Informatics Bibliography

2016

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Whitehead, D., K., Lynne, E. B., Kleier, H. (2016). Development and testing of an insturments to measure informatics knowledge, skills, and attitudes among entry-level nursing students. Journal of Nursing Informatics (OJNI), 20(2) available at http://www.himss.org/ojni

Instrument: KSANI: Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes towards Nursing Informatics

Overview: Development of a reliable and valid instrument based on the QSEN competencies to test the informatics knowledge, skills, and attitudes of current RN students

Reliability: The data were subjected to Cronbach’s test to estimate the level of reliability in internal consistency. At 0.90, the alpha for the overall scale

Notes: four factors, educational opportunity to apply informatics, knowledge of informatics, informatics skills confidence, and attitude toward informatics, all of which have a high internal consistency and reliability

 

2013

  • Choi, J., & Martinis, D. J. E.. (2013). Nursing informatics competencies: assessment of undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(13-14), 1970-1976.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To report the informatics competencies of students in selected undergraduate and graduate nursing programmes, to examine whether informatics competencies differed between the different programmes and to suggest competency-based applications that will strengthen informatics courses and informatics-related content throughout the curricula. BACKGROUND: Nursing students in undergraduate and graduate nursing programmes have different educational backgrounds and different practice experience. Thus, their informatics preparation is apt to be varied, and nursing curricula must reflect this variation while advancing students towards informatics proficiency. However, studies on informatics competency assessment in these nursing students are scarce. DESIGN: A descriptive survey design. METHODS: Data were collected from 289 nursing students using a 30-item Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale via an email sent to students using a LISTSERV mailing list. The email embedded link to the Internet survey package, SurveyMonkey, which included the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale and demographic questions along with an online consent form. RESULTS: Students in both programmes were competent in three subscale areas: basic computer knowledge and skills, clinical informatics attitude, and wireless device skills. Graduate students reported slightly higher mean competency scores than did undergraduate students in three subscales: clinical informatics role, clinical informatics attitude and wireless device skills. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate specific topics for nurse educators to consider when designing informatics curricula. The comparison of undergraduate and graduate students indicates similarities in informatics competencies in terms of areas where students were competent and small mean score differences. Further studies are suggested to examine whether there are differences in informatics competencies between undergraduate and graduate students. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: These results assist nurse educators in determining specific areas of informatics content that need greater focus and inclusion in the design of better nursing educational programmes. Examples of integrating competencies into existing curriculum or informatics courses are suggested.

    @article{RefWorks:304,
      author={J. Choi and J. E. De Martinis},
      year={2013},
      month={Jul},
      title={Nursing informatics competencies: assessment of undergraduate and graduate nursing students},
      journal={Journal of Clinical Nursing},
      volume={22},
      number={13-14},
      pages={1970-1976},
      note={CI: (c) 2013; JID: 9207302; 2012/11/10 [accepted]; ppublish},
      abstract={AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To report the informatics competencies of students in selected undergraduate and graduate nursing programmes, to examine whether informatics competencies differed between the different programmes and to suggest competency-based applications that will strengthen informatics courses and informatics-related content throughout the curricula. BACKGROUND: Nursing students in undergraduate and graduate nursing programmes have different educational backgrounds and different practice experience. Thus, their informatics preparation is apt to be varied, and nursing curricula must reflect this variation while advancing students towards informatics proficiency. However, studies on informatics competency assessment in these nursing students are scarce. DESIGN: A descriptive survey design. METHODS: Data were collected from 289 nursing students using a 30-item Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale via an email sent to students using a LISTSERV mailing list. The email embedded link to the Internet survey package, SurveyMonkey, which included the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale and demographic questions along with an online consent form. RESULTS: Students in both programmes were competent in three subscale areas: basic computer knowledge and skills, clinical informatics attitude, and wireless device skills. Graduate students reported slightly higher mean competency scores than did undergraduate students in three subscales: clinical informatics role, clinical informatics attitude and wireless device skills. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate specific topics for nurse educators to consider when designing informatics curricula. The comparison of undergraduate and graduate students indicates similarities in informatics competencies in terms of areas where students were competent and small mean score differences. Further studies are suggested to examine whether there are differences in informatics competencies between undergraduate and graduate students. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: These results assist nurse educators in determining specific areas of informatics content that need greater focus and inclusion in the design of better nursing educational programmes. Examples of integrating competencies into existing curriculum or informatics courses are suggested.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Nursing Informatics; Professional Competence; Students, Nursing},
      isbn={1365-2702; 0962-1067},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Choi, J., & M., D. Z.. (2013). Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies for Doctor of Nursing Practice Students. Journal of Professional Nursing, 29(6), 381-387.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master’s (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only I area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies.

    @article{RefWorks:289,
      author={Jeungok Choi and Donna Zucker  M.},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies for Doctor of Nursing Practice Students},
      journal={Journal of Professional Nursing},
      volume={29},
      number={6},
      pages={381-387},
      note={ID: 2012397320},
      abstract={This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only I area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies.},
      keywords={Students, Nursing, Doctoral; Nursing Informatics; Professional Competence; Computer Literacy; Human; Baccalaureate Nurses; Student Knowledge -- Evaluation; Masters-Prepared Nurses; Descriptive Research; Descriptive Statistics; T-Tests; Coefficient Alpha; Male; Female; Nursing Informatics -- Education; Educational Status; Self Assessment; Computer Literacy -- Evaluation; Schools, Nursing -- Massachusetts; Massachusetts},
      isbn={8755-7223},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012397320&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Erdogan, S., Secginli, S., Cosansu, G., Nahcivan, N. O., Esin, M. N., Aktas, E., & Monsen, K. A.. (2013). Using the Omaha System to describe health problems, interventions, and outcomes in home care in Istanbul, Turkey: a student informatics research experience. Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN, 31(6), 290-298.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Preparing nursing students to achieve informatics competencies is essential in today’s information-intensive healthcare delivery systems. This study aimed to provide hands-on informatics experience to nursing students and to identify the frequency and type of home care clients’ health problems, nursing interventions, and outcomes using a standardized nursing terminology, the Omaha System. Data were collected by 159 nursing students on home visits to 598 clients, who received 8657 interventions from students and faculty for 2267 problems, in addition to the services provided by the home care centers. Skin, neuromusculoskelatal function, personal care, nutrition, and urinary function were the most common problems. The most common intervention category was teaching, guidance, and counseling (47%), followed by treatments and procedures (22%), surveillance (22%), and case management (9%). Outcomes evaluation showed significant improvement in 97.5% of the identified problems. Students gained informatics experience in the use of a standardized nursing language in electronic health records, data management, and use of nursing data at the basic practice level. This study demonstrated that the Omaha System was a useful data collection tool for evaluating problems, interventions, and outcomes in home care and a positive teaching and learning tool for baccalaureate nursing education.

    @article{RefWorks:309,
      author={S. Erdogan and S. Secginli and G. Cosansu and N. O. Nahcivan and M. N. Esin and E. Aktas and K. A. Monsen},
      year={2013},
      month={Jun},
      title={Using the Omaha System to describe health problems, interventions, and outcomes in home care in Istanbul, Turkey: a student informatics research experience},
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      volume={31},
      number={6},
      pages={290-298},
      note={JID: 101141667; ppublish},
      abstract={Preparing nursing students to achieve informatics competencies is essential in today's information-intensive healthcare delivery systems. This study aimed to provide hands-on informatics experience to nursing students and to identify the frequency and type of home care clients' health problems, nursing interventions, and outcomes using a standardized nursing terminology, the Omaha System. Data were collected by 159 nursing students on home visits to 598 clients, who received 8657 interventions from students and faculty for 2267 problems, in addition to the services provided by the home care centers. Skin, neuromusculoskelatal function, personal care, nutrition, and urinary function were the most common problems. The most common intervention category was teaching, guidance, and counseling (47%), followed by treatments and procedures (22%), surveillance (22%), and case management (9%). Outcomes evaluation showed significant improvement in 97.5% of the identified problems. Students gained informatics experience in the use of a standardized nursing language in electronic health records, data management, and use of nursing data at the basic practice level. This study demonstrated that the Omaha System was a useful data collection tool for evaluating problems, interventions, and outcomes in home care and a positive teaching and learning tool for baccalaureate nursing education.},
      keywords={Adolescent; Adult; Evidence-Based Nursing; Female; Home Care Services/organization & administration; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Informatics; Nursing Research; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Students, Nursing; Turkey; Young Adult},
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Frisch, N., & Borycki, E.. (2013). A Framework for Leveling Informatics Content Across Four Years of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Curriculum. Studies in Health Technology & Informatics, 183, 356-366.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{RefWorks:297,
      author={Noreen Frisch and Elizabeth Borycki},
      year={2013},
      title={A Framework for Leveling Informatics Content Across Four Years of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Curriculum},
      journal={Studies in Health Technology & Informatics},
      volume={183},
      pages={356-366},
      note={ID: 2011922005},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Nursing Informatics; Curriculum},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011922005&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • G., S. M., Tietze, M., & V., M. F.. (2013). Developing an Applied Informatics Course for a Doctor of Nursing Practice Program. Nurse educator, 38(1), 37-42.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{RefWorks:293,
      author={Susan McBride  G. and Mari Tietze and Mary Fenton  V.},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={Developing an Applied Informatics Course for a Doctor of Nursing Practice Program},
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={38},
      number={1},
      pages={37-42},
      note={ID: 2011806554},
      keywords={Nursing Informatics -- Education -- Texas; Advanced Nursing Practice -- Education -- Texas; Education, Nursing, Doctoral -- Texas; Quality of Health Care; Patient Safety; Texas; Program Development; Conceptual Framework; Education, Non-Traditional; Data Management; Course Content; World Wide Web; Educational Technology; Program Evaluation},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011806554&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Gregory, L. C., Lowder, E., & Issah, F.. (2013). "There’s an app for that" bringing nursing education to the bedside. Journal of pediatric nursing, 28(2), 191-192.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Although many educators may not consider themselves technologically savvy, the reality is that the use of technology in nursing education is sharply rising and we must meet the needs of the adult learner. Now more than ever, learners utilize technology for their daily lives and actually prefer this form of education. The use of iPads can greatly impact nursing education which not only engages the staff, but provides an environment that is conducive to learning, is cost effective, and fun. iPads really do have an app for that!

    @article{RefWorks:310,
      author={L. C. Gregory and E. Lowder and F. Issah},
      year={2013},
      month={Apr},
      title={"There's an app for that" bringing nursing education to the bedside},
      journal={Journal of pediatric nursing},
      volume={28},
      number={2},
      pages={191-192},
      note={JID: 8607529; 2013/02/13 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Although many educators may not consider themselves technologically savvy, the reality is that the use of technology in nursing education is sharply rising and we must meet the needs of the adult learner. Now more than ever, learners utilize technology for their daily lives and actually prefer this form of education. The use of iPads can greatly impact nursing education which not only engages the staff, but provides an environment that is conducive to learning, is cost effective, and fun. iPads really do have an app for that!},
      keywords={Attitude to Computers; Computers, Handheld; Humans; Nursing Informatics/education; Point-of-Care Systems; Software; United States},
      isbn={1532-8449; 0882-5963},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hunter, K., McGonigle, D., & Hebda, T.. (2013). The Integration of Informatics Content in Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Education. Nurse educator, 38(3), 110-116.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{RefWorks:288,
      author={Kathleen Hunter and Dee McGonigle and Toni Hebda},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={The Integration of Informatics Content in Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Education},
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={38},
      number={3},
      pages={110-116},
      note={ID: 2012115822},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Education, Nursing, Graduate; Informatics -- Education; Human; Systematic Review; CINAHL Database; Medline; ERIC Database; Student Attitudes; Surveys; Faculty Attitudes; Professional Competence; Nursing Practice; Schools, Nursing; Nursing Informatics; Information Technology},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012115822&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Johansson, P. E., Petersson, G. I., & Nilsson, G. C.. (2013). Nursing students’ experience of using a personal digital assistant (PDA) in clinical practice – an intervention study. Nurse education today, 33(10), 1246-1251.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: A personal digital assistant (PDA) is a multifunctional information and communication tool allowing nursing students to keep up to date with expanding health related knowledge. OBJECTIVES: This study was aimed at exploring nursing students’ experience of using a PDA in clinical practice. METHOD: In this intervention study, nursing students (n=67) used PDAs during a period of 15 weeks, replied to questionnaires, and participated in focus group interviews. RESULTS: The PDA was found to support nursing students in clinical practice and to have the potential to be a useful tool with benefits for both the patients and for the students. The PDA was regarded as useful, and was presumed to imply increased confidence and time savings, and contribute to improved patient safety and quality of care. CONCLUSIONS: With available mobile technology, nursing students would be able to access necessary information, independent of time and place. Therefore, it is important that stakeholders and educators facilitate the use of PDAs to support nursing students during their clinical practice, in order to prepare them for their future work, and to continuously improve the safety and quality of healthcare.

    @article{RefWorks:313,
      author={P. E. Johansson and G. I. Petersson and G. C. Nilsson},
      year={2013},
      month={Oct},
      title={Nursing students' experience of using a personal digital assistant (PDA) in clinical practice - an intervention study},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={33},
      number={10},
      pages={1246-1251},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2012; JID: 8511379; OTO: NOTNLM; 2012/05/07 [received]; 2012/08/23 [revised]; 2012/08/30 [accepted]; 2012/09/20 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={BACKGROUND: A personal digital assistant (PDA) is a multifunctional information and communication tool allowing nursing students to keep up to date with expanding health related knowledge. OBJECTIVES: This study was aimed at exploring nursing students' experience of using a PDA in clinical practice. METHOD: In this intervention study, nursing students (n=67) used PDAs during a period of 15 weeks, replied to questionnaires, and participated in focus group interviews. RESULTS: The PDA was found to support nursing students in clinical practice and to have the potential to be a useful tool with benefits for both the patients and for the students. The PDA was regarded as useful, and was presumed to imply increased confidence and time savings, and contribute to improved patient safety and quality of care. CONCLUSIONS: With available mobile technology, nursing students would be able to access necessary information, independent of time and place. Therefore, it is important that stakeholders and educators facilitate the use of PDAs to support nursing students during their clinical practice, in order to prepare them for their future work, and to continuously improve the safety and quality of healthcare.},
      keywords={Computers handheld; Intervention study; Nursing informatics; Nursing practice; Nursing students},
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kowitlawakul, Y., Wang, L., & Wai-Chi, S. C.. (2013). Development of the electronic health records for nursing education (EHRNE) software program. Nurse education today, 33(12), 1529-1535.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Summary: This paper outlines preliminary research of an innovative software program that enables the use of an electronic health record in a nursing education curriculum. The software application program is called EHRNE, which stands for Electronic Heath Record for Nursing Education. The aim of EHRNE is to enhance student’s learning of health informatics when they are working in the simulation laboratory. Integrating EHRNE into the nursing curriculum exposes students to electronic health records before they go into the workplace. A qualitative study was conducted using focus group interviews of nine nursing students. Nursing students’ perceptions of using the EHRNE application were explored. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The data was analyzed following the Colaizzi (1978) guideline. Four main categories that related to the EHRNE application were identified from the interviews: functionality, data management, timing and complexity, and accessibility. The analysis of the data revealed advantages and limitations of using EHRNE in the classroom setting. Integrating the EHRNE program into the curriculum will promote students’ awareness of electronic documentation and enhance students’ learning in the simulation laboratory. Preliminary findings suggested that before integrating the EHRNE program into the nursing curriculum, educational sessions for both students and faculty outlining the software’s purpose, advantages, and limitations were needed. Following the educational sessions, further investigation of students’ perceptions and learning using the EHRNE program is recommended.

    @article{RefWorks:302,
      author={Yanika Kowitlawakul and Ling Wang and Sally Chan  Wai-Chi},
      year={2013},
      month={12},
      title={Development of the electronic health records for nursing education (EHRNE) software program},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={33},
      number={12},
      pages={1529-1535},
      note={ID: 2012335838},
      abstract={Summary: This paper outlines preliminary research of an innovative software program that enables the use of an electronic health record in a nursing education curriculum. The software application program is called EHRNE, which stands for Electronic Heath Record for Nursing Education. The aim of EHRNE is to enhance student's learning of health informatics when they are working in the simulation laboratory. Integrating EHRNE into the nursing curriculum exposes students to electronic health records before they go into the workplace. A qualitative study was conducted using focus group interviews of nine nursing students. Nursing students' perceptions of using the EHRNE application were explored. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The data was analyzed following the Colaizzi (1978) guideline. Four main categories that related to the EHRNE application were identified from the interviews: functionality, data management, timing and complexity, and accessibility. The analysis of the data revealed advantages and limitations of using EHRNE in the classroom setting. Integrating the EHRNE program into the curriculum will promote students' awareness of electronic documentation and enhance students' learning in the simulation laboratory. Preliminary findings suggested that before integrating the EHRNE program into the nursing curriculum, educational sessions for both students and faculty outlining the software's purpose, advantages, and limitations were needed. Following the educational sessions, further investigation of students' perceptions and learning using the EHRNE program is recommended.},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012335838&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Loftus, J.. (2013). Improving Technology Literacy and Skills Among Minority Nursing Students. Journal of Nursing Education, 52(4), 238.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    A technology-driven solution to improve technology access and literacy among ethnic minority nursing students is described. The program met the goal of creating a formative experience for minority students by using handheld technology to increase students’ access to technology and by providing high-quality information sources to improve informatics literacy.

    @article{RefWorks:303,
      author={Jocelyn Loftus},
      year={2013},
      month={Apr 2013},
      title={Improving Technology Literacy and Skills Among Minority Nursing Students},
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={52},
      number={4},
      pages={238},
      note={Source type: scholarlyjournals; Object type: Article; Object type: Feature; Copyright: Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated; DOCID: 2934431191; PCID: 76862232; PMID: 23497; CODEN: JNUEAW; ProvJournalCode: UACA; DOI: 10.3928/01484834-20130322-11; AccNum: 23550789; PublisherXID: SLCKUACA20130401103928014848342013032211},
      abstract={A technology-driven solution to improve technology access and literacy among ethnic minority nursing students is described. The program met the goal of creating a formative experience for minority students by using handheld technology to increase students' access to technology and by providing high-quality information sources to improve informatics literacy.},
      keywords={Medical Sciences--Nurses And Nursing; Information literacy; Nursing education; Minority students; Information technology; Educational technology; Attitude to Computers; Humans; Minority Groups; Students, Nursing; Computer Literacy},
      isbn={01484834},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.proquest.com/docview/1323001644?accountid=9920}
    }

  • M., E. B., Foster, J., Sahama, T., Frisch, N., & W., A. K.. (2013). Developing National Level Informatics Competencies for Undergraduate Nurses: Methodological Approaches from Australia and Canada. Studies in Health Technology & Informatics, 183, 345-349.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{RefWorks:298,
      author={Elizabeth Borycki  M. and Joanne Foster and Tony Sahama and Noreen Frisch and Andre Kushniruk  W.},
      year={2013},
      title={Developing National Level Informatics Competencies for Undergraduate Nurses: Methodological Approaches from Australia and Canada},
      journal={Studies in Health Technology & Informatics},
      volume={183},
      pages={345-349},
      note={ID: 2011922007},
      keywords={Nursing Informatics; Professional Competence -- Standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Canada; Australia; Planning Techniques},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011922007&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • McBride, S. G., Tietze, M., & Fenton, M. V.. (2013). Developing an applied informatics course for a doctor of nursing practice program. Nurse educator, 38(1), 37-42.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Rapid development of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs requires that nursing faculty and students become competent and proficient in the discipline of informatics. The authors describe the steps used to develop an applied informatics course in a post-master’s DNP program using content organizing and pedagogical frameworks and its positive learning outcomes.

    @article{RefWorks:305,
      author={S. G. McBride and M. Tietze and M. V. Fenton},
      year={2013},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={Developing an applied informatics course for a doctor of nursing practice program},
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={38},
      number={1},
      pages={37-42},
      note={JID: 7701902; ppublish},
      abstract={Rapid development of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs requires that nursing faculty and students become competent and proficient in the discipline of informatics. The authors describe the steps used to develop an applied informatics course in a post-master's DNP program using content organizing and pedagogical frameworks and its positive learning outcomes.},
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Humans; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Informatics/education; Program Development},
      isbn={1538-9855; 0363-3624},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McNeill, A., S., A. U., Wisniewski, A., Sitzenstock, S., & Fairchild, R.. (2013). Development of a Social Networking Site for Patients and Families: A Doctoral Level Nursing Informatics Project. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 17(1), 15-21.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{RefWorks:295,
      author={Ann McNeill and Andrea Underwood  S. and Amy Wisniewski and Susan Sitzenstock and Roseanne Fairchild},
      year={2013},
      month={02},
      title={Development of a Social Networking Site for Patients and Families: A Doctoral Level Nursing Informatics Project},
      journal={Online Journal of Nursing Informatics},
      volume={17},
      number={1},
      pages={15-21},
      note={ID: 2012232137},
      keywords={Website Development; Social Networking; World Wide Web; Nursing Informatics; Health Information; Education, Nursing, Doctoral; Family Nurse Practitioners; Information Technology; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Access to Information; Social Media},
      isbn={1089-9758},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012232137&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Stephens-Lee, C., Lu, D., & E., K. W.. (2013). Preparing Students for an Electronic Workplace. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 17(3), 1-10.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{RefWorks:291,
      author={Cheryl Stephens-Lee and Der-Fa Lu and Kathy Wilson  E.},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={Preparing Students for an Electronic Workplace},
      journal={Online Journal of Nursing Informatics},
      volume={17},
      number={3},
      pages={1-10},
      note={ID: 2012367239},
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Nursing Informatics -- Education; Curriculum Development; Human; Integrated Curriculum; Work Environment; Questionnaires; Faculty Attitudes; Faculty, Nursing; Computer Literacy; Conceptual Framework; Course Content},
      isbn={1089-9758},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012367239&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Talcott, K., M., J. O., & K., H. B.. (2013). Technology and the Nurse Educator: Are You ELITE?… Emerging Learning and Integrated Technologies Education (ELITE). Nurse educator, 38(3), 126-131.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{RefWorks:301,
      author={Kimberly Talcott and John O'Donnell  M. and Helen Burns  K.},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={Technology and the Nurse Educator: Are You ELITE?... Emerging Learning and Integrated Technologies Education (ELITE)},
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={38},
      number={3},
      pages={126-131},
      note={ID: 2012115827},
      keywords={Educational Technology; Faculty Development; Seminars and Workshops; Human; Faculty, Nursing; Pennsylvania; Schools, Nursing; Multimedia; Wireless Communications; Education, Non-Traditional; Education, Nursing; Informatics; Telehealth; Simulations; Summated Rating Scaling; Surveys; Questionnaires},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012115827&site=ehost-live}
    }

2012

  • A., J. S.. (2012). Integrating Informatics in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula: Using the QSEN Framework as a Guide. Journal of Nursing Education, 51(12), 697-701.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Informatics education must prepare today’s nurses to manage a deluge of information and use technology effectively. In addition, U.S. health care is being redesigned with technology that improves patient safety and quality of care. The Institute of Medicine’s recommendations for health care safety and professional education prompted initiatives by the National League for Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and others to make informatics a fundamental part of nursing education. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project outlines specific competency goals for informatics knowledge, skills, and attitudes. However, progress toward integration of informatics in nursing curricula has been slow, and additional strategies need further exploration and discussion in the nursing literature. This article uses the QSEN framework to present strategies for teaching multiple facets of informatics in the classroom, simulation laboratory, and clinical settings in a baccalaureate nursing curriculum.

    @article{RefWorks:290,
      author={Julie Spencer  A.},
      year={2012},
      month={12},
      title={Integrating Informatics in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula: Using the QSEN Framework as a Guide},
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={51},
      number={12},
      pages={697-701},
      note={ID: 2011763277},
      abstract={Informatics education must prepare today's nurses to manage a deluge of information and use technology effectively. In addition, U.S. health care is being redesigned with technology that improves patient safety and quality of care. The Institute of Medicine's recommendations for health care safety and professional education prompted initiatives by the National League for Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and others to make informatics a fundamental part of nursing education. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project outlines specific competency goals for informatics knowledge, skills, and attitudes. However, progress toward integration of informatics in nursing curricula has been slow, and additional strategies need further exploration and discussion in the nursing literature. This article uses the QSEN framework to present strategies for teaching multiple facets of informatics in the classroom, simulation laboratory, and clinical settings in a baccalaureate nursing curriculum.},
      keywords={Teaching Methods; Nursing Informatics; Curriculum Development; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Education Research; Learning Laboratories; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Education, Clinical},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011763277&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • C., A., W. B., T., J. M., & L., J. N.. (2012). Integrating informatics into the BSN curriculum: A review of the literature. Nurse education today, 32(6), 675-682.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Summary: Even though health informatics (HI) education is an essential component of the undergraduate nursing curriculum, it remains controversial with no clear consensus on which knowledge and skills should be integrated in a baccalaureate nursing program. The purpose of this review article is to integrate literature on HI education in the nursing curriculum by examining previous and current literature on this topic, synthesizing the findings, and recommending guidelines and future directions for nurse educators. The computerized databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC, Academic Search Premier, and Google Scholar were used to generate relevant literature. Nineteen studies published between 2000 and 2010 on HI education were included in this review, and from the critical and synthesis of those reports emerged four overarching themes: (a) lack of consensus on HI education; (b) impact on patient care outcomes; (c) faculty development through organizational collaboration; and (d) global disparities in HI education. Implications for nursing education and patient outcomes in clinical practice are also discussed. Further studies are warranted to promote the understanding and awareness of HI education in undergraduate nursing curriculum.

    @article{RefWorks:294,
      author={C. and William Bisanar  A. and Jacob Makowski  T. and Jennifer Neumann  L.},
      year={2012},
      month={08},
      title={Integrating informatics into the BSN curriculum: A review of the literature},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={32},
      number={6},
      pages={675-682},
      note={ID: 2011609233},
      abstract={Summary: Even though health informatics (HI) education is an essential component of the undergraduate nursing curriculum, it remains controversial with no clear consensus on which knowledge and skills should be integrated in a baccalaureate nursing program. The purpose of this review article is to integrate literature on HI education in the nursing curriculum by examining previous and current literature on this topic, synthesizing the findings, and recommending guidelines and future directions for nurse educators. The computerized databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC, Academic Search Premier, and Google Scholar were used to generate relevant literature. Nineteen studies published between 2000 and 2010 on HI education were included in this review, and from the critical and synthesis of those reports emerged four overarching themes: (a) lack of consensus on HI education; (b) impact on patient care outcomes; (c) faculty development through organizational collaboration; and (d) global disparities in HI education. Implications for nursing education and patient outcomes in clinical practice are also discussed. Further studies are warranted to promote the understanding and awareness of HI education in undergraduate nursing curriculum.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Nursing Informatics -- Education; Health Informatics -- Education; Program Implementation; Curriculum; CINAHL Database; Medline; ERIC Database; Faculty Development},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011609233&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • C., M. S.. (2012). PDA-Assisted Simulated Clinical Experiences in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Pilot Study. Nursing Education Perspectives, 33(6), 391-394.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Background. Descriptive literature on use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) in nursing education exists: but, quantitative outcome-driven studies of efficacy are lacking. Few studies have explored the integration of technologies like simulated clinical experiences (SCEs) with informatics competencies. Aim. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if nursing students’ knowledge and attitude scores following a PDA-assisted SCE would be equivalent to textbook-assisted scores. Method. Using a convenience sample of first-semester baccalaureate students and an equivalence design, multiple lessons were learned about the use of PDAs in the context of SCE. Results/Conclusion. Learning was supported through use of PDAs in place of traditional text references: students viewed PDAs as beneficial resources in the provision of care: PDA use prompted reflection and triggered important need-learning connections; orientation to the use of PDAs promoted positive student attitudes; and use of PDAs helped meet nursing informatics curricular requirements.

