }

  • Malloch, K., & Porter-O’Grady, T.. (2006). Introduction to Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Health Care (1st ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Contents: A new age for practice: creating the framework for evidence / Tim Porter-O’Grady — A framework for nursing clinical inquiry: pathway toward evidenced-based nursing practice / Dolora C. Sanares and Diane Heliker — From nursing process to nursing synthesis: evidence-based nursing education / Marcia K. Flesner … [et al.] — Linking structure and healing: building architecture for evidence-based practice / Rosalyn Cama — Living evidence: translating research into practice / Marie P. Farrell — The journey to evidence: managing the information infrastructure / Robert C. Geibert — Managing variance through an evidence-based framework for safe and reliable health care / Kathy A. Scott — Partnership economics: creating value through evidence-based workload management / Tim Porter-O’Grady and Kathy Malloch — Evidence-based practice and health policy: a match or a mismatch? / Susan R. Cooper … [et al.] — Creating nursing system excellence through the forces of magnetism / Amy Steinbinder and Elaine Scherer.

    @book{RefWorks:1000,
      author={K. Malloch and T. Porter-O’Grady},
      year={2006},
      title={Introduction to Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Health Care },
      publisher={Jones and Bartlett Publishers},
      address={Sudbury, MA},
      edition={1st},
      note={id: 1165},
      abstract={Contents: A new age for practice: creating the framework for evidence / Tim Porter-O'Grady -- A framework for nursing clinical inquiry: pathway toward evidenced-based nursing practice / Dolora C. Sanares and Diane Heliker -- From nursing process to nursing synthesis: evidence-based nursing education / Marcia K. Flesner ... [et al.] -- Linking structure and healing: building architecture for evidence-based practice / Rosalyn Cama -- Living evidence: translating research into practice / Marie P. Farrell -- The journey to evidence: managing the information infrastructure / Robert C. Geibert -- Managing variance through an evidence-based framework for safe and reliable health care / Kathy A. Scott -- Partnership economics: creating value through evidence-based workload management / Tim Porter-O'Grady and Kathy Malloch -- Evidence-based practice and health policy: a match or a mismatch? / Susan R. Cooper ... [et al.] -- Creating nursing system excellence through the forces of magnetism / Amy Steinbinder and Elaine Scherer. }
    }

  • Marketing, S., & Research, I. S. T. T. I.. (2006). EBP study: Summary of findings Sigma Theta Tau International.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI), the Honor Society of Nursing, conducted an online survey of active RNs in the United States to assess the understanding and use of evidence-based practice. Findings from the STTI survey highlight a number of issues that need to be addressed to maintain expansion of EBP. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @techreport{RefWorks:1038,
      author={Strategic Marketing & Research,Inc.for Sigma Theta Tau International},
      year={2006},
      title={EBP study: Summary of findings },
      institution={Sigma Theta Tau International},
      note={id: 854},
      abstract={Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI), the Honor Society of Nursing, conducted an online survey of active RNs in the United States to assess the understanding and use of evidence-based practice. Findings from the STTI survey highlight a number of issues that need to be addressed to maintain expansion of EBP. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      url={http://www.nursingknowledge.org/Portal/CMSLite/GetFile.aspx?ContentID=78260}
    }

  • Norton, M., Skiba, D. J., & Bowman, J.. (2006). Teaching nurses to provide patient centered evidence-based care through the use of informatics tools that promote safety, quality and effective clinical decisions . Studies in health technology and informatics, 122, 230-234.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Schools of Nursing face the challenge of providing students with experiences to use evidence-based consumer centric care information tools. To facilitate this challenge, a unique partnership was forged between a school of nursing and a leading clinical information systems corporation. This strategic partnership was created to advance the field of nursing informatics through the sharing of intellectual capital. Through this sharing, the goal is to study how technology can promote patient safety, support evidence-based care and facilitate consumer involvement in health care decisions. This paper describes the design, development and testing of a multimedia product that can be used by schools of nursing. This product can be integrated into a nursing curriculum to promote the use of informatics tools as an integral practice component. The multimedia product embraces the core competencies advocated by the Institute of Medicine’s Health Professions Education Report. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1011,
      author={M. Norton and D. J. Skiba and J. Bowman},
      year={2006},
      title={Teaching nurses to provide patient centered evidence-based care through the use of informatics tools that promote safety, quality and effective clinical decisions },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={122},
      pages={230-234},
      note={id: 484; PUBM: Print; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={Schools of Nursing face the challenge of providing students with experiences to use evidence-based consumer centric care information tools. To facilitate this challenge, a unique partnership was forged between a school of nursing and a leading clinical information systems corporation. This strategic partnership was created to advance the field of nursing informatics through the sharing of intellectual capital. Through this sharing, the goal is to study how technology can promote patient safety, support evidence-based care and facilitate consumer involvement in health care decisions. This paper describes the design, development and testing of a multimedia product that can be used by schools of nursing. This product can be integrated into a nursing curriculum to promote the use of informatics tools as an integral practice component. The multimedia product embraces the core competencies advocated by the Institute of Medicine's Health Professions Education Report. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Decision Support Systems, Clinical; Education, Nursing; Evidence-Based Medicine; Focus Groups; Humans; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Nursing Informatics; Patient-Centered Care; Quality of Health Care; Safety Management},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Quick, B., Nordstrom, S., & Johnson, K.. (2006). Using continuous quality improvement to implement evidence-based medicine . Lippincott’s case management, 11(6), 305-317.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The importance of implementing evidence-based medicine is being driven by public reporting of outcome data and linking these measures to reimbursement. Most hospitals are faced with many challenges in gaining sponsorship, staffing, creating tools, and reporting of evidence-based outcome measures. This article describes the use of the SSM Health Care (SSMHC) Continuous Quality Improvement model in implementing evidence-based practices at SSM DePaul Health Center, a community hospital member of SSMHC, including successes, opportunities for improvement, and lessons learned. Specifically, the article includes two different processes for data collection and interventions with staff, process requirements for each, and outcome data associated with each model. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1019,
      author={B. Quick and S. Nordstrom and K. Johnson},
      year={2006},
      month={11},
      title={Using continuous quality improvement to implement evidence-based medicine },
      journal={Lippincott's case management},
      volume={11},
      number={6},
      pages={305-317},
      note={id: 1163; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070216. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; exam questions; forms; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Case Management; Evidence-Based Practice; Quality Assurance. No. of Refs: 3 ref. NLM UID: 100961551. Email: Barbara quick@ssmhc.com. },
      abstract={The importance of implementing evidence-based medicine is being driven by public reporting of outcome data and linking these measures to reimbursement. Most hospitals are faced with many challenges in gaining sponsorship, staffing, creating tools, and reporting of evidence-based outcome measures. This article describes the use of the SSM Health Care (SSMHC) Continuous Quality Improvement model in implementing evidence-based practices at SSM DePaul Health Center, a community hospital member of SSMHC, including successes, opportunities for improvement, and lessons learned. Specifically, the article includes two different processes for data collection and interventions with staff, process requirements for each, and outcome data associated with each model. (Source:PubMed) },
      keywords={Medical Practice, Evidence-Based; Quality Improvement; Benchmarking; Case Managers; Data Analysis; Data Collection; Documentation; Education, Continuing (Credit); Hospitals; Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations; Length of Stay; Missouri; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Organizational Objectives; Teamwork; Time Factors; United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services}
    }

  • Upton, D., & Upton, P.. (2006). Development of an evidence-based practice questionnaire for nurses . Journal of advanced nursing, 53(4), 454-458.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The aim of this paper is to report the development and validation of a self-report measure of knowledge, practice and attitudes towards evidence-based practice (EBP). BACKGROUND: Evidence-based practice has become increasingly important in health care since the mid-1990s as it provides a framework for clinical problem-solving. However, to date no means exist to quantify the extent to which barriers, such as lack of time in the working day, lack of appropriate skills and negative attitudes, may prevent greater uptake of EBP. METHODS: Questionnaire development was based on established psychometric methods. Principal component factor analysis was used to uncover the underlying dimensions of the scale. Internal consistency of the scale was assessed by Cronbach’s alpha. Finally, construct validity was assessed via convergent and discriminant validity. RESULTS: The final questionnaire comprised three distinct scales (EBP, attitudes towards EBP and knowledge of EBP), which had robust validity and internal reliability. CONCLUSION: This tool can be used to measure the implementation of EBP. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1042,
      author={D. Upton and P. Upton},
      year={2006},
      month={Feb},
      title={Development of an evidence-based practice questionnaire for nurses },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={53},
      number={4},
      pages={454-458},
      note={id: 482; LR: 20061115; PUBM: Print; JID: 7609811; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: The aim of this paper is to report the development and validation of a self-report measure of knowledge, practice and attitudes towards evidence-based practice (EBP). BACKGROUND: Evidence-based practice has become increasingly important in health care since the mid-1990s as it provides a framework for clinical problem-solving. However, to date no means exist to quantify the extent to which barriers, such as lack of time in the working day, lack of appropriate skills and negative attitudes, may prevent greater uptake of EBP. METHODS: Questionnaire development was based on established psychometric methods. Principal component factor analysis was used to uncover the underlying dimensions of the scale. Internal consistency of the scale was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Finally, construct validity was assessed via convergent and discriminant validity. RESULTS: The final questionnaire comprised three distinct scales (EBP, attitudes towards EBP and knowledge of EBP), which had robust validity and internal reliability. CONCLUSION: This tool can be used to measure the implementation of EBP. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Evidence-Based Medicine; Feedback; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Male; Nurses/psychology; Principal Component Analysis; Questionnaires; Reproducibility of Results},
      isbn={0309-2402},
      language={eng}
    }

