Patient-Centered Care Bibliography

2014

  • M., A. G., C., M. S., S., J. R., & I., A. G.. (2014). Assessment of nursing students and nurses’ orientation towards patient-centeredness. Nurse education today, 34(1), 35-39.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Summary: Background: Being patient centered is a core value for nursing. Patient centered-care has been related to patient and health provider satisfaction, better health outcomes, higher quality of care and more efficient health care delivery. Objectives: The purpose was to assess the orientation adopted by nurses and students in patient care, using The Patient–Practitioner Orientation Scale, as well as to compare the results between resident nurses and students from different academic years. Settings: Public School of Nursing and a Central Hospital, in Lisbon (Portugal). Participants: Students in the first, second and fourth year of nursing school and nurses participated in the study. Methods: For data collection, we used The Patient–Practitioner Orientation Scale (European Portuguese version), an instrument designed to measure individual preferences toward the dimension of caring a sharing in health professional–patient relationship. Students and nurses also filled out two additional questions about their perception of competence in technical and communication skills. Additional demographic information was also collected, including gender, age, academic year and length of professional experience. Results: A total of 525 students (84.7% female) and 108 nurses (77.8% female) participated in this study. In general, caring sub-scores, measuring the preference of about attending to patient emotional aspects, were higher than sharing sub-scores, measuring beliefs about giving information and perceiving patient as a member of the health team. Students were significantly more patient-centered throughout their nursing education (p<0.001). Comparing to students in the second and fourth academic years (p<0.001) nurses’ scores were significantly lower both in total PPOS and in caring and sharing subscales. Conclusions: These results reinforce the idea that patient centeredness may be developed in academic context. The scores obtained highlight the importance of studies that aim to identify factors that may explain the decrease of patient centeredness in professional practice.

    @article{RefWorks:146,
      author={Ana Grilo  M. and Margarida Santos  C. and Joana Rita  S. and Ana Gomes  I.},
      year={2014},
      title={Assessment of nursing students and nurses' orientation towards patient-centeredness},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={34},
      number={1},
      pages={35-39},
      note={ID: 2012387137},
      abstract={Summary: Background: Being patient centered is a core value for nursing. Patient centered-care has been related to patient and health provider satisfaction, better health outcomes, higher quality of care and more efficient health care delivery. Objectives: The purpose was to assess the orientation adopted by nurses and students in patient care, using The Patient–Practitioner Orientation Scale, as well as to compare the results between resident nurses and students from different academic years. Settings: Public School of Nursing and a Central Hospital, in Lisbon (Portugal). Participants: Students in the first, second and fourth year of nursing school and nurses participated in the study. Methods: For data collection, we used The Patient–Practitioner Orientation Scale (European Portuguese version), an instrument designed to measure individual preferences toward the dimension of caring a sharing in health professional–patient relationship. Students and nurses also filled out two additional questions about their perception of competence in technical and communication skills. Additional demographic information was also collected, including gender, age, academic year and length of professional experience. Results: A total of 525 students (84.7% female) and 108 nurses (77.8% female) participated in this study. In general, caring sub-scores, measuring the preference of about attending to patient emotional aspects, were higher than sharing sub-scores, measuring beliefs about giving information and perceiving patient as a member of the health team. Students were significantly more patient-centered throughout their nursing education (p<0.001). Comparing to students in the second and fourth academic years (p<0.001) nurses' scores were significantly lower both in total PPOS and in caring and sharing subscales. Conclusions: These results reinforce the idea that patient centeredness may be developed in academic context. The scores obtained highlight the importance of studies that aim to identify factors that may explain the decrease of patient centeredness in professional practice.},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012387137&site=ehost-live}
    }

2013

  • E., L. H.. (2013). Patient-Centered Care: A Nursing Priority. Journal of continuing education in nursing, 44(1), 10-11.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Patient-centered care (PCC) is increasingly being accepted as fundamental to quality and patient safety. Nurse educators must embrace PCC as a competency critical to positive patient outcomes and champion its inclusion in nursing curricula nationally. This column offers some strategies for teaching PCC in pre-licen-sure nursing programs. J Contin Educ Nurs 2013;44(1 ):10-11.