    @article{RefWorks:300,
      author={Maura Schlairet  C.},
      year={2012},
      month={11},
      title={PDA-Assisted Simulated Clinical Experiences in Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Pilot Study},
      journal={Nursing Education Perspectives},
      volume={33},
      number={6},
      pages={391-394},
      note={ID: 2012317622},
      abstract={Background. Descriptive literature on use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) in nursing education exists: but, quantitative outcome-driven studies of efficacy are lacking. Few studies have explored the integration of technologies like simulated clinical experiences (SCEs) with informatics competencies. Aim. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if nursing students' knowledge and attitude scores following a PDA-assisted SCE would be equivalent to textbook-assisted scores. Method. Using a convenience sample of first-semester baccalaureate students and an equivalence design, multiple lessons were learned about the use of PDAs in the context of SCE. Results/Conclusion. Learning was supported through use of PDAs in place of traditional text references: students viewed PDAs as beneficial resources in the provision of care: PDA use prompted reflection and triggered important need-learning connections; orientation to the use of PDAs promoted positive student attitudes; and use of PDAs helped meet nursing informatics curricular requirements.},
      keywords={Computers, Hand-Held; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Education, Clinical; Simulations; Human; Pilot Studies; Male; Female; Adult; Middle Age; Student Knowledge -- Evaluation; Student Attitudes -- Evaluation; Convenience Sample; Outcomes of Education -- Evaluation; Attitude Measures; Textbooks; T-Tests; Sample Size; Confidence Intervals; Two-Tailed Test},
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012317622&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Choi, J.. (2012). Comparative Assessment of Informatics Competencies in Three Undergraduate Programs. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 16(2), 1-8.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This study was conducted to determine and compare the informatics competencies of students in three undergraduate tracks: Traditional Pre-Licensure, Registered Nurse (RN) to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), and Accelerated BSN. Data were collected from 131 students in fall 2011 using a 30-item Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale. Scale scores indicated that RN to BSN (mean=3.21) and Accelerated BSN (mean=3.01) students were competent in informatics, but not Traditional Pre-Licensure students (mean=2.82). Comparison of competency scores by track reveal that RN to BSN and Traditional Pre-Licensure students differed significantly in overall informatics competency (F(2, 92)=4.31, p=.02). This difference may reflect students’ different levels of clinical nursing experience and the learning format of each track. All students perceived they lacked competence in two subscale areas, "Applied computer skills" and "Clinical informatics role." These findings provide insight about the strengths and weakness of the informatics competencies of nursing students and warrant attention from nurse educators when designing nursing curricula.

    @article{RefWorks:292,
      author={Jeungok Choi},
      year={2012},
      month={06},
      title={Comparative Assessment of Informatics Competencies in Three Undergraduate Programs},
      journal={Online Journal of Nursing Informatics},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-8},
      note={ID: 2011651616},
      abstract={This study was conducted to determine and compare the informatics competencies of students in three undergraduate tracks: Traditional Pre-Licensure, Registered Nurse (RN) to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), and Accelerated BSN. Data were collected from 131 students in fall 2011 using a 30-item Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale. Scale scores indicated that RN to BSN (mean=3.21) and Accelerated BSN (mean=3.01) students were competent in informatics, but not Traditional Pre-Licensure students (mean=2.82). Comparison of competency scores by track reveal that RN to BSN and Traditional Pre-Licensure students differed significantly in overall informatics competency (F(2, 92)=4.31, p=.02). This difference may reflect students' different levels of clinical nursing experience and the learning format of each track. All students perceived they lacked competence in two subscale areas, "Applied computer skills" and "Clinical informatics role." These findings provide insight about the strengths and weakness of the informatics competencies of nursing students and warrant attention from nurse educators when designing nursing curricula.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Nursing Informatics; Professional Competence; Analysis of Variance; Asians; Baccalaureate Nurses; Blacks; Convenience Sample; Data Analysis Software; Descriptive Statistics; Education, Baccalaureate; Female; Hispanics; Human; Internet; Listserv; Male; Middle Age; Registered Nurses; Scales; Summated Rating Scaling; Whites},
      isbn={1089-9758},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011651616&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Gagne, D. J. C., Bisanar, W. A., Makowski, J. T., & Neumann, J. L.. (2012). Integrating informatics into the BSN curriculum: a review of the literature. Nurse education today, 32(6), 675-682.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Even though health informatics (HI) education is an essential component of the undergraduate nursing curriculum, it remains controversial with no clear consensus on which knowledge and skills should be integrated in a baccalaureate nursing program. The purpose of this review article is to integrate literature on HI education in the nursing curriculum by examining previous and current literature on this topic, synthesizing the findings, and recommending guidelines and future directions for nurse educators. The computerized databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC, Academic Search Premier, and Google Scholar were used to generate relevant literature. Nineteen studies published between 2000 and 2010 on HI education were included in this review, and from the critical and synthesis of those reports emerged four overarching themes: (a) lack of consensus on HI education; (b) impact on patient care outcomes; (c) faculty development through organizational collaboration; and (d) global disparities in HI education. Implications for nursing education and patient outcomes in clinical practice are also discussed. Further studies are warranted to promote the understanding and awareness of HI education in undergraduate nursing curriculum.

    @article{RefWorks:311,
      author={J. C. De Gagne and W. A. Bisanar and J. T. Makowski and J. L. Neumann},
      year={2012},
      month={Aug},
      title={Integrating informatics into the BSN curriculum: a review of the literature},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={32},
      number={6},
      pages={675-682},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2011; JID: 8511379; 2011/04/12 [received]; 2011/08/29 [revised]; 2011/09/13 [accepted]; 2011/10/04 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Even though health informatics (HI) education is an essential component of the undergraduate nursing curriculum, it remains controversial with no clear consensus on which knowledge and skills should be integrated in a baccalaureate nursing program. The purpose of this review article is to integrate literature on HI education in the nursing curriculum by examining previous and current literature on this topic, synthesizing the findings, and recommending guidelines and future directions for nurse educators. The computerized databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC, Academic Search Premier, and Google Scholar were used to generate relevant literature. Nineteen studies published between 2000 and 2010 on HI education were included in this review, and from the critical and synthesis of those reports emerged four overarching themes: (a) lack of consensus on HI education; (b) impact on patient care outcomes; (c) faculty development through organizational collaboration; and (d) global disparities in HI education. Implications for nursing education and patient outcomes in clinical practice are also discussed. Further studies are warranted to promote the understanding and awareness of HI education in undergraduate nursing curriculum.},
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Humans; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Informatics/education},
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hebda, T. L., & Calderone, T. L.. (2012). Informatics competencies for healthcare professionals: the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative model. Drug metabolism and drug interactions, 27(3), 145-149.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A growing awareness exists that informatics competencies are essential skills for healthcare professionals today, yet the development of these competencies lags behind the need. The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative represents a comprehensive, interdisciplinary effort that is well suited to the integration of informatics into education, practice, administration, and research environments. This article briefly discusses the background and significance of the TIGER Initiative and why it may be used as a model to instill informatics among the healthcare professionals globally.

    @article{RefWorks:314,
      author={T. L. Hebda and T. L. Calderone},
      year={2012},
      title={Informatics competencies for healthcare professionals: the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative model},
      journal={Drug metabolism and drug interactions},
      volume={27},
      number={3},
      pages={145-149},
      note={JID: 8904736; 2012/04/29 [received]; 2012/06/29 [accepted]; ppublish},
      abstract={A growing awareness exists that informatics competencies are essential skills for healthcare professionals today, yet the development of these competencies lags behind the need. The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative represents a comprehensive, interdisciplinary effort that is well suited to the integration of informatics into education, practice, administration, and research environments. This article briefly discusses the background and significance of the TIGER Initiative and why it may be used as a model to instill informatics among the healthcare professionals globally.},
      keywords={Competency-Based Education; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Educational Technology/methods; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Medical Informatics/education; Models, Educational; Professional Competence},
      isbn={0792-5077; 0792-5077},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lee, C. G., & J., S. J.. (2012). Utilization of Academic Electronic Medical Records in Undergraduate Nursing Education. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 16(2), 31-37.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The profession of nursing and nursing education is "radically transforming" to meet the newly evolving expectations of the nursing workforce. Informatics and electronic medical records must be used to prepare nursing graduates for professional practice. Federal mandates and professional organizations are driving the adoption of electronic medical records in clinical practice. Academic electronic medical records are fully functional systems through which students can navigate technology and document and plan patient care in a simulated format. The academic electronic medical record allows students to apply skills and knowledge obtained during their educational experience and aids in the development of critical thinking skills. Competencies have been developed for the novice or beginning nurse and should serve as a guide to nurse educators in the development of nursing curriculum. Nursing faculty have been identified as the major barrier to the integration of the academic electronic medical record into nursing curriculum.

    @article{RefWorks:299,
      author={Carrie Gardner  Lee and Stacey Jones  J.},
      year={2012},
      month={06},
      title={Utilization of Academic Electronic Medical Records in Undergraduate Nursing Education},
      journal={Online Journal of Nursing Informatics},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={31-37},
      note={ID: 2011651624},
      abstract={The profession of nursing and nursing education is "radically transforming" to meet the newly evolving expectations of the nursing workforce. Informatics and electronic medical records must be used to prepare nursing graduates for professional practice. Federal mandates and professional organizations are driving the adoption of electronic medical records in clinical practice. Academic electronic medical records are fully functional systems through which students can navigate technology and document and plan patient care in a simulated format. The academic electronic medical record allows students to apply skills and knowledge obtained during their educational experience and aids in the development of critical thinking skills. Competencies have been developed for the novice or beginning nurse and should serve as a guide to nurse educators in the development of nursing curriculum. Nursing faculty have been identified as the major barrier to the integration of the academic electronic medical record into nursing curriculum.},
      keywords={Computer Simulation; Education, Baccalaureate; Education, Nursing; Learning Methods; Patient Record Systems; Accreditation; American Nurses Association; Health Informatics -- Legislation and Jurisprudence -- United States; New Graduate Nurses; Product Evaluation; Professional Competence; Program Implementation; Reimbursement, Incentive; United States},
      isbn={1089-9758},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011651624&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • M., A. M., Horton-Deutsch, S., & M., B. F.. (2012). Improving Quality and Safety in Graduate Education Using an Electronic Student Tracking System. Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, 26(5), 358-363.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Topic: The Institute of Medicine report on the future of nursing, the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses initiative, and the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform movement are among the most prominent forces guiding change related to information technology and informatics in nursing to improve quality and safety in practice. Informatics competencies are essential for psychiatric nurses to leverage and integrate information technology into education, practice, and research. Purpose: This article examines informatics and information technology from the perspective of educational preparation of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. Sources of Information: Literature related to informatics, information technology, and quality and safety in advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Conclusion: Strategies for integration of information technology in educating psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner students are described. Informatics competency will result in safer and higher quality care.

    @article{RefWorks:296,
      author={Angela McNelis  M. and Sara Horton-Deutsch and Barbara Friesth  M.},
      year={2012},
      month={10},
      title={Improving Quality and Safety in Graduate Education Using an Electronic Student Tracking System},
      journal={Archives of Psychiatric Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={5},
      pages={358-363},
      note={ID: 2011687312},
      abstract={Topic: The Institute of Medicine report on the future of nursing, the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses initiative, and the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform movement are among the most prominent forces guiding change related to information technology and informatics in nursing to improve quality and safety in practice. Informatics competencies are essential for psychiatric nurses to leverage and integrate information technology into education, practice, and research. Purpose: This article examines informatics and information technology from the perspective of educational preparation of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. Sources of Information: Literature related to informatics, information technology, and quality and safety in advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Conclusion: Strategies for integration of information technology in educating psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner students are described. Informatics competency will result in safer and higher quality care.},
      keywords={Information Technology; Nursing Informatics; Quality Improvement; Patient Safety; Nursing Practice; Psychiatric Nursing -- Education; Nurse Practitioners -- Education; Information Literacy; Institute of Medicine (U.S.); Change Management; Education, Nursing; Research, Nursing},
      isbn={0883-9417},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011687312&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Mantas, J.. (2012). Implementation of the recommendations in master’s courses in health informatics. Studies in health technology and informatics, 174, 57-61.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The publication of the International Medical Informatics Association revised version of the existing international recommendations in health informatics / medical informatics education was welcome positively by the educational community. The recommendations help to establish courses and complete programs in the field of Biomedical and Health Informatics (BMHI), to further develop existing educational activities in the various nations and to support international initiatives. The paper focuses on the Master’s courses, which are the most widely established programs following the recommendations. The number of citations of the recommendations shows the worldwide acceptance. However, an in-depth review is recommended.

    @article{RefWorks:315,
      author={J. Mantas},
      year={2012},
      title={Implementation of the recommendations in master's courses in health informatics},
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={174},
      pages={57-61},
      note={JID: 9214582; ppublish},
      abstract={The publication of the International Medical Informatics Association revised version of the existing international recommendations in health informatics / medical informatics education was welcome positively by the educational community. The recommendations help to establish courses and complete programs in the field of Biomedical and Health Informatics (BMHI), to further develop existing educational activities in the various nations and to support international initiatives. The paper focuses on the Master's courses, which are the most widely established programs following the recommendations. The number of citations of the recommendations shows the worldwide acceptance. However, an in-depth review is recommended.},
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Graduate/organization & administration; Educational Measurement; Humans; Medical Informatics/education; Universities/organization & administration},
      isbn={0926-9630; 0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Meek, J. A., Lee, M., Jones, J., Mutea, N., & Prizevoits, A.. (2012). Using podcasts to help students apply health informatics concepts: benefits and unintended consequences. Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN, 30(8), 426-439.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Despite requirements for robust health informatics education, a multitude of educators and policy analysts report that programs are not adequately preparing nurses to handle the bevy of technologies that will be a part of their practice. A series of 14 "Podcasted" exemplars were developed to help graduate online students visualize the application of health informatics concepts in real-world settings and to determine the impact of podcasting on student cognition, engagement, and satisfaction. Although no significant differences in student cognition scores or student engagement were found between course conditions, course satisfaction was significantly higher in Podcasted weeks of the course. Also, student engagement was positively correlated with aspects of course satisfaction and overall cognition scores under both course conditions. This result suggests that student engagement plays an important mediating role in improving cognition. Students’ use of podcasting did produce a temporary drop in scores for one group; therefore, more research is needed to understand these unintended consequences. With distance/online education becoming mainstream, it is imperative that faculty deploy and confirm ways to improve student cognition, engagement, and satisfaction.

    @article{RefWorks:307,
      author={J. A. Meek and M. Lee and J. Jones and N. Mutea and A. Prizevoits},
      year={2012},
      month={Aug},
      title={Using podcasts to help students apply health informatics concepts: benefits and unintended consequences},
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      volume={30},
      number={8},
      pages={426-439},
      note={JID: 101141667; ppublish},
      abstract={Despite requirements for robust health informatics education, a multitude of educators and policy analysts report that programs are not adequately preparing nurses to handle the bevy of technologies that will be a part of their practice. A series of 14 "Podcasted" exemplars were developed to help graduate online students visualize the application of health informatics concepts in real-world settings and to determine the impact of podcasting on student cognition, engagement, and satisfaction. Although no significant differences in student cognition scores or student engagement were found between course conditions, course satisfaction was significantly higher in Podcasted weeks of the course. Also, student engagement was positively correlated with aspects of course satisfaction and overall cognition scores under both course conditions. This result suggests that student engagement plays an important mediating role in improving cognition. Students' use of podcasting did produce a temporary drop in scores for one group; therefore, more research is needed to understand these unintended consequences. With distance/online education becoming mainstream, it is imperative that faculty deploy and confirm ways to improve student cognition, engagement, and satisfaction.},
      keywords={Cognition; Cross-Over Studies; Education, Nursing, Graduate/methods; Educational Measurement; Humans; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Informatics/education; Risk Assessment; Students, Nursing/psychology; Webcasts as Topic/utilization},
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Wittmann-Price, R. A., Kennedy, L. D., & Godwin, C.. (2012). Use of personal phones by senior nursing students to access health care information during clinical education: staff nurses’ and students’ perceptions. The Journal of nursing education, 51(11), 642-646.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Research indicates that having electronic resources readily available increases learners’ ability to make clinical decisions and confidence in patient care. This mixed-method, descriptive pilot study collected data about senior prelicensure nursing students using smartphones, a type of mobile electronic device (MED), in the clinical area. The smartphones contained nursing diagnosis, pharmacology, and laboratory information; an encyclopedia; and the MEDLINE database. Student (n = 7) data about smartphone use during a 10-week clinical rotation were collected via student-recorded usage logs and focus group recordings. Staff nurses’ (n = 5) perceptions of students’ use of smartphones for clinical educational resources were collected by anonymous survey. Both the focus group transcript and staff surveys were evaluated and the themes summarized by content analysis. Positive results and barriers to use, such as cost and technological comfort levels, are discussed. The results may help nurse educators and administrators initiate further research of MEDs as a clinical resource.

    @article{RefWorks:306,
      author={R. A. Wittmann-Price and L. D. Kennedy and C. Godwin},
      year={2012},
      month={Nov},
      title={Use of personal phones by senior nursing students to access health care information during clinical education: staff nurses' and students' perceptions},
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={51},
      number={11},
      pages={642-646},
      note={CI: Copyright 2012; JID: 7705432; 2011/11/17 [received]; 2012/06/07 [accepted]; 2012/09/14 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Research indicates that having electronic resources readily available increases learners' ability to make clinical decisions and confidence in patient care. This mixed-method, descriptive pilot study collected data about senior prelicensure nursing students using smartphones, a type of mobile electronic device (MED), in the clinical area. The smartphones contained nursing diagnosis, pharmacology, and laboratory information; an encyclopedia; and the MEDLINE database. Student (n = 7) data about smartphone use during a 10-week clinical rotation were collected via student-recorded usage logs and focus group recordings. Staff nurses' (n = 5) perceptions of students' use of smartphones for clinical educational resources were collected by anonymous survey. Both the focus group transcript and staff surveys were evaluated and the themes summarized by content analysis. Positive results and barriers to use, such as cost and technological comfort levels, are discussed. The results may help nurse educators and administrators initiate further research of MEDs as a clinical resource.},
      keywords={Adult; Attitude to Computers; Cellular Phone; Computers, Handheld; Data Collection; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Female; Focus Groups; Humans; Male; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Informatics/methods; Nursing Staff/psychology; Pilot Projects; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

2011

  • Brusco, J. M.. (2011). Electronic health records: what nurses need to know . AORN Journal, 93(3), 371-379.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    No abstract available

    @article{RefWorks:352,
      author={J. M. Brusco},
      year={2011},
      month={Mar},
      title={Electronic health records: what nurses need to know },
      journal={AORN Journal},
      volume={93},
      number={3},
      pages={371-379},
      note={id: 5260; JID: 0372403; 2010/12/30 [received]; 2010/12/30 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={No abstract available },
      keywords={Documentation; Medical Records Systems, Computerized/economics/standards; Motivation; Nurses; United States},
      isbn={1878-0369; 0001-2092},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cibulka, N. J., & Crane-Wider, L.. (2011). Introducing personal digital assistants to enhance nursing education in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs . The Journal of nursing education, 50(2), 115-118.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes how a school of nursing implemented an innovative program to introduce personal digital assistants to undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Undergraduate students studying pharmacology and nurse practitioner graduate students in an adult health course were asked to purchase a personal digital assistant privately or through the university bookstore. Faculty selected an appropriate software package. After students were oriented to the hardware and software package, innovative teaching strategies were implemented to help guide students to use their mobile devices to access clinically relevant information. Student feedback about this experience was positive. The most important elements for successful adoption of personal digital assistants are to provide training for both faculty and students, and to develop learning opportunities using the technology. Use of mobile technologies is an important competency that will improve the quality of nursing practice and therefore should be included in nursing curricula. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:353,
      author={N. J. Cibulka and L. Crane-Wider},
      year={2011},
      month={Feb},
      title={Introducing personal digital assistants to enhance nursing education in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={50},
      number={2},
      pages={115-118},
      note={id: 5255; CI: Copyright 2011; JID: 7705432; 2010/02/10 [received]; 2010/08/06 [accepted]; 2010/12/31 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={This article describes how a school of nursing implemented an innovative program to introduce personal digital assistants to undergraduate and graduate nursing students. Undergraduate students studying pharmacology and nurse practitioner graduate students in an adult health course were asked to purchase a personal digital assistant privately or through the university bookstore. Faculty selected an appropriate software package. After students were oriented to the hardware and software package, innovative teaching strategies were implemented to help guide students to use their mobile devices to access clinically relevant information. Student feedback about this experience was positive. The most important elements for successful adoption of personal digital assistants are to provide training for both faculty and students, and to develop learning opportunities using the technology. Use of mobile technologies is an important competency that will improve the quality of nursing practice and therefore should be included in nursing curricula. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Computers, Handheld; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Education, Nursing, Graduate/methods; Female; Humans; Male; Midwestern United States; Nurse Practitioners/education; Nursing Informatics/education; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Teaching/methods},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Courtney, K. L., Goodwin, L. K., & Aubrecht, J.. (2011). Database management systems–their place in nursing informatics education . Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN, 29(1), 7-12.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Despite an acknowledgment of the importance of database management skills and understanding of data structures, management, and evaluation in nursing informatics practice, there remains little description in the literature of the minimal requirements, let alone ideal requirements for DBMS concepts to be incorporated into nursing informatics educational programs. This article makes recommendations for minimal content necessary to meet the standards of practice and certification for nursing informatics and review two models for including DBMS knowledge into nursing informatics curricula. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:354,
      author={K. L. Courtney and L. K. Goodwin and J. Aubrecht},
      year={2011},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={Database management systems--their place in nursing informatics education },
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      volume={29},
      number={1},
      pages={7-12},
      note={id: 5257; JID: 101141667; ppublish },
      abstract={Despite an acknowledgment of the importance of database management skills and understanding of data structures, management, and evaluation in nursing informatics practice, there remains little description in the literature of the minimal requirements, let alone ideal requirements for DBMS concepts to be incorporated into nursing informatics educational programs. This article makes recommendations for minimal content necessary to meet the standards of practice and certification for nursing informatics and review two models for including DBMS knowledge into nursing informatics curricula. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Database Management Systems; Education, Nursing/organization & administration; Nursing Informatics/education; Terminology as Topic},
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Johnson, D. M., & Bushey, T. I.. (2011). Integrating the academic electronic health record into nursing curriculum: preparing student nurses for practice . Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN, 29(3), 133-137.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The College of St Scholastica has taken active steps to implement informatics technology into nursing and other health science curricula. An academic electronic health record (AEHR) system is available at the College of St. Scholastica. The AEHR is an HER used for teaching purposes. It contains all of the capabilities of a true EHR used in professional practice. The AEHR is interoperable, secure, and contains all of the functionality required of an EHR. The AEHR provides extensive hands-on experience using stateof-the-art EHR and information systems to provide students with learning opportunities in patient assessment, clinical knowledge, decision-making, and documentation competencies. This article describes the work of the School of Nursing to continue the purposeful integration of the AEHR across the nursing curricula within the traditional undergraduate the baccalaureate and graduate programs at the College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, MN. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:355,
      author={D. M. Johnson and T. I. Bushey},
      year={2011},
      month={Mar},
      title={Integrating the academic electronic health record into nursing curriculum: preparing student nurses for practice },
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      volume={29},
      number={3},
      pages={133-137},
      note={id: 5259; JID: 101141667; ppublish },
      abstract={The College of St Scholastica has taken active steps to implement informatics technology into nursing and other health science curricula. An academic electronic health record (AEHR) system is available at the College of St. Scholastica. The AEHR is an HER used for teaching purposes. It contains all of the capabilities of a true EHR used in professional practice. The AEHR is interoperable, secure, and contains all of the functionality required of an EHR. The AEHR provides extensive hands-on experience using stateof-the-art EHR and information systems to provide students with learning opportunities in patient assessment, clinical knowledge, decision-making, and documentation competencies. This article describes the work of the School of Nursing to continue the purposeful integration of the AEHR across the nursing curricula within the traditional undergraduate the baccalaureate and graduate programs at the College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, MN. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing; Electronic Health Records; United States},
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Majid, S., Foo, S., Luyt, B., Zhang, X., Theng, Y. L., Chang, Y. K., & Mokhtar, I. A.. (2011). Adopting evidence-based practice in clinical decision making: nurses’ perceptions, knowledge, and barriers . Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 99(3), 229-236.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based practice (EBP) provides nurses with a method to use critically appraised and scientifically proven evidence for delivering quality health care to a specific population. The objective of this study was to explore nurses’ awareness of, knowledge of, and attitude toward EBP and factors likely to encourage or create barriers to adoption. In addition, information sources used by nurses and their literature searching skills were also investigated. METHOD: A total of 2,100 copies of the questionnaire were distributed to registered nurses in 2 public hospitals in Singapore, and 1,486 completed forms were returned, resulting in a response rate of 70.8%. RESULTS: More than 64% of the nurses expressed a positive attitude toward EBP. However, they pointed out that due to heavy workload, they cannot keep up to date with new evidence. Regarding self-efficacy of EBP-related abilities, the nurses perceived themselves to possess moderate levels of skills. The nurses also felt that EBP training, time availability, and mentoring by nurses with EBP experience would encourage them to implement EBP. The top three barriers to adopting EBP were lack of time, inability to understand statistical terms, and inadequate understanding of the jargon used in research articles. For literature searching, nurses were using basic search features and less than one-quarter of them were familiar with Boolean and proximity operators. CONCLUSION: Although nurses showed a positive attitude toward EBP, certain barriers were hindering their smooth adoption. It is, therefore, desirable that hospital management in Southeast Asia, particularly in Singapore, develop a comprehensive strategy for building EBP competencies through proper training. Moreover, hospital libraries should also play an active role in developing adequate information literacy skills among the nurses. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:356,
      author={S. Majid and S. Foo and B. Luyt and X. Zhang and Y. L. Theng and Y. K. Chang and I. A. Mokhtar},
      year={2011},
      month={Jul},
      title={Adopting evidence-based practice in clinical decision making: nurses' perceptions, knowledge, and barriers },
      journal={Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA},
      volume={99},
      number={3},
      pages={229-236},
      note={id: 5258; JID: 101132728; OID: NLM: PMC3133901; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based practice (EBP) provides nurses with a method to use critically appraised and scientifically proven evidence for delivering quality health care to a specific population. The objective of this study was to explore nurses' awareness of, knowledge of, and attitude toward EBP and factors likely to encourage or create barriers to adoption. In addition, information sources used by nurses and their literature searching skills were also investigated. METHOD: A total of 2,100 copies of the questionnaire were distributed to registered nurses in 2 public hospitals in Singapore, and 1,486 completed forms were returned, resulting in a response rate of 70.8%. RESULTS: More than 64% of the nurses expressed a positive attitude toward EBP. However, they pointed out that due to heavy workload, they cannot keep up to date with new evidence. Regarding self-efficacy of EBP-related abilities, the nurses perceived themselves to possess moderate levels of skills. The nurses also felt that EBP training, time availability, and mentoring by nurses with EBP experience would encourage them to implement EBP. The top three barriers to adopting EBP were lack of time, inability to understand statistical terms, and inadequate understanding of the jargon used in research articles. For literature searching, nurses were using basic search features and less than one-quarter of them were familiar with Boolean and proximity operators. CONCLUSION: Although nurses showed a positive attitude toward EBP, certain barriers were hindering their smooth adoption. It is, therefore, desirable that hospital management in Southeast Asia, particularly in Singapore, develop a comprehensive strategy for building EBP competencies through proper training. Moreover, hospital libraries should also play an active role in developing adequate information literacy skills among the nurses. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1558-9439; 1536-5050},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Mastrian, K. G., McGonigle, D., Mahan, W. L., & Bixler, B.. (2011). Integrating Technology in Nursing Education: Tools for the Knowledge Era . Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This resource for graduate-level nurse educator courses covers practical issues, theory, and emerging trends in the use of technology in the nursing classroom. The authors include a nursing educator, an instructional designer, an informaticist, and a simulation expert. (Source: Publisher)