2005

  • Ayers, D. M., & Coeling, H.. (2005). Incorporating research into associate degree nursing curricula . The Journal of nursing education, 44(11), 515-518.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    All nurses are urged to be involved in research as participants and/or consumers. Such involvement may range from using research findings to participating in one or more of the research process steps to serving as principle investigator of a funded study. Clinicians at the bedside, including associate degree (AD) nurses, are well positioned to contribute to the body of nursing knowledge and enhance nursing care by identifying nursing care problems worthy of research, collecting data for nursing studies, and applying research findings in the care they provide. Minimal literature has addressed the preparation of AD students to assist in the research process. In this article, we describe how one AD program prepared students for their role as research participants. Content about the research process was presented in an easy-to-understand, clinically focused manner, and a brief research experience was provided to motivate and prepare these students for research involvement as nurses prepared at the AD level. The educational objectives were met, although time constraints limited students’ opportunity to learn about research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:956,
      author={D. M. Ayers and H. Coeling},
      year={2005},
      month={Nov},
      title={Incorporating research into associate degree nursing curricula },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={44},
      number={11},
      pages={515-518},
      note={id: 68; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={All nurses are urged to be involved in research as participants and/or consumers. Such involvement may range from using research findings to participating in one or more of the research process steps to serving as principle investigator of a funded study. Clinicians at the bedside, including associate degree (AD) nurses, are well positioned to contribute to the body of nursing knowledge and enhance nursing care by identifying nursing care problems worthy of research, collecting data for nursing studies, and applying research findings in the care they provide. Minimal literature has addressed the preparation of AD students to assist in the research process. In this article, we describe how one AD program prepared students for their role as research participants. Content about the research process was presented in an easy-to-understand, clinically focused manner, and a brief research experience was provided to motivate and prepare these students for research involvement as nurses prepared at the AD level. The educational objectives were met, although time constraints limited students' opportunity to learn about research. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Curriculum; Data Collection; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Education, Nursing, Associate/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Information Dissemination; Motivation; Nurse's Role; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education; Organizational Objectives; Practice Guidelines; Problem Solving; Professional Competence; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Research Design; Students, Nursing/psychology; Teaching/organization & administration},
      isbn={0148-4834 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Banning, M.. (2005). Conceptions of evidence, evidence-based medicine, evidence-based practice and their use in nursing: independent nurse prescribers’ views . Journal of clinical nursing, 14(4), 411-417.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ conceptions of evidence and evidence-based practice, whether there are differences between evidence-based practice and evidence-based medicine and to identify the uptake of research evidence in the workplace. BACKGROUND: The use and comprehension of the term ‘evidence-based practice’ in relation to nursing shows remarkable variation. Numerous definitions are provided, some tend to be closely related to the concept ‘evidence-based medicine’. Independent nurse prescribers need to be able to understand the concept of evidence-based practice to utilize and apply this concept in order to provide adequate medication management of their patients. METHOD: Data were generated by focus group interview and open question questionnaire and analysed by analytical abstraction. RESULTS: Nurses offered a variety of views on the use and uptake of evidence in the workplace. Some nurses acknowledged that they did not read research papers but were aware that they used a lot of evidence in their practice. Nurses had difficulty differentiating evidence-based practice from evidence-based medicine. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses were familiar with the research process but not the canons of evidenced-based practice. The data generated indicate different levels of evidence are used by nurses. This may be a reflection of the level of intrigue of the nurses involved. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The education and training of independent nurse prescribers should include the exploration of evidence from randomized controlled trials and from naturalistic studies and their contribution to evidenced-based practice and evidence-based medicine. Both concepts need to be explored in relation to the medication management of patients. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:958,
      author={M. Banning},
      year={2005},
      month={Apr},
      title={Conceptions of evidence, evidence-based medicine, evidence-based practice and their use in nursing: independent nurse prescribers' views },
      journal={Journal of clinical nursing},
      volume={14},
      number={4},
      pages={411-417},
      note={id: 78; PUBM: Print; JID: 9207302; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' conceptions of evidence and evidence-based practice, whether there are differences between evidence-based practice and evidence-based medicine and to identify the uptake of research evidence in the workplace. BACKGROUND: The use and comprehension of the term 'evidence-based practice' in relation to nursing shows remarkable variation. Numerous definitions are provided, some tend to be closely related to the concept 'evidence-based medicine'. Independent nurse prescribers need to be able to understand the concept of evidence-based practice to utilize and apply this concept in order to provide adequate medication management of their patients. METHOD: Data were generated by focus group interview and open question questionnaire and analysed by analytical abstraction. RESULTS: Nurses offered a variety of views on the use and uptake of evidence in the workplace. Some nurses acknowledged that they did not read research papers but were aware that they used a lot of evidence in their practice. Nurses had difficulty differentiating evidence-based practice from evidence-based medicine. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses were familiar with the research process but not the canons of evidenced-based practice. The data generated indicate different levels of evidence are used by nurses. This may be a reflection of the level of intrigue of the nurses involved. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The education and training of independent nurse prescribers should include the exploration of evidence from randomized controlled trials and from naturalistic studies and their contribution to evidenced-based practice and evidence-based medicine. Both concepts need to be explored in relation to the medication management of patients. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Benchmarking; Diffusion of Innovation; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Focus Groups; Great Britain; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Nurse Clinicians/education/psychology; Nurse Practitioners/education/psychology; Nurse's Role; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Patient Participation; Patient Selection; Practice Guidelines; Prescriptions, Drug; Professional Autonomy; Professional Competence/standards; Qualitative Research; Questionnaires; Randomized Controlled Trials; Research Design},
      isbn={0962-1067 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Belcher, J. V., & Vonderhaar, K. J.. (2005). Web-delivered research-based nursing staff education for seeking Magnet status . The Journal of nursing administration, 35(9), 382-386.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nurses use evidence to create clinical practice guidelines to standardize patient care. Evidence-based practice is based on research findings and research evidence that guide clinical decision making and patient care. Continuing education helps nurses maintain professional competence in dealing with the continuous influx of new knowledge in rapidly changing healthcare systems. Computer and Web-based education can provide dynamic, information-rich learning opportunities. These multimedia applications may be used to improve the quality and efficiency of teaching at a time when resources are limited. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @article{RefWorks:959,
      author={J. V. Belcher and K. J. Vonderhaar},
      year={2005},
      month={Sep},
      title={Web-delivered research-based nursing staff education for seeking Magnet status },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={35},
      number={9},
      pages={382-386},
      note={id: 71; PUBM: Print; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={Nurses use evidence to create clinical practice guidelines to standardize patient care. Evidence-based practice is based on research findings and research evidence that guide clinical decision making and patient care. Continuing education helps nurses maintain professional competence in dealing with the continuous influx of new knowledge in rapidly changing healthcare systems. Computer and Web-based education can provide dynamic, information-rich learning opportunities. These multimedia applications may be used to improve the quality and efficiency of teaching at a time when resources are limited. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      keywords={American Nurses' Association; Attitude of Health Personnel; Benchmarking/organization & administration; Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Credentialing; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Humans; Inservice Training/organization & administration; Internet/organization & administration; Motivation; Needs Assessment; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Service, Hospital/standards; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Organizational Objectives; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Practice Guidelines; Program Development; Program Evaluation; United States},
      isbn={0002-0443 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Brucker, M. C.. (2005). Providing evidence-based care. You can understand research and use it in practice! . AWHONN lifelines / Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, 9(1), 46-55.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article details the difference between evidence-based care and expert-based care, categorization of the levels of evidence, and strategies and recommendations on how to analyze data. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @article{RefWorks:963,
      author={M. C. Brucker},
      year={2005},
      month={Feb-Mar},
      title={Providing evidence-based care. You can understand research and use it in practice! },
      journal={AWHONN lifelines / Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses},
      volume={9},
      number={1},
      pages={46-55},
      note={id: 62; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 9708553; RF: 13; ppublish },
      abstract={This article details the difference between evidence-based care and expert-based care, categorization of the levels of evidence, and strategies and recommendations on how to analyze data. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Decision Making; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods; Humans; Models, Nursing; Specialties, Nursing/standards},
      isbn={1091-5923 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Burke, L. E., Schlenk, E. A., Sereika, S. M., Cohen, S. M., Happ, M. B., & Dorman, J. S.. (2005). Developing research competence to support evidence-based practice . Journal of professional nursing, 21(6), 358-363.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes one step in the process that was undertaken to prepare for the introduction of evidence-based practice (EBP) into the curriculum across the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing, and Doctor of Philosophy programs, as well as the programs that were under development, Clinical Nurse Leader and Doctor of Nursing Practice, at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. Expected research competencies were identified for each level or academic year within each program. Based on these competencies, recommendations on how to modify the curriculum into one that would support students’ acquisition and development of the skills necessary to be successful in matriculating through an EBP curriculum were developed. Evaluation mechanisms for the achievement of these competencies vary across the academic programs and will include performance on capstone projects, comprehensive examinations, and program milestones for doctoral students. The establishment of evidence-based competencies provided a foundation for the development of new teaching approaches and the curricular revisions across the three academic programs. Thus, the University of Pittsburgh model of educating for EBP is based on a sequential layering of research competencies throughout the curriculum. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:964,
      author={L. E. Burke and E. A. Schlenk and S. M. Sereika and S. M. Cohen and M. B. Happ and J. S. Dorman},
      year={2005},
      month={11//2005 Nov-Dec},
      title={Developing research competence to support evidence-based practice },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing},
      volume={21},
      number={6},
      pages={358-363},
      note={id: 231; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060224. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 4 ref. NLM UID: 8511298. Email: ibu100@pitt.edu. },
      abstract={This article describes one step in the process that was undertaken to prepare for the introduction of evidence-based practice (EBP) into the curriculum across the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing, and Doctor of Philosophy programs, as well as the programs that were under development, Clinical Nurse Leader and Doctor of Nursing Practice, at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. Expected research competencies were identified for each level or academic year within each program. Based on these competencies, recommendations on how to modify the curriculum into one that would support students' acquisition and development of the skills necessary to be successful in matriculating through an EBP curriculum were developed. Evaluation mechanisms for the achievement of these competencies vary across the academic programs and will include performance on capstone projects, comprehensive examinations, and program milestones for doctoral students. The establishment of evidence-based competencies provided a foundation for the development of new teaching approaches and the curricular revisions across the three academic programs. Thus, the University of Pittsburgh model of educating for EBP is based on a sequential layering of research competencies throughout the curriculum. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based--Education; Research, Nursing--Education; Behavioral Objectives; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Education, Nursing, Doctoral; Education, Nursing, Masters; Outcomes of Education--Evaluation; Pennsylvania; Schools, Nursing},
      isbn={8755-7223}
    }

  • Burns, H. K., & Foley, S. M.. (2005). Building a foundation for an evidence-based approach to practice: teaching basic concepts to undergraduate freshman students . Journal of professional nursing, 21(6), 351-357.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing introduced evidence-based practice (EBP) into the freshman-level curriculum this year. This article describes the reasons behind this decision, the development of the curriculum, the specific EBP content, and the student assignments. The introduction of EBP into the first-level nursing curriculum has proven to be successful; consideration is even being given to expanding the EBP content. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:968,
      author={H. K. Burns and S. M. Foley},
      year={2005},
      month={11//2005 Nov-Dec},
      title={Building a foundation for an evidence-based approach to practice: teaching basic concepts to undergraduate freshman students },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing},
      volume={21},
      number={6},
      pages={351-357},
      note={id: 230; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060224. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 22 ref. NLM UID: 8511298. Email: burnsh@pitt.edu. },
      abstract={The University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing introduced evidence-based practice (EBP) into the freshman-level curriculum this year. This article describes the reasons behind this decision, the development of the curriculum, the specific EBP content, and the student assignments. The introduction of EBP into the first-level nursing curriculum has proven to be successful; consideration is even being given to expanding the EBP content. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based--Education; Computerized Literature Searching--Education; Course Content; Critical Thinking--Education; Curriculum; Pennsylvania; Research--Utilization; Schools, Nursing; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={8755-7223}
    }