    @article{RefWorks:152,
      author={Lynette Hinds  E.},
      year={2013},
      title={Patient-Centered Care: A Nursing Priority},
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={44},
      number={1},
      pages={10-11},
      note={ID: 2011883009},
      abstract={Patient-centered care (PCC) is increasingly being accepted as fundamental to quality and patient safety. Nurse educators must embrace PCC as a competency critical to positive patient outcomes and champion its inclusion in nursing curricula nationally. This column offers some strategies for teaching PCC in pre-licen-sure nursing programs. J Contin Educ Nurs 2013;44(1 ):10-11.},
      keywords={Patient Centered Care -- Education; Education, Nursing; Nursing Practice; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={0022-0124},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011883009&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Elisabeth, E. S., Roos-Marie, Smith, S., Bright, C., & M., M. K.. (2013). Perspectives of person-centred care. Nursing Standard, 27(48), 35-41.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Aim: To ascertain and compare the perspectives of students and lecturers at Edinburgh Napier University and Hanze University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands, regarding person-centred care. Method: Data were collected using face-to-face, structured interviews and analysed using a person-centred nursing framework. Findings: Participants believed that person-centred care should be incorporated within pre-registration nursing education. Conclusion: The way person-centred care is taught varied between the two universities. With the focus on high quality, compassionate care, it is important to identify how nursing curricula can promote these qualities.

    @article{RefWorks:141,
      author={Eva Steenbergen  Elisabeth and Roos-Marie and Stephen Smith and Carolyn Bright and Maarten Kaaijk  M.},
      year={2013},
      month={07/31},
      title={Perspectives of person-centred care},
      journal={Nursing Standard},
      volume={27},
      number={48},
      pages={35-41},
      note={ID: 2012214705},
      abstract={Aim: To ascertain and compare the perspectives of students and lecturers at Edinburgh Napier University and Hanze University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands, regarding person-centred care. Method: Data were collected using face-to-face, structured interviews and analysed using a person-centred nursing framework. Findings: Participants believed that person-centred care should be incorporated within pre-registration nursing education. Conclusion: The way person-centred care is taught varied between the two universities. With the focus on high quality, compassionate care, it is important to identify how nursing curricula can promote these qualities.},
      keywords={Patient Centered Care; Education, Nursing; Course Content; Student Attitudes; Faculty Attitudes; Scotland; Netherlands; Human; Qualitative Studies; Audiorecording; Semi-Structured Interview},
      isbn={0029-6570},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012214705&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Kalam-Salminen, L., Valkonen, M., Aro, I., & Routasalo, P.. (2013). Client-centeredness of Finnish and Estonian nursing students and the support from nursing education to develop it. Students’ self-evaluation. Nurse education today, 33(10), 1112-1118.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Summary: Purpose: The purpose of this comparative study is to describe the differences between Finnish and Estonian students evaluations about their client-centeredness and educational support they received to develop it. Background: Client-centeredness has many positive effects on the quality and effectiveness of care. However, some deficiencies have been identified in the client-centeredness of nursing staff. Research on the subject has been limited, and we lack knowledge of graduating students’ competence in client-centeredness and the support of their education to develop it. Methods: The sample consisted of 390 undergraduate nursing students, 195 from Finland and 195 from Estonia. The data were collected in 2009 using the structured five-point scale questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed to measure students’ client-centeredness and the educational support they received from nursing education. The data were analyzed by the PASW Statistics 18-programme using descriptive statistics, Kolmogorov–Smirnov test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Predominantly, students in both countries evaluated their level of client-centeredness high. The Estonian students generally evaluated their client-centeredness higher compared to the Finnish students. The same applied to support provided by nursing education. The greatest differences were related to education and particularly theoretical teaching. In Estonia, students’ client-centeredness manifested itself more in politeness and willingness to serve clients, whereas respecting the clients’ values was emphasized in Finland. Students’ requisites, referred here as knowledge, skills and abilities to implement client-centered nursing, for client-centeredness had deficiencies, and the support from education was also the weakest regarding these aspects. Conclusion: In future, education on development of nursing activities, acquisition of knowledge and services provided by health care as well as legislation should be enhanced, since these areas proved the most difficult for the students.