    @book{RefWorks:346,
      author={K. G. Mastrian and D. McGonigle and W. L. Mahan and B. Bixler},
      year={2011},
      title={Integrating Technology in Nursing Education: Tools for the Knowledge Era },
      publisher={Jones and Bartlett Publishers},
      address={Sudbury, MA},
      note={id: 4857},
      abstract={This resource for graduate-level nurse educator courses covers practical issues, theory, and emerging trends in the use of technology in the nursing classroom. The authors include a nursing educator, an instructional designer, an informaticist, and a simulation expert. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Poe, S. S., Abbott, P., & Pronovost, P.. (2011). Building nursing intellectual capital for safe use of information technology: a before-after study to test an evidence-based peer coach intervention . Journal of nursing care quality, 26(2), 110-119.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Use of peer coaches may be effective in building and maintaining competencies bedside nurses need to safely use electronic health records (EHRs). A nonexperimental design with before-after measures was used to evaluate the effectiveness of peer coaches in increasing learner satisfaction and confidence in EHR use on 9 units at an academic medical center. Survey findings suggested that nurses experienced higher than expected satisfaction with training and increased self-confidence in the EHR use following program implementation. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:358,
      author={S. S. Poe and P. Abbott and P. Pronovost},
      year={2011},
      month={Apr-Jun},
      title={Building nursing intellectual capital for safe use of information technology: a before-after study to test an evidence-based peer coach intervention },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={26},
      number={2},
      pages={110-119},
      note={id: 5256; JID: 9200672; ppublish },
      abstract={Use of peer coaches may be effective in building and maintaining competencies bedside nurses need to safely use electronic health records (EHRs). A nonexperimental design with before-after measures was used to evaluate the effectiveness of peer coaches in increasing learner satisfaction and confidence in EHR use on 9 units at an academic medical center. Survey findings suggested that nurses experienced higher than expected satisfaction with training and increased self-confidence in the EHR use following program implementation. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/methods/organization & administration; Humans; Inservice Training/methods/organization & administration; Medical Informatics/methods/organization & administration; Mentors; Models, Educational; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration; Peer Group},
      isbn={1550-5065; 1057-3631},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Simpson, R. L.. (2011). Nurse informaticians critical to proving meaningful use . Nursing administration quarterly, 35(1), 82-84.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nurses at the bedside serve on "the front lines" as hospitals strive to prove their "meaningful use" of technology to the federal government in hopes of securing significant funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Nurse informaticians, working in concert with chief nursing officers, guide the nursing organization toward the most effective and efficient ways to demonstrate "meaningful use." Armed with data points from the point of care, nurse informaticians and chief nursing officers will be able to quantify, for the very first time, the value of nursing’s contribution to the quality of patient care in America. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:360,
      author={R. L. Simpson},
      year={2011},
      month={Jan-Mar},
      title={Nurse informaticians critical to proving meaningful use },
      journal={Nursing administration quarterly},
      volume={35},
      number={1},
      pages={82-84},
      note={id: 5262; JID: 7703976; ppublish },
      abstract={Nurses at the bedside serve on "the front lines" as hospitals strive to prove their "meaningful use" of technology to the federal government in hopes of securing significant funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Nurse informaticians, working in concert with chief nursing officers, guide the nursing organization toward the most effective and efficient ways to demonstrate "meaningful use." Armed with data points from the point of care, nurse informaticians and chief nursing officers will be able to quantify, for the very first time, the value of nursing's contribution to the quality of patient care in America. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={American Recovery and Reinvestment Act; Humans; Nurse Administrators/economics/standards; Nursing Informatics/economics/organization & administration/standards; Nursing, Supervisory/economics/standards; Quality of Health Care/economics/organization & administration/standards; United States},
      isbn={1550-5103; 0363-9568},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Smith, J. M.. (2011). Clinical information system training tips and techniques for the novice educator . Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN, 29(7), 375-380.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    As new electronic health record systems are deployed and older systems are replaced, healthcare organizations will be dependent on their information technology staff, staff development educators, and designated super users to provide system training to clinicians and all skill levels of healthcare personnel. This article offers the readers tips and techniques for facilitating their success as CIS educators. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:361,
      author={J. M. Smith},
      year={2011},
      month={Jul},
      title={Clinical information system training tips and techniques for the novice educator },
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      volume={29},
      number={7},
      pages={375-380},
      note={id: 5428; JID: 101141667; ppublish },
      abstract={As new electronic health record systems are deployed and older systems are replaced, healthcare organizations will be dependent on their information technology staff, staff development educators, and designated super users to provide system training to clinicians and all skill levels of healthcare personnel. This article offers the readers tips and techniques for facilitating their success as CIS educators. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={eng}
    }

2010

  • Carlson, E., Catrambone, C., Oder, K., Nauseda, S., Fogg, L., Garcia, B., Jr, B. F. M., Johnson, M. E., Johnson, T. J., & Llewellyn, J.. (2010). Point-of-care technology supports bedside documentation . The Journal of nursing administration, 40(9), 360-365.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    As the conversion to an electronic health record intensifies, the question of which data-entry device works best in what environment and situation is paramount. Specifically, what is the best mix of equipment to purchase and install on clinical units based on staff preferences and budget constraints? The authors discuss their evaluation of stationary personal computers, workshops on wheels, and handheld tablets related to timeliness of data entry and their use of focus groups to ascertain the pros/cons of data-entry devices and staff preferences. An assessment of the implications for costs related to the timeliness of data entry is also presented. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:337,
      author={E. Carlson and C. Catrambone and K. Oder and S. Nauseda and L. Fogg and B. Garcia and F. M. Brown Jr and M. E. Johnson and T. J. Johnson and J. Llewellyn},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep},
      title={Point-of-care technology supports bedside documentation },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={40},
      number={9},
      pages={360-365},
      note={id: 4876; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={As the conversion to an electronic health record intensifies, the question of which data-entry device works best in what environment and situation is paramount. Specifically, what is the best mix of equipment to purchase and install on clinical units based on staff preferences and budget constraints? The authors discuss their evaluation of stationary personal computers, workshops on wheels, and handheld tablets related to timeliness of data entry and their use of focus groups to ascertain the pros/cons of data-entry devices and staff preferences. An assessment of the implications for costs related to the timeliness of data entry is also presented. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Computers; Choice Behavior; Computers, Handheld/economics/utilization; Documentation/economics/methods; Electronic Health Records/organization & administration; Equipment Design; Focus Groups; Humans; Interior Design and Furnishings; Microcomputers/economics/utilization; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Records/economics; Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology; Patients' Rooms; Point-of-Care Systems/organization & administration; Time Factors; User-Computer Interface},
      isbn={1539-0721; 0002-0443},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cornell, P., Herrin-Griffith, D., Keim, C., Petschonek, S., Sanders, A. M., D’Mello, S., Golden, T. W., & Shepherd, G.. (2010). Transforming nursing workflow, part 1: the chaotic nature of nurse activities . The Journal of nursing administration, 40(9), 366-373.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively measure workflow and computer use, the activities of 27 medical-surgical RNs were recorded through direct observation. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown how nurses spend their time but have not documented the pattern, duration, or frequency of activities. The absence of this information is problematic for leaders charged with improving performance and staff development. METHODS: Observers recorded nurse activities and location in real time using predefined lists. More than 98 hours of observations were recorded. RESULTS: Assessment, charting, and communicating were the most frequent activities, consuming 18.1%, 9.9%, and 11.8% of nurse time, respectively. The duration of 40% of the activities was less than 10 seconds. Timelines revealed that nurses constantly switch activities and locations in a seemingly random pattern. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that there is little "flow" in nurse workflow. The chaotic pace implies that nurses rarely complete an activity before switching to another. The opportunity to use critical thinking and engage in planning care is severely limited under these circumstances. The implications for cognition and role transformation are discussed. Part 2 of this research explores the impact of new technology on nurse activities and workflow. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:338,
      author={P. Cornell and D. Herrin-Griffith and C. Keim and S. Petschonek and A. M. Sanders and S. D'Mello and T. W. Golden and G. Shepherd},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep},
      title={Transforming nursing workflow, part 1: the chaotic nature of nurse activities },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={40},
      number={9},
      pages={366-373},
      note={id: 4875; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively measure workflow and computer use, the activities of 27 medical-surgical RNs were recorded through direct observation. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown how nurses spend their time but have not documented the pattern, duration, or frequency of activities. The absence of this information is problematic for leaders charged with improving performance and staff development. METHODS: Observers recorded nurse activities and location in real time using predefined lists. More than 98 hours of observations were recorded. RESULTS: Assessment, charting, and communicating were the most frequent activities, consuming 18.1%, 9.9%, and 11.8% of nurse time, respectively. The duration of 40% of the activities was less than 10 seconds. Timelines revealed that nurses constantly switch activities and locations in a seemingly random pattern. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that there is little "flow" in nurse workflow. The chaotic pace implies that nurses rarely complete an activity before switching to another. The opportunity to use critical thinking and engage in planning care is severely limited under these circumstances. The implications for cognition and role transformation are discussed. Part 2 of this research explores the impact of new technology on nurse activities and workflow. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Communication; Computers/utilization; Documentation; Drug Therapy/nursing; Efficiency, Organizational; Hospitals, General; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Administration Research; Nursing Assessment; Nursing Records; Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration/psychology; Patient Admission; Patient Discharge; Teaching Rounds; Time and Motion Studies; Workflow; Workload/psychology/statistics & numerical data},
      isbn={1539-0721; 0002-0443},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dixon, B. E., & Newlon, C. M.. (2010). How do future nursing educators perceive informatics? Advancing the nursing informatics agenda through dialogue . Journal of professional nursing : Official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 26(2), 82-89.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Informatics is a popular topic in literature, in media, and in education. However, nursing professionals and even nursing faculty may not have a clear understanding of informatics. The authors conducted a small simulation study to examine how nursing students enrolled in a doctor of philosophy program-future nursing educators-perceived informatics and its core elements. Using an online collaboration tool, the students were asked to create a plan for integrating informatics into a simulated undergraduate nursing program. The results of the study provide lessons for nursing professionals and educators. Students identified only a handful of competencies believed important by informatics initiatives led by the American Nurses Association and the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform. Although most students believed an undergraduate curriculum should teach computer skills, only a few participants identified information literacy skills, such as privacy and security of health information, as important for beginning nurses. Although limited, findings articulate the need for a universally accepted definition of informatics and a shared understanding of an informatics core curriculum. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:399,
      author={B. E. Dixon and C. M. Newlon},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar},
      title={How do future nursing educators perceive informatics? Advancing the nursing informatics agenda through dialogue },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : Official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={2},
      pages={82-89},
      note={id: 4682; JID: 8511298; 2008/06/15 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Informatics is a popular topic in literature, in media, and in education. However, nursing professionals and even nursing faculty may not have a clear understanding of informatics. The authors conducted a small simulation study to examine how nursing students enrolled in a doctor of philosophy program-future nursing educators-perceived informatics and its core elements. Using an online collaboration tool, the students were asked to create a plan for integrating informatics into a simulated undergraduate nursing program. The results of the study provide lessons for nursing professionals and educators. Students identified only a handful of competencies believed important by informatics initiatives led by the American Nurses Association and the Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform. Although most students believed an undergraduate curriculum should teach computer skills, only a few participants identified information literacy skills, such as privacy and security of health information, as important for beginning nurses. Although limited, findings articulate the need for a universally accepted definition of informatics and a shared understanding of an informatics core curriculum. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing/manpower; Faculty, Nursing; Medical Records Systems, Computerized; Nursing Informatics},
      isbn={1532-8481; 8755-7223},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Flood, L. S., Gasiewicz, N., & Delpier, T.. (2010). Integrating information literacy across a BSN curriculum . Journal of Nursing Education, 49(2), 101-104.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Although research regarding effective informatics teaching strategies is sparse and informatics competencies have not yet been finalized, nurse educators have been challenged to include informatics throughout the curriculum. Nurse educators are confronted with how best to incorporate informatics into an already burgeoning curriculum. This article offers a systematic approach to incorporating information literacy, a vital component of informatics, across a baccalaureate of science in nursing curriculum. Motivated by the Institute of Medicine report, guided by the initial Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform competency framework, and using the specific Quality and Safety Education for Nurses informatics competencies, the proposed integrated approach emphasizes clinical applications. The five assignments are designed to incrementally increase students’ abilities to recognize the need for information (i.e., knowledge); advance students’ abilities to locate, evaluate, and use information (i.e., skills); and foster a positive appreciation for information literacy (i.e., attitudes) when planning safe, effective patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:400,
      author={L. S. Flood and N. Gasiewicz and T. Delpier},
      year={2010},
      month={02},
      title={Integrating information literacy across a BSN curriculum },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={49},
      number={2},
      pages={101-104},
      note={id: 4603},
      abstract={Although research regarding effective informatics teaching strategies is sparse and informatics competencies have not yet been finalized, nurse educators have been challenged to include informatics throughout the curriculum. Nurse educators are confronted with how best to incorporate informatics into an already burgeoning curriculum. This article offers a systematic approach to incorporating information literacy, a vital component of informatics, across a baccalaureate of science in nursing curriculum. Motivated by the Institute of Medicine report, guided by the initial Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform competency framework, and using the specific Quality and Safety Education for Nurses informatics competencies, the proposed integrated approach emphasizes clinical applications. The five assignments are designed to incrementally increase students' abilities to recognize the need for information (i.e., knowledge); advance students' abilities to locate, evaluate, and use information (i.e., skills); and foster a positive appreciation for information literacy (i.e., attitudes) when planning safe, effective patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010550698&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Gantt, L. T.. (2010). Strategic planning for skills and simulation labs in colleges of nursing . Nursing economic$, 28(5), 308-313.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    While simulation laboratories for clinical nursing education are predicted to grow, budget cuts may threaten these programs. One of the ways to develop a new lab, as well as to keep an existing one on track, is to develop and regularly update a strategic plan. The process of planning not only helps keep the lab faculty and staff apprised of the challenges to be faced, but it also helps to keep senior level management engaged by reason of the need for their input and approval of the plan. The strategic planning documents drafted by those who supervised the development of the new building and Concepts Integration Labs (CILs) helped guide and orient faculty and other personnel hired to implement the plan and fulfill the vision. As the CILs strategic plan was formalized, the draft plans, including the SWOT analysis, were reviewed to provide historical perspective, stimulate discussion, and to make sure old or potential mistakes were not repeated. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:340,
      author={L. T. Gantt},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Strategic planning for skills and simulation labs in colleges of nursing },
      journal={Nursing economic$},
      volume={28},
      number={5},
      pages={308-313},
      note={id: 4872; JID: 8404213; ppublish },
      abstract={While simulation laboratories for clinical nursing education are predicted to grow, budget cuts may threaten these programs. One of the ways to develop a new lab, as well as to keep an existing one on track, is to develop and regularly update a strategic plan. The process of planning not only helps keep the lab faculty and staff apprised of the challenges to be faced, but it also helps to keep senior level management engaged by reason of the need for their input and approval of the plan. The strategic planning documents drafted by those who supervised the development of the new building and Concepts Integration Labs (CILs) helped guide and orient faculty and other personnel hired to implement the plan and fulfill the vision. As the CILs strategic plan was formalized, the draft plans, including the SWOT analysis, were reviewed to provide historical perspective, stimulate discussion, and to make sure old or potential mistakes were not repeated. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods; Concept Formation; Data Collection; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Decision Making, Organizational; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Goals; Guidelines as Topic; Humans; Manikins; Needs Assessment; North Carolina; Nurse's Role; Organizational Objectives; Planning Techniques; Program Development/methods; Schools, Nursing/organization & administration},
      isbn={0746-1739; 0746-1739},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Gloe, D.. (2010). Selecting an academic electronic health record . Nurse educator, 35(4), 156-161.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    It is critical to keep students up-to-date on technology being used in healthcare systems. One such system is the electronic health record; however, selecting the academic electronic health record (AEHR) system and integrating it into the curriculum are complex. This author presents a plan for researching, reviewing, and choosing an AEHR. This plan can be adapted to any school interested in choosing an AEHR. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:401,
      author={D. Gloe},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Selecting an academic electronic health record },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={35},
      number={4},
      pages={156-161},
      note={id: 4632; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={It is critical to keep students up-to-date on technology being used in healthcare systems. One such system is the electronic health record; however, selecting the academic electronic health record (AEHR) system and integrating it into the curriculum are complex. This author presents a plan for researching, reviewing, and choosing an AEHR. This plan can be adapted to any school interested in choosing an AEHR. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9855; 0363-3624},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hart, M. D.. (2010). A Delphi study to determine baseline informatics competencies for nurse managers . Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN, 28(6), 364-370.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The objective of this research study was to produce a job-specific list of informatics competencies for generic nurse manager positions. In 2002, Staggers et al (Nurs Res. 2002;51(6):383-390) identified a list of core nursing informatics competencies at four levels of nursing practice but concluded that job-specific competencies still needed to be developed. An expert panel utilized the Master List of Nursing Informatics Competencies produced in the 2002 study by Staggers et al to define the job-specific informatics competencies appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. A three-round Delphi study was utilized to establish the core competencies appropriate for this job-specific position. Participants were expert informatics nurses in the US Veterans’ Healthcare System. Based on the Four Levels of Practice defined in the 2002 study by Staggers et al, the panel identified the level 2 experienced nurse as most appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. For the purposes of review, each practice level was considered to include the competencies of the levels below it. Therefore, having selected level 2 experienced nurse, this necessitated the review of levels 1 and 2, which totaled 69 competencies. From the available 69 competencies, the panel selected a total of 49 core competencies appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. This Delphi research study chose to focus on a single job-specific position to take one small step toward the recommendation of Staggers et al to identify job-specific competencies. The generic nurse manager position was selected as it is a vital position in providing leadership and support within all institutions. While the study raises several questions about how the panel elected some competencies over others, it also begins to define which levels of competencies and categories are most appropriate. With this information at hand, the next logical step would be to establish associated tools for competency development and evaluation, which could then be used to properly prepare and review individuals for the associated nurse manager responsibilities. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:341,
      author={M. D. Hart},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={A Delphi study to determine baseline informatics competencies for nurse managers },
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      volume={28},
      number={6},
      pages={364-370},
      note={id: 4883; JID: 101141667; ppublish },
      abstract={The objective of this research study was to produce a job-specific list of informatics competencies for generic nurse manager positions. In 2002, Staggers et al (Nurs Res. 2002;51(6):383-390) identified a list of core nursing informatics competencies at four levels of nursing practice but concluded that job-specific competencies still needed to be developed. An expert panel utilized the Master List of Nursing Informatics Competencies produced in the 2002 study by Staggers et al to define the job-specific informatics competencies appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. A three-round Delphi study was utilized to establish the core competencies appropriate for this job-specific position. Participants were expert informatics nurses in the US Veterans' Healthcare System. Based on the Four Levels of Practice defined in the 2002 study by Staggers et al, the panel identified the level 2 experienced nurse as most appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. For the purposes of review, each practice level was considered to include the competencies of the levels below it. Therefore, having selected level 2 experienced nurse, this necessitated the review of levels 1 and 2, which totaled 69 competencies. From the available 69 competencies, the panel selected a total of 49 core competencies appropriate for generic nurse manager positions. This Delphi research study chose to focus on a single job-specific position to take one small step toward the recommendation of Staggers et al to identify job-specific competencies. The generic nurse manager position was selected as it is a vital position in providing leadership and support within all institutions. While the study raises several questions about how the panel elected some competencies over others, it also begins to define which levels of competencies and categories are most appropriate. With this information at hand, the next logical step would be to establish associated tools for competency development and evaluation, which could then be used to properly prepare and review individuals for the associated nurse manager responsibilities. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hebda, T., & Calderone, T. L.. (2010). What nurse educators need to know about the TIGER initiative . Nurse educator, 35(2), 56-60.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative is designed to address a set of skills that is needed by all nurses who will practice in the profession in the 21st century. The skill set includes informatics competencies that range from basic computer skills to advanced-level information technology and literacy competencies and expertise. Despite the significance of the TIGER Initiative, few nurse educators have operationalized TIGER or adopted its plan to transform nursing practice and education to better prepare nurses to practice in a technology rich healthcare environment. TIGER is currently in phase III: implementation. The authors outline the TIGER Initiative as well as actions that nurse educators can take to develop and integrate informatics competencies into the curriculum to prepare nurses for the high-touch, high-technology patient-centered care of the 21st century. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:402,
      author={T. Hebda and T. L. Calderone},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={What nurse educators need to know about the TIGER initiative },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={35},
      number={2},
      pages={56-60},
      note={id: 4654; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative is designed to address a set of skills that is needed by all nurses who will practice in the profession in the 21st century. The skill set includes informatics competencies that range from basic computer skills to advanced-level information technology and literacy competencies and expertise. Despite the significance of the TIGER Initiative, few nurse educators have operationalized TIGER or adopted its plan to transform nursing practice and education to better prepare nurses to practice in a technology rich healthcare environment. TIGER is currently in phase III: implementation. The authors outline the TIGER Initiative as well as actions that nurse educators can take to develop and integrate informatics competencies into the curriculum to prepare nurses for the high-touch, high-technology patient-centered care of the 21st century. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9855; 0363-3624},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Huryk, L. A.. (2010). Factors influencing nurses’ attitudes towards healthcare information technology . Journal of nursing management, 18(5), 606-612.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM(S): This literature review examines the current trend in nurses’ attitudes toward healthcare information technology (HIT). BACKGROUND: HIT implementation and expansion are at the core of global efforts to improve healthcare quality and patient safety. As a large portion of the healthcare workforce, nurses’ attitudes towards HIT are likely to have a major impact on the electronic health record (EHR) implementation process. EVALUATION: A search of PubMed, CINAHL and Medline databases produced 1930 combined hits. Returned articles were scanned for relevancy and applicability. Thirteen articles met all criteria and were subsequently reviewed in their entirety. KEY ISSUE(S): In accordance with two change theories, if HIT implementation projects are to be successful, nurses must recognize that incorporating EHRs into their daily practice is beneficial to patient outcomes. CONCLUSION(S): Overall, the attitudes of nurses toward HIT are positive. Increased computer experience is the main demographic indicator for positive attitudes. The most common detractors are poor system design, system slowdown and system downtime. Nurses are also fearful that the use of technology will dehumanize patient care. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Involving nurses in system design is likely to improve post-implementation satisfaction. Creating a positive, supportive atmosphere appears to be instrumental to sustainability. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:342,
      author={L. A. Huryk},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul},
      title={Factors influencing nurses' attitudes towards healthcare information technology },
      journal={Journal of nursing management},
      volume={18},
      number={5},
      pages={606-612},
      note={id: 4881; JID: 9306050; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM(S): This literature review examines the current trend in nurses' attitudes toward healthcare information technology (HIT). BACKGROUND: HIT implementation and expansion are at the core of global efforts to improve healthcare quality and patient safety. As a large portion of the healthcare workforce, nurses' attitudes towards HIT are likely to have a major impact on the electronic health record (EHR) implementation process. EVALUATION: A search of PubMed, CINAHL and Medline databases produced 1930 combined hits. Returned articles were scanned for relevancy and applicability. Thirteen articles met all criteria and were subsequently reviewed in their entirety. KEY ISSUE(S): In accordance with two change theories, if HIT implementation projects are to be successful, nurses must recognize that incorporating EHRs into their daily practice is beneficial to patient outcomes. CONCLUSION(S): Overall, the attitudes of nurses toward HIT are positive. Increased computer experience is the main demographic indicator for positive attitudes. The most common detractors are poor system design, system slowdown and system downtime. Nurses are also fearful that the use of technology will dehumanize patient care. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Involving nurses in system design is likely to improve post-implementation satisfaction. Creating a positive, supportive atmosphere appears to be instrumental to sustainability. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2834; 0966-0429},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Jette, S., Tribble, D. S., Gagnon, J., & Mathieu, L.. (2010). Nursing students’ perceptions of their resources toward the development of competencies in nursing informatics . Nurse education today, 30(8), 742-746.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: This article presents the findings of a doctoral study about the internal and external resources required to develop nursing informatics competencies in student nurses. BACKGROUND: Colleges and universities are responsible for training nursing students, including in the area of nursing informatics. Even though nursing informatics is a specialty recognized by the American Nursing Association (2001), it has received limited attention in Quebec, Canada. METHOD: A total of 131 college-level nursing students were randomly surveyed with a mail questionnaire designed to describe their perceptions about their internal and external resources in nursing informatics. RESULTS: Nursing students perceive that their internal and external resources necessary to ensure "knowledge to act" in nursing informatics is moderately high. They said they lacked knowledge about using spreadsheet programs, presentation software, and courseware, about data security, and about how to analyze the quality of a health-related Web site and search electronic scientific databases. CONCLUSION: These results show that, even if nursing students have access to a computer and the Internet at home and even if they feel competent using informatics in nursing, they still lack important resources for developing competencies in nursing informatics. We recommend that faculties and colleges focus on these elements. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:343,
      author={S. Jette and D. S. Tribble and J. Gagnon and L. Mathieu},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov},
      title={Nursing students' perceptions of their resources toward the development of competencies in nursing informatics },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={30},
      number={8},
      pages={742-746},
      note={id: 4885; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; JID: 8511379; 2009/06/03 [received]; 2010/01/20 [revised]; 2010/01/28 [accepted]; 2010/04/01 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={PURPOSE: This article presents the findings of a doctoral study about the internal and external resources required to develop nursing informatics competencies in student nurses. BACKGROUND: Colleges and universities are responsible for training nursing students, including in the area of nursing informatics. Even though nursing informatics is a specialty recognized by the American Nursing Association (2001), it has received limited attention in Quebec, Canada. METHOD: A total of 131 college-level nursing students were randomly surveyed with a mail questionnaire designed to describe their perceptions about their internal and external resources in nursing informatics. RESULTS: Nursing students perceive that their internal and external resources necessary to ensure "knowledge to act" in nursing informatics is moderately high. They said they lacked knowledge about using spreadsheet programs, presentation software, and courseware, about data security, and about how to analyze the quality of a health-related Web site and search electronic scientific databases. CONCLUSION: These results show that, even if nursing students have access to a computer and the Internet at home and even if they feel competent using informatics in nursing, they still lack important resources for developing competencies in nursing informatics. We recommend that faculties and colleges focus on these elements. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kalisch, B. J., & Begeny, S.. (2010). Preparation of nursing students for change and innovation . Western journal of nursing research, 32(2), 157-167.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    As health care technology advances and patients require more care, nurses will need to be prepared to change old and incorporate new care practices and systems. Nurses must not only be able to deliver quality nursing care, but will also need to be capable of creating innovative approaches, reacting quickly, and taking calculated risks. Using the Organizational Engineering Model, this study examines the informational processing styles of students entering the nursing profession and in turn, measures the way they process information at the end of their education. The information processing style predicts the ability to innovate, take risks, and change. The findings of this study demonstrate that we attract nursing students who fall within the Conservator information processing style. Conservators focus on outcome certainty and a deliberate response. Schools of nursing also graduate students with this same profile, indicating that we have not altered their information processing style during their education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:404,
      author={B. J. Kalisch and S. Begeny},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar},
      title={Preparation of nursing students for change and innovation },
      journal={Western journal of nursing research},
      volume={32},
      number={2},
      pages={157-167},
      note={id: 4684; JID: 7905435; CIN: West J Nurs Res. 2010 Mar;32(2):155-6. PMID: 20185802; 2009/05/15 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={As health care technology advances and patients require more care, nurses will need to be prepared to change old and incorporate new care practices and systems. Nurses must not only be able to deliver quality nursing care, but will also need to be capable of creating innovative approaches, reacting quickly, and taking calculated risks. Using the Organizational Engineering Model, this study examines the informational processing styles of students entering the nursing profession and in turn, measures the way they process information at the end of their education. The information processing style predicts the ability to innovate, take risks, and change. The findings of this study demonstrate that we attract nursing students who fall within the Conservator information processing style. Conservators focus on outcome certainty and a deliberate response. Schools of nursing also graduate students with this same profile, indicating that we have not altered their information processing style during their education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing/organization & administration; Models, Organizational; Organizational Innovation; Students, Nursing},
      isbn={1552-8456; 0193-9459},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kuiper, R.. (2010). Metacognitive factors that impact student nurse use of point of care technology in clinical settings . International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 7(1), 15p-15p.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The utility of personal digital assistants (PDA) as a point of care resource in health care practice and education presents new challenges for nursing faculty. While there is a plethora of PDA resources available, little is known about the variables that effect student learning and technology adoption. In this study nursing students used PDA software programs which included a drug guide, medical dictionary, laboratory manual and nursing diagnosis manual during acute care clinical experiences. Analysis of student journals comparative reflective statements about the PDA as an adjunct to other available resources in clinical practice are presented. The benefits of having a PDA included readily available data, validation of thinking processes, and facilitation of care plan re-evaluation. Students reported increased frequency of use and independence. Significant correlations between user perceptions and computer self-efficacy suggested greater confidence in abilities with technology resulting in increased self-awareness and achievement of learning outcomes. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:405,
      author={R. Kuiper},
      year={2010},
      title={Metacognitive factors that impact student nurse use of point of care technology in clinical settings },
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship},
      volume={7},
      number={1},
      pages={15p-15p},
      note={id: 4604},
      abstract={The utility of personal digital assistants (PDA) as a point of care resource in health care practice and education presents new challenges for nursing faculty. While there is a plethora of PDA resources available, little is known about the variables that effect student learning and technology adoption. In this study nursing students used PDA software programs which included a drug guide, medical dictionary, laboratory manual and nursing diagnosis manual during acute care clinical experiences. Analysis of student journals comparative reflective statements about the PDA as an adjunct to other available resources in clinical practice are presented. The benefits of having a PDA included readily available data, validation of thinking processes, and facilitation of care plan re-evaluation. Students reported increased frequency of use and independence. Significant correlations between user perceptions and computer self-efficacy suggested greater confidence in abilities with technology resulting in increased self-awareness and achievement of learning outcomes. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Access to Information; Clinical Information Systems -- Utilization; Computers, Hand-Held -- Utilization; Diffusion of Innovation; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Academic Achievement; Acute Care; Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior; Attitude to Computers; Coefficient Alpha; Cognition; Conceptual Framework; Content Analysis; Correlational Studies; Diaries; Human; Nursing Care Plans -- Evaluation; Pretest-Posttest Design; Productivity; Questionnaires; Reflection; Repeated Measures; Self Regulation; Self-Efficacy; Young Adult},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010555022&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Kunz, M. K.. (2010). Embracing the electronic medical record: helping nurses overcome possible barriers . Nursing for women’s health, 14(4), 290-300.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The purpose of this article is to explore some possible barriers that nurses may face as they transition from a paper to an electronic flow sheet. Solutions are suggested for how to minimize or overcome these barriers. In addition, this paper examines the political impetus encouraging health institutions to develop EMRs and why an EMR is superior to charting on paper. The foundational theories of change management and self-efficacy are incorporated. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:344,
      author={M. K. Kunz},
      year={2010},
      month={Aug},
      title={Embracing the electronic medical record: helping nurses overcome possible barriers },
      journal={Nursing for women's health},
      volume={14},
      number={4},
      pages={290-300},
      note={id: 4879; JID: 101304602; ppublish },
      abstract={The purpose of this article is to explore some possible barriers that nurses may face as they transition from a paper to an electronic flow sheet. Solutions are suggested for how to minimize or overcome these barriers. In addition, this paper examines the political impetus encouraging health institutions to develop EMRs and why an EMR is superior to charting on paper. The foundational theories of change management and self-efficacy are incorporated. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude to Computers; Electronic Health Records/standards/utilization; Humans; Nurses/psychology; Nursing/instrumentation/methods/standards; Self Efficacy},
      isbn={1751-486X; 1751-4851},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Liaw, S. T., & Gray, K.. (2010). Clinical health informatics education for a 21st Century World . Studies in health technology and informatics, 151, 479-491.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This chapter gives an educational overview of the following: health informatics competencies in medical, nursing and allied clinical health professions; health informatics learning cultures and just-in-time health informatics training in clinical work settings; major considerations in selecting or developing health informatics education and training programs for local implementation; and using elearning effectively to meet the objectives of health informatics education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:406,
      author={S. T. Liaw and K. Gray},
      year={2010},
      title={Clinical health informatics education for a 21st Century World },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={151},
      pages={479-491},
      note={id: 4685; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={This chapter gives an educational overview of the following: health informatics competencies in medical, nursing and allied clinical health professions; health informatics learning cultures and just-in-time health informatics training in clinical work settings; major considerations in selecting or developing health informatics education and training programs for local implementation; and using elearning effectively to meet the objectives of health informatics education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer Literacy; Credentialing; Curriculum; History, 21st Century; Humans; Medical Informatics/education; Professional Competence},
      isbn={0926-9630; 0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Mahon, P. Y., Nickitas, D. M., & Nokes, K. M.. (2010). Faculty perceptions of student documentation skills during the transition from paper-based to electronic health records systems . The Journal of nursing education, 49(11), 615-621.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nursing faculty perceptions of teaching undergraduate nursing students documentation skills using either paper-based or electronic health record systems were explored in this study. Twenty-five nursing faculty in a large urban public school of nursing were interviewed using a 13-item survey questionnaire. Responses were analyzed using the constant comparative method, and four major themes arose: teaching strategies; learning from experts; road from novice to expert; and legal, ethical, and institutional issues. Results demonstrate how faculty overcome myriad obstacles encountered while teaching clinical documentation processes. Self-efficacy theory, with its emphasis on knowledge, skills, and social context, describes how faculty are modeling behaviors necessary to succeed during this transition from paper to electronic documentation. The school of nursing is integrating the findings from this research to further informatics integration across the curricula, and ongoing research is planned to investigate issues of self-efficacy and student and clinical staff perceptions of teaching-learning clinical documentation. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:345,
      author={P. Y. Mahon and D. M. Nickitas and K. M. Nokes},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov},
      title={Faculty perceptions of student documentation skills during the transition from paper-based to electronic health records systems },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={11},
      pages={615-621},
      note={id: 4884; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 7705432; 2009/03/18 [received]; 2009/12/21 [accepted]; 2010/05/28 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Nursing faculty perceptions of teaching undergraduate nursing students documentation skills using either paper-based or electronic health record systems were explored in this study. Twenty-five nursing faculty in a large urban public school of nursing were interviewed using a 13-item survey questionnaire. Responses were analyzed using the constant comparative method, and four major themes arose: teaching strategies; learning from experts; road from novice to expert; and legal, ethical, and institutional issues. Results demonstrate how faculty overcome myriad obstacles encountered while teaching clinical documentation processes. Self-efficacy theory, with its emphasis on knowledge, skills, and social context, describes how faculty are modeling behaviors necessary to succeed during this transition from paper to electronic documentation. The school of nursing is integrating the findings from this research to further informatics integration across the curricula, and ongoing research is planned to investigate issues of self-efficacy and student and clinical staff perceptions of teaching-learning clinical documentation. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Computers; Clinical Competence/standards; Computer User Training/methods; Curriculum; Documentation/standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Electronic Health Records/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/statistics & numerical data; Humans; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Models, Psychological; New York City; Nursing Informatics/education; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Records/standards; Organizational Innovation; Qualitative Research; Self Efficacy; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Nickitas, D. M., Nokes, K. M., Caroselli, C., Mahon, P. Y., Colucci, D. E., & Lester, R. D.. (2010). Increasing nursing student communication skills through electronic health record system documentation . CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 28(1), 7-11.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Learning clinical documentation is an important facet in the education of nursing students and needs to be integrated into course work. If we are to prepare students to function in the electronic age, it is necessary to teach documentation in the way that it will be used in the clinical area. Students need to learn not only to electronically document but also how to use these data effectively in guiding their practice. To accomplish this, we made the decision to transition from handwritten narrative/flow sheets to an electronic health record system (EHRS) in the college laboratory. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:408,
      author={D. M. Nickitas and K. M. Nokes and C. Caroselli and P. Y. Mahon and D. E. Colucci and R. D. Lester},
      year={2010},
      month={2010},
      title={Increasing nursing student communication skills through electronic health record system documentation },
      journal={CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing},
      volume={28},
      number={1},
      pages={7-11},
      note={id: 4720},
      abstract={Learning clinical documentation is an important facet in the education of nursing students and needs to be integrated into course work. If we are to prepare students to function in the electronic age, it is necessary to teach documentation in the way that it will be used in the clinical area. Students need to learn not only to electronically document but also how to use these data effectively in guiding their practice. To accomplish this, we made the decision to transition from handwritten narrative/flow sheets to an electronic health record system (EHRS) in the college laboratory. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Documentation; Patient Record Systems -- Education; Students, Nursing -- New York; Teaching Methods; Bar Coding; Curriculum; Economic and Social Security; New York; Program Implementation; United States Department of Veterans Affairs},
      isbn={1538-2931},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010513882&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Poe, S. S.. (2010). Building Nursing Intellectual Capital for Safe Use of Information Technology: A Systematic Review . Journal of nursing care quality, 2010 Apr 29. [Epub ahead of print].
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Information technology is integral to health care delivery. Nurse leaders recognize the need to build intellectual capital (knowledge, skills, and experience) in use and oversight of electronic health records despite financial constraints on indirect care time. A systematic literature review was conducted to answer the question, "What are the best practices to build nursing intellectual capital for use of IT for safe clinical care?" Evidence was translated to support a planned electronic health record rollout. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:409,
      author={S. S. Poe},
      year={2010},
      month={Apr 29},
      title={Building Nursing Intellectual Capital for Safe Use of Information Technology: A Systematic Review },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={2010 Apr 29. [Epub ahead of print]},
      note={id: 4681; JID: 9200672; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Information technology is integral to health care delivery. Nurse leaders recognize the need to build intellectual capital (knowledge, skills, and experience) in use and oversight of electronic health records despite financial constraints on indirect care time. A systematic literature review was conducted to answer the question, "What are the best practices to build nursing intellectual capital for use of IT for safe clinical care?" Evidence was translated to support a planned electronic health record rollout. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1550-5065; 1057-3631},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Schnall, R., Velez, O., John, R. M., & Bakken, S.. (2010). Psychometric Evaluation of the Attitudes Toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale in a Sample of Nursing Students . Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Valid measures of attitudes are an important component of developing and testing educational interventions aimed at improving technology acceptance. The aim of this study was to assess the construct validity (factor analysis and discriminant validity), internal consistency reliability (Cronbach alpha), and responsiveness (independent-samples t test) of the Attitudes toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale in a sample of 103 nursing students engaged in a set of curricular activities focused on enabling safe and evidence-based nursing practice through the use of information technology. Principal components factor analysis resulted in three factors (ease of use and usefulness, clinical support, and barriers to use) that explained 55.49% of the variance. Internal consistency reliability estimates ranged from.61 to.82. Factor scores did not discriminate between nursing students who owned a PDA and those who did not. There were no significant changes in factors scores over time (responsiveness). This study provides preliminary evidence for the factorial structure of the Handheld Decision Support Software Scale and internal consistency of two of the three factor scales. Further exploration of the construct validity, internal consistency, and responsiveness is warranted. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:359,
      author={R. Schnall and O. Velez and R. M. John and S. Bakken},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov 23},
      title={Psychometric Evaluation of the Attitudes Toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale in a Sample of Nursing Students },
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      note={id: 4828; JID: 101141667; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Valid measures of attitudes are an important component of developing and testing educational interventions aimed at improving technology acceptance. The aim of this study was to assess the construct validity (factor analysis and discriminant validity), internal consistency reliability (Cronbach alpha), and responsiveness (independent-samples t test) of the Attitudes toward Handheld Decision Support Software Scale in a sample of 103 nursing students engaged in a set of curricular activities focused on enabling safe and evidence-based nursing practice through the use of information technology. Principal components factor analysis resulted in three factors (ease of use and usefulness, clinical support, and barriers to use) that explained 55.49% of the variance. Internal consistency reliability estimates ranged from.61 to.82. Factor scores did not discriminate between nursing students who owned a PDA and those who did not. There were no significant changes in factors scores over time (responsiveness). This study provides preliminary evidence for the factorial structure of the Handheld Decision Support Software Scale and internal consistency of two of the three factor scales. Further exploration of the construct validity, internal consistency, and responsiveness is warranted. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Stuart, G. W., Erkel, E. A., & Shull, L. H.. (2010). Allocating resources in a data-driven college of nursing . Nursing outlook, 58(4), 200-206.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Three years ago our college of nursing faced a critical strategic planning question: How could the college initiate and offer a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree program without additional human and financial resources? This article describes the process used to open a new educational program with no new resources by suspending educational programs that were not financially viable. While the process was difficult, shared governance and data-driven decision-making fostered trust and openness that allowed faculty members to make critical decisions, assuring the viability and future growth of the college. At the end of this process, faculty members were united in their decisions and actively and energetically engaged in the development of a new DNP curriculum that built upon their strengths and expertise. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:347,
      author={G. W. Stuart and E. A. Erkel and L. H. Shull},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Allocating resources in a data-driven college of nursing },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={58},
      number={4},
      pages={200-206},
      note={id: 4880; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 0401075; 2009/11/18 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Three years ago our college of nursing faced a critical strategic planning question: How could the college initiate and offer a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree program without additional human and financial resources? This article describes the process used to open a new educational program with no new resources by suspending educational programs that were not financially viable. While the process was difficult, shared governance and data-driven decision-making fostered trust and openness that allowed faculty members to make critical decisions, assuring the viability and future growth of the college. At the end of this process, faculty members were united in their decisions and actively and energetically engaged in the development of a new DNP curriculum that built upon their strengths and expertise. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Cost Control; Curriculum; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Decision Making, Organizational; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Humans; Income/statistics & numerical data; Interprofessional Relations; Nursing Administration Research; Planning Techniques; Program Development/economics/methods; Resource Allocation/organization & administration; Salaries and Fringe Benefits/economics; Schools, Nursing/organization & administration; South Carolina; Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data; Trust; Workload/economics},
      isbn={1528-3968; 0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Turner, M. P.. (2010). Stratifying computer literacy: a competency measurement strategy . Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN, 28(5), 291-296.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Institutions using a clinical information system which feeds an electronic medical record system must consider evaluation programs that measure the nurse’s ability to use and understand the clinical data in the clinical information system. By measuring and tracking the nurse’s level of computer literacy, training programs and system enhancements can be better designed. A well-designed system will lead to improved system acceptance and higher adoption rates. There is a need for a defined system implementation strategy that includes nursing staff assessment and system training formulated to fit the specific literacy levels of the majority users of the clinical information system, the nursing staff. Computer literacy in relation to the use of clinical information systems and electronic medical record adoption is the focus of this article. If a strategy based on Benner’s novice to expert theory is implemented, computer literacy among frontline users could be assessed, and appropriate education and training programs can be developed. Ultimately, these programs would promote positive perception of the clinical information system, which would result in a better adoption rate of the electronic medical record. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:348,
      author={M. P. Turner},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Stratifying computer literacy: a competency measurement strategy },
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      volume={28},
      number={5},
      pages={291-296},
      note={id: 4877; JID: 101141667; ppublish },
      abstract={Institutions using a clinical information system which feeds an electronic medical record system must consider evaluation programs that measure the nurse's ability to use and understand the clinical data in the clinical information system. By measuring and tracking the nurse's level of computer literacy, training programs and system enhancements can be better designed. A well-designed system will lead to improved system acceptance and higher adoption rates. There is a need for a defined system implementation strategy that includes nursing staff assessment and system training formulated to fit the specific literacy levels of the majority users of the clinical information system, the nursing staff. Computer literacy in relation to the use of clinical information systems and electronic medical record adoption is the focus of this article. If a strategy based on Benner's novice to expert theory is implemented, computer literacy among frontline users could be assessed, and appropriate education and training programs can be developed. Ultimately, these programs would promote positive perception of the clinical information system, which would result in a better adoption rate of the electronic medical record. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer Literacy; Electronic Health Records; Humans; Nursing Staff/education; Organizational Innovation; United States},
      isbn={1538-9774; 1538-2931},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Walker, P. H.. (2010). The TIGER initiative: a call to accept and pass the baton . Nursing economic$, 28(5), 352-355.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The TIGER Initiative is focused on using informatics tools, principles, theories, and practices to enable nurses to make health care safer, more effective, efficient, patient centered, timely, and equitable. To meet the demands of an increasingly electronic and rapidly changing health care environment, this goal can only be achieved if technology is integrated transparently into nursing practice and education. What would a call to accept and pass this baton mean for nursing? It means leaders within the profession would begin to see nursing informatics and technology as core support to nursing functions, nursing decision making, and a new nurse-patient relationship based on ubiquitous access to patient and health care data and information. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:349,
      author={P. H. Walker},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={The TIGER initiative: a call to accept and pass the baton },
      journal={Nursing economic$},
      volume={28},
      number={5},
      pages={352-355},
      note={id: 4882; JID: 8404213; ppublish },
      abstract={
    The TIGER Initiative is focused on using informatics tools, principles, theories, and practices to enable nurses to make health care safer, more effective, efficient, patient centered, timely, and equitable. To meet the demands of an increasingly electronic and rapidly changing health care environment, this goal can only be achieved if technology is integrated transparently into nursing practice and education. What would a call to accept and pass this baton mean for nursing? It means leaders within the profession would begin to see nursing informatics and technology as core support to nursing functions, nursing decision making, and a new nurse-patient relationship based on ubiquitous access to patient and health care data and information. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Diffusion of Innovation; Electronic Health Records/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Health Care Reform/organization & administration; Humans; Leadership; Nurse Administrators/organization & administration; Nursing Informatics/education/organization & administration; Organizational Objectives; Technology Assessment, Biomedical; United States},
      isbn={0746-1739; 0746-1739},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Waneka, R., & Spetz, J.. (2010). Hospital information technology systems’ impact on nurses and nursing care . The Journal of nursing administration, 40(12), 509-514.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: We conducted a review of the literature to determine the impact of health information technologies (HITs) on nurses and nursing care. BACKGROUND: Nurses’ effective use of HIT has the potential to produce a positive impact on nursing-sensitive patient outcomes, patient safety, and quality of care. METHODS: A review of the literature produced 564 unique references of which 74 were selected for review. RESULTS: Findings suggest that (1) HIT improves the quality of nursing documentation; (2) HIT reduces medication administration errors; (3) nurses are generally satisfied with HIT and have positive attitudes about it; and (4) nurse involvement in all stages of HIT design and implementation, and effective leadership throughout these processes, can improve HIT. CONCLUSION: HIT has had positive influences on nurse satisfaction and patient care. Effective nursing leadership can positively influence the effective development, dissemination, and use of HIT. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:350,
      author={R. Waneka and J. Spetz},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec},
      title={Hospital information technology systems' impact on nurses and nursing care },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={40},
      number={12},
      pages={509-514},
      note={id: 4873; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: We conducted a review of the literature to determine the impact of health information technologies (HITs) on nurses and nursing care. BACKGROUND: Nurses' effective use of HIT has the potential to produce a positive impact on nursing-sensitive patient outcomes, patient safety, and quality of care. METHODS: A review of the literature produced 564 unique references of which 74 were selected for review. RESULTS: Findings suggest that (1) HIT improves the quality of nursing documentation; (2) HIT reduces medication administration errors; (3) nurses are generally satisfied with HIT and have positive attitudes about it; and (4) nurse involvement in all stages of HIT design and implementation, and effective leadership throughout these processes, can improve HIT. CONCLUSION: HIT has had positive influences on nurse satisfaction and patient care. Effective nursing leadership can positively influence the effective development, dissemination, and use of HIT. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Documentation; Hospital Information Systems; Humans; Job Satisfaction; Medication Errors/prevention & control; Nurse Administrators; Nursing Care; Time Factors},
      isbn={1539-0721; 0002-0443},
      language={eng}
    }