  • Callister, L. C., Matsumura, G., Lookinland, S., Mangum, S., & Loucks, C.. (2005). Inquiry in baccalaureate nursing education: fostering evidence-based practice . The Journal of nursing education, 44(2), 59-64.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    With the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice, nurse educators need to more fully implement teaching strategies that help students gain critical thinking skills related to inquiry and understand the importance of evidence-based nursing practice. Research and scholarship emphases in one baccalaureate nursing program, student-identified benefits, and challenges associated with incorporating inquiry across the curriculum are described in this article. In clinical journal entries, students described the following benefits associated with curricular emphasis on inquiry: increased interest in evidence-based nursing practice and participating in the generation of research; enhanced critical thinking skills through the development of knowledge, experience, and competencies; increased motivation to continue professional growth and development by participating in lifelong learning; the desire to become better consumers of research findings; better understanding of the "real world" of clinical research; and increased desire to pursue graduate studies in nursing. The challenge to promote student growth toward competence in the application of evidence-based principles in clinical practice is ongoing. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:970,
      author={L. C. Callister and G. Matsumura and S. Lookinland and S. Mangum and C. Loucks},
      year={2005},
      month={Feb},
      title={Inquiry in baccalaureate nursing education: fostering evidence-based practice },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={44},
      number={2},
      pages={59-64},
      note={id: 64; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; RF: 46; ppublish },
      abstract={With the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice, nurse educators need to more fully implement teaching strategies that help students gain critical thinking skills related to inquiry and understand the importance of evidence-based nursing practice. Research and scholarship emphases in one baccalaureate nursing program, student-identified benefits, and challenges associated with incorporating inquiry across the curriculum are described in this article. In clinical journal entries, students described the following benefits associated with curricular emphasis on inquiry: increased interest in evidence-based nursing practice and participating in the generation of research; enhanced critical thinking skills through the development of knowledge, experience, and competencies; increased motivation to continue professional growth and development by participating in lifelong learning; the desire to become better consumers of research findings; better understanding of the "real world" of clinical research; and increased desire to pursue graduate studies in nursing. The challenge to promote student growth toward competence in the application of evidence-based principles in clinical practice is ongoing. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Humans; Mentors; Nursing Research/education; Teaching/methods; Thinking; United States},
      isbn={0148-4834 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ciliska, D.. (2005). Educating for evidence-based practice . Journal of professional nursing, 21(6), 345-350.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Several countries have developed policy initiatives that require health care to be evidence based and health science students to study under an evidence-based curriculum as well as learn how to practice in an evidence-based way. Evidence-based nursing (EBN) is too new to have any actual research on which to base a curriculum. However, in the absence of evidence, several schools of nursing have moved or are moving forward. This article presents ideas and examples gleaned from colleagues around the world on the why’s and how’s of teaching EBN. Finally, this article calls for the funding and planning of an evaluation of evidence-based curricula and teaching strategies for continued development of the field. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:972,
      author={D. Ciliska},
      year={2005},
      month={11//2005 Nov-Dec},
      title={Educating for evidence-based practice },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing},
      volume={21},
      number={6},
      pages={345-350},
      note={id: 232; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060224. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 11 ref. NLM UID: 8511298. Email: ciliska@mcmaster.ca. },
      abstract={Several countries have developed policy initiatives that require health care to be evidence based and health science students to study under an evidence-based curriculum as well as learn how to practice in an evidence-based way. Evidence-based nursing (EBN) is too new to have any actual research on which to base a curriculum. However, in the absence of evidence, several schools of nursing have moved or are moving forward. This article presents ideas and examples gleaned from colleagues around the world on the why's and how's of teaching EBN. Finally, this article calls for the funding and planning of an evaluation of evidence-based curricula and teaching strategies for continued development of the field. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based--Education; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Education, Nursing, Graduate; Faculty Role; Faculty, Nursing; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={8755-7223}
    }

  • DiCenso, A., Guyatt, G., & Ciliska, D.. (2005). Evidence-based nursing: a guide to clinical practice . St. Louis, MO; London: Mosby.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Written in response to numerous requests by nurse practitioners and other graduate faculty for a nursing literature resource, this book is based on the Users’ Guides to the Medical Literature: A Manual for Evidence-Based Practice by Dr. Gordon Guyatt and Dr. Drummond Rennie, published in 2001 by the AMA. Revised for the nursing audience, Evidence-Based Nursing is a reader-friendly, accessible guide that features plentiful examples from the nursing literature and the addition of specific nursing issues such as qualitative research, with direct application for clinical practice. Drs. DiCenso, Ciliska, and Guyatt are three of the leaders in the evidence-based nursing community and command worldwide recognition. Evidence-Based Nursing will enable nurses to frame their clinical questions in a way that will help them find and distinguish between strong and weak evidence; clearly understand study results; weigh the risks and benefits of management options; and apply the evidence to their individual patients to improve outcomes. (Source: Publisher)