    @article{RefWorks:142,
      author={Ly Kalam-Salminen and Marjo-Riitta Valkonen and Ilme Aro and Pirkko Routasalo},
      year={2013},
      month={10},
      title={Client-centeredness of Finnish and Estonian nursing students and the support from nursing education to develop it. Students' self-evaluation},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={33},
      number={10},
      pages={1112-1118},
      note={ID: 2012298979},
      abstract={Summary: Purpose: The purpose of this comparative study is to describe the differences between Finnish and Estonian students evaluations about their client-centeredness and educational support they received to develop it. Background: Client-centeredness has many positive effects on the quality and effectiveness of care. However, some deficiencies have been identified in the client-centeredness of nursing staff. Research on the subject has been limited, and we lack knowledge of graduating students' competence in client-centeredness and the support of their education to develop it. Methods: The sample consisted of 390 undergraduate nursing students, 195 from Finland and 195 from Estonia. The data were collected in 2009 using the structured five-point scale questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed to measure students' client-centeredness and the educational support they received from nursing education. The data were analyzed by the PASW Statistics 18-programme using descriptive statistics, Kolmogorov–Smirnov test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Predominantly, students in both countries evaluated their level of client-centeredness high. The Estonian students generally evaluated their client-centeredness higher compared to the Finnish students. The same applied to support provided by nursing education. The greatest differences were related to education and particularly theoretical teaching. In Estonia, students' client-centeredness manifested itself more in politeness and willingness to serve clients, whereas respecting the clients' values was emphasized in Finland. Students' requisites, referred here as knowledge, skills and abilities to implement client-centered nursing, for client-centeredness had deficiencies, and the support from education was also the weakest regarding these aspects. Conclusion: In future, education on development of nursing activities, acquisition of knowledge and services provided by health care as well as legislation should be enhanced, since these areas proved the most difficult for the students.},
      keywords={Student-Patient Relations -- Finland; Patient Centered Care; Student-Patient Relations -- Estonia; Education, Nursing -- Finland; Education, Nursing -- Estonia; Human; Comparative Studies; Finland; Estonia; Structured Questionnaires; Self Assessment; Summated Rating Scaling; Mann-Whitney U Test; Geographic Factors; Education, Nursing, Theory-Based; Descriptive Statistics},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012298979&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • M., L. F., Ward, H., Card, S., Sheppard, S., & McMurtry, J.. (2013). Putting the ‘patient’ back into patient-centred care: An education perspective. Nurse Education in Practice, 13(4), 283-287.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Patient-centred care is a value espoused by most healthcare systems and a concept taught in nursing education programs as a fundamental concept of patient care. In this study, we focused on the patient’s experience of patient-centredness, interviewing eighteen patients and eight family members about their experiences as patients on an in-patient acute care medical unit in a large hospital in Canada. Approximately half of the patients expressed satisfaction with their experiences and their involvement in decisions about their healthcare. The remainder expressed concerns about their care that jeopardized their experiences of patient-centredness. These areas concerned issues of communication with and among healthcare professionals, relationships with these care providers, trust and respect in the professional relationships, and general satisfaction with care. Participants provided advice to professional students about ways to interact more effectively with their patients to establish caring, empathetic, patient-centred relationships as the basis for care. We address patient recommendations to support learner understanding of the patient experience both in classrooms and clinical experiences throughout educational programs as a means to enhance their patient-centredness.