2009

  • (2009). Collaborating to Integrate Evidence and Informatics into Nursing Practice and Education: An Executive Summary Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This report provides an executive summary of the TIGER activities through 2008, as well as a brief synopsis of each of the findings and recommendations of the nine collaborative teams. (Source: TIGER website)

    @techreport{RefWorks:362,
      year={2009},
      title={Collaborating to Integrate Evidence and Informatics into Nursing Practice and Education: An Executive Summary },
      institution={Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative},
      note={id: 4134},
      abstract={This report provides an executive summary of the TIGER activities through 2008, as well as a brief synopsis of each of the findings and recommendations of the nine collaborative teams. (Source: TIGER website) },
      url={http://www.tigersummit.com/uploads/TIGER_Collaborative_Exec_Summary_040509}
    }

  • Ainsley, B., & Brown, A.. (2009). The impact of informatics on nursing education: a review of the literature . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 40(5), 228-232.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    On the basis of a study by the Institute of Medicine, the current health care system is facing several challenges that may be addressed by changes in health professions education. The study focused on integration of five core competencies into health professions education, one of which was informatics. This critical analysis investigates current use of technology and online instructional strategies in nursing education. It also explores the potential impact of integration of informatics into nursing education to increase the cognitive skills of nurses to promote evidence-based nursing. Advantages and disadvantages of using online education in the instruction of nursing students and recommendations for best online practices in nursing education are discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:363,
      author={B. Ainsley and A. Brown},
      year={2009},
      month={May},
      title={The impact of informatics on nursing education: a review of the literature },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={40},
      number={5},
      pages={228-232},
      note={id: 4107; JID: 0262321; ppublish },
      abstract={On the basis of a study by the Institute of Medicine, the current health care system is facing several challenges that may be addressed by changes in health professions education. The study focused on integration of five core competencies into health professions education, one of which was informatics. This critical analysis investigates current use of technology and online instructional strategies in nursing education. It also explores the potential impact of integration of informatics into nursing education to increase the cognitive skills of nurses to promote evidence-based nursing. Advantages and disadvantages of using online education in the instruction of nursing students and recommendations for best online practices in nursing education are discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0022-0124},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Amarasingham, R., Plantinga, L., Diener-West, M., Gaskin, D. J., & Powe, N. R.. (2009). Clinical information technologies and inpatient outcomes: a multiple hospital study . Archives of Internal Medicine, 169(2), 108-114.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Despite speculation that clinical information technologies will improve clinical and financial outcomes, few studies have examined this relationship in a large number of hospitals. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of urban hospitals in Texas using the Clinical Information Technology Assessment Tool, which measures a hospital’s level of automation based on physician interactions with the information system. After adjustment for potential confounders, we examined whether greater automation of hospital information was associated with reduced rates of inpatient mortality, complications, costs, and length of stay for 167 233 patients older than 50 years admitted to responding hospitals between December 1, 2005, and May 30, 2006. RESULTS: We received a sufficient number of responses from 41 of 72 hospitals (58%). For all medical conditions studied, a 10-point increase in the automation of notes and records was associated with a 15% decrease in the adjusted odds of fatal hospitalizations (0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.97). Higher scores in order entry were associated with 9% and 55% decreases in the adjusted odds of death for myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass graft procedures, respectively. For all causes of hospitalization, higher scores in decision support were associated with a 16% decrease in the adjusted odds of complications (0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.79-0.90). Higher scores on test results, order entry, and decision support were associated with lower costs for all hospital admissions (-$110, -$132, and -$538, respectively; P

    @article{RefWorks:364,
      author={R. Amarasingham and L. Plantinga and M. Diener-West and D. J. Gaskin and N. R. Powe},
      year={2009},
      month={Jan 26},
      title={Clinical information technologies and inpatient outcomes: a multiple hospital study },
      journal={Archives of Internal Medicine},
      volume={169},
      number={2},
      pages={108-114},
      note={id: 3037; JID: 0372440; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Despite speculation that clinical information technologies will improve clinical and financial outcomes, few studies have examined this relationship in a large number of hospitals. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of urban hospitals in Texas using the Clinical Information Technology Assessment Tool, which measures a hospital's level of automation based on physician interactions with the information system. After adjustment for potential confounders, we examined whether greater automation of hospital information was associated with reduced rates of inpatient mortality, complications, costs, and length of stay for 167 233 patients older than 50 years admitted to responding hospitals between December 1, 2005, and May 30, 2006. RESULTS: We received a sufficient number of responses from 41 of 72 hospitals (58%). For all medical conditions studied, a 10-point increase in the automation of notes and records was associated with a 15% decrease in the adjusted odds of fatal hospitalizations (0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.97). Higher scores in order entry were associated with 9% and 55% decreases in the adjusted odds of death for myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass graft procedures, respectively. For all causes of hospitalization, higher scores in decision support were associated with a 16% decrease in the adjusted odds of complications (0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.79-0.90). Higher scores on test results, order entry, and decision support were associated with lower costs for all hospital admissions (-$110, -$132, and -$538, respectively; P },
      isbn={1538-3679},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Andersen, P., Lindgaard, A. M., Prgomet, M., Creswick, N., & Westbrook, J. I.. (2009). Mobile and fixed computer use by doctors and nurses on hospital wards: multi-method study on the relationships between clinician role, clinical task, and device choice . Journal of medical Internet research, 11(3), e32.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Selecting the right mix of stationary and mobile computing devices is a significant challenge for system planners and implementers. There is very limited research evidence upon which to base such decisions. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the relationships between clinician role, clinical task, and selection of a computer hardware device in hospital wards. METHODS: Twenty-seven nurses and eight doctors were observed for a total of 80 hours as they used a range of computing devices to access a computerized provider order entry system on two wards at a major Sydney teaching hospital. Observers used a checklist to record the clinical tasks completed, devices used, and location of the activities. Field notes were also documented during observations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after observation sessions. Assessment of the physical attributes of three devices-stationary PCs, computers on wheels (COWs) and tablet PCs-was made. Two types of COWs were available on the wards: generic COWs (laptops mounted on trolleys) and ergonomic COWs (an integrated computer and cart device). Heuristic evaluation of the user interfaces was also carried out. RESULTS: The majority (93.1%) of observed nursing tasks were conducted using generic COWs. Most nursing tasks were performed in patients’ rooms (57%) or in the corridors (36%), with a small percentage at a patient’s bedside (5%). Most nursing tasks related to the preparation and administration of drugs. Doctors on ward rounds conducted 57.3% of observed clinical tasks on generic COWs and 35.9% on tablet PCs. On rounds, 56% of doctors’ tasks were performed in the corridors, 29% in patients’ rooms, and 3% at the bedside. Doctors not on a ward round conducted 93.6% of tasks using stationary PCs, most often within the doctors’ office. Nurses and doctors were observed performing workarounds, such as transcribing medication orders from the computer to paper. CONCLUSIONS: The choice of device was related to clinical role, nature of the clinical task, degree of mobility required, including where task completion occurs, and device design. Nurses’ work, and clinical tasks performed by doctors during ward rounds, require highly mobile computer devices. Nurses and doctors on ward rounds showed a strong preference for generic COWs over all other devices. Tablet PCs were selected by doctors for only a small proportion of clinical tasks. Even when using mobile devices clinicians completed a very low proportion of observed tasks at the bedside. The design of the devices and ward space configurations place limitations on how and where devices are used and on the mobility of clinical work. In such circumstances, clinicians will initiate workarounds to compensate. In selecting hardware devices, consideration should be given to who will be using the devices, the nature of their work, and the physical layout of the ward. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:351,
      author={P. Andersen and A. M. Lindgaard and M. Prgomet and N. Creswick and J. I. Westbrook},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug 4},
      title={Mobile and fixed computer use by doctors and nurses on hospital wards: multi-method study on the relationships between clinician role, clinical task, and device choice },
      journal={Journal of medical Internet research},
      volume={11},
      number={3},
      pages={e32},
      note={id: 5157; LR: 20100924; JID: 100959882; OID: NLM: PMC2762853; 2009/02/19 [received]; 2009/06/22 [accepted]; 2009/05/08 [revised]; epublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Selecting the right mix of stationary and mobile computing devices is a significant challenge for system planners and implementers. There is very limited research evidence upon which to base such decisions. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the relationships between clinician role, clinical task, and selection of a computer hardware device in hospital wards. METHODS: Twenty-seven nurses and eight doctors were observed for a total of 80 hours as they used a range of computing devices to access a computerized provider order entry system on two wards at a major Sydney teaching hospital. Observers used a checklist to record the clinical tasks completed, devices used, and location of the activities. Field notes were also documented during observations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after observation sessions. Assessment of the physical attributes of three devices-stationary PCs, computers on wheels (COWs) and tablet PCs-was made. Two types of COWs were available on the wards: generic COWs (laptops mounted on trolleys) and ergonomic COWs (an integrated computer and cart device). Heuristic evaluation of the user interfaces was also carried out. RESULTS: The majority (93.1%) of observed nursing tasks were conducted using generic COWs. Most nursing tasks were performed in patients' rooms (57%) or in the corridors (36%), with a small percentage at a patient's bedside (5%). Most nursing tasks related to the preparation and administration of drugs. Doctors on ward rounds conducted 57.3% of observed clinical tasks on generic COWs and 35.9% on tablet PCs. On rounds, 56% of doctors' tasks were performed in the corridors, 29% in patients' rooms, and 3% at the bedside. Doctors not on a ward round conducted 93.6% of tasks using stationary PCs, most often within the doctors' office. Nurses and doctors were observed performing workarounds, such as transcribing medication orders from the computer to paper. CONCLUSIONS: The choice of device was related to clinical role, nature of the clinical task, degree of mobility required, including where task completion occurs, and device design. Nurses' work, and clinical tasks performed by doctors during ward rounds, require highly mobile computer devices. Nurses and doctors on ward rounds showed a strong preference for generic COWs over all other devices. Tablet PCs were selected by doctors for only a small proportion of clinical tasks. Even when using mobile devices clinicians completed a very low proportion of observed tasks at the bedside. The design of the devices and ward space configurations place limitations on how and where devices are used and on the mobility of clinical work. In such circumstances, clinicians will initiate workarounds to compensate. In selecting hardware devices, consideration should be given to who will be using the devices, the nature of their work, and the physical layout of the ward. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Computers; Australia; Choice Behavior; Computers; Documentation/methods; Drug Therapy/methods; Hospital Design and Construction; Humans; Interviews as Topic; Medical Staff, Hospital; Microcomputers; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Patients' Rooms; Role; Software},
      isbn={1438-8871; 1438-8871},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Arndt, R. M.. (2009). Library and information literacy . Journal of emergency nursing: JEN : official publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association, 35(4), 360-362.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Time and resources are major factors when it comes to hospitals attempting to teach or improve information literacy skills. Professionals in health care cannot afford to be kept in the dark when it comes to acquiring information relevant to patient care. Who should be responsible for teaching research skills? Librarians and faculty in schools of nursing can assume those responsibilities. Whether the skills are taught in a curriculum or in a hospital setting, it will take a collaborative effort. “The investment made by nurse educators, librarians, and administrators in teaching literacy skills will pay off in acts of recognition and completion for the nursing profession.” (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:378,
      author={R. M. Arndt},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul},
      title={Library and information literacy },
      journal={Journal of emergency nursing: JEN : official publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association},
      volume={35},
      number={4},
      pages={360-362},
      note={id: 4396; JID: 7605913; 2009/03/11 [received]; 2009/03/20 [accepted]; 2009/05/28 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Time and resources are major factors when it comes to hospitals attempting to teach or improve information literacy skills. Professionals in health care cannot afford to be kept in the dark when it comes to acquiring information relevant to patient care. Who should be responsible for teaching research skills? Librarians and faculty in schools of nursing can assume those responsibilities. Whether the skills are taught in a curriculum or in a hospital setting, it will take a collaborative effort. “The investment made by nurse educators, librarians, and administrators in teaching literacy skills will pay off in acts of recognition and completion for the nursing profession.” (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Educational Status; Evidence-Based Nursing/education; Humans; Library Science/education; Professional Competence},
      isbn={1527-2966},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bakken, S., Currie, L., Hyun, S., Lee, N. J., John, R., Schnall, R., & Velez, O.. (2009). Reducing health disparities and improving patient safety and quality by integrating HIT into the Columbia APN curriculum . Studies in health technology and informatics, 146, 859.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    No abstract available