    @book{RefWorks:975,
      author={A. DiCenso and G. Guyatt and D. Ciliska},
      year={2005},
      title={Evidence-based nursing: a guide to clinical practice },
      publisher={Mosby},
      address={St. Louis, MO; London},
      note={id: 342},
      abstract={Written in response to numerous requests by nurse practitioners and other graduate faculty for a nursing literature resource, this book is based on the Users' Guides to the Medical Literature: A Manual for Evidence-Based Practice by Dr. Gordon Guyatt and Dr. Drummond Rennie, published in 2001 by the AMA. Revised for the nursing audience, Evidence-Based Nursing is a reader-friendly, accessible guide that features plentiful examples from the nursing literature and the addition of specific nursing issues such as qualitative research, with direct application for clinical practice. Drs. DiCenso, Ciliska, and Guyatt are three of the leaders in the evidence-based nursing community and command worldwide recognition. Evidence-Based Nursing will enable nurses to frame their clinical questions in a way that will help them find and distinguish between strong and weak evidence; clearly understand study results; weigh the risks and benefits of management options; and apply the evidence to their individual patients to improve outcomes. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Duffy, M. E.. (2005). Translation research: its relationship to evidence-based practice . Clinical nurse specialist CNS, 19(2), 60-62.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Despite a growing body of literature documenting the results of well-designed clinical intervention research, few findings are effectively implemented in clinical practice settings. Although translation research is still in its infancy, much is being done to enhance its development. Nurse scientists and nurse clinicians need to work together to develop, implement, and evaluate carefully crafted translational research projects. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:977,
      author={M. E. Duffy},
      year={2005},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Translation research: its relationship to evidence-based practice },
      journal={Clinical nurse specialist CNS},
      volume={19},
      number={2},
      pages={60-62},
      note={id: 63; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8709115; RF: 12; ppublish },
      abstract={Despite a growing body of literature documenting the results of well-designed clinical intervention research, few findings are effectively implemented in clinical practice settings. Although translation research is still in its infancy, much is being done to enhance its development. Nurse scientists and nurse clinicians need to work together to develop, implement, and evaluate carefully crafted translational research projects. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Benchmarking; Diffusion of Innovation; Evidence-Based Medicine/organization & administration; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Information Dissemination; Nursing Research/organization & administration; Planning Techniques; Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration; Research Design; Transfer (Psychology); United States; United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality},
      isbn={0887-6274 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ferguson, L., & Day, R. A.. (2005). Evidence-based nursing education: myth or reality? . The Journal of nursing education, 44(3), 107-115.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article explores the concept of evidence-based nursing education. Because nurse educators incorporate evidence-based practice as a basic tenet of their programs, they assume nursing education itself is evidence based. Nursing education has a body of knowledge on which nurse educators base teaching, educational strategies, and curricular designs, but most of this knowledge is tacit, experiential, and based on practice. This knowledge relates to the art of teaching in nursing and can warrant the practice of nurse educators. However, research is also necessary to demonstrate the effectiveness of teaching approaches and strategies. Nurse educators need to develop the science of nursing education through qualitative and quantitative research, to add to the tacit knowledge underpinning nursing education strategies. When the science of nursing education is adequately developed through rigorous research, we will truly be able to say that nursing education is evidence based. Until then, it may be only a myth. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:979,
      author={L. Ferguson and R. A. Day},
      year={2005},
      month={Mar},
      title={Evidence-based nursing education: myth or reality? },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={44},
      number={3},
      pages={107-115},
      note={id: 79; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; RF: 60; ppublish },
      abstract={This article explores the concept of evidence-based nursing education. Because nurse educators incorporate evidence-based practice as a basic tenet of their programs, they assume nursing education itself is evidence based. Nursing education has a body of knowledge on which nurse educators base teaching, educational strategies, and curricular designs, but most of this knowledge is tacit, experiential, and based on practice. This knowledge relates to the art of teaching in nursing and can warrant the practice of nurse educators. However, research is also necessary to demonstrate the effectiveness of teaching approaches and strategies. Nurse educators need to develop the science of nursing education through qualitative and quantitative research, to add to the tacit knowledge underpinning nursing education strategies. When the science of nursing education is adequately developed through rigorous research, we will truly be able to say that nursing education is evidence based. Until then, it may be only a myth. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Curriculum/standards; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing; Humans; Judgment; Knowledge; Models, Educational; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Professional Competence/standards; Qualitative Research; Research Design; Students, Nursing/psychology; Teaching/organization & administration},
      isbn={0148-4834 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fineout-Overholt, E., Melnyk, B. M., & Schultz, A.. (2005). Transforming health care from the inside out: advancing evidence-based practice in the 21st century . Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 21(6), 335-344.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Health care is in need of change. Major professional and health care organizations as well as federal agencies and policy-making bodies are emphasizing the importance of evidence-based practice (EBP). Using this problem solving approach to clinical care that incorporates the conscientious use of current best evidence from well designed studies, a clinician’s expertise, and patient values and preferences, nurses and other health care providers can provide care that goes beyond the status quo. Health care that is evidence-based and conducted in a caring context leads to better clinical decisions and patient outcomes. Gaining knowledge and skills in the EBP process provides nurses and other clinicians the tools needed to take ownership of their practices and transform health care. Key elements of a best practice culture are EBP mentors, partnerships between academic and clinical settings, EBP champions, clearly written research, time and resources, and administrative support. This article provides an overview of EBP and offers recommendations for accelerating the adoption of EBP as a culture in education, practice and research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:981,
      author={E. Fineout-Overholt and B. M. Melnyk and A. Schultz},
      year={2005},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Transforming health care from the inside out: advancing evidence-based practice in the 21st century },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={21},
      number={6},
      pages={335-344},
      note={id: 267; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511298; RF: 29; ppublish },
      abstract={Health care is in need of change. Major professional and health care organizations as well as federal agencies and policy-making bodies are emphasizing the importance of evidence-based practice (EBP). Using this problem solving approach to clinical care that incorporates the conscientious use of current best evidence from well designed studies, a clinician's expertise, and patient values and preferences, nurses and other health care providers can provide care that goes beyond the status quo. Health care that is evidence-based and conducted in a caring context leads to better clinical decisions and patient outcomes. Gaining knowledge and skills in the EBP process provides nurses and other clinicians the tools needed to take ownership of their practices and transform health care. Key elements of a best practice culture are EBP mentors, partnerships between academic and clinical settings, EBP champions, clearly written research, time and resources, and administrative support. This article provides an overview of EBP and offers recommendations for accelerating the adoption of EBP as a culture in education, practice and research. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Benchmarking/organization & administration; Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Diffusion of Innovation; Empathy; Evidence-Based Medicine/organization & administration; Forecasting; Health Care Reform/organization & administration; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Mentors; Models, Nursing; Nursing Care/organization & administration; Nursing Research/organization & administration; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Outcome Assessment (Health Care)/organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Problem Solving; Research Design},
      isbn={8755-7223 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fonteyn, M.. (2005). The interrelationships among thinking skills, research knowledge, and evidence-based practice . The Journal of nursing education, 44(10), 439.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This editorial introduces this month’s issue of the Journal of Nursing Education. The articles confirm that nursing faculty continue to strive to develop and improve their students’ thinking skills and to provide them with the requisite knowledge and understanding of research needed to support the type of evidence-based practice that has become the expectation of our profession. The work exemplified by the authors in this issue has important implications for faculty, researchers, and clinicians. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:983,
      author={M. Fonteyn},
      year={2005},
      month={Oct},
      title={The interrelationships among thinking skills, research knowledge, and evidence-based practice },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={44},
      number={10},
      pages={439},
      note={id: 70; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={This editorial introduces this month's issue of the Journal of Nursing Education. The articles confirm that nursing faculty continue to strive to develop and improve their students' thinking skills and to provide them with the requisite knowledge and understanding of research needed to support the type of evidence-based practice that has become the expectation of our profession. The work exemplified by the authors in this issue has important implications for faculty, researchers, and clinicians. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Humans; Nursing Research/education; Thinking; United States},
      isbn={0148-4834 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hopp, L.. (2005). Minding the gap: evidence-based practice brings the academy to clinical practice . Clinical nurse specialist CNS, 19(4), 190-192.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Heavy teaching loads and the relationships between schools of nursing and clinical settings pose challenges to faculty clinical practice. Many schools of nursing that prepare CNS graduates are not part of major medical centers where the division between school and practice arena blurs. Evidence-based practice (EBP) can provide faculty with an opportunity to mind the gap between the clinical practice platform and the academic train that diverts from the essence of CNS being—influencing patients, nurses, and healthcare systems. This article describes the nature of CNS practice and the facilitation of EBP as a solution to bridge the gap. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @article{RefWorks:987,
      author={L. Hopp},
      year={2005},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Minding the gap: evidence-based practice brings the academy to clinical practice },
      journal={Clinical nurse specialist CNS},
      volume={19},
      number={4},
      pages={190-192},
      note={id: 75; PUBM: Print; JID: 8709115; ppublish },
      abstract={Heavy teaching loads and the relationships between schools of nursing and clinical settings pose challenges to faculty clinical practice. Many schools of nursing that prepare CNS graduates are not part of major medical centers where the division between school and practice arena blurs. Evidence-based practice (EBP) can provide faculty with an opportunity to mind the gap between the clinical practice platform and the academic train that diverts from the essence of CNS being—influencing patients, nurses, and healthcare systems. This article describes the nature of CNS practice and the facilitation of EBP as a solution to bridge the gap. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence/standards; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Humans; Nurse Clinicians/education/organization & administration; Nurse's Role; Nursing Faculty Practice/organization & administration; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Workload},
      isbn={0887-6274 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ironside, P. M.. (2005). Teaching thinking and reaching the limits of memorization: enacting new pedagogies . The Journal of nursing education, 44(10), 441-449.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Contemporary practice environments are complex and require students and new graduates to possess high-level thinking capabilities to ensure patient safety and quality of care. To achieve this goal, many nurse educators are exploring new pedagogies (critical, feminist, phenomenological, and postmodern) to teach students the practices of thinking that contemporary clinical situations demand. These new pedagogies offer alternatives to the predominant use of conventional pedagogies, which emphasize students’ memorization of content and its subsequent application in practice situations. This study, using Heideggerian hermeneutics, documents how teachers are using new pedagogies in ways that shift their attention to teaching thinking and away from devising strategies to help students memorize and apply more content. One of the themes that emerged from this study, Teaching Thinking and Reaching the Limits of Memorization, and two subthemes, Thinking AS Memorization and Recall, and Beyond Memorization: Thinking in Context are presented. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:990,
      author={P. M. Ironside},
      year={2005},
      month={Oct},
      title={Teaching thinking and reaching the limits of memorization: enacting new pedagogies },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={44},
      number={10},
      pages={441-449},
      note={id: 398; LR: 20061115; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={Contemporary practice environments are complex and require students and new graduates to possess high-level thinking capabilities to ensure patient safety and quality of care. To achieve this goal, many nurse educators are exploring new pedagogies (critical, feminist, phenomenological, and postmodern) to teach students the practices of thinking that contemporary clinical situations demand. These new pedagogies offer alternatives to the predominant use of conventional pedagogies, which emphasize students' memorization of content and its subsequent application in practice situations. This study, using Heideggerian hermeneutics, documents how teachers are using new pedagogies in ways that shift their attention to teaching thinking and away from devising strategies to help students memorize and apply more content. One of the themes that emerged from this study, Teaching Thinking and Reaching the Limits of Memorization, and two subthemes, Thinking AS Memorization and Recall, and Beyond Memorization: Thinking in Context are presented. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing/methods; Humans; Interviews; Models, Educational; Teaching/methods; Thinking; United States},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Killeen, M. B., & Barnfather, J. S.. (2005). A successful teaching strategy for applying evidence-based practice . Nurse educator, 30(3), 127-132.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the conscientious use of the best evidence contained in the literature to guide healthcare decisions. The authors describe how their baccalaureate program prepares its graduates to be successful in implementing EBP in their nursing practice. Outcomes of sustained student projects in agency settings are presented. They posit that bachelor of science in nursing students, agency personnel, and faculty can lead practice innovations supported by EBP. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:992,
      author={M. B. Killeen and J. S. Barnfather},
      year={2005},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={A successful teaching strategy for applying evidence-based practice },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={30},
      number={3},
      pages={127-132},
      note={id: 77; PUBM: Print; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the conscientious use of the best evidence contained in the literature to guide healthcare decisions. The authors describe how their baccalaureate program prepares its graduates to be successful in implementing EBP in their nursing practice. Outcomes of sustained student projects in agency settings are presented. They posit that bachelor of science in nursing students, agency personnel, and faculty can lead practice innovations supported by EBP. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Curriculum; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/standards; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Information Dissemination; Knowledge; Leadership; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education/standards; Organizational Objectives; Problem Solving; Professional Competence; Program Evaluation; Psychological Theory; Research Design/standards; Students, Nursing/psychology; Teaching/methods},
      isbn={0363-3624 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Klem, M. L., & Weiss, P. M.. (2005). Evidence-based resources and the role of librarians in developing evidence-based practice curricula . Journal of professional nursing, 21(6), 380-387.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) requires acquisition and use of a complex set of skills, including the ability to locate and critically evaluate clinically relevant research literature. In this article, we discuss information resources and tools that may be of value to educators faced with the task of teaching students to search for and evaluate research-based evidence. In addition, we discuss how health sciences librarians, with the use of new models of information instruction and delivery, can work with nursing faculty in developing curricula for training students in EBP. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:994,
      author={M. L. Klem and P. M. Weiss},
      year={2005},
      month={11//2005 Nov-Dec},
      title={Evidence-based resources and the role of librarians in developing evidence-based practice curricula },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing},
      volume={21},
      number={6},
      pages={380-387},
      note={id: 229; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060224. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 42 ref. NLM UID: 8511298. Email: Klem@pitt.edu. },
      abstract={The implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) requires acquisition and use of a complex set of skills, including the ability to locate and critically evaluate clinically relevant research literature. In this article, we discuss information resources and tools that may be of value to educators faced with the task of teaching students to search for and evaluate research-based evidence. In addition, we discuss how health sciences librarians, with the use of new models of information instruction and delivery, can work with nursing faculty in developing curricula for training students in EBP. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum Development; Education, Nursing; Librarians; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based--Education; CINAHL Database; Cochrane Library; Computerized Literature Searching; Medline; Practice Guidelines; Professional Role; Psycinfo},
      isbn={8755-7223}
    }

  • Lever, K. A.. (2005). Introducing students to research: the road to success . The Journal of nursing education, 44(10), 470-472.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Introduction of the terminology associated with research can overwhelm both students and faculty. In this article, I describe an interactive method for teaching undergraduate nursing students about the concepts involved in the research process. The "Research Road to Success" is a board game created to promote active learning using repetition, peer collaboration, group dynamics, and questioning. The game has been part of the curriculum for 3 years, with positive results. Nurse educators and students can benefit from the incorporation of creative methods to stimulate interest in and understanding of nursing research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:996,
      author={K. A. Lever},
      year={2005},
      month={Oct},
      title={Introducing students to research: the road to success },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={44},
      number={10},
      pages={470-472},
      note={id: 399; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={Introduction of the terminology associated with research can overwhelm both students and faculty. In this article, I describe an interactive method for teaching undergraduate nursing students about the concepts involved in the research process. The "Research Road to Success" is a board game created to promote active learning using repetition, peer collaboration, group dynamics, and questioning. The game has been part of the curriculum for 3 years, with positive results. Nurse educators and students can benefit from the incorporation of creative methods to stimulate interest in and understanding of nursing research. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing/methods; Humans; Nursing Research/education; Play and Playthings; Teaching/methods; Terminology; United States},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Mattila, L. R., Koivisto, V., & Haggman-Laitila, A.. (2005). Evaluation of learning outcomes in a research process and the utilization of research knowledge from the viewpoint of nursing students . Nurse education today, 25(6), 487-495.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to evaluate the learning that takes place in a research process of nursing students when writing their Bachelor’s theses and to describe the learning outcomes in utilizing research knowledge. The sample comprised nursing students from a Finnish polytechnic. All of them worked with their Bachelor’s theses. The data were collected by a questionnaire constructed for this study and 257 nursing students participated in the study. The data were analysed by SPSS 10.0 software. The students knew the steps of the research process moderately well. Most of the students responded that research results had been implemented in nursing practice. More than half of the students found the attitudes towards research positive in their clinical placements. Students’ self-evaluation of learning outcomes was positive and they felt able to use research knowledge. The results indicated improving learning outcomes during the working process of the Bachelor’s thesis. Working with the Bachelor’s thesis is an effective way to lead the students to use research knowledge. The results are useful in guiding the students through their Bachelor’s theses as well as in developing the curriculum and working life. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1001,
      author={L. R. Mattila and V. Koivisto and A. Haggman-Laitila},
      year={2005},
      month={Aug},
      title={Evaluation of learning outcomes in a research process and the utilization of research knowledge from the viewpoint of nursing students },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={25},
      number={6},
      pages={487-495},
      note={id: 76; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511379; 2004/06/11 [received]; 2005/05/09 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={The purpose of this descriptive study was to evaluate the learning that takes place in a research process of nursing students when writing their Bachelor's theses and to describe the learning outcomes in utilizing research knowledge. The sample comprised nursing students from a Finnish polytechnic. All of them worked with their Bachelor's theses. The data were collected by a questionnaire constructed for this study and 257 nursing students participated in the study. The data were analysed by SPSS 10.0 software. The students knew the steps of the research process moderately well. Most of the students responded that research results had been implemented in nursing practice. More than half of the students found the attitudes towards research positive in their clinical placements. Students' self-evaluation of learning outcomes was positive and they felt able to use research knowledge. The results indicated improving learning outcomes during the working process of the Bachelor's thesis. Working with the Bachelor's thesis is an effective way to lead the students to use research knowledge. The results are useful in guiding the students through their Bachelor's theses as well as in developing the curriculum and working life. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Analysis of Variance; Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Health; Data Collection; Dissertations, Academic; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Educational Measurement; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Finland; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval; Knowledge; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Process; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Periodicals; Professional Competence/standards; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; Self Efficacy; Students, Nursing/psychology; Writing},
      isbn={0260-6917 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Melnyk, B. M., & Fineout-Overholt, E.. (2005). Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: a guide to best practice . Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This user-friendly resource to evidence-based practice will serve as a guide to implementing evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare. "Real-life" examples assist the reader in actualizing important concepts and overcoming barriers in the implementation of evidence-based care; efficient critical appraisal of both quantitative and qualitative evidence; how to factor in a clinician’s expertise and patient preferences/values when making decisions about patient care; chapters on outcomes management and how to create a vision to motivate a change to best practice; chapters on generating both qualitative and quantitative evidence; how to write a successful grant proposal; as well as a chapter on how to disseminate evidence to other professionals, the media, and policy-makers. The text also includes web-alerts that direct readers to helpful internet resources and an accompanying CD-ROM with 40 evidence reviews written by experts in the field that answer burning clinical questions across six specialty areas: adults in critical/acute care; adults in primary care; aging; emergency & trauma care; high-risk children & youth; and psychiatric mental health. (Source: Publisher)