    @article{RefWorks:143,
      author={Linda Ferguson  M. and Heather Ward and Sharon Card and Suzanne Sheppard and Jane McMurtry},
      year={2013},
      month={07},
      title={Putting the 'patient' back into patient-centred care: An education perspective},
      journal={Nurse Education in Practice},
      volume={13},
      number={4},
      pages={283-287},
      note={ID: 2012167856},
      abstract={Patient-centred care is a value espoused by most healthcare systems and a concept taught in nursing education programs as a fundamental concept of patient care. In this study, we focused on the patient's experience of patient-centredness, interviewing eighteen patients and eight family members about their experiences as patients on an in-patient acute care medical unit in a large hospital in Canada. Approximately half of the patients expressed satisfaction with their experiences and their involvement in decisions about their healthcare. The remainder expressed concerns about their care that jeopardized their experiences of patient-centredness. These areas concerned issues of communication with and among healthcare professionals, relationships with these care providers, trust and respect in the professional relationships, and general satisfaction with care. Participants provided advice to professional students about ways to interact more effectively with their patients to establish caring, empathetic, patient-centred relationships as the basis for care. We address patient recommendations to support learner understanding of the patient experience both in classrooms and clinical experiences throughout educational programs as a means to enhance their patient-centredness.},
      keywords={Patient Centered Care; Student-Patient Relations; Patient Satisfaction; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Human; Patient Satisfaction -- Evaluation; Academic Medical Centers; Saskatchewan; Qualitative Studies; Descriptive Research; Conceptual Framework; Interviews; Audiorecording; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Models, Theoretical; Thematic Analysis; Convenience Sample; Trust; Respect; Communication},
      isbn={1471-5953},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012167856&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • M., L. F., Ward, H., Card, S., Sheppard, S., & McMurtry, J.. (2013). Putting the ‘patient’ back into patient-centred care: An education perspective. Nurse Education in Practice, 13(4), 283-287.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Patient-centred care is a value espoused by most healthcare systems and a concept taught in nursing education programs as a fundamental concept of patient care. In this study, we focused on the patient’s experience of patient-centredness, interviewing eighteen patients and eight family members about their experiences as patients on an in-patient acute care medical unit in a large hospital in Canada. Approximately half of the patients expressed satisfaction with their experiences and their involvement in decisions about their healthcare. The remainder expressed concerns about their care that jeopardized their experiences of patient-centredness. These areas concerned issues of communication with and among healthcare professionals, relationships with these care providers, trust and respect in the professional relationships, and general satisfaction with care. Participants provided advice to professional students about ways to interact more effectively with their patients to establish caring, empathetic, patient-centred relationships as the basis for care. We address patient recommendations to support learner understanding of the patient experience both in classrooms and clinical experiences throughout educational programs as a means to enhance their patient-centredness.

    @article{RefWorks:143,
      author={Linda Ferguson  M. and Heather Ward and Sharon Card and Suzanne Sheppard and Jane McMurtry},
      year={2013},
      month={07},
      title={Putting the 'patient' back into patient-centred care: An education perspective},
      journal={Nurse Education in Practice},
      volume={13},
      number={4},
      pages={283-287},
      note={ID: 2012167856},
      abstract={Patient-centred care is a value espoused by most healthcare systems and a concept taught in nursing education programs as a fundamental concept of patient care. In this study, we focused on the patient's experience of patient-centredness, interviewing eighteen patients and eight family members about their experiences as patients on an in-patient acute care medical unit in a large hospital in Canada. Approximately half of the patients expressed satisfaction with their experiences and their involvement in decisions about their healthcare. The remainder expressed concerns about their care that jeopardized their experiences of patient-centredness. These areas concerned issues of communication with and among healthcare professionals, relationships with these care providers, trust and respect in the professional relationships, and general satisfaction with care. Participants provided advice to professional students about ways to interact more effectively with their patients to establish caring, empathetic, patient-centred relationships as the basis for care. We address patient recommendations to support learner understanding of the patient experience both in classrooms and clinical experiences throughout educational programs as a means to enhance their patient-centredness.},
      keywords={Patient Centered Care; Student-Patient Relations; Patient Satisfaction; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Human; Patient Satisfaction -- Evaluation; Academic Medical Centers; Saskatchewan; Qualitative Studies; Descriptive Research; Conceptual Framework; Interviews; Audiorecording; Adult; Middle Age; Aged; Models, Theoretical; Thematic Analysis; Convenience Sample; Trust; Respect; Communication},
      isbn={1471-5953},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012167856&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Minden, P.. (2013). Bearing witness: to promote therapeutic effectiveness. Holistic nursing practice, 27(3), 168-176.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article describes an innovative educational approach to developing soft skills that underpin therapeutic effectiveness and are critical for safe patient care. Called Bearing Witness, it derived from 10 years of partnering with residents of a low-income neighborhood to provide undergraduate nursing students with wellness-focused interviewing experiences that were paradoxically real and simulated.