    @article{RefWorks:379,
      author={S. Bakken and L. Currie and S. Hyun and N. J. Lee and R. John and R. Schnall and O. Velez},
      year={2009},
      title={Reducing health disparities and improving patient safety and quality by integrating HIT into the Columbia APN curriculum },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={146},
      pages={859},
      note={id: 4405; GR: G08 LM008588/LM/NLM NIH HHS/United States; GR: R01NR008903/NR/NINR NIH HHS/United States; GR: R21 CA126325/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={No abstract available },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing; Healthcare Disparities; Humans; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Nursing Informatics/education; Quality of Health Care; Safety Management},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Barton, A. J., & Skiba, D. J.. (2009). Informatics curriculum integration for quality and safety education for nurses . Studies in health technology and informatics, 146, 593-597.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This paper describes the creation of an informatics curricular thread in pre-licensure nursing education, using the informatics competencies defined by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) collaborative. Several U.S. initiatives are calling for more rapid incorporation of informatics competencies into nursing curriculum. Baseline data are presented and plans to roll-out the new curricular approach discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:380,
      author={A. J. Barton and D. J. Skiba},
      year={2009},
      title={Informatics curriculum integration for quality and safety education for nurses },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={146},
      pages={593-597},
      note={id: 4204; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={This paper describes the creation of an informatics curricular thread in pre-licensure nursing education, using the informatics competencies defined by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) collaborative. Several U.S. initiatives are calling for more rapid incorporation of informatics competencies into nursing curriculum. Baseline data are presented and plans to roll-out the new curricular approach discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bond, C. S.. (2009). Nurses, computers and pre-registration education . Nurse education today.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nursing informatics, the use of information and technology, to support the work of the nurse, is an essential part of the modern nurses’ job. In the UK this is supported by a range of National Health Service policy documents over the past decade, starting with Information for Health in 1998. Research carried out over this period has however found that nurses lack the necessary skills and knowledge to use computers effectively, and that pre-registration education does not fully prepare student nurses for this aspect of the role of the nurse. This paper presents the results of a longitudinal study carried out with a cohort of nursing students, which found that although the students lacked computer skills and knowledge at the start of their programme they were willing to engage with this agenda. Two factors were found to be necessary for students to use the available IT on placement. One was a belief that they had the skills to use the computers; the other was a supportive environment that encouraged their use. Unfortunately only a minority of students reported that they had experienced a supportive environment. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:366,
      author={C. S. Bond},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar 25},
      title={Nurses, computers and pre-registration education },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      note={id: 4099; JID: 8511379; 2008/08/08 [received]; 2009/01/09 [revised]; 2009/02/27 [accepted]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Nursing informatics, the use of information and technology, to support the work of the nurse, is an essential part of the modern nurses' job. In the UK this is supported by a range of National Health Service policy documents over the past decade, starting with Information for Health in 1998. Research carried out over this period has however found that nurses lack the necessary skills and knowledge to use computers effectively, and that pre-registration education does not fully prepare student nurses for this aspect of the role of the nurse. This paper presents the results of a longitudinal study carried out with a cohort of nursing students, which found that although the students lacked computer skills and knowledge at the start of their programme they were willing to engage with this agenda. Two factors were found to be necessary for students to use the available IT on placement. One was a belief that they had the skills to use the computers; the other was a supportive environment that encouraged their use. Unfortunately only a minority of students reported that they had experienced a supportive environment. (Source: PubMed) },
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Borycki, E. M., Kushniruk, A. W., & et al Joe, R.. (2009). The University of Victoria Interdisciplinary Electronic Health Record Educational Portal . Studies in health technology and informatics, 143, 49-54.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Use of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems is increasing globally. However, adoption rates of Health Information Systems (HISs) continue to remain poor. To improve adoption rates, there is need to provide greater HIS experience to health professionals and informaticians in health and biomedicine during their undergraduate and graduate education. A recent review of the health professional educational curricula (i.e., medicine, nursing, allied health and health/biomedical informatics) revealed that they provide only limited exposure to EHRs. In response to this educational need, the authors have developed the University of Victoria Interdisciplinary Electronic Health Record Educational Portal (UVicIED-EHR Portal). This unique, web-based portal allows students of the health professions and practicing professionals to access and interact with a set of representative EHR HIS solutions using the web. The portal, which links to several EMRs, EPRs and PHRs, has been used by several health professional educational programs in medicine, nursing and health informatics. It provides practicing health and health/biomedical informatics professionals, for example, managers and directors, with opportunities to access and review EHR systems. The portal has been used successfully in the classroom, laboratory and with distance education to give hands-on experience with a variety of HISs and their components. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:367,
      author={E. M. Borycki and A. W. Kushniruk and R. et al Joe},
      year={2009},
      title={The University of Victoria Interdisciplinary Electronic Health Record Educational Portal },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={143},
      pages={49-54},
      note={id: 4111; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={Use of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems is increasing globally. However, adoption rates of Health Information Systems (HISs) continue to remain poor. To improve adoption rates, there is need to provide greater HIS experience to health professionals and informaticians in health and biomedicine during their undergraduate and graduate education. A recent review of the health professional educational curricula (i.e., medicine, nursing, allied health and health/biomedical informatics) revealed that they provide only limited exposure to EHRs. In response to this educational need, the authors have developed the University of Victoria Interdisciplinary Electronic Health Record Educational Portal (UVicIED-EHR Portal). This unique, web-based portal allows students of the health professions and practicing professionals to access and interact with a set of representative EHR HIS solutions using the web. The portal, which links to several EMRs, EPRs and PHRs, has been used by several health professional educational programs in medicine, nursing and health informatics. It provides practicing health and health/biomedical informatics professionals, for example, managers and directors, with opportunities to access and review EHR systems. The portal has been used successfully in the classroom, laboratory and with distance education to give hands-on experience with a variety of HISs and their components. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={British Columbia; Curriculum; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Medical; Education, Nursing; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Internet; Medical Records Systems, Computerized},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Brixey, J. J., & Warren, J. J.. (2009). Creating experiential learning activities using Web 2.0 tools and technologies: a case study . Studies in health technology and informatics, 146, 613-617.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Learning is no longer an internal individual activity but occurs through networks and connections. The aim of this project was to teach online health informatics students to use Web 2.0 tools and technologies to form networks and connections through experiential learning assignments. Web 2.0 tools and technologies were evaluated using a criteria checklist prior to implementation for students enrolled in health informatics classes at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Health informatics students have developed competencies using an instant message service, blogging, concept mapping, social bookmarking, and interacting a virtual environment. In the future, health care professionals will have to work in rapidly changing environments and keep abreast of new innovations and tools, learn to use those tools, and to teach others about the tools. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:381,
      author={J. J. Brixey and J. J. Warren},
      year={2009},
      title={Creating experiential learning activities using Web 2.0 tools and technologies: a case study },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={146},
      pages={613-617},
      note={id: 4407; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={Learning is no longer an internal individual activity but occurs through networks and connections. The aim of this project was to teach online health informatics students to use Web 2.0 tools and technologies to form networks and connections through experiential learning assignments. Web 2.0 tools and technologies were evaluated using a criteria checklist prior to implementation for students enrolled in health informatics classes at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Health informatics students have developed competencies using an instant message service, blogging, concept mapping, social bookmarking, and interacting a virtual environment. In the future, health care professionals will have to work in rapidly changing environments and keep abreast of new innovations and tools, learn to use those tools, and to teach others about the tools. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Humans; Internet; Kansas; Organizational Case Studies; Problem-Based Learning; Schools, Nursing; Software},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Clark, J., Baker, B., & Baker, D.. (2009). Getting eHealth into basic nursing education: report of the RCN information in nursing project . Studies in health technology and informatics, 146, 534-539.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This paper reports the results of a project undertaken in 2008 by the Royal College of Nursing’s Information in Nursing Forum. The project, undertaken by the RCN IN Forum in association with the RCN Education Forum and the RCN Association of Nursing Students, was in two parts. The first part consisted of an on-line survey of nursing students to discover their "readiness" for working in an electronic environment. The second part consisted of a workshop for invited stakeholders – organisations responsible for commissioning and providing basic nursing education, regulators, nurse teachers, and nursing students themselves – the objective of which was to consider the results of the survey and other information, in order to develop a consensus on how best to incorporate eHealth issues into basic nursing education. The survey was undertaken during April 2008 via the RCN website. Students were asked how well they felt their nursing education had prepared them for competencies set out in a previously published model curriculum. 1,120 students responded. 565 students who had used electronic patient records during their most recent clinical placement were asked about their experience. Students rated their basic computer skills much higher than their understanding of eHealth. While they felt competent to document assessments and care plans using paper records, few felt competent to do so using electronic records. Few know anything about telehealth (remote diagnosis and delivery of healthcare) or telecare (assistive technology in people’s homes). Among those who had used computers in their most recent clinical placement there were clear breaches of the protocols designed to ensure security and confidentiality. Twenty seven invited participants attended the workshop held in October 2008, plus 12 members of the participating Forums and relevant RCN staff. Following presentation and discussion of the findings of the survey, participants worked in three groups to identify and discuss issues arising from the survey, and to identify barriers using a Force Field Analysis. All participants agreed eHealth should be an integral part of nursing education and not an "add-on", and that the responsibility for "Getting eHealth into basic nursing education" had to be shared by university based educators, placement supervisors, and regulators. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:382,
      author={J. Clark and B. Baker and D. Baker},
      year={2009},
      title={Getting eHealth into basic nursing education: report of the RCN information in nursing project },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={146},
      pages={534-539},
      note={id: 4412; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={This paper reports the results of a project undertaken in 2008 by the Royal College of Nursing's Information in Nursing Forum. The project, undertaken by the RCN IN Forum in association with the RCN Education Forum and the RCN Association of Nursing Students, was in two parts. The first part consisted of an on-line survey of nursing students to discover their "readiness" for working in an electronic environment. The second part consisted of a workshop for invited stakeholders - organisations responsible for commissioning and providing basic nursing education, regulators, nurse teachers, and nursing students themselves - the objective of which was to consider the results of the survey and other information, in order to develop a consensus on how best to incorporate eHealth issues into basic nursing education. The survey was undertaken during April 2008 via the RCN website. Students were asked how well they felt their nursing education had prepared them for competencies set out in a previously published model curriculum. 1,120 students responded. 565 students who had used electronic patient records during their most recent clinical placement were asked about their experience. Students rated their basic computer skills much higher than their understanding of eHealth. While they felt competent to document assessments and care plans using paper records, few felt competent to do so using electronic records. Few know anything about telehealth (remote diagnosis and delivery of healthcare) or telecare (assistive technology in people's homes). Among those who had used computers in their most recent clinical placement there were clear breaches of the protocols designed to ensure security and confidentiality. Twenty seven invited participants attended the workshop held in October 2008, plus 12 members of the participating Forums and relevant RCN staff. Following presentation and discussion of the findings of the survey, participants worked in three groups to identify and discuss issues arising from the survey, and to identify barriers using a Force Field Analysis. All participants agreed eHealth should be an integral part of nursing education and not an "add-on", and that the responsibility for "Getting eHealth into basic nursing education" had to be shared by university based educators, placement supervisors, and regulators. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Data Collection; Education; Education, Nursing; Great Britain; Humans; Nursing Informatics/education; Societies, Nursing},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Demiris, G., & Zierler, B.. (2009). Integrating problem-based learning in a nursing informatics curriculum . Nurse education today.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In recent years employers in health care organizations have been recognizing the need for nurses to enter the workforce with a set of informatics competencies. Numerous nursing informatics programs have been established worldwide. The challenge becomes to explore innovative tools that will equip nurses with the appropriate skills to utilize information technology to improve health care quality and patient safety and redesign health care services. This paper presents the introduction of problem-based learning (PBL) modules into an existing nursing informatics curriculum, the Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies Master program at the School of Nursing, University of Washington. Additionally, we discuss recommendations and challenges associated with the integration of PBL in nursing informatics graduate education including the need for facilitators, flexible technology platforms, promotion and documentation of group work, faculty training and supervision by a program committee. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:383,
      author={G. Demiris and B. Zierler},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug 12},
      title={Integrating problem-based learning in a nursing informatics curriculum },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      note={id: 4359; JID: 8511379; 2009/01/07 [received]; 2009/06/06 [revised]; 2009/07/09 [accepted]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={In recent years employers in health care organizations have been recognizing the need for nurses to enter the workforce with a set of informatics competencies. Numerous nursing informatics programs have been established worldwide. The challenge becomes to explore innovative tools that will equip nurses with the appropriate skills to utilize information technology to improve health care quality and patient safety and redesign health care services. This paper presents the introduction of problem-based learning (PBL) modules into an existing nursing informatics curriculum, the Clinical Informatics and Patient Centered Technologies Master program at the School of Nursing, University of Washington. Additionally, we discuss recommendations and challenges associated with the integration of PBL in nursing informatics graduate education including the need for facilitators, flexible technology platforms, promotion and documentation of group work, faculty training and supervision by a program committee. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1532-2793},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Doran, D.. (2009). The emerging role of PDAs in information use and clinical decision making . Evidence-based nursing, 12(2), 35-38.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The types of clinical decisions that nurses actually make provide clues about how research information might assist in decision making. Other authors have examined the clinical decisions of healthcare professionals (and the clinical questions arising from such decisions) as expressions of potential information need. Thus, decisions are an important context for information use. We will show how understanding the structure and characteristics of the decisions nurses face is important for understanding the ways in which information is accessed and processed by nurses. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:369,
      author={D. Doran},
      year={2009},
      month={Apr},
      title={The emerging role of PDAs in information use and clinical decision making },
      journal={Evidence-based nursing},
      volume={12},
      number={2},
      pages={35-38},
      note={id: 3690; JID: 9815947; ppublish },
      abstract={The types of clinical decisions that nurses actually make provide clues about how research information might assist in decision making. Other authors have examined the clinical decisions of healthcare professionals (and the clinical questions arising from such decisions) as expressions of potential information need. Thus, decisions are an important context for information use. We will show how understanding the structure and characteristics of the decisions nurses face is important for understanding the ways in which information is accessed and processed by nurses. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Computers, Handheld; Cooperative Behavior; Decision Support Systems, Clinical; Education, Continuing/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing; Workplace},
      isbn={1468-9618},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Elder, B. L., & Koehn, M. L.. (2009). Assessment tool for nursing student computer competencies . Nursing Education Perspectives, 30(3), 148-152.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Computer skills have been established as important for nursing students and for graduate nurses. No current research was found on the best method to evaluate the skills of incoming nursing students. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to compare student ratings of their computer competency to their performance of those skills on a computer-graded assessment. A convenience sample of 87 nursing students was used. There was a low, but significant correlation between the scores on the survey and the assessment. The results suggest that students rate themselves higher on their skills than their actual performance of computer skills. Implications for educators are presented, and the value of using a computer-graded assessment is discussed. (Source: CINAHL)

    @article{RefWorks:370,
      author={B. L. Elder and M. L. Koehn},
      year={2009},
      month={05},
      title={Assessment tool for nursing student computer competencies },
      journal={Nursing Education Perspectives},
      volume={30},
      number={3},
      pages={148-152},
      note={id: 4135},
      abstract={Computer skills have been established as important for nursing students and for graduate nurses. No current research was found on the best method to evaluate the skills of incoming nursing students. The purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to compare student ratings of their computer competency to their performance of those skills on a computer-graded assessment. A convenience sample of 87 nursing students was used. There was a low, but significant correlation between the scores on the survey and the assessment. The results suggest that students rate themselves higher on their skills than their actual performance of computer skills. Implications for educators are presented, and the value of using a computer-graded assessment is discussed. (Source: CINAHL) },
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010319525&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Fetter, M. S.. (2009). Graduating nurses’ self-evaluation of information technology competencies . The Journal of nursing education, 48(2), 86-90.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Using a standardized instrument, graduating baccalaureate nurses reported moderate information technology skills. The students were most confident in their Internet, word processing, and systems operations skills; the students’ rated themselves lowest on care documentation and planning, valuing informatics knowledge, skills development, and data entry competencies. Exposure to the latest informatics systems was a priority. Students want fair access to informatics and technology-rich clinical settings; more realistic informatics and technology simulations; enthusiastic and capable faculty; and better hardware, software, and literature-searching support in agencies, classrooms, laboratories, and residences. Nursing programs, clinical agencies, and policy makers need to recognize that students are advancing beyond acquiring informatics skills to integrating health information literacy into practice. To facilitate current and future skills attainment and innovation, nursing informatics education and evaluation must keep pace. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:372,
      author={M. S. Fetter},
      year={2009},
      month={Feb},
      title={Graduating nurses' self-evaluation of information technology competencies },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={2},
      pages={86-90},
      note={id: 4100; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={Using a standardized instrument, graduating baccalaureate nurses reported moderate information technology skills. The students were most confident in their Internet, word processing, and systems operations skills; the students' rated themselves lowest on care documentation and planning, valuing informatics knowledge, skills development, and data entry competencies. Exposure to the latest informatics systems was a priority. Students want fair access to informatics and technology-rich clinical settings; more realistic informatics and technology simulations; enthusiastic and capable faculty; and better hardware, software, and literature-searching support in agencies, classrooms, laboratories, and residences. Nursing programs, clinical agencies, and policy makers need to recognize that students are advancing beyond acquiring informatics skills to integrating health information literacy into practice. To facilitate current and future skills attainment and innovation, nursing informatics education and evaluation must keep pace. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer Literacy; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Educational Measurement; Humans; United States},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fetter, M. S.. (2009). Collaborating to optimize nursing students’ agency information technology use . Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN, 27(6), 354-62; quiz 363-4.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students’ information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students’ use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students’ information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare’s transformation into the digital age. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:385,
      author={M. S. Fetter},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Collaborating to optimize nursing students' agency information technology use },
      journal={Computers, informatics, nursing : CIN},
      volume={27},
      number={6},
      pages={354-62; quiz 363-4},
      note={id: 4324; JID: 101141667; ppublish },
      abstract={As the learning laboratory for gaining actual patient care experience, clinical agencies play an essential role in nursing education. With an information technology revolution transforming healthcare, nursing programs are eager for their students to learn the latest informatics systems and technologies. However, many healthcare institutions are struggling to meet their own information technology needs and report limited resources and other as barriers to nursing student training. In addition, nursing students' information technology access and use raise security and privacy concerns. With the goal of a fully electronic health record by 2014, it is imperative that agencies and educational programs collaborate. They need to establish educationally sound, cost-effective, and secure policies and procedures for managing students' use of information technology systems. Strategies for evaluating options, selecting training methods, and ensuring data security are shared, along with strategies that may reap clinical, economic, and educational benefits. Students' information technology use raises numerous issues that the nursing profession must address to participate in healthcare's transformation into the digital age. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9774},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fetter, M. S.. (2009). Curriculum strategies to improve baccalaureate nursing information technology outcomes . The Journal of nursing education, 48(2), 78-85.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Improving information technology (IT) outcomes is a top nursing education priority. Improving care access, quality, and cost effectiveness, IT skills are vital for professional development and advancement. Nursing programs have embraced distance learning and added informatics content, courses, and specific technologies; however, undergraduates’ and educators’ skills are still considered inadequate. Meanwhile, the Nursing Informatics specialty has moved beyond IT competency articulation and measurement. It is promoting information literacy to support evidence-based practice and the cultivation of clinical wisdom. The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative, a coalition aiming to advance IT outcomes in nursing education, has cited benchmarking and sharing best practices as key to achieving its goals. Thus, this article reports on the process, results, and implications of a project using curriculum strategies to enhance IT outcomes. A 3-year action plan directed faculty, student, and agency evaluation, curriculum mapping, model learning module, and documentation development. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:371,
      author={M. S. Fetter},
      year={2009},
      month={Feb},
      title={Curriculum strategies to improve baccalaureate nursing information technology outcomes },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={2},
      pages={78-85},
      note={id: 4101; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={Improving information technology (IT) outcomes is a top nursing education priority. Improving care access, quality, and cost effectiveness, IT skills are vital for professional development and advancement. Nursing programs have embraced distance learning and added informatics content, courses, and specific technologies; however, undergraduates' and educators' skills are still considered inadequate. Meanwhile, the Nursing Informatics specialty has moved beyond IT competency articulation and measurement. It is promoting information literacy to support evidence-based practice and the cultivation of clinical wisdom. The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative, a coalition aiming to advance IT outcomes in nursing education, has cited benchmarking and sharing best practices as key to achieving its goals. Thus, this article reports on the process, results, and implications of a project using curriculum strategies to enhance IT outcomes. A 3-year action plan directed faculty, student, and agency evaluation, curriculum mapping, model learning module, and documentation development. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer Literacy; Computer User Training; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Humans; Mid-Atlantic Region; Program Development},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Flood, L. S., Gasiewicz, N., & Delpier, T.. (2009). Integrating Information Literacy Across a BSN Curriculum . The Journal of nursing education, 1-4.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Although research regarding effective informatics teaching strategies is sparse and informatics competencies have not yet been finalized, nurse educators have been challenged to include informatics throughout the curriculum. Nurse educators are confronted with how best to incorporate informatics into an already burgeoning curriculum. This article offers a systematic approach to incorporating information literacy, a vital component of informatics, across a baccalaureate of science in nursing curriculum. Motivated by the Institute of Medicine report, guided by the initial Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform competency framework, and using the specific Quality and Safety Education for Nurses informatics competencies, the proposed integrated approach emphasizes clinical applications. The five assignments are designed to incrementally increase students’ abilities to recognize the need for information (i.e., knowledge); advance students’ abilities to locate, evaluate, and use information (i.e., skills); and foster a positive appreciation for information literacy (i.e., attitudes) when planning safe, effective patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:386,
      author={L. S. Flood and N. Gasiewicz and T. Delpier},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov 3},
      title={Integrating Information Literacy Across a BSN Curriculum },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      pages={1-4},
      note={id: 4348; CI: Copyright 2009; JID: 7705432; 2008/06/04 [received]; 2008/10/20 [accepted]; aheadofprint; SO: J Nurs Educ. 2009 Nov 3:1-4. doi: 10.3928/01484834-20091023-01. },
      abstract={Although research regarding effective informatics teaching strategies is sparse and informatics competencies have not yet been finalized, nurse educators have been challenged to include informatics throughout the curriculum. Nurse educators are confronted with how best to incorporate informatics into an already burgeoning curriculum. This article offers a systematic approach to incorporating information literacy, a vital component of informatics, across a baccalaureate of science in nursing curriculum. Motivated by the Institute of Medicine report, guided by the initial Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform competency framework, and using the specific Quality and Safety Education for Nurses informatics competencies, the proposed integrated approach emphasizes clinical applications. The five assignments are designed to incrementally increase students' abilities to recognize the need for information (i.e., knowledge); advance students' abilities to locate, evaluate, and use information (i.e., skills); and foster a positive appreciation for information literacy (i.e., attitudes) when planning safe, effective patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Foster, J., & Dallemagne, C.. (2009). Teaching undergraduate nursing students renal care in a 3D Gaming Environment . Studies in health technology and informatics, 146, 837-840.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The original program on renal care was developed between 1995-1997 using ‘Toolbook’ software, which presented the content in a non interactive graphical way without tracking student progress or recording of results and was available to students via a CDRom. The content described the clinical decision making process that practitioners had to follow when diagnosing and managing renal diseases. These processes followed a learning sequence whereby a series of decisions lead to the next phase of the diagnosis and treatment. The purpose was to simulate the live clinical decision making processes for practitioners. An additional build-in ‘Ask the Expert’-button (Help function) guided students in correct clinical decision making. One of the problems encountered in the original program is that the navigation is not intuitive to the user and students could get easily lost while going through the step-by-step introduction as well as the lack of interactivity. The original program still has relevant learning content, but the software, illustrations and tracking of learning outcomes are out-of-date. Therefore a re-design of the original program using a 3D Gaming Environment with updated content is being undertaken. This paper will discuss the methodology underpinning the new development, a demonstration of the program and the results from student feedback which will be undertaken in February – March 2009. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:387,
      author={J. Foster and C. Dallemagne},
      year={2009},
      title={Teaching undergraduate nursing students renal care in a 3D Gaming Environment },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={146},
      pages={837-840},
      note={id: 4406; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={The original program on renal care was developed between 1995-1997 using 'Toolbook' software, which presented the content in a non interactive graphical way without tracking student progress or recording of results and was available to students via a CDRom. The content described the clinical decision making process that practitioners had to follow when diagnosing and managing renal diseases. These processes followed a learning sequence whereby a series of decisions lead to the next phase of the diagnosis and treatment. The purpose was to simulate the live clinical decision making processes for practitioners. An additional build-in 'Ask the Expert'-button (Help function) guided students in correct clinical decision making. One of the problems encountered in the original program is that the navigation is not intuitive to the user and students could get easily lost while going through the step-by-step introduction as well as the lack of interactivity. The original program still has relevant learning content, but the software, illustrations and tracking of learning outcomes are out-of-date. Therefore a re-design of the original program using a 3D Gaming Environment with updated content is being undertaken. This paper will discuss the methodology underpinning the new development, a demonstration of the program and the results from student feedback which will be undertaken in February - March 2009. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Kidney Diseases/therapy; Video Games},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Gillespie, M., & Peterson, B. L.. (2009). Helping novice nurses make effective clinical decisions: the situated clinical decision-making framework . Nursing education perspectives, 30(3), 164-170.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The nature of novice nurses’ clinical decision-making has been well documented as linear, based on limited knowledge and experience in the profession, and frequently focused on single tasks or problems. Theorists suggest that, with sufficient experience in the clinical setting, novice nurses will move from reliance on abstract principles to the application of concrete experience and to view a clinical situation within its context and as a whole. In the current health care environment, novice nurses frequently work with few clinical supports and mentors while facing complex patient situations that demand skilled decision-making. The Situated Clinical Decision-Making Framework is presented for use by educators and novice nurses to support development of clinical decision-making. It provides novice nurses with a tool that a) assists them in making decisions; b) can be used to guide retrospective reflection on decision-making processes and outcomes; c) socializes them to an understanding of the nature of decision-making in nursing; and d) fosters the development of their knowledge, skill, and confidence as nurses. This article provides an overview of the framework, including its theoretical foundations and a schematic representation of its components. A case exemplar illustrates one application of the framework in assisting novice nurses in developing their decision-making skills. Future directions regarding the use and study of this framework in nursing education are considered. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:388,
      author={M. Gillespie and B. L. Peterson},
      year={2009},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Helping novice nurses make effective clinical decisions: the situated clinical decision-making framework },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={30},
      number={3},
      pages={164-170},
      note={id: 4404; JID: 101140025; RF: 23; ppublish },
      abstract={The nature of novice nurses' clinical decision-making has been well documented as linear, based on limited knowledge and experience in the profession, and frequently focused on single tasks or problems. Theorists suggest that, with sufficient experience in the clinical setting, novice nurses will move from reliance on abstract principles to the application of concrete experience and to view a clinical situation within its context and as a whole. In the current health care environment, novice nurses frequently work with few clinical supports and mentors while facing complex patient situations that demand skilled decision-making. The Situated Clinical Decision-Making Framework is presented for use by educators and novice nurses to support development of clinical decision-making. It provides novice nurses with a tool that a) assists them in making decisions; b) can be used to guide retrospective reflection on decision-making processes and outcomes; c) socializes them to an understanding of the nature of decision-making in nursing; and d) fosters the development of their knowledge, skill, and confidence as nurses. This article provides an overview of the framework, including its theoretical foundations and a schematic representation of its components. A case exemplar illustrates one application of the framework in assisting novice nurses in developing their decision-making skills. Future directions regarding the use and study of this framework in nursing education are considered. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Cues; Decision Support Techniques; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Helping Behavior; Humans; Judgment; Knowledge; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Assessment/organization & administration; Nursing Process/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Self Efficacy; Socialization; Thinking},
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Grassley, J. S., & Bartoletti, R.. (2009). Wikis and blogs: tools for online interaction . Nurse educator, 34(5), 209-213.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Online education requires nursing faculty to learn teaching strategies that encourage students’ interaction with the course content, their peers, the faculty, and the technology. The Web 2.0 technologies of wikis and blogs can help faculty direct online learning activities that encourage peer support, collaboration, and dialogue. The authors discuss these tools and how they were used to engage students in a nursing research course. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:389,
      author={J. S. Grassley and R. Bartoletti},
      year={2009},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Wikis and blogs: tools for online interaction },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={34},
      number={5},
      pages={209-213},
      note={id: 4357; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={Online education requires nursing faculty to learn teaching strategies that encourage students' interaction with the course content, their peers, the faculty, and the technology. The Web 2.0 technologies of wikis and blogs can help faculty direct online learning activities that encourage peer support, collaboration, and dialogue. The authors discuss these tools and how they were used to engage students in a nursing research course. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9855},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kiteley, R. J., & Ormrod, G.. (2009). Towards a team-based, collaborative approach to embedding e-learning within undergraduate nursing programmes . Nurse education today, 29(6), 623-629.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    E-learning approaches are incorporated in many undergraduate nursing programmes but there is evidence to suggest that these are often piecemeal and have little impact on the wider, nurse education curriculum. This is consistent with a broader view of e-learning within the higher education (HE) sector, which suggests that higher education institutions (HEIs) are struggling to make e-learning a part of their mainstream delivery [HEFCE, 2005. HEFCE Strategy for E-Learning 2005/12. Bristol, UK, Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE). [online] Available at: Accessed: 30 May 07]. This article discusses some of the challenges that face contemporary nurse education and seeks to account for reasons as to why e-learning may not be fully embedded within the undergraduate curriculum. These issues are considered within a wider debate about the need to align e-learning approaches with a shift towards a more student focused learning and teaching paradigm. The article goes on to consider broader issues in the literature on the adoption, embedding and diffusion of innovations, particularly in relation to the value of collaboration. A collaborative, team-based approach to e-learning development is considered as a way of facilitating sustainable, responsive and multidisciplinary developments within a field which is constantly changing and evolving. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:390,
      author={R. J. Kiteley and G. Ormrod},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug},
      title={Towards a team-based, collaborative approach to embedding e-learning within undergraduate nursing programmes },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={29},
      number={6},
      pages={623-629},
      note={id: 4379; JID: 8511379; 2008/07/03 [received]; 2008/12/23 [revised]; 2009/01/24 [accepted]; 2009/03/03 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={E-learning approaches are incorporated in many undergraduate nursing programmes but there is evidence to suggest that these are often piecemeal and have little impact on the wider, nurse education curriculum. This is consistent with a broader view of e-learning within the higher education (HE) sector, which suggests that higher education institutions (HEIs) are struggling to make e-learning a part of their mainstream delivery [HEFCE, 2005. HEFCE Strategy for E-Learning 2005/12. Bristol, UK, Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE). [online] Available at: Accessed: 30 May 07]. This article discusses some of the challenges that face contemporary nurse education and seeks to account for reasons as to why e-learning may not be fully embedded within the undergraduate curriculum. These issues are considered within a wider debate about the need to align e-learning approaches with a shift towards a more student focused learning and teaching paradigm. The article goes on to consider broader issues in the literature on the adoption, embedding and diffusion of innovations, particularly in relation to the value of collaboration. A collaborative, team-based approach to e-learning development is considered as a way of facilitating sustainable, responsive and multidisciplinary developments within a field which is constantly changing and evolving. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer-Assisted Instruction; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Great Britain; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Educational; Nursing Education Research; Online Systems; Organizational Culture; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Social Support},
      isbn={1532-2793},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kitt, S., Szekendi, M., & Linn, K.. (2009). Leveraging technology for nursing handoffs . CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 27(5), 334-334.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The development and implementation of an electronic report tool that leverages existing medical record documentation and is used as a reference while giving report are useful in improving quality of report and in reducing the time it takes to prepare and provide report. The electronic report can be used for patient transfer and downtime communication as well. (Source: Publisher) Available at http://www.nursingcenter.com/pdf.asp?AID=813144