    @book{RefWorks:1002,
      author={B. M. Melnyk and E. Fineout-Overholt},
      year={2005},
      title={Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: a guide to best practice },
      publisher={Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
      address={Philadelphia},
      note={id: 340},
      abstract={This user-friendly resource to evidence-based practice will serve as a guide to implementing evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare. "Real-life" examples assist the reader in actualizing important concepts and overcoming barriers in the implementation of evidence-based care; efficient critical appraisal of both quantitative and qualitative evidence; how to factor in a clinician's expertise and patient preferences/values when making decisions about patient care; chapters on outcomes management and how to create a vision to motivate a change to best practice; chapters on generating both qualitative and quantitative evidence; how to write a successful grant proposal; as well as a chapter on how to disseminate evidence to other professionals, the media, and policy-makers. The text also includes web-alerts that direct readers to helpful internet resources and an accompanying CD-ROM with 40 evidence reviews written by experts in the field that answer burning clinical questions across six specialty areas: adults in critical/acute care; adults in primary care; aging; emergency & trauma care; high-risk children & youth; and psychiatric mental health. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Newhouse, R., Dearholt, S., Poe, S., Pugh, L. C., & White, K. M.. (2005). Evidence-based practice: a practical approach to implementation . The Journal of nursing administration, 35(1), 35-40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Organizations often do not have processes in place to support nurses through a systematic approach for developing and evaluating nursing interventions, protocols, critical pathways, and policies that are derived from scientific evidence. The development of a framework to guide inquiry will have a positive impact on patients. This process may foster a higher level of professional engagement by nurses that may, in the long-term, help improve nurse retention and recruitment. The authors discuss a nursing evidence-based practice model and guidelines that were developed by a team of hospital and academic nurse leaders and is practical and easy to use. This model has been successfully implemented across the department of nursing as a strategic initiative. Results of the implementation have shown that staff nurses can effectively use this model with the help of knowledgeable mentors. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1008,
      author={R. Newhouse and S. Dearholt and S. Poe and L. C. Pugh and K. M. White},
      year={2005},
      month={Jan},
      title={Evidence-based practice: a practical approach to implementation },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={35},
      number={1},
      pages={35-40},
      note={id: 80; PUBM: Print; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={Organizations often do not have processes in place to support nurses through a systematic approach for developing and evaluating nursing interventions, protocols, critical pathways, and policies that are derived from scientific evidence. The development of a framework to guide inquiry will have a positive impact on patients. This process may foster a higher level of professional engagement by nurses that may, in the long-term, help improve nurse retention and recruitment. The authors discuss a nursing evidence-based practice model and guidelines that were developed by a team of hospital and academic nurse leaders and is practical and easy to use. This model has been successfully implemented across the department of nursing as a strategic initiative. Results of the implementation have shown that staff nurses can effectively use this model with the help of knowledgeable mentors. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Baltimore; Clinical Competence/standards; Clinical Protocols/standards; Critical Pathways/standards; Curriculum/standards; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Hospitals, University; Humans; Inservice Training/organization & administration; Leadership; Manuals/standards; Mentors; Models, Nursing; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Research/education/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration/psychology; Pilot Projects; Practice Guidelines/standards; Professional Staff Committees/organization & administration; Program Development/methods; Program Evaluation},
      isbn={0002-0443 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pipe, T. B., Wellik, K. E., Buchda, V. L., Hansen, C. M., & Martyn, D. R.. (2005). Implementing evidence-based nursing practice . Medsurg nursing : official journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, 14(3), 179-184.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A methodology for establishing and supporting evidence-based nursing practice is examined. Description of a clinical and administrative scenario serves as an example of a systematic appraisal of the relevant literature that had implications for clinical practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1015,
      author={T. B. Pipe and K. E. Wellik and V. L. Buchda and C. M. Hansen and D. R. Martyn},
      year={2005},
      month={Jun},
      title={Implementing evidence-based nursing practice },
      journal={Medsurg nursing : official journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses},
      volume={14},
      number={3},
      pages={179-184},
      note={id: 60; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 9300545; RF: 14; ppublish },
      abstract={A methodology for establishing and supporting evidence-based nursing practice is examined. Description of a clinical and administrative scenario serves as an example of a systematic appraisal of the relevant literature that had implications for clinical practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods; Humans; Models, Nursing; Nursing/methods/standards; Nursing Staff/organization & administration},
      isbn={1092-0811 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pravikoff, D. S., Tanner, A. B., & Pierce, S. T.. (2005). Readiness of U.S. nurses for evidence-based practice . The American journal of nursing, 105(9), 40-51; quiz 52.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Evidence-based practice is a systematic approach to problem solving for health care providers, including RNs, characterized by the use of the best evidence currently available for clinical decision making, in order to provide the most consistent and best possible care to patients. Are RNs in the United States prepared to engage in this process? This study examines nurses’ perceptions of their access to tools with which to obtain evidence and whether they have the skills to do so. Using a stratified random sample of 3,000 RNs across the United States, 1,097 nurses (37%) responded to the 93-item questionnaire. Seven hundred sixty respondents (77% of those who were employed at the time of the survey) worked in clinical settings and are the focus of this article. Although these nurses acknowledge that they frequently need information for practice, they feel much more confident asking colleagues or peers and searching the Internet and World Wide Web than they do using bibliographic databases such as PubMed or CINAHL to find specific information. They don’t understand or value research and have received little or no training in the use of tools that would help them find evidence on which to base their practice. Implications for nursing and nursing education are discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1016,
      author={D. S. Pravikoff and A. B. Tanner and S. T. Pierce},
      year={2005},
      month={Sep},
      title={Readiness of U.S. nurses for evidence-based practice },
      journal={The American journal of nursing},
      volume={105},
      number={9},
      pages={40-51; quiz 52},
      note={id: 57; LR: 20060309; PUBM: Print; JID: 0372646; CIN: Am J Nurs. 2005 Sep;105(9):11. PMID: 16138014; ppublish },
      abstract={Evidence-based practice is a systematic approach to problem solving for health care providers, including RNs, characterized by the use of the best evidence currently available for clinical decision making, in order to provide the most consistent and best possible care to patients. Are RNs in the United States prepared to engage in this process? This study examines nurses' perceptions of their access to tools with which to obtain evidence and whether they have the skills to do so. Using a stratified random sample of 3,000 RNs across the United States, 1,097 nurses (37%) responded to the 93-item questionnaire. Seven hundred sixty respondents (77% of those who were employed at the time of the survey) worked in clinical settings and are the focus of this article. Although these nurses acknowledge that they frequently need information for practice, they feel much more confident asking colleagues or peers and searching the Internet and World Wide Web than they do using bibliographic databases such as PubMed or CINAHL to find specific information. They don't understand or value research and have received little or no training in the use of tools that would help them find evidence on which to base their practice. Implications for nursing and nursing education are discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Computers; Benchmarking; Computer Literacy; Databases, Bibliographic/utilization; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval/utilization; Internet/utilization; MEDLINE/utilization; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Research/education; Nursing Staff/education/psychology; Practice Guidelines; Professional Competence/standards; Questionnaires; Self Efficacy; Time Factors; United States; Workload},
      isbn={0002-936X (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ring, N., Malcolm, C., Coull, A., Murphy-Black, T., & Watterson, A.. (2005). Nursing best practice statements: an exploration of their implementation in clinical practice . Journal of clinical nursing, 14(9), 1048-1058.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore implementation of the first five Best Practice Statements from the perspective of nurses involved in their development. BACKGROUND: Best Practice Statements were introduced in Scotland to encourage consistent evidence-based nursing practice. As a new initiative, research was required to investigate their clinical implementation. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this descriptive study, semi-structured interviews of a purposive sample of nurses (n = 15) were undertaken. Content analysis was used to identify themes emerging from the interview data. FINDINGS: Four main themes emerged from analysis of transcripts: variations in use of the Best Practice Statements; benefits to patients; benefits to practitioners; and, barriers and drivers to use. Amongst participants, personal users adopted the statements in their own practice but enablers also actively encouraged others to use the statements. Whether participants acted as enablers depended on individual, team and organizational factors. The ability of participants to act as leaders was influential in determining their ability both to facilitate local implementation and to encourage others to regard the Best Practice Statements as a priority for implementation. CONCLUSIONS: This exploratory study highlighted examples of patients and practitioners benefiting from the Best Practice Statements. Such findings suggest these statements could become a useful tool in promoting evidence-based nursing practice. However, implementation of the Best Practice Statements varied between participants and their organizations. Nurses who were most effective in promoting local implementation of the Best Practice Statements adopted facilitator and leadership roles within their organizations. RELEVANCE TO PRACTICE: By relating research findings to the literature on guideline and research utilization, this study gives further insight into the implementation of evidence-based practice by nurses. In particular, it supports the conclusion that to be truly effective, initiatives to promote evidence-based practice require nurses to act as local facilitators and leaders. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1021,
      author={N. Ring and C. Malcolm and A. Coull and T. Murphy-Black and A. Watterson},
      year={2005},
      month={Oct},
      title={Nursing best practice statements: an exploration of their implementation in clinical practice },
      journal={Journal of clinical nursing},
      volume={14},
      number={9},
      pages={1048-1058},
      note={id: 59; PUBM: Print; JID: 9207302; ppublish },
      abstract={AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore implementation of the first five Best Practice Statements from the perspective of nurses involved in their development. BACKGROUND: Best Practice Statements were introduced in Scotland to encourage consistent evidence-based nursing practice. As a new initiative, research was required to investigate their clinical implementation. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this descriptive study, semi-structured interviews of a purposive sample of nurses (n = 15) were undertaken. Content analysis was used to identify themes emerging from the interview data. FINDINGS: Four main themes emerged from analysis of transcripts: variations in use of the Best Practice Statements; benefits to patients; benefits to practitioners; and, barriers and drivers to use. Amongst participants, personal users adopted the statements in their own practice but enablers also actively encouraged others to use the statements. Whether participants acted as enablers depended on individual, team and organizational factors. The ability of participants to act as leaders was influential in determining their ability both to facilitate local implementation and to encourage others to regard the Best Practice Statements as a priority for implementation. CONCLUSIONS: This exploratory study highlighted examples of patients and practitioners benefiting from the Best Practice Statements. Such findings suggest these statements could become a useful tool in promoting evidence-based nursing practice. However, implementation of the Best Practice Statements varied between participants and their organizations. Nurses who were most effective in promoting local implementation of the Best Practice Statements adopted facilitator and leadership roles within their organizations. RELEVANCE TO PRACTICE: By relating research findings to the literature on guideline and research utilization, this study gives further insight into the implementation of evidence-based practice by nurses. In particular, it supports the conclusion that to be truly effective, initiatives to promote evidence-based practice require nurses to act as local facilitators and leaders. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Benchmarking/organization & administration; Decision Making, Organizational; Diffusion of Innovation; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Leadership; Nurse Clinicians/education/organization & administration/psychology; Nurse's Role; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Staff/education/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Practice Guidelines; Qualitative Research; Questionnaires; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Scotland; State Medicine/organization & administration; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={0962-1067 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Skiba, D. J.. (2005). Preparing for evidence-based practice: revisiting information literacy . Nursing education perspectives, 26(5), 310-311.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    When educators are redesigning nursing curricula or developing courses for evidence-based practice (EBP), it is important to consider the essential role of informatics. Recent research affirms that an informatics infrastructure is an essential ingredient to EBP and patient safety. This article provides a synopsis of the results of Tanner and others, as well as recommendations to prepare for EBP. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @article{RefWorks:1034,
      author={D. J. Skiba},
      year={2005},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Preparing for evidence-based practice: revisiting information literacy },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={26},
      number={5},
      pages={310-311},
      note={id: 69; PUBM: Print; JID: 101140025; RF: 10; ppublish },
      abstract={When educators are redesigning nursing curricula or developing courses for evidence-based practice (EBP), it is important to consider the essential role of informatics. Recent research affirms that an informatics infrastructure is an essential ingredient to EBP and patient safety. This article provides a synopsis of the results of Tanner and others, as well as recommendations to prepare for EBP. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      keywords={Computer Literacy; Computer User Training/methods/standards; Curriculum/standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Models, Educational; Nursing Research/education; Professional Competence},
      isbn={1536-5026 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Stevens, K. R.. (2005). Essential competencies for evidence-based practice in nursing (1st ed.). San Antonio: Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, UTHSCSA.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Essential Competencies for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing will guide nursing education program revision. Development of the Essential Competencies was academically rigorous and has the added credibility of consensus from a national panel of EBP experts. Included in this publication are: purpose of the essential competencies, competencies for undergraduate, masters and doctoral nursing education, report of the consensus development project, description of the Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice (ACE) and the ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @book{RefWorks:1037,
      author={K. R. Stevens},
      year={2005},
      title={Essential competencies for evidence-based practice in nursing },
      publisher={Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, UTHSCSA},
      address={San Antonio},
      edition={1st},
      note={id: 41},
      abstract={Essential Competencies for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing will guide nursing education program revision. Development of the Essential Competencies was academically rigorous and has the added credibility of consensus from a national panel of EBP experts. Included in this publication are: purpose of the essential competencies, competencies for undergraduate, masters and doctoral nursing education, report of the consensus development project, description of the Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice (ACE) and the ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation. (Source: QSEN Team) }
    }