    @article{RefWorks:148,
      author={Pamela Minden},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={Bearing witness: to promote therapeutic effectiveness},
      journal={Holistic nursing practice},
      volume={27},
      number={3},
      pages={168-176},
      note={ID: 2012109302},
      abstract={This article describes an innovative educational approach to developing soft skills that underpin therapeutic effectiveness and are critical for safe patient care. Called Bearing Witness, it derived from 10 years of partnering with residents of a low-income neighborhood to provide undergraduate nursing students with wellness-focused interviewing experiences that were paradoxically real and simulated.},
      keywords={Education, Clinical; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Motivational Interviewing -- Education; Simulations; Clinical Conferences; Educational Theory; Experiential Learning; Medical-Surgical Nursing -- Education; Patient Centered Care; Psychiatric Nursing -- Education; Skill Acquisition; Student Experiences; Wellness},
      isbn={0887-9311},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012109302&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Pauly-O’Neill, S., Prion, S., & Nguyen, H.. (2013). Comparison of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN)-related student experiences during pediatric clinical and simulation rotations. The Journal of nursing education, 52(9), 534-538.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Nurse educators are challenged with providing meaningful clinical experiences for students. However, patient safety regulations constrain what nursing students are able to accomplish in the pediatric setting. So, what are students actually doing in their clinical rotation? This pilot observational study was undertaken to provide a snapshot of the experiences available to nursing students that develop the six Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies. Students were directly observed during pediatric clinical and pediatric simulation rotations, and their time-on-task was calculated and categorized. Three of the six QSEN competencies were observed more often than the others during both the simulation and clinical experiences. Much work needs to be done to include all QSEN-related knowledge and skills into prelicensure clinical rotations.; Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