    @article{RefWorks:391,
      author={S. Kitt and M. Szekendi and K. Linn},
      year={2009},
      month={2009},
      title={Leveraging technology for nursing handoffs },
      journal={CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing},
      volume={27},
      number={5},
      pages={334-334},
      note={id: 4403},
      abstract={The development and implementation of an electronic report tool that leverages existing medical record documentation and is used as a reference while giving report are useful in improving quality of report and in reducing the time it takes to prepare and provide report. The electronic report can be used for patient transfer and downtime communication as well. (Source: Publisher)
    
    Available at http://www.nursingcenter.com/pdf.asp?AID=813144 },
      keywords={Nurse Attitudes -- Evaluation; Nursing Information Systems -- Methods; Shift Reports -- Methods; Medical-Surgical Nursing; Oncologic Nursing; Pretest-Posttest Design; Surveys},
      isbn={1538-2931},
      language={English},
      url={http://www.nursingcenter.com/pdf.asp?AID=813144}
    }

  • Leasure, A. R., Delise, D., Clifton, S. C., & Pascucci, M. A.. (2009). Health information literacy: hardwiring behavior through multilevels of instruction and application . Dimensions of critical care nursing : DCCN, 28(6), 276-282.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    To produce a healthcare provider who is competent in accessing health information, nursing faculty members, in tandem with medical librarians, play a crucial role in establishing the knowledge base for student competency in health information literacy. The time to prepare nursing students to meet the information challenges and opportunities of today’s healthcare environment is not after graduation, but rather while they are in school. By incorporating health information literacy skill building throughout the curriculum, nursing faculty members can prepare their students to enter the workforce equipped with the skills they need to find, retrieve, appraise, and apply information to their clinical practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:392,
      author={A. R. Leasure and D. Delise and S. C. Clifton and M. A. Pascucci},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Health information literacy: hardwiring behavior through multilevels of instruction and application },
      journal={Dimensions of critical care nursing : DCCN},
      volume={28},
      number={6},
      pages={276-282},
      note={id: 4462; JID: 8211489; ppublish },
      abstract={To produce a healthcare provider who is competent in accessing health information, nursing faculty members, in tandem with medical librarians, play a crucial role in establishing the knowledge base for student competency in health information literacy. The time to prepare nursing students to meet the information challenges and opportunities of today's healthcare environment is not after graduation, but rather while they are in school. By incorporating health information literacy skill building throughout the curriculum, nursing faculty members can prepare their students to enter the workforce equipped with the skills they need to find, retrieve, appraise, and apply information to their clinical practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer User Training/methods; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Education, Nursing, Graduate/methods; Evidence-Based Practice/education/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval/methods; Internet/organization & administration; Librarians; MEDLINE/organization & administration; Medical Subject Headings; Nursing Diagnosis; Nursing Informatics/education; Professional Competence; Professional Role},
      isbn={1538-8646; 1538-8646},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Levett-Jones, T., Kenny, R., der Riet, V. P., & et al. (2009). Exploring the information and communication technology competence and confidence of nursing students and their perception of its relevance to clinical practice . Nurse education today, 29(6), 612-616.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: This paper profiles a study that explored nursing students’ information and communication technology competence and confidence. It presents selected findings that focus on students’ attitudes towards information and communication technology as an educational methodology and their perceptions of its relevance to clinical practice. BACKGROUND: Information and communication technology is integral to contemporary nursing practice. Development of these skills is important to ensure that graduates are ‘work ready’ and adequately prepared to practice in increasingly technological healthcare environments. METHODS: This was a mixed methods study. Students (n=971) from three Australian universities were surveyed using an instrument designed specifically for the study, and 24 students participated in focus groups. FINDINGS: The focus group data revealed that a number of students were resistant to the use of information and communication technology as an educational methodology and lacked the requisite skills and confidence to engage successfully with this educational approach. Survey results indicated that 26 per cent of students were unsure about the relevance of information and communication technology to clinical practice and only 50 per cent felt ‘very confident’ using a computer. CONCLUSION: While the importance of information and communication technology to student’s learning and to their preparedness for practice has been established, it is evident that students’ motivation is influenced by their level of confidence and competence, and their understanding of the relevance of information and communication technology to their future careers. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:393,
      author={T. Levett-Jones and R. Kenny and P. Van der Riet and et al},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug},
      title={Exploring the information and communication technology competence and confidence of nursing students and their perception of its relevance to clinical practice },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={29},
      number={6},
      pages={612-616},
      note={id: 4380; JID: 8511379; 2008/07/17 [received]; 2008/11/22 [revised]; 2009/01/14 [accepted]; 2009/02/23 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: This paper profiles a study that explored nursing students' information and communication technology competence and confidence. It presents selected findings that focus on students' attitudes towards information and communication technology as an educational methodology and their perceptions of its relevance to clinical practice. BACKGROUND: Information and communication technology is integral to contemporary nursing practice. Development of these skills is important to ensure that graduates are 'work ready' and adequately prepared to practice in increasingly technological healthcare environments. METHODS: This was a mixed methods study. Students (n=971) from three Australian universities were surveyed using an instrument designed specifically for the study, and 24 students participated in focus groups. FINDINGS: The focus group data revealed that a number of students were resistant to the use of information and communication technology as an educational methodology and lacked the requisite skills and confidence to engage successfully with this educational approach. Survey results indicated that 26 per cent of students were unsure about the relevance of information and communication technology to clinical practice and only 50 per cent felt 'very confident' using a computer. CONCLUSION: While the importance of information and communication technology to student's learning and to their preparedness for practice has been established, it is evident that students' motivation is influenced by their level of confidence and competence, and their understanding of the relevance of information and communication technology to their future careers. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adolescent; Adult; Australia; Computer-Assisted Instruction/statistics & numerical data; Cross-Sectional Studies; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods/statistics & numerical data; Focus Groups; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Middle Aged; Nursing Education Research; Pilot Projects; Professional Competence/statistics & numerical data; Qualitative Research; Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data; Young Adult},
      isbn={1532-2793},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Morris, J., & Maynard, V.. (2009). Pilot Study to Test the Use of a Mobile Device in the Clinical Setting to Access Evidence-Based Practice Resources . Worldviews on evidence-based nursing / Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    ABSTRACT Aim: To test the feasibility and acceptability of the use of a mobile device to access evidence-based practice (EBP) resources in the clinical setting. Methods: A pretest/posttest design was used with a convenience sample of 2nd- and 3rd-year preregistration undergraduate health care students in the United Kingdom. Questionnaires were used to measure (1) feasibility and acceptability of the mobile device and (2) perceptions of the development of EBP knowledge and skills. The study took place during the students’ clinical practice and involved two meetings at the beginning and end of the placement period. A Web page was developed to support the process and provide links to key EBP resources. Results: Nineteen undergraduate physiotherapy and nursing students took part in the study. The main findings indicated a generally low level of utilisation of the mobile device in the clinical setting, primarily due to practical difficulties associated with accessing the Internet and the small size of the screen. Consequently, the majority of the students used personal computers (PCs) to access EBP resources. Through the process, students reported improvements in their knowledge and skills in relation to EBP and the appraisal of clinical guidelines. Conclusions: Students were able to complete the EBP activity using either the mobile device or PC and reported improvements in their knowledge and skills in relation to EBP and the appraisal of clinical guidelines. Findings suggest that for undergraduate health care students, rapid access to online evidence in the clinical environment is not necessarily essential for the integration of the EBP process into practice, or for the development of EBP knowledge and skills, provided there is easy access to such evidence at some point during the placement period. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:394,
      author={J. Morris and V. Maynard},
      year={2009},
      month={Oct 5},
      title={Pilot Study to Test the Use of a Mobile Device in the Clinical Setting to Access Evidence-Based Practice Resources },
      journal={Worldviews on evidence-based nursing / Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing},
      note={id: 4390; JID: 101185267; aheadofprint },
      abstract={ABSTRACT Aim: To test the feasibility and acceptability of the use of a mobile device to access evidence-based practice (EBP) resources in the clinical setting. Methods: A pretest/posttest design was used with a convenience sample of 2nd- and 3rd-year preregistration undergraduate health care students in the United Kingdom. Questionnaires were used to measure (1) feasibility and acceptability of the mobile device and (2) perceptions of the development of EBP knowledge and skills. The study took place during the students' clinical practice and involved two meetings at the beginning and end of the placement period. A Web page was developed to support the process and provide links to key EBP resources. Results: Nineteen undergraduate physiotherapy and nursing students took part in the study. The main findings indicated a generally low level of utilisation of the mobile device in the clinical setting, primarily due to practical difficulties associated with accessing the Internet and the small size of the screen. Consequently, the majority of the students used personal computers (PCs) to access EBP resources. Through the process, students reported improvements in their knowledge and skills in relation to EBP and the appraisal of clinical guidelines. Conclusions: Students were able to complete the EBP activity using either the mobile device or PC and reported improvements in their knowledge and skills in relation to EBP and the appraisal of clinical guidelines. Findings suggest that for undergraduate health care students, rapid access to online evidence in the clinical environment is not necessarily essential for the integration of the EBP process into practice, or for the development of EBP knowledge and skills, provided there is easy access to such evidence at some point during the placement period. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1741-6787},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Patterson, R., Carter-Templeton, H., & Russell, C.. (2009). Information literacy: using LISTEN project strategies to equip nurses worldwide . Studies in health technology and informatics, 146, 652-656.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The 21st century presents a major challenge in the form of information overload. In a profession where new knowledge is ever expanding, nurse educators must equip nurses to find the information they need to provide safe evidence-based care. Information literacy and information technology competencies have become a priority in nursing education, but inconsistencies in definitions, frameworks, content, and design, combined with ill-equipped faculty have hindered the development of a transferable model geared toward improving nurses’ information literacy. Challenges are compounded for nurses in developing nations, where access to information and training for information literacy are both problematic. This paper describes experiences from the LISTEN project, during the 1st year of a 3-year funded Nurse Education Practice and Retention grant. Designed to improve information literacy competencies of student and workforce nurses, using individualized learning via interactive web-based modules, LISTEN provides on its’ website a Did You Know video dramatizing the importance of information literacy to nurses, and offers resources for information literacy, information technology, and evidence-based nursing practice. Preliminary findings from beta testing reveal the module content is realistic, complete, and logical. The website and video have generated worldwide interest. Future possibilities include nationwide implementation and adaptation for the international arena. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:395,
      author={R. Patterson and H. Carter-Templeton and C. Russell},
      year={2009},
      title={Information literacy: using LISTEN project strategies to equip nurses worldwide },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={146},
      pages={652-656},
      note={id: 4408; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={The 21st century presents a major challenge in the form of information overload. In a profession where new knowledge is ever expanding, nurse educators must equip nurses to find the information they need to provide safe evidence-based care. Information literacy and information technology competencies have become a priority in nursing education, but inconsistencies in definitions, frameworks, content, and design, combined with ill-equipped faculty have hindered the development of a transferable model geared toward improving nurses' information literacy. Challenges are compounded for nurses in developing nations, where access to information and training for information literacy are both problematic. This paper describes experiences from the LISTEN project, during the 1st year of a 3-year funded Nurse Education Practice and Retention grant. Designed to improve information literacy competencies of student and workforce nurses, using individualized learning via interactive web-based modules, LISTEN provides on its' website a Did You Know video dramatizing the importance of information literacy to nurses, and offers resources for information literacy, information technology, and evidence-based nursing practice. Preliminary findings from beta testing reveal the module content is realistic, complete, and logical. The website and video have generated worldwide interest. Future possibilities include nationwide implementation and adaptation for the international arena. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Evidence-Based Practice; Information Storage and Retrieval; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Informatics/education; Professional Competence/standards; Teaching/organization & administration},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Schutt, M. A., & Hightower, B.. (2009). Enhancing RN-to-BSN students’ information literacy skills through the use of instructional technology . The Journal of nursing education, 48(2), 101-105.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing advocates that professional nurses have the information literacy skills essential for evidence-based practice. As nursing schools embrace evidence-based models to prepare students for nursing careers, faculty can collaborate with librarians to create engaging learning activities focused on the development of information literacy skills. Instructional technology tools such as course management systems, virtual classrooms, and online tutorials provide opportunities to reach students outside the traditional campus classroom. This article discusses the collaborative process between faculty and a library instruction coordinator and strategies used to create literacy learning activities focused on the development of basic database search skills for a Computers in Nursing course. The activities and an online tutorial were included in a library database module incorporated into WebCT. In addition, synchronous classroom meeting software was used by the librarian to reach students in the distance learning environment. Recommendations for module modifications and faculty, librarian, and student evaluations are offered. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:374,
      author={M. A. Schutt and B. Hightower},
      year={2009},
      month={Feb},
      title={Enhancing RN-to-BSN students' information literacy skills through the use of instructional technology },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={2},
      pages={101-105},
      note={id: 3706; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={The American Association of Colleges of Nursing advocates that professional nurses have the information literacy skills essential for evidence-based practice. As nursing schools embrace evidence-based models to prepare students for nursing careers, faculty can collaborate with librarians to create engaging learning activities focused on the development of information literacy skills. Instructional technology tools such as course management systems, virtual classrooms, and online tutorials provide opportunities to reach students outside the traditional campus classroom. This article discusses the collaborative process between faculty and a library instruction coordinator and strategies used to create literacy learning activities focused on the development of basic database search skills for a Computers in Nursing course. The activities and an online tutorial were included in a library database module incorporated into WebCT. In addition, synchronous classroom meeting software was used by the librarian to reach students in the distance learning environment. Recommendations for module modifications and faculty, librarian, and student evaluations are offered. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Alabama; Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods; Databases, Bibliographic; Education, Distance/methods; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval; Libraries, Digital; Nursing Informatics/education},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Skiba, D. J.. (2009). NURSING 2.0: should we as educators be crafting the next generation of nursing practice? . Nursing education perspectives, 30(1), 48-49.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    As educators preparing nurses to practice in our future health care system, we need to consider this comment from www.health2con.com/about.html: “There is huge room for debate about whether we’re talking about limited use of tools and technologies or a wider movement to change the whole healthcare system — or perhaps if it’s just all buzzwords with no substance” [italics added]. Over the next few issues, we will explore this phenomenon, talking about social networking, wiki/blogs, and other user (patient/consumer)-generated content related to health care. We will harness the collective wisdom of nursing to have you participate and decide if we need to craft a Nursing 2.0 definition or just consider this hype, a buzzword, or a passing fad. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:375,
      author={D. J. Skiba},
      year={2009},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={NURSING 2.0: should we as educators be crafting the next generation of nursing practice? },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={30},
      number={1},
      pages={48-49},
      note={id: 4098; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={As educators preparing nurses to practice in our future health care system, we need to consider this comment from www.health2con.com/about.html: “There is huge room for debate about whether we're talking about limited use of tools and technologies or a wider movement to change the whole healthcare system — or perhaps if it's just all buzzwords with no substance” [italics added]. Over the next few issues, we will explore this phenomenon, talking about social networking, wiki/blogs, and other user (patient/consumer)-generated content related to health care. We will harness the collective wisdom of nursing to have you participate and decide if we need to craft a Nursing 2.0 definition or just consider this hype, a buzzword, or a passing fad. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing/trends; Forecasting; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval/trends; Internet/trends; Nursing Informatics/education/trends; Software/trends; Terminology as Topic},
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Stacey, D., Higuchi, K. A., & et al Menard, P.. (2009). Integrating patient decision support in an undergraduate nursing curriculum: an implementation project . International journal of nursing education scholarship, 6(1), Article10.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A 4-year curriculum project (2004-2008) to integrate patient decision support into an existing curriculum was guided by the Knowledge-to-Action process model. The purpose of this project was to integrate a patient decision support theoretical framework and associated evidence-based resources throughout a four-year baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Interventions designed to adapt knowledge to local context and overcome barriers to knowledge use included faculty workshop to increase awareness, instructional resources designed for courses and core content, curricular blueprint of key threads to be included within courses, shared resources on the school of nursing internal website, and development of decision support resources in French. Curricular change and sustained use of knowledge was evidenced by repeated use of guest lecturers, assignments, and problem-based scenarios in courses, and students’ evaluations on the tutorial and assignments. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:376,
      author={D. Stacey and K. A. Higuchi and P. et al Menard},
      year={2009},
      title={Integrating patient decision support in an undergraduate nursing curriculum: an implementation project },
      journal={International journal of nursing education scholarship},
      volume={6},
      number={1},
      pages={Article10},
      note={id: 3703; JID: 101214977; 2009/03/30 [epublish]; ppublish },
      abstract={A 4-year curriculum project (2004-2008) to integrate patient decision support into an existing curriculum was guided by the Knowledge-to-Action process model. The purpose of this project was to integrate a patient decision support theoretical framework and associated evidence-based resources throughout a four-year baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Interventions designed to adapt knowledge to local context and overcome barriers to knowledge use included faculty workshop to increase awareness, instructional resources designed for courses and core content, curricular blueprint of key threads to be included within courses, shared resources on the school of nursing internal website, and development of decision support resources in French. Curricular change and sustained use of knowledge was evidenced by repeated use of guest lecturers, assignments, and problem-based scenarios in courses, and students' evaluations on the tutorial and assignments. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1548-923X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Stewart, S., Pope, D., & Duncan, D.. (2009). Using Second Life to enhance ACCEL an online accelerated nursing BSN program . Studies in health technology and informatics, 146, 636-640.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    To create a presence in Second Life (SL) the university college of nursing (CON) purchased four virtual islands in December 2007. The intent was to enhance distance education with immersion learning experiences for nursing students in SL. The Pollock Alumni House, classrooms, faculty offices, a library, a student welcome center, a public health office, a disaster scenario, a clinic, a hospital, and several patient avatars were created. Houses are being built for nursing students to experience different patient care scenarios during home visits. At least 20 nursing faculty and academic staff and three cohorts of accelerated nursing students (77) have avatars and have experienced class sessions. Faculty and students schedule office hours, engage in synchronous chats, and utilize the public health department and SL support groups for class exercises. Current exercises in the public health department include a module in which the student learns the role of the sanitarian. Students use a checklist to inspect restaurants and bars in SL. They are also able to view a video of an interview with a sanitarian. Another module introduces them to the WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) program. Future student activities related to public health include disaster planning, bioterrorism, evacuations, community assessment, windshield surveys, fund raising, and health education as well as other activities suggested by public health nurses and students. The possibilities are limitless because of the resources that exist in the virtual world, SL. The purchase of the first two islands, the initial buildings, and the creation of the public health department was funded by a research grant. Virtual environments offer many advantages for nursing education. Many nursing students say they learn best when they actually "do something," which indicates that they often prefer experiential learning. Rare but life-threatening patient situations can be experienced since the clinical environment can be realistically simulated. The student has the opportunity to practice repeatedly without causing harm to patients. During these simulations, active learning takes place, immediate feedback can be given for both correct and incorrect actions, errors can be corrected, and consistent experiences can be reproduced for all students. This technology is revolutionizing education and will meet the needs of the media savvy generations to come. It can also provide virtual experiences that nursing students may encounter in the clinical setting which are high risk and low volume, thus enhancing patient safety. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:396,
      author={S. Stewart and D. Pope and D. Duncan},
      year={2009},
      title={Using Second Life to enhance ACCEL an online accelerated nursing BSN program },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={146},
      pages={636-640},
      note={id: 4409; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={To create a presence in Second Life (SL) the university college of nursing (CON) purchased four virtual islands in December 2007. The intent was to enhance distance education with immersion learning experiences for nursing students in SL. The Pollock Alumni House, classrooms, faculty offices, a library, a student welcome center, a public health office, a disaster scenario, a clinic, a hospital, and several patient avatars were created. Houses are being built for nursing students to experience different patient care scenarios during home visits. At least 20 nursing faculty and academic staff and three cohorts of accelerated nursing students (77) have avatars and have experienced class sessions. Faculty and students schedule office hours, engage in synchronous chats, and utilize the public health department and SL support groups for class exercises. Current exercises in the public health department include a module in which the student learns the role of the sanitarian. Students use a checklist to inspect restaurants and bars in SL. They are also able to view a video of an interview with a sanitarian. Another module introduces them to the WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) program. Future student activities related to public health include disaster planning, bioterrorism, evacuations, community assessment, windshield surveys, fund raising, and health education as well as other activities suggested by public health nurses and students. The possibilities are limitless because of the resources that exist in the virtual world, SL. The purchase of the first two islands, the initial buildings, and the creation of the public health department was funded by a research grant. Virtual environments offer many advantages for nursing education. Many nursing students say they learn best when they actually "do something," which indicates that they often prefer experiential learning. Rare but life-threatening patient situations can be experienced since the clinical environment can be realistically simulated. The student has the opportunity to practice repeatedly without causing harm to patients. During these simulations, active learning takes place, immediate feedback can be given for both correct and incorrect actions, errors can be corrected, and consistent experiences can be reproduced for all students. This technology is revolutionizing education and will meet the needs of the media savvy generations to come. It can also provide virtual experiences that nursing students may encounter in the clinical setting which are high risk and low volume, thus enhancing patient safety. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer Simulation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Humans; Internet; Program Development; User-Computer Interface},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Trangenstein, P. A., Weiner, E. E., Gordon, J. S., & McArthur, D.. (2009). Nursing informatics for future nurse scholars: lessons learned with the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) . Studies in health technology and informatics, 146, 551-555.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The addition of the DNP created challenges that resulted in a re-evaluation of the leveling of informatics competencies across the nursing curriculum. The knowledge and skills needed by informatics nurse specialists was differentiated from those needed by three levels of nurses (entry level practitioner, advanced practice nurse, and nurse scholar (both PhD and DNP)). After a thorough review of the literature and examination of various competencies and definition for nursing informatics, a new model was proposed and guided the creation and implementation of a core course in informatics for DNP students. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:397,
      author={P. A. Trangenstein and E. E. Weiner and J. S. Gordon and D. McArthur},
      year={2009},
      title={Nursing informatics for future nurse scholars: lessons learned with the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={146},
      pages={551-555},
      note={id: 4411; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={The addition of the DNP created challenges that resulted in a re-evaluation of the leveling of informatics competencies across the nursing curriculum. The knowledge and skills needed by informatics nurse specialists was differentiated from those needed by three levels of nurses (entry level practitioner, advanced practice nurse, and nurse scholar (both PhD and DNP)). After a thorough review of the literature and examination of various competencies and definition for nursing informatics, a new model was proposed and guided the creation and implementation of a core course in informatics for DNP students. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval; Nursing Informatics/education; Nursing Process},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Wink, D. M.. (2009). Web-based collaboration tools . Nurse educator, 34(6), 235-237.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes Web-based collaboration tools and techniques to increase their effectiveness. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:398,
      author={D. M. Wink},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Web-based collaboration tools },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={34},
      number={6},
      pages={235-237},
      note={id: 4346; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes Web-based collaboration tools and techniques to increase their effectiveness. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9855},
      language={eng}
    }

2008

  • Abbott, P. A., & Coenen, A.. (2008). Globalization and advances in information and communication technologies: the impact on nursing and health . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 238-246.e2.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Globalization and information and communication technology (ICT) continue to change us and the world we live in. Nursing stands at an opportunity intersection where challenging global health issues, an international workforce shortage, and massive growth of ICT combine to create a very unique space for nursing leadership and nursing intervention. Learning from prior successes in the field can assist nurse leaders in planning and advancing strategies for global health using ICT. Attention to lessons learned will assist in combating the technological apartheid that is already present in many areas of the globe and will highlight opportunities for innovative applications in health. ICT has opened new channels of communication, creating the beginnings of a global information society that will facilitate access to isolated areas where health needs are extreme and where nursing can contribute significantly to the achievement of "Health for All." The purpose of this article is to discuss the relationships between globalization, health, and ICT, and to illuminate opportunities for nursing in this flattening and increasingly interconnected world.