  • Strauss, S., Richardson, W., Glasziou, P., & Haynes, R. B.. (2005). Evidence-based medicine: How to practice and teach EBM (3rd ed.). Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingston.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) provides a clear explanation of the central questions of EBM how to ask answerable clinical questions, how to translate them into effective searches for the best evidence, how to critically appraise that evidence for its validity and importance, and how to integrate it with patients’ values and preferences. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @book{RefWorks:1039,
      author={S. Strauss and WS Richardson and P. Glasziou and R. B. Haynes},
      year={2005},
      title={Evidence-based medicine: How to practice and teach EBM },
      publisher={Elsevier Churchill Livingston},
      address={Edinburgh},
      edition={3rd},
      note={id: 40},
      abstract={Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) provides a clear explanation of the central questions of EBM how to ask answerable clinical questions, how to translate them into effective searches for the best evidence, how to critically appraise that evidence for its validity and importance, and how to integrate it with patients' values and preferences. (Source: QSEN Team) }
    }

  • Weaver, C. A., Warren, J. J., Delaney, C., Association., I. M. I., (IMIA-NI)., N. I. S. I. G., & Group., E. P. W.. (2005). Bedside, classroom and bench: collaborative strategies to generate evidence-based knowledge for nursing practice . International journal of medical informatics, 74(11-12), 989-999.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The rise of evidence-base practice (EBP) as a standard for care delivery is rapidly emerging as a global phenomenon that is transcending political, economic and geographic boundaries. Evidence-based nursing (EBN) addresses the growing body of nursing knowledge supported by different levels of evidence for best practices in nursing care. Across all health care, including nursing, we face the challenge of how to most effectively close the gap between what is known and what is practiced. There is extensive literature on the barriers and difficulties of translating research findings into practical application. While the literature refers to this challenge as the "Bench to Bedside" lag, this paper presents three collaborative strategies that aim to minimize this gap. The Bedside strategy proposes to use the data generated from care delivery and captured in the massive data repositories of electronic health record (EHR) systems as empirical evidence that can be analysed to discover and then inform best practice. In the Classroom strategy, we present a description for how evidence-based nursing knowledge is taught in a baccalaureate nursing program. And finally, the Bench strategy describes applied informatics in converting paper-based EBN protocols into the workflow of clinical information systems. Protocols are translated into reference and executable knowledge with the goal of placing the latest scientific knowledge at the fingertips of front line clinicians. In all three strategies, information technology (IT) is presented as the underlying tool that makes this rapid translation of nursing knowledge into practice and education feasible. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1044,
      author={C. A. Weaver and J. J. Warren and C. Delaney and International Medical Informatics Association. and Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA-NI). and Evidence-Based Practice Working Group.},
      year={2005},
      month={Dec},
      title={Bedside, classroom and bench: collaborative strategies to generate evidence-based knowledge for nursing practice },
      journal={International journal of medical informatics},
      volume={74},
      number={11-12},
      pages={989-999},
      note={id: 74; PUBM: Print-Electronic; DEP: 20050803; JID: 9711057; 2005/08/03 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={The rise of evidence-base practice (EBP) as a standard for care delivery is rapidly emerging as a global phenomenon that is transcending political, economic and geographic boundaries. Evidence-based nursing (EBN) addresses the growing body of nursing knowledge supported by different levels of evidence for best practices in nursing care. Across all health care, including nursing, we face the challenge of how to most effectively close the gap between what is known and what is practiced. There is extensive literature on the barriers and difficulties of translating research findings into practical application. While the literature refers to this challenge as the "Bench to Bedside" lag, this paper presents three collaborative strategies that aim to minimize this gap. The Bedside strategy proposes to use the data generated from care delivery and captured in the massive data repositories of electronic health record (EHR) systems as empirical evidence that can be analysed to discover and then inform best practice. In the Classroom strategy, we present a description for how evidence-based nursing knowledge is taught in a baccalaureate nursing program. And finally, the Bench strategy describes applied informatics in converting paper-based EBN protocols into the workflow of clinical information systems. Protocols are translated into reference and executable knowledge with the goal of placing the latest scientific knowledge at the fingertips of front line clinicians. In all three strategies, information technology (IT) is presented as the underlying tool that makes this rapid translation of nursing knowledge into practice and education feasible. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing/methods/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Nursing Informatics/methods/organization & administration; Nursing Process/organization & administration; Teaching/methods/organization & administration; United States},
      isbn={1386-5056 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