    @article{RefWorks:1047,
      author={P. A. Abbott and A. Coenen},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Globalization and advances in information and communication technologies: the impact on nursing and health },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={238-246.e2},
      note={id: 2737; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2008/02/02 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Globalization and information and communication technology (ICT) continue to change us and the world we live in. Nursing stands at an opportunity intersection where challenging global health issues, an international workforce shortage, and massive growth of ICT combine to create a very unique space for nursing leadership and nursing intervention. Learning from prior successes in the field can assist nurse leaders in planning and advancing strategies for global health using ICT. Attention to lessons learned will assist in combating the technological apartheid that is already present in many areas of the globe and will highlight opportunities for innovative applications in health. ICT has opened new channels of communication, creating the beginnings of a global information society that will facilitate access to isolated areas where health needs are extreme and where nursing can contribute significantly to the achievement of "Health for All." The purpose of this article is to discuss the relationships between globalization, health, and ICT, and to illuminate opportunities for nursing in this flattening and increasingly interconnected world. },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Androwich, I. M., Kraft, M. R., & Haas, S.. (2008). AAN news & opinion. Information technology care competencies: from now to tomorrow . Nursing outlook, 56(4), 189-190.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Given the importance of understanding the potential benefits of optimizing HIT to improve health care, how can the leaders in the field insure that the nursing profession gains and maintains adequate competencies in this arena? Keys to understanding and implementing strategies to achieve competencies are suggested. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1048,
      author={I. M. Androwich and M. R. Kraft and S. Haas},
      year={2008},
      month={07},
      title={AAN news & opinion. Information technology care competencies: from now to tomorrow },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={4},
      pages={189-190},
      note={id: 2747; Accession Number: 2010008713. Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. No. of Refs: 13 ref. NLM UID: 0401075. },
      abstract={Given the importance of understanding the potential benefits of optimizing HIT to improve health care, how can the leaders in the field insure that the nursing profession gains and maintains adequate competencies in this arena? Keys to understanding and implementing strategies to achieve competencies are suggested. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010008713&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Bakken, S., Stone, P. W., & Larson, E. L.. (2008). A nursing informatics research agenda for 2008-18: contextual influences and key components . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 206-214.e3.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The context for nursing informatics research has changed significantly since the National Institute of Nursing Research-funded Nursing Informatics Research Agenda was published in 1993 and the Delphi study of nursing informatics research priorities reported a decade ago. The authors focus on 3 specific aspects of context–genomic health care, shifting research paradigms, and social (Web 2.0) technologies–that must be considered in formulating a nursing informatics research agenda. These influences are illustrated using the significant issue of healthcare associated infections (HAI). A nursing informatics research agenda for 2008-18 must expand users of interest to include interdisciplinary researchers; build upon the knowledge gained in nursing concept representation to address genomic and environmental data; guide the reengineering of nursing practice; harness new technologies to empower patients and their caregivers for collaborative knowledge development; develop user-configurable software approaches that support complex data visualization, analysis, and predictive modeling; facilitate the development of middle-range nursing informatics theories; and encourage innovative evaluation methodologies that attend to human-computer interface factors and organizational context.

    @article{RefWorks:1049,
      author={S. Bakken and P. W. Stone and E. L. Larson},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={A nursing informatics research agenda for 2008-18: contextual influences and key components },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={206-214.e3},
      note={id: 2741; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2008/01/24 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={The context for nursing informatics research has changed significantly since the National Institute of Nursing Research-funded Nursing Informatics Research Agenda was published in 1993 and the Delphi study of nursing informatics research priorities reported a decade ago. The authors focus on 3 specific aspects of context--genomic health care, shifting research paradigms, and social (Web 2.0) technologies--that must be considered in formulating a nursing informatics research agenda. These influences are illustrated using the significant issue of healthcare associated infections (HAI). A nursing informatics research agenda for 2008-18 must expand users of interest to include interdisciplinary researchers; build upon the knowledge gained in nursing concept representation to address genomic and environmental data; guide the reengineering of nursing practice; harness new technologies to empower patients and their caregivers for collaborative knowledge development; develop user-configurable software approaches that support complex data visualization, analysis, and predictive modeling; facilitate the development of middle-range nursing informatics theories; and encourage innovative evaluation methodologies that attend to human-computer interface factors and organizational context. },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bakken, S., Currie, L. M., Lee, N. J., Roberts, W. D., Collins, S. A., & Cimino, J. J.. (2008). Integrating evidence into clinical information systems for nursing decision support . International journal of medical informatics, 77(6), 413-420.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: To illustrate approaches for providing decision support for evidence-based nursing practice through integration of evidence into clinical information systems (CISs) with examples from our experience at Columbia University Medical Center. ORGANIZING CONSTRUCT: Examples are organized according to three types of decision support functions: information management, focusing attention, and patient-specific consultation. METHODS: Three decision support tools that are integrated into three types of CISs are discussed: (1) infobuttons that provide context-specific access to digital sources of evidence; (2) automated Fall-Injury Risk Assessment; and (3) personal digital assistant-based screening reminders, screening assessments, and tailored documentation templates for the identification and management of obesity, depression, and tobacco cessation. The informatics infrastructure for implementing these decision support tools is described from the perspective of components identified in the published literature. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to facilitate application of evidence into nursing practice are unlikely to be successful unless the approaches used are integrated into the clinical workflow. Our approaches use a variety of informatics methods to integrate evidence into CISs as a mechanism for providing decision support for evidence-based practice in a manner consistent with nursing workflow. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:365,
      author={S. Bakken and L. M. Currie and N. J. Lee and W. D. Roberts and S. A. Collins and J. J. Cimino},
      year={2008},
      month={Jun},
      title={Integrating evidence into clinical information systems for nursing decision support },
      journal={International journal of medical informatics},
      volume={77},
      number={6},
      pages={413-420},
      note={id: 2405; PUBM: Print-Electronic; GR: R01 LM007593-02/LM/United States NLM; GR: R01 NR008903-02/NR/United States NINR; GR: R01LM07593/LM/United States NLM; GR: R01NR008903/NR/United States NINR; GR: T32 NR007969/NR/United States NINR; GR: T32 NR007969-05/NR/United States NINR; DEP: 20070929; JID: 9711057; PMC2426954; NIHMS50589; 2007/03/30 [received]; 2007/08/05 [revised]; 2007/08/16 [accepted]; 2007/09/29 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={PURPOSE: To illustrate approaches for providing decision support for evidence-based nursing practice through integration of evidence into clinical information systems (CISs) with examples from our experience at Columbia University Medical Center. ORGANIZING CONSTRUCT: Examples are organized according to three types of decision support functions: information management, focusing attention, and patient-specific consultation. METHODS: Three decision support tools that are integrated into three types of CISs are discussed: (1) infobuttons that provide context-specific access to digital sources of evidence; (2) automated Fall-Injury Risk Assessment; and (3) personal digital assistant-based screening reminders, screening assessments, and tailored documentation templates for the identification and management of obesity, depression, and tobacco cessation. The informatics infrastructure for implementing these decision support tools is described from the perspective of components identified in the published literature. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to facilitate application of evidence into nursing practice are unlikely to be successful unless the approaches used are integrated into the clinical workflow. Our approaches use a variety of informatics methods to integrate evidence into CISs as a mechanism for providing decision support for evidence-based practice in a manner consistent with nursing workflow. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Decision Support Systems, Clinical/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods/organization & administration; Humans; Medical Informatics/methods/organization & administration; Nursing Care/methods/organization & administration; Systems Integration; United States},
      isbn={1386-5056},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bauldoff, G. S., Kirkpatrick, B., Sheets, D. J., Mays, B., & Curran, C. R.. (2008). Implementation of handheld devices . Nurse educator, 33(6), 244-248.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    With the rapid introduction of technology in nursing education, information regarding its implementation in undergraduate curricula is emerging. The authors describe the implementation process used to integrate personal digital assistants into an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Barriers such as potential for device loss, issues related to patient confidentiality, and infection control are addressed.

    @article{RefWorks:1050,
      author={G. S. Bauldoff and B. Kirkpatrick and D. J. Sheets and B. Mays and C. R. Curran},
      year={2008},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Implementation of handheld devices },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={33},
      number={6},
      pages={244-248},
      note={id: 2797; PUBM: Print; GR: D11HP03121/United States PHS; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={With the rapid introduction of technology in nursing education, information regarding its implementation in undergraduate curricula is emerging. The authors describe the implementation process used to integrate personal digital assistants into an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Barriers such as potential for device loss, issues related to patient confidentiality, and infection control are addressed. },
      isbn={1538-9855},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Billings, D. M.. (2008). Quality care, patient safety, and the focus on technology . The Journal of nursing education, 47(2), 51-52.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A call for the transformation of nursing education to provide nurses with the essential competencies required to improve patient care quality and safety has been issued by groups describing the future of nursing and the role of technology. Recommended competencies include the abilities to provide patient-centered care; collaborate as a member of an interdisciplinary team; understand how to access, interpret, and synthesize information; use evidence to guide nursing practice; and manage workflow and clinical decision making. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1051,
      author={D. M. Billings},
      year={2008},
      month={Feb},
      title={Quality care, patient safety, and the focus on technology },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={47},
      number={2},
      pages={51-52},
      note={id: 2784; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={A call for the transformation of nursing education to provide nurses with the essential competencies required to improve patient care quality and safety has been issued by groups describing the future of nursing and the role of technology. Recommended competencies include the abilities to provide patient-centered care; collaborate as a member of an interdisciplinary team; understand how to access, interpret, and synthesize information; use evidence to guide nursing practice; and manage workflow and clinical decision making. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing/organization & administration; Educational Technology/organization & administration; Humans; Nurse's Role; Nursing Education Research; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Professional Competence/standards; Quality of Health Care/organization & administration; Safety Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Boehm-Davis, D. A.. (2008). Discoveries and developments in human-computer interaction . Human factors, 50(3), 560-564.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: This paper describes contributions made to the science and practice of human-computer interaction (HCI), primarily through Human Factors and the society’s annual proceedings. Background: Research in HCI began to appear in publications associated with the Society around 1980 and has continued through the present. METHOD: A search of the literature appearing in either the journal or the proceedings was done to identify the specific contributions made by researchers in this area. RESULTS: More than 2,300 papers were identified, some comparing the actual or predicted performance of a new device, display format, or computer-based system with an existing or alternative system. Other work describes methods for evaluating systems performance. CONCLUSION: This work has had a tremendous impact, particularly the work of Fitts, Smith and Mosier, and Virzi. APPLICATION: Work on HCI has contributed to (a) current national and international guidelines, (b) the development of user interface management systems, (c) the provision of guidance as to where best to invest resources when evaluating computing systems, and (d) the prediction of human performance using those systems.

    @article{RefWorks:1052,
      author={D. A. Boehm-Davis},
      year={2008},
      month={Jun},
      title={Discoveries and developments in human-computer interaction },
      journal={Human factors},
      volume={50},
      number={3},
      pages={560-564},
      note={id: 2724; PUBM: Print; JID: 0374660; RF: 42; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: This paper describes contributions made to the science and practice of human-computer interaction (HCI), primarily through Human Factors and the society's annual proceedings. Background: Research in HCI began to appear in publications associated with the Society around 1980 and has continued through the present. METHOD: A search of the literature appearing in either the journal or the proceedings was done to identify the specific contributions made by researchers in this area. RESULTS: More than 2,300 papers were identified, some comparing the actual or predicted performance of a new device, display format, or computer-based system with an existing or alternative system. Other work describes methods for evaluating systems performance. CONCLUSION: This work has had a tremendous impact, particularly the work of Fitts, Smith and Mosier, and Virzi. APPLICATION: Work on HCI has contributed to (a) current national and international guidelines, (b) the development of user interface management systems, (c) the provision of guidance as to where best to invest resources when evaluating computing systems, and (d) the prediction of human performance using those systems. },
      keywords={Human Engineering; Humans; Research; User-Computer Interface},
      isbn={0018-7208},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Clancy, T. R., Effken, J. A., & Pesut, D.. (2008). Applications of complex systems theory in nursing education, research, and practice . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 248-256.e3.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The clinical and administrative processes in today’s healthcare environment are becoming increasingly complex. Multiple providers, new technology, competition, and the growing ubiquity of information all contribute to the notion of health care as a complex system. A complex system (CS) is characterized by a highly connected network of entities (e.g., physical objects, people or groups of people) from which higher order behavior emerges. Research in the transdisciplinary field of CS has focused on the use of computational modeling and simulation as a methodology for analyzing CS behavior. The creation of virtual worlds through computer simulation allows researchers to analyze multiple variables simultaneously and begin to understand behaviors that are common regardless of the discipline. The application of CS principles, mediated through computer simulation, informs nursing practice of the benefits and drawbacks of new procedures, protocols and practices before having to actually implement them. The inclusion of new computational tools and their applications in nursing education is also gaining attention. For example, education in CSs and applied computational applications has been endorsed by The Institute of Medicine, the American Organization of Nurse Executives and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing as essential training of nurse leaders. The purpose of this article is to review current research literature regarding CS science within the context of expert practice and implications for the education of nurse leadership roles. The article focuses on 3 broad areas: CS defined, literature review and exemplars from CS research and applications of CS theory in nursing leadership education. The article also highlights the key role nursing informaticists play in integrating emerging computational tools in the analysis of complex nursing systems.

    @article{RefWorks:1053,
      author={T. R. Clancy and J. A. Effken and D. Pesut},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Applications of complex systems theory in nursing education, research, and practice },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={248-256.e3},
      note={id: 2736; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2007/12/15 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={The clinical and administrative processes in today's healthcare environment are becoming increasingly complex. Multiple providers, new technology, competition, and the growing ubiquity of information all contribute to the notion of health care as a complex system. A complex system (CS) is characterized by a highly connected network of entities (e.g., physical objects, people or groups of people) from which higher order behavior emerges. Research in the transdisciplinary field of CS has focused on the use of computational modeling and simulation as a methodology for analyzing CS behavior. The creation of virtual worlds through computer simulation allows researchers to analyze multiple variables simultaneously and begin to understand behaviors that are common regardless of the discipline. The application of CS principles, mediated through computer simulation, informs nursing practice of the benefits and drawbacks of new procedures, protocols and practices before having to actually implement them. The inclusion of new computational tools and their applications in nursing education is also gaining attention. For example, education in CSs and applied computational applications has been endorsed by The Institute of Medicine, the American Organization of Nurse Executives and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing as essential training of nurse leaders. The purpose of this article is to review current research literature regarding CS science within the context of expert practice and implications for the education of nurse leadership roles. The article focuses on 3 broad areas: CS defined, literature review and exemplars from CS research and applications of CS theory in nursing leadership education. The article also highlights the key role nursing informaticists play in integrating emerging computational tools in the analysis of complex nursing systems. },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Curran, C. R.. (2008). Faculty development initiatives for the integration of informatics competencies and point-of-care technologies in undergraduate nursing education . The Nursing clinics of North America, 43(4), 523-33, v.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Faculty members have a critical role in deciding the content that is taught to their nursing students. They must grasp the importance of using technology to facilitate learning and knowledge of informatics concepts and skills. This article describes a successful faculty development program that was aimed at upgrading the technology and informatics skills of the faculty while at the same time developing and threading informatics skills across the baccalaureate nursing curriculum. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:368,
      author={C. R. Curran},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={Faculty development initiatives for the integration of informatics competencies and point-of-care technologies in undergraduate nursing education },
      journal={The Nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={43},
      number={4},
      pages={523-33, v},
      note={id: 4108; GR: D11HP03121/PHS HHS/United States; JID: 0042033; RF: 10; ppublish },
      abstract={Faculty members have a critical role in deciding the content that is taught to their nursing students. They must grasp the importance of using technology to facilitate learning and knowledge of informatics concepts and skills. This article describes a successful faculty development program that was aimed at upgrading the technology and informatics skills of the faculty while at the same time developing and threading informatics skills across the baccalaureate nursing curriculum. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer Literacy; Computer User Training; Computers, Handheld; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Humans; Internet; Medical Records Systems, Computerized; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Needs Assessment; Nurse's Role; Nursing Informatics/education/organization & administration; Ohio; Point-of-Care Systems/organization & administration; Professional Competence; Program Development; Staff Development/organization & administration},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Eley, R., Fallon, T., Soar, J., Buikstra, E., & Hegney, D.. (2008). The status of training and education in information and computer technology of Australian nurses: a national survey . Journal of clinical nursing, 17(20), 2758-2767.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Aims and objectives. A study was undertaken of the current knowledge and future training requirements of nurses in information and computer technology to inform policy to meet national goals for health. Background. The role of the modern clinical nurse is intertwined with information and computer technology and adoption of such technology forms an important component of national strategies in health. The majority of nurses are expected to use information and computer technology during their work; however, the full extent of their knowledge and experience is unclear. Design. Self-administered postal survey. Methods. A 78-item questionnaire was distributed to 10,000 Australian Nursing Federation members to identify the nurses’ use of information and computer technology. Eighteen items related to nurses’ training and education in information and computer technology. Results. Response rate was 44%. Computers were used by 86.3% of respondents as part of their work-related activities. Between 4-17% of nurses had received training in each of 11 generic computer skills and software applications during their preregistration/pre-enrolment and between 12-30% as continuing professional education. Nurses who had received training believed that it was adequate to meet the needs of their job and was given at an appropriate time. Almost half of the respondents indicated that they required more training to better meet the information and computer technology requirements of their jobs and a quarter believed that their level of computer literacy was restricting their career development. Nurses considered that the vast majority of employers did not encourage information and computer technology training and, for those for whom training was available, workload was the major barrier to uptake. Nurses favoured introduction of a national competency standard in information and computer technology. Conclusions. For the considerable benefits of information and computer technology to be incorporated fully into the health system, employers must pay more attention to the training and education of nurses who are the largest users of that technology. Relevance to clinical practice. Knowledge of the training and education needs of clinical nurses with respect to information and computer technology will provide a platform for the development of appropriate policies by government and by employers.

    @article{RefWorks:1054,
      author={R. Eley and T. Fallon and J. Soar and E. Buikstra and D. Hegney},
      year={2008},
      month={10/15},
      title={The status of training and education in information and computer technology of Australian nurses: a national survey },
      journal={Journal of clinical nursing},
      volume={17},
      number={20},
      pages={2758-2767},
      note={id: 2862; Accession Number: 2010084883. Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. No. of Refs: 28 ref. NLM UID: 9207302. },
      abstract={Aims and objectives. A study was undertaken of the current knowledge and future training requirements of nurses in information and computer technology to inform policy to meet national goals for health. Background. The role of the modern clinical nurse is intertwined with information and computer technology and adoption of such technology forms an important component of national strategies in health. The majority of nurses are expected to use information and computer technology during their work; however, the full extent of their knowledge and experience is unclear. Design. Self-administered postal survey. Methods. A 78-item questionnaire was distributed to 10,000 Australian Nursing Federation members to identify the nurses' use of information and computer technology. Eighteen items related to nurses' training and education in information and computer technology. Results. Response rate was 44%. Computers were used by 86.3% of respondents as part of their work-related activities. Between 4-17% of nurses had received training in each of 11 generic computer skills and software applications during their preregistration/pre-enrolment and between 12-30% as continuing professional education. Nurses who had received training believed that it was adequate to meet the needs of their job and was given at an appropriate time. Almost half of the respondents indicated that they required more training to better meet the information and computer technology requirements of their jobs and a quarter believed that their level of computer literacy was restricting their career development. Nurses considered that the vast majority of employers did not encourage information and computer technology training and, for those for whom training was available, workload was the major barrier to uptake. Nurses favoured introduction of a national competency standard in information and computer technology. Conclusions. For the considerable benefits of information and computer technology to be incorporated fully into the health system, employers must pay more attention to the training and education of nurses who are the largest users of that technology. Relevance to clinical practice. Knowledge of the training and education needs of clinical nurses with respect to information and computer technology will provide a platform for the development of appropriate policies by government and by employers. },
      isbn={0962-1067},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010084883&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Fetter, M. S.. (2008). Enhancing baccalaureate nursing information technology outcomes: faculty perspectives . International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 5(1), 1-15.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Baccalaureate nurses must be prepared to meet information technology expectations for practice and future professional development. Therefore, educational programs must evaluate curriculum and student outcomes and address areas for improvement. Faculty members were surveyed regarding barriers and strategies for improving information technology outcomes. Project findings have educational, clinical agency, legal, and policy implications.

    @article{RefWorks:1055,
      author={M. S. Fetter},
      year={2008},
      title={Enhancing baccalaureate nursing information technology outcomes: faculty perspectives },
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship},
      volume={5},
      number={1},
      pages={1-15},
      note={id: 2339; Accession Number: 2009894627. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080418. Revision Date: 20080711. Publication Type: journal article; research. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 64 ref. NLM UID: 101214977. },
      abstract={Baccalaureate nurses must be prepared to meet information technology expectations for practice and future professional development. Therefore, educational programs must evaluate curriculum and student outcomes and address areas for improvement. Faculty members were surveyed regarding barriers and strategies for improving information technology outcomes. Project findings have educational, clinical agency, legal, and policy implications. },
      keywords={Computer Literacy; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Faculty Attitudes; Faculty, Nursing; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Adult; Content Analysis; Mid Atlantic Region; Middle Age; Open-Ended Questionnaires; Schools, Nursing; Summated Rating Scaling},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009894627&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Forbes, M. O., & Hickey, M. T.. (2008). Podcasting: implementation and evaluation in an undergraduate nursing program . Nurse educator, 33(5), 224-227.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Podcasting, a recently introduced technology, is being used increasingly in higher education. The authors provide an overview of the potential uses and techniques for implementing podcasting in nursing education. Their experiences with implementing podcasting in their nursing courses and the results of a survey on student feedback related to podcasting are presented.

    @article{RefWorks:1056,
      author={M. O. Forbes and M. T. Hickey},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Podcasting: implementation and evaluation in an undergraduate nursing program },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={33},
      number={5},
      pages={224-227},
      note={id: 2799; PUBM: Print; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={Podcasting, a recently introduced technology, is being used increasingly in higher education. The authors provide an overview of the potential uses and techniques for implementing podcasting in nursing education. Their experiences with implementing podcasting in their nursing courses and the results of a survey on student feedback related to podcasting are presented. },
      isbn={1538-9855},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Gassert, C. A.. (2008). Technology and informatics competencies . The Nursing clinics of North America, 43(4), 507-21, v.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Health care information technology has the potential to achieve clinical transformation. Nursing students and faculty must be able to use these tools effectively to use data and knowledge in their practice. This article describes informatics competencies for four levels of nurses (beginning nurses, experienced nurses, informatics specialists, and informatics innovators). Recent activities to include informatics competencies in program outcomes are also described in relation to the clinical nurse leader, doctorate of nursing practice, and baccalaureate essentials documents. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:373,
      author={C. A. Gassert},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={Technology and informatics competencies },
      journal={The Nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={43},
      number={4},
      pages={507-21, v},
      note={id: 4109; JID: 0042033; RF: 35; ppublish },
      abstract={Health care information technology has the potential to achieve clinical transformation. Nursing students and faculty must be able to use these tools effectively to use data and knowledge in their practice. This article describes informatics competencies for four levels of nurses (beginning nurses, experienced nurses, informatics specialists, and informatics innovators). Recent activities to include informatics competencies in program outcomes are also described in relation to the clinical nurse leader, doctorate of nursing practice, and baccalaureate essentials documents. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computer Literacy; Computer User Training/methods; Diffusion of Innovation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Educational Technology/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Guidelines as Topic; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Nurse Administrators/organization & administration; Nurse Clinicians/organization & administration; Nurse's Role; Nursing Informatics/education/organization & administration; Organizational Innovation; Professional Competence/standards},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={eng}
    }

  • King, C. J., Moseley, S., Hindenlang, B., & Kuritz, P.. (2008). Limited use of the human patient simulator by nurse faculty: an intervention program designed to increase use . International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 5(1), 1-17.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Underutilization of human patient simulators (HPS) is not only a curricular issue but also a resource allocation problem. The study explored factors contributing to the limited HPS by faculty in a large ADN program. There is limited empirical evidence published to address this phenomenon. The researchers surveyed the faculty to identify their beliefs and challenges with implementing simulation based upon the constructs (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control and intent to use) of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). An educational intervention to address these specific challenges was implemented. The intervention had a positive influence on all TPB construct means (attitudes, p

    @article{RefWorks:1057,
      author={C. J. King and S. Moseley and B. Hindenlang and P. Kuritz},
      year={2008},
      title={Limited use of the human patient simulator by nurse faculty: an intervention program designed to increase use },
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship},
      volume={5},
      number={1},
      pages={1-17},
      note={id: 2340; Accession Number: 2009894634. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080418. Revision Date: 20080711. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. Instrumentation: Faculty Attitudes and Intent to Use Related to the Human Patient Simulator (HPS); Nurses' Attitudes Towards Computerization Questionnaire (Stronge and Brodt); Phase II: ADN Faculty HPS Pre-Educational Program; Phase II: Faculty Post-Educational Program Survey on the Human Patient Simulator. No. of Refs: 19 ref. NLM UID: 101214977. },
      abstract={Underutilization of human patient simulators (HPS) is not only a curricular issue but also a resource allocation problem. The study explored factors contributing to the limited HPS by faculty in a large ADN program. There is limited empirical evidence published to address this phenomenon. The researchers surveyed the faculty to identify their beliefs and challenges with implementing simulation based upon the constructs (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control and intent to use) of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). An educational intervention to address these specific challenges was implemented. The intervention had a positive influence on all TPB construct means (attitudes, p },
      keywords={Computer Assisted Instruction -- Utilization; Computer Simulation -- Utilization; Education, Nursing, Associate; Faculty Attitudes; Faculty, Nursing; Models, Anatomic; Adult; Aged; Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior; Attitude Measures; Coefficient Alpha; Content Validity; Convenience Sample; Curriculum; Descriptive Statistics; Education Research; Employment Status; Faculty Development; Inferential Statistics; Internal Consistency; Job Experience; Middle Age; Multiple Regression; P-Value; Paired T-Tests; Pretest-Posttest Design; Qualitative Studies; Quantitative Studies; Questionnaires; Scales; Schools, Nursing; Southeastern United States; Summated Rating Scaling; Surveys},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009894634&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Lang, N. M.. (2008). The promise of simultaneous transformation of practice and research with the use of clinical information systems . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 232-236.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The author builds a case that the design and use of intelligent information systems in real-time practice holds the promise of simultaneously transforming practice and research. Requirements include the identification of actionable knowledge that can be embedded in clinical decision support and electronic documentation systems, the creation of clinical data repositories, and a data warehouse from which analyses can be conducted across multiple settings. An innovative project, the Knowledge-Based Nursing Initiative, is briefly described as illustrative of these requirements.