2004

  • Klardie, K. A., Johnson, J., McNaughton, M. A., & Meyers, W.. (2004). Integrating the principles of evidence-based practice into clinical practice . Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 16(3), 98, 100-2, 104-5.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This series of articles illustrates many considerations relevant to the application of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). This particular column describes the actions of a nurse practitioner (NP) striving to understand the foundations of recommendations that are based largely on expert opinion. Although application of CPGs does not generally require this degree of investigation, it is essential that providers understand the processes used to interpret the basis of recommendations, including the application of the basic statistical concepts, when making decisions about how recommendations apply to individual patient scenarios. Utilizing evidence-based practice when providing patient care requires a range of skills that allows the NP to locate appropriate research evidence, to develop an understanding of the statistics used in interpreting and reporting research, and to evaluate the effects of interventions on patient outcomes. The application of the key concepts of evidenced-based practice within the primary care setting is explored through a hypothetical patient scenario, which was created as the focal point for three articles that illustrate principles of evidence-based practice. The goal of this series of articles is to provide a basic understanding of evidence-based practice and its application in clinical practice. This article explores the use of interventions selected from CPGs and investigates the potential effects of recommended interventions on patient outcomes. Commonly encountered statistical concepts are reviewed, and examples of their application in interpreting and reporting research are demonstrated. The principles of relative risk, relative risk reduction, absolute risk reduction, and numbers needed to treat are described. This review provides the NP with some basic skills to determine both the quality and usefulness of research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:993,
      author={K. A. Klardie and J. Johnson and M. A. McNaughton and W. Meyers},
      year={2004},
      month={Mar},
      title={Integrating the principles of evidence-based practice into clinical practice },
      journal={Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners},
      volume={16},
      number={3},
      pages={98, 100-2, 104-5},
      note={id: 67; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8916634; RF: 25; ppublish },
      abstract={This series of articles illustrates many considerations relevant to the application of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). This particular column describes the actions of a nurse practitioner (NP) striving to understand the foundations of recommendations that are based largely on expert opinion. Although application of CPGs does not generally require this degree of investigation, it is essential that providers understand the processes used to interpret the basis of recommendations, including the application of the basic statistical concepts, when making decisions about how recommendations apply to individual patient scenarios. Utilizing evidence-based practice when providing patient care requires a range of skills that allows the NP to locate appropriate research evidence, to develop an understanding of the statistics used in interpreting and reporting research, and to evaluate the effects of interventions on patient outcomes. The application of the key concepts of evidenced-based practice within the primary care setting is explored through a hypothetical patient scenario, which was created as the focal point for three articles that illustrate principles of evidence-based practice. The goal of this series of articles is to provide a basic understanding of evidence-based practice and its application in clinical practice. This article explores the use of interventions selected from CPGs and investigates the potential effects of recommended interventions on patient outcomes. Commonly encountered statistical concepts are reviewed, and examples of their application in interpreting and reporting research are demonstrated. The principles of relative risk, relative risk reduction, absolute risk reduction, and numbers needed to treat are described. This review provides the NP with some basic skills to determine both the quality and usefulness of research. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Confidence Intervals; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods/standards; Humans; Models, Nursing; Models, Organizational; Nurse Practitioners/standards; Nurse's Role; Nursing Assessment/standards; Nursing Care/standards; Nursing Evaluation Research; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Practice Guidelines; Quality Assurance, Health Care; Risk Management},
      isbn={1041-2972 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rycroft-Malone, J., Harvey, G., Seers, K., Kitson, A., McCormack, B., & Titchen, A.. (2004). An exploration of the factors that influence the implementation of evidence into practice . Journal of clinical nursing, 13(8), 913-924.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: The challenges of implementing evidence-based practice are complex and varied. Against this background a framework has been developed to represent the multiple factors that may influence the implementation of evidence into practice. It is proposed that successful implementation is dependent upon the nature of the evidence being used, the quality of context, and, the type of facilitation required to enable the change process. This study sets out to scrutinize the elements of the framework through empirical enquiry. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to address the following questions: * What factors do practitioners identify as the most important in enabling implementation of evidence into practice? * What are the factors practitioners identify that mediate the implementation of evidence into practice? * Do the concepts of evidence, context and facilitation constitute the key elements of a framework for getting evidence into practice? DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was conducted in two phases. Phase 1: Exploratory focus groups (n = 2) were conducted to inform the development of an interview guide. This was used with individual key informants in case study sites. Phase 2: Two sites with on-going or recent implementation projects were studied. Within sites semi-structured interviews were conducted (n = 17). RESULTS: A number of key issues in relation to the implementation of evidence into practice emerged including: the nature and role of evidence, relevance and fit with organizational and practice issues, multi-professional relationships and collaboration, role of the project lead and resources. CONCLUSIONS: The results are discussed with reference to the wider literature and in relation to the on-going development of the framework. Crucially the growing body of evidence reveals that a focus on individual approaches to implementing evidence-based practice, such as skilling-up practitioners to appraise research evidence, will be ineffective by themselves. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Key elements that require attention in implementing evidence into practice are presented and may provide a useful checklist for future implementation and evaluation projects. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1022,
      author={J. Rycroft-Malone and G. Harvey and K. Seers and A. Kitson and B. McCormack and A. Titchen},
      year={2004},
      month={Nov},
      title={An exploration of the factors that influence the implementation of evidence into practice },
      journal={Journal of clinical nursing},
      volume={13},
      number={8},
      pages={913-924},
      note={id: 66; PUBM: Print; JID: 9207302; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: The challenges of implementing evidence-based practice are complex and varied. Against this background a framework has been developed to represent the multiple factors that may influence the implementation of evidence into practice. It is proposed that successful implementation is dependent upon the nature of the evidence being used, the quality of context, and, the type of facilitation required to enable the change process. This study sets out to scrutinize the elements of the framework through empirical enquiry. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to address the following questions: * What factors do practitioners identify as the most important in enabling implementation of evidence into practice? * What are the factors practitioners identify that mediate the implementation of evidence into practice? * Do the concepts of evidence, context and facilitation constitute the key elements of a framework for getting evidence into practice? DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was conducted in two phases. Phase 1: Exploratory focus groups (n = 2) were conducted to inform the development of an interview guide. This was used with individual key informants in case study sites. Phase 2: Two sites with on-going or recent implementation projects were studied. Within sites semi-structured interviews were conducted (n = 17). RESULTS: A number of key issues in relation to the implementation of evidence into practice emerged including: the nature and role of evidence, relevance and fit with organizational and practice issues, multi-professional relationships and collaboration, role of the project lead and resources. CONCLUSIONS: The results are discussed with reference to the wider literature and in relation to the on-going development of the framework. Crucially the growing body of evidence reveals that a focus on individual approaches to implementing evidence-based practice, such as skilling-up practitioners to appraise research evidence, will be ineffective by themselves. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Key elements that require attention in implementing evidence into practice are presented and may provide a useful checklist for future implementation and evaluation projects. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Diffusion of Innovation; Evidence-Based Medicine; Focus Groups; Humans; Nursing Care; Professional Practice; Social Facilitation},
      isbn={0962-1067 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Tanner, A., Pierce, S., & Pravikoff, D.. (2004). Readiness for evidence-based practice: information literacy needs of nurses in the United States . Medinfo, 11(Pt 2), 936-940.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In this paper U.S. nurses’ readiness to provide Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as measured by their information literacy knowledge and skills is described. The Institute of Medicine directed health care providers to use EBP as a means to improve patient safety, efficiency and effectiveness of health care services. Information literacy has been identified as a nursing informatics competency for the basic nurse. As such, information literacy is an essential component in the application of EBP. The importance of developing information literacy skills is enhancement of the nurse’s ability to use current best available research literature in the conduct of EBP with subsequent improvement in nursing sensitive patient outcomes. This study describes the level of nurses’ information literacy knowledge and gaps in their skills for identifying, accessing, retrieving, evaluating and utilizing research evidence to provide best care for patients. The value of this study is to increase awareness among nurse administrators, educators, and clinicians of the need for information literacy education to enable evidence-based nursing practice and to guide development of supportive curricula and professional continuing education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1040,
      author={A. Tanner and S. Pierce and D. Pravikoff},
      year={2004},
      title={Readiness for evidence-based practice: information literacy needs of nurses in the United States },
      journal={Medinfo},
      volume={11},
      number={Pt 2},
      pages={936-940},
      note={id: 81; PUBM: Print; JID: 7600347; ppublish },
      abstract={In this paper U.S. nurses' readiness to provide Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) as measured by their information literacy knowledge and skills is described. The Institute of Medicine directed health care providers to use EBP as a means to improve patient safety, efficiency and effectiveness of health care services. Information literacy has been identified as a nursing informatics competency for the basic nurse. As such, information literacy is an essential component in the application of EBP. The importance of developing information literacy skills is enhancement of the nurse's ability to use current best available research literature in the conduct of EBP with subsequent improvement in nursing sensitive patient outcomes. This study describes the level of nurses' information literacy knowledge and gaps in their skills for identifying, accessing, retrieving, evaluating and utilizing research evidence to provide best care for patients. The value of this study is to increase awareness among nurse administrators, educators, and clinicians of the need for information literacy education to enable evidence-based nursing practice and to guide development of supportive curricula and professional continuing education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Biomedical Research; Computer Literacy; Evidence-Based Medicine; Information Science; Information Storage and Retrieval; Nurses; United States},
      isbn={1569-6332 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Taylor-Seehafer, M. A., Abel, E., Tyler, D. O., & Sonstein, F. C.. (2004). Integrating evidence-based practice in nurse practitioner education . Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 16(12), 520-525.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This column normally focuses on a specific clinical practice guideline (CPG). This month’s column deviates from that practice to demonstrate how evidence-based practice (EBP) was integrated into the nurse practitioner (NP) curriculum at the University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing. Processes of EBP were linked to student clinical assignments across core NP clinical courses, culminating in a student-published CPG. When students research and analyze available scientific evidence for a CPG, they learn to critically evaluate and logically organize knowledge for use in clinical practice, and those critical-thinking skills can lead to improved clinical reasoning and decision making. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1041,
      author={M. A. Taylor-Seehafer and E. Abel and D. O. Tyler and F. C. Sonstein},
      year={2004},
      month={Dec},
      title={Integrating evidence-based practice in nurse practitioner education },
      journal={Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners},
      volume={16},
      number={12},
      pages={520-525},
      note={id: 65; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8916634; RF: 16; ppublish },
      abstract={This column normally focuses on a specific clinical practice guideline (CPG). This month's column deviates from that practice to demonstrate how evidence-based practice (EBP) was integrated into the nurse practitioner (NP) curriculum at the University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing. Processes of EBP were linked to student clinical assignments across core NP clinical courses, culminating in a student-published CPG. When students research and analyze available scientific evidence for a CPG, they learn to critically evaluate and logically organize knowledge for use in clinical practice, and those critical-thinking skills can lead to improved clinical reasoning and decision making. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Evidence-Based Medicine/education; Humans; Internet; Nurse Practitioners/education; Program Development; United States},
      isbn={1041-2972 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

2003

  • Papastrat, K., & Wallace, S.. (2003). Teaching baccalaureate nursing students to prevent medication errors using a problem-based learning approach . The Journal of nursing education, 42(10), 459-464.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    An objective of the baccalaureate nursing curriculum at Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson College of Health Professions is to facilitate nursing students’ transfer of medication error knowledge into preventive action in the clinical unit. Using a problem-based learning approach, first-semester students are exposed to situations that reflect the real-world scope and complexity of medication administration and errors. Using the frameworks of Failure Mode Analysis and Human Error Mode and Effects Analysis, student groups identify hypotheses, devise solutions, and develop continuous quality improvement processes to prevent errors and facilitate error reporting. Problem-based learning is used in subsequent clinical experiences throughout the curriculum. This reinforcement, combined with a focus on increasingly complex pharmacological agents and medication calculations, enables students to employ critical thinking skills and develop the confidence necessary for safe, professional practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1013,
      author={K. Papastrat and S. Wallace},
      year={2003},
      month={Oct},
      title={Teaching baccalaureate nursing students to prevent medication errors using a problem-based learning approach },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={42},
      number={10},
      pages={459-464},
      note={id: 392; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; CIN: J Nurs Educ. 2003 Oct;42(10):431-2. PMID: 14577727; RF: 15; ppublish },
      abstract={An objective of the baccalaureate nursing curriculum at Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson College of Health Professions is to facilitate nursing students' transfer of medication error knowledge into preventive action in the clinical unit. Using a problem-based learning approach, first-semester students are exposed to situations that reflect the real-world scope and complexity of medication administration and errors. Using the frameworks of Failure Mode Analysis and Human Error Mode and Effects Analysis, student groups identify hypotheses, devise solutions, and develop continuous quality improvement processes to prevent errors and facilitate error reporting. Problem-based learning is used in subsequent clinical experiences throughout the curriculum. This reinforcement, combined with a focus on increasingly complex pharmacological agents and medication calculations, enables students to employ critical thinking skills and develop the confidence necessary for safe, professional practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence/standards; Curriculum/standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods/standards; Humans; Medication Errors/prevention & control; Nursing Education Research; Problem-Based Learning/standards; Quality Assurance, Health Care; Students, Nursing; United States},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