    @article{RefWorks:1059,
      author={N. M. Lang},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={The promise of simultaneous transformation of practice and research with the use of clinical information systems },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={232-236},
      note={id: 2738; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2008/02/08 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={The author builds a case that the design and use of intelligent information systems in real-time practice holds the promise of simultaneously transforming practice and research. Requirements include the identification of actionable knowledge that can be embedded in clinical decision support and electronic documentation systems, the creation of clinical data repositories, and a data warehouse from which analyses can be conducted across multiple settings. An innovative project, the Knowledge-Based Nursing Initiative, is briefly described as illustrative of these requirements. },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McBride, A. B., & Detmer, D. E.. (2008). Using informatics to go beyond technologic thinking . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 195-196.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Introduces this issue of Nursing Outlook, which focuses on how nursing is making, or should make, use of information and communication technology (ICT) to improve the situation of patients and their caregivers. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1060,
      author={A. B. McBride and D. E. Detmer},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Using informatics to go beyond technologic thinking },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={195-196},
      note={id: 2743; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2008/03/27 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Introduces this issue of Nursing Outlook, which focuses on how nursing is making, or should make, use of information and communication technology (ICT) to improve the situation of patients and their caregivers. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McDaniel, A. M., Schutte, D. L., & Keller, L. O.. (2008). Consumer health informatics: from genomics to population health . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 216-223.e3.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Innovations in health information technology have ushered in a new era of health care. The use of emerging information and communication technology to improve or enable health and health care is the central focus of consumer health informatics (CHI). Traditionally, CHI interventions to promote health and well-being have targeted the individual or family. Advances in genomic health and the emergence of public health informatics call for broadening the scope of CHI. The authors discuss CHI from the point-of-view of the consumer (e.g., from individuals to policy makers) and the level of health data from the subcellular (e.g., genetic or protein structures) to population (e.g., geographically-referenced information).

    @article{RefWorks:1061,
      author={A. M. McDaniel and D. L. Schutte and L. O. Keller},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Consumer health informatics: from genomics to population health },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={216-223.e3},
      note={id: 2740; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2008/02/18 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Innovations in health information technology have ushered in a new era of health care. The use of emerging information and communication technology to improve or enable health and health care is the central focus of consumer health informatics (CHI). Traditionally, CHI interventions to promote health and well-being have targeted the individual or family. Advances in genomic health and the emergence of public health informatics call for broadening the scope of CHI. The authors discuss CHI from the point-of-view of the consumer (e.g., from individuals to policy makers) and the level of health data from the subcellular (e.g., genetic or protein structures) to population (e.g., geographically-referenced information). },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Nelson, R., & Staggers, N.. (2008). Implications of the American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Practice for nursing informatics for nurse educators: a discussion . Nursing outlook, 56(2), 93-94.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    There is no question that faculty need to be prepared to teach future nurses to practice in the modern world of informatics-infused health care delivery. But what knowledge and skills should faculty master if they are to achieve this goal? This discussion raises two of the many questions that must be addressed if the faculty are to be prepared for this responsibility. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1062,
      author={R. Nelson and N. Staggers},
      year={2008},
      month={03},
      title={Implications of the American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Practice for nursing informatics for nurse educators: a discussion },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={2},
      pages={93-94},
      note={id: 2746; Accession Number: 2009956982. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080718. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. No. of Refs: 7 ref. NLM UID: 0401075. },
      abstract={There is no question that faculty need to be prepared to teach future nurses to practice in the modern world of informatics-infused health care delivery. But what knowledge and skills should faculty master if they are to achieve this goal? This discussion raises two of the many questions that must be addressed if the faculty are to be prepared for this responsibility. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={American Nurses Association; Nursing Informatics -- Standards; Nursing Practice -- Standards; Scope of Nursing Practice; Computer Literacy; Faculty, Nursing},
      isbn={0029-6554},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009956982&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Ozbolt, J. G., & Saba, V. K.. (2008). A brief history of nursing informatics in the United States of America . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 199-205.e2.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    From the beginning of modern nursing, data from standardized patient records were seen as a potentially powerful resource for assessing and improving the quality of care. As nursing informatics began to evolve in the second half of the 20th century, the lack of standards for language and data limited the functionality and usefulness of early applications. In response, nurses developed standardized languages, but until the turn of the century, neither they nor anyone else understood the attributes required to achieve computability and semantic interoperability. Collaboration across disciplines and national boundaries has led to the development of standards that meet these requirements, opening the way for powerful information tools. Many challenges remain, however. Realizing the potential of nurses to transform and improve health care and outcomes through informatics will require fundamental changes in individuals, organizations, and systems. Nurses are developing and applying informatics methods and tools to discover knowledge and improve health from the molecular to the global level and are seeking the collective wisdom of interdisciplinary and interorganizational collaboration to effect the necessary changes. NOTE: Although this article focuses on nursing informatics in the United States, nurses around the world have made substantial contributions to the field. This article alludes to a few of those advances, but a comprehensive description is beyond the scope of the present work.

    @article{RefWorks:1063,
      author={J. G. Ozbolt and V. K. Saba},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={A brief history of nursing informatics in the United States of America },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={199-205.e2},
      note={id: 2742; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2008/02/04 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={From the beginning of modern nursing, data from standardized patient records were seen as a potentially powerful resource for assessing and improving the quality of care. As nursing informatics began to evolve in the second half of the 20th century, the lack of standards for language and data limited the functionality and usefulness of early applications. In response, nurses developed standardized languages, but until the turn of the century, neither they nor anyone else understood the attributes required to achieve computability and semantic interoperability. Collaboration across disciplines and national boundaries has led to the development of standards that meet these requirements, opening the way for powerful information tools. Many challenges remain, however. Realizing the potential of nurses to transform and improve health care and outcomes through informatics will require fundamental changes in individuals, organizations, and systems. Nurses are developing and applying informatics methods and tools to discover knowledge and improve health from the molecular to the global level and are seeking the collective wisdom of interdisciplinary and interorganizational collaboration to effect the necessary changes. NOTE: Although this article focuses on nursing informatics in the United States, nurses around the world have made substantial contributions to the field. This article alludes to a few of those advances, but a comprehensive description is beyond the scope of the present work. },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rush, K. L.. (2008). Connecting practice to evidence using laptop computers in the classroom . CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 26(4), 190-198.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Evidenced-based practice is no longer a "frill" but a necessity, demanded by an evolving healthcare system and the needs of practice, professional nursing bodies, and American consumers who want safe, quality care. Although its importance has been touted by the profession, incorporating evidence into practice is not a skill for which nurses at point of care are ready. Preparation for evidence-based practice must begin in basic educational programs. Yet, the process of using evidence to guide practice is complex especially for undergraduate students who are only beginning to ask questions let alone answer them. Nursing schools have responded to the professional call to evidence-based practice with the use of a variety of teaching approaches. This article presents a unique approach, not previously described, involving the use of laptops in an undergraduate nursing research course to equip students for evidence-based practice, giving students hands-on experience with the process and introducing students to online resources. Student feedback and educator reflections highlight the value of the technology in expediting student learning and comfort with evidence-based practice.

    @article{RefWorks:1064,
      author={K. L. Rush},
      year={2008},
      month={07},
      title={Connecting practice to evidence using laptop computers in the classroom },
      journal={CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={4},
      pages={190-198},
      note={id: 2857; Accession Number: 2009968025. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080822. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; exam questions. Journal Subset: Computer/Information Science; Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Informatics; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 27 ref. NLM UID: 101141667. },
      abstract={Evidenced-based practice is no longer a "frill" but a necessity, demanded by an evolving healthcare system and the needs of practice, professional nursing bodies, and American consumers who want safe, quality care. Although its importance has been touted by the profession, incorporating evidence into practice is not a skill for which nurses at point of care are ready. Preparation for evidence-based practice must begin in basic educational programs. Yet, the process of using evidence to guide practice is complex especially for undergraduate students who are only beginning to ask questions let alone answer them. Nursing schools have responded to the professional call to evidence-based practice with the use of a variety of teaching approaches. This article presents a unique approach, not previously described, involving the use of laptops in an undergraduate nursing research course to equip students for evidence-based practice, giving students hands-on experience with the process and introducing students to online resources. Student feedback and educator reflections highlight the value of the technology in expediting student learning and comfort with evidence-based practice. },
      keywords={Computer Assisted Instruction; Computer Literacy; Computerized Literature Searching, End User -- Education; Computers, Portable -- Utilization; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Information Literacy; Library User Education; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based -- Education; CINAHL Database -- Utilization; Education, Continuing (Credit); Faculty, Nursing; Medline -- Education; Program Evaluation; Program Implementation; Student Satisfaction -- Evaluation},
      isbn={1538-2931},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009968025&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Schulte, S. J.. (2008). Integrating information literacy into an online undergraduate nursing informatics course: the librarian’s role in the design and teaching of the course . Medical reference services quarterly, 27(2), 158-172.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Integration of information literacy as a core component into a new online undergraduate nursing course proved to be a learning experience in course design and teaching. This article describes the framework for the course design that combined cultural competency, informatics, and information literacy and was grounded in informatics competencies for nurses at the beginning level, an informatics textbook, and the Neurnan Systems Model. The librarian’s role in this process and the information literacy unit’s content and written assignment are detailed, and challenges in the collaboration are also addressed.

    @article{RefWorks:1065,
      author={S. J. Schulte},
      year={2008},
      month={06},
      title={Integrating information literacy into an online undergraduate nursing informatics course: the librarian's role in the design and teaching of the course },
      journal={Medical reference services quarterly},
      volume={27},
      number={2},
      pages={158-172},
      note={id: 2860; Accession Number: 2009976662. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080926. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Computer/Information Science; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 20 ref. NLM UID: 8219208. },
      abstract={Integration of information literacy as a core component into a new online undergraduate nursing course proved to be a learning experience in course design and teaching. This article describes the framework for the course design that combined cultural competency, informatics, and information literacy and was grounded in informatics competencies for nurses at the beginning level, an informatics textbook, and the Neurnan Systems Model. The librarian's role in this process and the information literacy unit's content and written assignment are detailed, and challenges in the collaboration are also addressed. },
      keywords={Information Literacy; Librarians; Nursing Informatics -- Education -- Indiana; Students, Nursing -- Indiana; CINAHL Database; Computerized Literature Searching -- Methods; Course Content; Cultural Competence; Curriculum; Education, Non-Traditional; Faculty; Indiana; Medline; Motion Pictures; Neuman Systems Model; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={0276-3869},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009976662&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Skiba, D. J., Connors, H. R., & Jeffries, P. R.. (2008). Information technologies and the transformation of nursing education . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 225-230.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Higher education is facing new challenges with the emergence of the Internet and other information and communication technologies. The call for the transformation of higher education is imperative. This article describes the transformation of higher education and its impact on nursing education. Nursing education, considered by many a pioneer in the use of educational technologies, still faces 3 major challenges. The first challenge is incorporation of the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation of 5 core competencies for all health professionals. The second challenge focuses on the preparation of nurses to practice in informatics-intensive healthcare environments. The last challenge is the use of emerging technologies, such as Web 2.0 tools, that will help to bridge the gap between the next generation and faculty in nursing schools. Nurse educators need to understand and use the power of technologies to prepare the next generation of nurses.

    @article{RefWorks:1066,
      author={D. J. Skiba and H. R. Connors and P. R. Jeffries},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Information technologies and the transformation of nursing education },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={225-230},
      note={id: 2739; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2008/02/24 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Higher education is facing new challenges with the emergence of the Internet and other information and communication technologies. The call for the transformation of higher education is imperative. This article describes the transformation of higher education and its impact on nursing education. Nursing education, considered by many a pioneer in the use of educational technologies, still faces 3 major challenges. The first challenge is incorporation of the Institute of Medicine's recommendation of 5 core competencies for all health professionals. The second challenge focuses on the preparation of nurses to practice in informatics-intensive healthcare environments. The last challenge is the use of emerging technologies, such as Web 2.0 tools, that will help to bridge the gap between the next generation and faculty in nursing schools. Nurse educators need to understand and use the power of technologies to prepare the next generation of nurses. },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Sockolow, P., & Bowles, K. H.. (2008). Including information technology project management in the nursing informatics curriculum . CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 26(1), 14-22.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Project management is a critical skill for nurse informaticists who are in prominent roles developing and implementing clinical information systems. It should be included in the nursing informatics curriculum, as evidenced by its inclusion in informatics competencies and surveys of important skills for informaticists. The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing includes project management in two of the four courses in the master’s level informatics minor. Course content includes the phases of the project management process; the iterative unified process methodology; and related systems analysis and project management skills. During the introductory course, students learn about the project plan, requirements development, project feasibility, and executive summary documents. In the capstone course, students apply the system development life cycle and project management skills during precepted informatics projects. During this in situ experience, students learn, the preceptors benefit, and the institution better prepares its students for the real world.

    @article{RefWorks:1067,
      author={P. Sockolow and K. H. Bowles},
      year={2008},
      month={2008 Jan-Feb},
      title={Including information technology project management in the nursing informatics curriculum },
      journal={CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={1},
      pages={14-22},
      note={id: 2859; Accession Number: 2009762844. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080229. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; exam questions; forms; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Computer/Information Science; Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Informatics; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 12 ref. NLM UID: 101141667. },
      abstract={Project management is a critical skill for nurse informaticists who are in prominent roles developing and implementing clinical information systems. It should be included in the nursing informatics curriculum, as evidenced by its inclusion in informatics competencies and surveys of important skills for informaticists. The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing includes project management in two of the four courses in the master's level informatics minor. Course content includes the phases of the project management process; the iterative unified process methodology; and related systems analysis and project management skills. During the introductory course, students learn about the project plan, requirements development, project feasibility, and executive summary documents. In the capstone course, students apply the system development life cycle and project management skills during precepted informatics projects. During this in situ experience, students learn, the preceptors benefit, and the institution better prepares its students for the real world. },
      keywords={Course Content; Education, Nursing, Masters; Information Technology -- Education; Nursing Informatics -- Education; Nursing Management -- Education; Program Implementation -- Education; Change Management -- Education; Curriculum; Education, Continuing (Credit); Pennsylvania; Program Development -- Education; Schools, Nursing -- Pennsylvania},
      isbn={1538-2931},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009762844&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Staggers, N., McCasky, T., Brazelton, N., & Kennedy, R.. (2008). Nanotechnology: the coming revolution and its implications for consumers, clinicians, and informatics . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 268-274.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nanotechnology promises to revolutionize manufactured materials as we know them, creating a vast array of new products, drug delivery devices, and monitoring mechanisms. The promise of these products and devices is tremendous. Likewise, the implications of this technology are immense, ranging across consumers, clinicians, and the practice of informatics. Specific implications include opportunities for education of health care consumers and clinicians about the safe and ethical use of nanomaterials, a requirement for new policies and regulations, potential radical role changes for both consumers and clinicians, and new demands in the practice of informatics. The most pressing concern for health applications is the safe use of nanomaterials. Given the promise of nanomaterials and the implications across at least these 3 areas, nurses need to understand the capabilities and limitations of nanomaterials, proceed with reasoned caution, and plan now for its wide-ranging impacts.

    @article{RefWorks:1068,
      author={N. Staggers and T. McCasky and N. Brazelton and R. Kennedy},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Nanotechnology: the coming revolution and its implications for consumers, clinicians, and informatics },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={268-274},
      note={id: 2734; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2008/02/12 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Nanotechnology promises to revolutionize manufactured materials as we know them, creating a vast array of new products, drug delivery devices, and monitoring mechanisms. The promise of these products and devices is tremendous. Likewise, the implications of this technology are immense, ranging across consumers, clinicians, and the practice of informatics. Specific implications include opportunities for education of health care consumers and clinicians about the safe and ethical use of nanomaterials, a requirement for new policies and regulations, potential radical role changes for both consumers and clinicians, and new demands in the practice of informatics. The most pressing concern for health applications is the safe use of nanomaterials. Given the promise of nanomaterials and the implications across at least these 3 areas, nurses need to understand the capabilities and limitations of nanomaterials, proceed with reasoned caution, and plan now for its wide-ranging impacts. },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Starkweather, A. R., & Kardong-Edgren, S.. (2008). Diffusion of innovation: embedding simulation into nursing curricula . International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 5(1), 1-11.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Numerous articles have documented the benefits of using simulation as a teaching method for undergraduate nursing students. Simulation can enhance learning and provides a stimulating environment for technologically proficient students. Yet, there remain a large number of nursing programs and faculty members that are resistant toward implementing simulation as a learning tool. This article provides details on the efforts to embed simulation in an undergraduate program that started with a few interested faculty at a large, multi-site nursing program. The Diffusion of Innovation theory was used to guide the expansion of simulation to other faculty groups. The techniques used to embed simulation into the undergraduate curriculum were directed by past research. This process led to a successful integration of simulation which could provide some innovative suggestions for other programs facing similar barriers.

    @article{RefWorks:1069,
      author={A. R. Starkweather and S. Kardong-Edgren},
      year={2008},
      title={Diffusion of innovation: embedding simulation into nursing curricula },
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship},
      volume={5},
      number={1},
      pages={1-11},
      note={id: 2338; Accession Number: 2009894635. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080418. Revision Date: 20080711. Publication Type: journal article; research. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 46 ref. NLM UID: 101214977. },
      abstract={Numerous articles have documented the benefits of using simulation as a teaching method for undergraduate nursing students. Simulation can enhance learning and provides a stimulating environment for technologically proficient students. Yet, there remain a large number of nursing programs and faculty members that are resistant toward implementing simulation as a learning tool. This article provides details on the efforts to embed simulation in an undergraduate program that started with a few interested faculty at a large, multi-site nursing program. The Diffusion of Innovation theory was used to guide the expansion of simulation to other faculty groups. The techniques used to embed simulation into the undergraduate curriculum were directed by past research. This process led to a successful integration of simulation which could provide some innovative suggestions for other programs facing similar barriers. },
      keywords={Curriculum; Diffusion of Innovation -- Methods; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Models, Anatomic -- Utilization; Patient Simulation -- Utilization; Course Evaluation; Curriculum Development; Nurse-Patient Relations; Outcomes of Education; Random Assignment; Schools, Nursing; Student Satisfaction; Students, Nursing; Teaching Methods; Washington},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009894635&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Thompson, B. W., & Skiba, D. J.. (2008). Informatics in the nursing curriculum: a national survey of nursing informatics requirements in nursing curricula . Nursing education perspectives, 29(5), 312-317.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In 2005, the NLN Educational Technology and Information Management Advisory Council established the Task Group on Informatics Competencies to review the informatics literature and survey faculty and administrators on the extent of preparation in nursing informatics competencies in schools of nursing. The purpose of the survey was to measure the informatics-related requirements of nursing curricula and ascertain how those requirements are integrated into curricula. In 2008, the NLN Board of Governors issued the position statement Preparing the Next Generation of Nurses to Practice in a Technology-Rich Environment: An Informatics Agenda. The need for this agenda was partially informed by the results of the NLN-sponsored nationwide survey of faculty and administrators on the nursing informatics requirements in their courses and curricula. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1070,
      author={B. W. Thompson and D. J. Skiba},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Informatics in the nursing curriculum: a national survey of nursing informatics requirements in nursing curricula },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={29},
      number={5},
      pages={312-317},
      note={id: 2798; PUBM: Print; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={In 2005, the NLN Educational Technology and Information Management Advisory Council established the Task Group on Informatics Competencies to review the informatics literature and survey faculty and administrators on the extent of preparation in nursing informatics competencies in schools of nursing. The purpose of the survey was to measure the informatics-related requirements of nursing curricula and ascertain how those requirements are integrated into curricula. In 2008, the NLN Board of Governors issued the position statement Preparing the Next Generation of Nurses to Practice in a Technology-Rich Environment: An Informatics Agenda. The need for this agenda was partially informed by the results of the NLN-sponsored nationwide survey of faculty and administrators on the nursing informatics requirements in their courses and curricula. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Turisco, F., & Rhoads, J.. (2008). Equipped for Efficiency: Improving Nursing Care Through Technology California Healthcare Foundation.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This report, a successor to the 2002 CHCF publication The Nursing Shortage: Can Technology Help?, examines hospitals’ experiences with eight types of devices and applications: wireless communications, real-time location systems, delivery robots, workflow management systems, wireless patient monitoring, electronic medication administration with bar coding, electronic clinical documentation with clinical decision support, and interactive patient systems. Two other technologies — alarm/event messaging and biomedical device integration — are also discussed. (Source: Publisher)

    @techreport{RefWorks:1071,
      author={F. Turisco and J. Rhoads},
      year={2008},
      title={Equipped for Efficiency: Improving Nursing Care Through Technology },
      institution={California Healthcare Foundation},
      note={id: 2913},
      abstract={This report, a successor to the 2002 CHCF publication The Nursing Shortage: Can Technology Help?, examines hospitals’ experiences with eight types of devices and applications: wireless communications, real-time location systems, delivery robots, workflow management systems, wireless patient monitoring, electronic medication administration with bar coding, electronic clinical documentation with clinical decision support, and interactive patient systems. Two other technologies — alarm/event messaging and biomedical device integration — are also discussed. (Source: Publisher) },
      url={http://www.chcf.org/documents/hospitals/EquippedForEfficiency.pdf}
    }

  • Vestal, V. R., Krautwurst, N., & Hack, R. R.. (2008). CIN Plus. A model for incorporating technology into student nurse clinical . CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 26(1), 2-4.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Prohibiting student nurses from utilizing healthcare technology and documenting in the EMR prevents them from being fully prepared for the roles and responsibilities of the practicing nurse. In a 872-bed academic medical center in the southeast United States, the Department of Nursing Clinical Systems (NCS) partnered with schools of nursing to provide nursing students with clinical experiences that incorporate information technology. Theoretical learning alone cannot shape skilled, capable, computer-fluent nurses who are armed to meet the changing needs of today’s diverse patient population. The medical center continues to look for opportunities to incorporate information technology in student nurses clinical experience. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1072,
      author={V. R. Vestal and N. Krautwurst and R. R. Hack},
      year={2008},
      month={2008 Jan-Feb},
      title={CIN Plus. A model for incorporating technology into student nurse clinical },
      journal={CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing},
      volume={26},
      number={1},
      pages={2-4},
      note={id: 2856; Accession Number: 2009798666. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080229. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Computer/Information Science; Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Informatics; Nursing Education. NLM UID: 101141667. },
      abstract={Prohibiting student nurses from utilizing healthcare technology and documenting in the EMR prevents them from being fully prepared for the roles and responsibilities of the practicing nurse. In a 872-bed academic medical center in the southeast United States, the Department of Nursing Clinical Systems (NCS) partnered with schools of nursing to provide nursing students with clinical experiences that incorporate information technology. Theoretical learning alone cannot shape skilled, capable, computer-fluent nurses who are armed to meet the changing needs of today's diverse patient population. The medical center continues to look for opportunities to incorporate information technology in student nurses clinical experience. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Computerized Patient Record -- Education; Education, Clinical; Education, Nursing; Hospital Information Systems -- Education; Information Technology -- Education; Models, Educational; Nursing Informatics -- Education; Teaching Methods, Clinical; Academic Medical Centers -- Southeastern United States; Southeastern United States},
      isbn={1538-2931},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009798666&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Westra, B. L., Delaney, C. W., Konicek, D., & Keenan, G.. (2008). Nursing standards to support the electronic health record . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 258-266.e1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Quality and low cost health care that is free of medical mistakes requires continuity of person-centric healthcare information across the life span and healthcare settings. Interoperable clinical information systems that rely on the use of multiple standards to support health information exchange and, in particular, nurse sensitive data, information, and knowledge are key components to support high quality, safe care. A 2004 Executive Order called for a National Health Information Network and the widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by 2014. While there are numerous standards influencing the exchange of health data, the primary focus of this article is to synthesize the state-of-the-art in nursing standardized terminologies to support the development, exchange, and communication of nursing data. Research exemplars are described for information systems to support nursing practice using standardized terminologies and secondary use of standardized nursing data from EHRs for knowledge development. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:377,
      author={B. L. Westra and C. W. Delaney and D. Konicek and G. Keenan},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Nursing standards to support the electronic health record },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={258-266.e1},
      note={id: 4103; JID: 0401075; CIN: Nurs Outlook. 2008 Sep-Oct;56(5):267. PMID: 18922282; RF: 55; 2008/02/25 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Quality and low cost health care that is free of medical mistakes requires continuity of person-centric healthcare information across the life span and healthcare settings. Interoperable clinical information systems that rely on the use of multiple standards to support health information exchange and, in particular, nurse sensitive data, information, and knowledge are key components to support high quality, safe care. A 2004 Executive Order called for a National Health Information Network and the widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by 2014. While there are numerous standards influencing the exchange of health data, the primary focus of this article is to synthesize the state-of-the-art in nursing standardized terminologies to support the development, exchange, and communication of nursing data. Research exemplars are described for information systems to support nursing practice using standardized terminologies and secondary use of standardized nursing data from EHRs for knowledge development. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Data Collection; Decision Support Systems, Clinical; Documentation; Guidelines as Topic; Humans; Medical Record Linkage/methods; Medical Records Systems, Computerized/organization & administration; Nursing Care; Nursing Diagnosis; Nursing Informatics/organization & administration; Nursing Records/standards; Nursing Research/organization & administration; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); United States; United States Dept. of Health and Human Services; User-Computer Interface; Vocabulary, Controlled},
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

2007

  • Laframboise, L.. (2007). Nursing immigrants teaching nursing natives: crossing the digital divide . CanadaRN, 4(39), 7-13.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    No abstract available.

    @article{RefWorks:1058,
      author={L. Laframboise},
      year={2007},
      month={11},
      title={Nursing immigrants teaching nursing natives: crossing the digital divide },
      journal={CanadaRN},
      volume={4},
      number={39},
      pages={7-13},
      note={id: 2861; Accession Number: 2009767162. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080314. Publication Type: journal article; pictorial; review. Journal Subset: Canada; Nursing; Online. Special Interest: Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 34 ref. },
      abstract={No abstract available. },
      keywords={Education, Nursing -- Trends; Information Technology; Nursing Informatics; Age Factors; Faculty, Nursing -- Education; Information Technology -- Education; Intergenerational Relations; Nursing Informatics -- Education},
      isbn={1718-2948},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009767162&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Foundation, R. W. J.. Addressing the Quality and Safety Gap—Part II : How Nurses Are Shaping, and Being Shaped by, Health Information Technologies . .
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This issue of Charting Nursing’s Future, the second in a miniseries on quality and safety, examines the role of nurses in designing, implementing, and educating clinicians to use HITs.

    @misc{RefWorks:410,
      author={Robert Wood Johnson Foundation},
      title={Addressing the Quality and Safety Gap—Part II : How Nurses Are Shaping, and Being Shaped by, Health Information Technologies },
      journal={Charting Nursing's Future},
      volume={July 2009, Issue 11},
      number={07/23},
      pages={1-8},
      note={id: 4781},
      abstract={This issue of Charting Nursing’s Future, the second in a miniseries on quality and safety, examines the role of nurses in designing, implementing, and educating clinicians to use HITs. },
      url={http://www.rwjf.org/files/research/20090709chartingissue11.pdf}
    }