2001

  • of Medicine, I.. (2001). Crossing the quality chasm: A new health system for the 21st century . Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Crossing the Quality Chasm makes an urgent call for fundamental change to close the quality gap. This book recommends a sweeping redesign of the American health care system and provides overarching principles for specific direction for policymakers, health care leaders, clinicians, regulators, purchasers, and others. In this comprehensive volume the committee offers: a set of performance expectations for the 21st century health care system; a set of 10 new rules to guide patient-clinician relationships; a suggested organizing framework to better align the incentives inherent in payment and accountability with improvements in quality; and key steps to promote evidence-based practice and strengthen clinical information systems. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @book{RefWorks:988,
      author={Institute of Medicine},
      year={2001},
      title={Crossing the quality chasm: A new health system for the 21st century },
      publisher={National Academy Press},
      address={Washington, DC},
      note={id: 42},
      abstract={Crossing the Quality Chasm makes an urgent call for fundamental change to close the quality gap. This book recommends a sweeping redesign of the American health care system and provides overarching principles for specific direction for policymakers, health care leaders, clinicians, regulators, purchasers, and others. In this comprehensive volume the committee offers: a set of performance expectations for the 21st century health care system; a set of 10 new rules to guide patient-clinician relationships; a suggested organizing framework to better align the incentives inherent in payment and accountability with improvements in quality; and key steps to promote evidence-based practice and strengthen clinical information systems. (Source: QSEN Team) }
    }

  • Williams, B.. (2001). Developing critical reflection for professional practice through problem-based learning . Journal of advanced nursing, 34(1), 27-34.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIMS: To explore the influence of current learning traditions in nursing on the development of reflection and critical reflection as professional practice skills and to offer suggestions for nursing education that will specifically facilitate the development of critical reflection. ORGANIZATIONAL CONSTRUCTS: Mezirow’s transformative learning theory, Barrows conceptualization of problem-based learning (PBL). METHODS: Integrative literature review of published literature related to nursing, health science education and professional education from 1983-2000. FINDINGS: Professional education scholars concur that specialized knowledge is clearly essential for professional practice, however, they also suggest that self-consciousness (reflection) and continual self-critique (critical reflection) are crucial to continued competence. While strategies to facilitate reflection have been outlined in the literature, specific strategies to facilitate the development of critical reflection and implications for nursing education are much less clear. Advocates of reflective and critically reflective practice suggest that the development of these abilities should be inextricably linked to professional development and can be developed through active repeated guided practice. In health care, PBL based on constructivism, has been identified as one way to facilitate the development of these skills. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing learners exposed to PBL develop the ability to be reflective and critically reflective in their learning and acquire the knowledge and skill within the discipline of nursing by encountering key professional practice situations as the stimulus and focus of their classroom learning. The learners’ ability to be both reflective and critically reflective in their learning is developed by critical questioning of the faculty tutor during situational analysis, learning need determination, application of knowledge, critique of resources and personal problem-solving processes, and summarization of what was learned. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1046,
      author={B. Williams},
      year={2001},
      month={Apr},
      title={Developing critical reflection for professional practice through problem-based learning },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={34},
      number={1},
      pages={27-34},
      note={id: 395; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7609811; RF: 45; ppublish },
      abstract={AIMS: To explore the influence of current learning traditions in nursing on the development of reflection and critical reflection as professional practice skills and to offer suggestions for nursing education that will specifically facilitate the development of critical reflection. ORGANIZATIONAL CONSTRUCTS: Mezirow's transformative learning theory, Barrows conceptualization of problem-based learning (PBL). METHODS: Integrative literature review of published literature related to nursing, health science education and professional education from 1983-2000. FINDINGS: Professional education scholars concur that specialized knowledge is clearly essential for professional practice, however, they also suggest that self-consciousness (reflection) and continual self-critique (critical reflection) are crucial to continued competence. While strategies to facilitate reflection have been outlined in the literature, specific strategies to facilitate the development of critical reflection and implications for nursing education are much less clear. Advocates of reflective and critically reflective practice suggest that the development of these abilities should be inextricably linked to professional development and can be developed through active repeated guided practice. In health care, PBL based on constructivism, has been identified as one way to facilitate the development of these skills. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing learners exposed to PBL develop the ability to be reflective and critically reflective in their learning and acquire the knowledge and skill within the discipline of nursing by encountering key professional practice situations as the stimulus and focus of their classroom learning. The learners' ability to be both reflective and critically reflective in their learning is developed by critical questioning of the faculty tutor during situational analysis, learning need determination, application of knowledge, critique of resources and personal problem-solving processes, and summarization of what was learned. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing/methods; Humans; Problem-Based Learning; Thinking},
      isbn={0309-2402},
      language={eng}
    }

2000

  • Baker, C. M.. (2000). Problem-based learning for nursing: integrating lessons from other disciplines with nursing experiences . Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 16(5), 258-266.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a philosophy and teaching method that structures knowledge in clinical contexts, strengthens motivation to learn, develops clinical reasoning skills, and enhances self-directed and life-long learning. During the past 30 years, PBL has been implemented in schools of medicine worldwide, including 100 of the 126 schools in the United States. This article reviews the international PBL literature and focuses on the key aspects of this paradigm in educating health professionals: recent history and worldwide diffusion, basic characteristics and rationale, typical case presentation, student and tutor roles, and data-based outcomes. Conclusions from selected meta-analytic studies of assessment are described and discussed. The potential of PBL for nursing education is examined. Key implementation issues are identified, including the challenge to persuade faculty to move from efficient teaching to effective learning. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:957,
      author={C. M. Baker},
      year={2000},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Problem-based learning for nursing: integrating lessons from other disciplines with nursing experiences },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={5},
      pages={258-266},
      note={id: 391; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511298; RF: 58; ppublish },
      abstract={Problem-based learning (PBL) is a philosophy and teaching method that structures knowledge in clinical contexts, strengthens motivation to learn, develops clinical reasoning skills, and enhances self-directed and life-long learning. During the past 30 years, PBL has been implemented in schools of medicine worldwide, including 100 of the 126 schools in the United States. This article reviews the international PBL literature and focuses on the key aspects of this paradigm in educating health professionals: recent history and worldwide diffusion, basic characteristics and rationale, typical case presentation, student and tutor roles, and data-based outcomes. Conclusions from selected meta-analytic studies of assessment are described and discussed. The potential of PBL for nursing education is examined. Key implementation issues are identified, including the challenge to persuade faculty to move from efficient teaching to effective learning. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence/standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Humans; Job Description; Models, Educational; Nursing Education Research; Philosophy, Nursing; Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration; Program Evaluation; Students, Nursing},
      isbn={8755-7223},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Price, B.. (2000). Problem-based learning the distance learning way: a bridge too far? . Nurse education today, 20(2), 98-105.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Since problem-based learning is classically associated with campus based, small group learning conducted over protracted periods of time, it should not, in theory, be well suited to the distance learning mode of study. Just how do you write distance learning materials which adequately accommodate the problem-based learning process, and which acknowledge the variety of problems that could be identified for study? This paper critically examines one distance learning initiative designed to test whether problem-based learning may be delivered to student benefit at post-registration, undergraduate nurse programme level. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1017,
      author={B. Price},
      year={2000},
      month={Feb},
      title={Problem-based learning the distance learning way: a bridge too far? },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={20},
      number={2},
      pages={98-105},
      note={id: 393; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511379; RF: 22; ppublish },
      abstract={Since problem-based learning is classically associated with campus based, small group learning conducted over protracted periods of time, it should not, in theory, be well suited to the distance learning mode of study. Just how do you write distance learning materials which adequately accommodate the problem-based learning process, and which acknowledge the variety of problems that could be identified for study? This paper critically examines one distance learning initiative designed to test whether problem-based learning may be delivered to student benefit at post-registration, undergraduate nurse programme level. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Distance/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Forecasting; Humans; Needs Assessment/organization & administration; Nursing Education Research; Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration; Teaching/organization & administration; Teaching Materials},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Retsas, A.. (2000). Barriers to using research evidence in nursing practice . Journal of advanced nursing, 31(3), 599-606.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Barriers to using research evidence in nursing practice The nursing profession has long recognized the importance of research as an essential basis for its development. More recently, the movement supporting evidence-based practice has brought this point into focus. However, relatively little research has been conducted to identify factors that interfere with the ability of nurses to base their practice on research evidence. Using factor analysis procedures, barriers to the use of research evidence in practice which were perceived to be present by 400 registered nurses working in an Australian hospital, were grouped under four main factors. These were accessibility of research findings, anticipated outcomes of using research, organizational support to use research and support from others to use research. The most important factor was perceived to be organizational support, particularly in relation to providing time to use and conduct research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1020,
      author={A. Retsas},
      year={2000},
      month={Mar},
      title={Barriers to using research evidence in nursing practice },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={31},
      number={3},
      pages={599-606},
      note={id: 58; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 7609811; ppublish },
      abstract={Barriers to using research evidence in nursing practice The nursing profession has long recognized the importance of research as an essential basis for its development. More recently, the movement supporting evidence-based practice has brought this point into focus. However, relatively little research has been conducted to identify factors that interfere with the ability of nurses to base their practice on research evidence. Using factor analysis procedures, barriers to the use of research evidence in practice which were perceived to be present by 400 registered nurses working in an Australian hospital, were grouped under four main factors. These were accessibility of research findings, anticipated outcomes of using research, organizational support to use research and support from others to use research. The most important factor was perceived to be organizational support, particularly in relation to providing time to use and conduct research. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Diffusion of Innovation; Evidence-Based Medicine; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Male; Motivation; Needs Assessment; Nursing Care/methods/standards; Nursing Research/education; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Organizational Culture; Periodicals/utilization; Questionnaires; Reward; Social Support; Time Factors},
      isbn={0309-2402 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

1999

  • Price, B.. (1999). An introduction to problem-based learning . Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987), 13(40), 48-53; quiz 54.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article examines different approaches to clinical problem analysis and multidisciplinary processes that provide effective solutions and enhance individualised patient care. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1018,
      author={B. Price},
      year={1999},
      month={Jun 23-29},
      title={An introduction to problem-based learning },
      journal={Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain) : 1987)},
      volume={13},
      number={40},
      pages={48-53; quiz 54},
      note={id: 394; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 9012906; RF: 11; ppublish },
      abstract={This article examines different approaches to clinical problem analysis and multidisciplinary processes that provide effective solutions and enhance individualised patient care. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Decision Support Techniques; Evidence-Based Medicine; Humans; Knowledge; Nursing Process; Patient Care Team; Problem Solving; Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration},
      isbn={0029-6570},
      language={eng}
    }