    @article{RefWorks:153,
      author={Susan Pauly-O'Neill and Susan Prion and Helen Nguyen},
      year={2013},
      month={09},
      title={Comparison of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN)-related student experiences during pediatric clinical and simulation rotations},
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={52},
      number={9},
      pages={534-538},
      note={ID: 23952771; Accession Number: 23952771. Language: English. Date Created: 20130910. Date Completed: 20140107. Update Code: 20140107. Publication Type: Comparative Study. Journal ID: 7705432. Publication Model: Print-Electronic. Cited Medium: Print. NLM ISO Abbr: J Nurs Educ. Linking ISSN: 01484834. Subset: IM; N; Date of Electronic Publication: 2013 Aug 19. Current Imprints: Publication: Thorofare, N.J. : Charles B. Slack; Original Imprints: Publication: New York, N.Y. : Blackiston Division, McGraw-Hill, c1962-},
      abstract={Nurse educators are challenged with providing meaningful clinical experiences for students. However, patient safety regulations constrain what nursing students are able to accomplish in the pediatric setting. So, what are students actually doing in their clinical rotation? This pilot observational study was undertaken to provide a snapshot of the experiences available to nursing students that develop the six Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies. Students were directly observed during pediatric clinical and pediatric simulation rotations, and their time-on-task was calculated and categorized. Three of the six QSEN competencies were observed more often than the others during both the simulation and clinical experiences. Much work needs to be done to include all QSEN-related knowledge and skills into prelicensure clinical rotations.; Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.},
      keywords={Competency-Based Education/*methods; Competency-Based Education/*standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/*methods; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/*standards; Patient Safety/*standards; Pediatric Nursing/*education; Child; Clinical Competence; Humans; Nursing Education Research; Patient Simulation; Patient-Centered Care/methods; Patient-Centered Care/standards; Pilot Projects; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=mnh&AN=23952771&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Webster, D.. (2013). Promoting Therapeutic Communication and Patient-Centered Care Using Standardized Patients. Journal of Nursing Education, 52(11), 645-648.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article describes an assignment designed to incorporate the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competency of patient-centered care into a simulation activity aimed to improve therapeutic communication skills in psychiatric nursing. During this pilot activity, students engaged in an interaction with an actor trained to portray an individual with mental illness. Students viewed their video-recorded interaction to identify communication techniques used and completed a self-evaluation examining their strengths and areas for improvement. Faculty and actors provided feedback to students during a faculty-led debriefing held to discuss the use of therapeutic communication and care focused on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality patient-centered care. Desired learning outcomes included the demonstration of therapeutic communication and assessment skills, empathy and caring, and addressing patient values, preferences, and beliefs. This article describes an assignment designed to incorporate the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competency of patient-centered care into a simulation activity aimed to improve therapeutic communication skills in psychiatric nursing. During this pilot activity, students engaged in an interaction with an actor trained to portray an individual with mental illness. Students viewed their video-recorded interaction to identify communication techniques used and completed a self-evaluation examining their strengths and areas for improvement. Faculty and actors provided feedback to students during a faculty-led debriefing held to discuss the use of therapeutic communication and care focused on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality patient-centered care. Desired learning outcomes included the demonstration of therapeutic communication and assessment skills, empathy and caring, and addressing patient values, preferences, and beliefs.

    @article{RefWorks:149,
      author={Debra Webster},
      year={2013},
      month={11},
      title={Promoting Therapeutic Communication and Patient-Centered Care Using Standardized Patients},
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={52},
      number={11},
      pages={645-648},
      note={ID: 2012352148},
      abstract={This article describes an assignment designed to incorporate the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competency of patient-centered care into a simulation activity aimed to improve therapeutic communication skills in psychiatric nursing. During this pilot activity, students engaged in an interaction with an actor trained to portray an individual with mental illness. Students viewed their video-recorded interaction to identify communication techniques used and completed a self-evaluation examining their strengths and areas for improvement. Faculty and actors provided feedback to students during a faculty-led debriefing held to discuss the use of therapeutic communication and care focused on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality patient-centered care. Desired learning outcomes included the demonstration of therapeutic communication and assessment skills, empathy and caring, and addressing patient values, preferences, and beliefs. This article describes an assignment designed to incorporate the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competency of patient-centered care into a simulation activity aimed to improve therapeutic communication skills in psychiatric nursing. During this pilot activity, students engaged in an interaction with an actor trained to portray an individual with mental illness. Students viewed their video-recorded interaction to identify communication techniques used and completed a self-evaluation examining their strengths and areas for improvement. Faculty and actors provided feedback to students during a faculty-led debriefing held to discuss the use of therapeutic communication and care focused on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality patient-centered care. Desired learning outcomes included the demonstration of therapeutic communication and assessment skills, empathy and caring, and addressing patient values, preferences, and beliefs.},
      keywords={Patient Centered Care; Communication; Psychiatric Nursing; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Student-Patient Relations; Simulations -- Utilization; Human; Pilot Studies; Videorecording; Behavioral Objectives; Outcomes of Education; Education Research},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012352148&site=ehost-live}
    }

2012

  • A., L. K., Montgomery, P., M., J. R., Mossey, S., E., K. T., & Binette, J.. (2012). Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology. BMC Nursing, 11(1), 26-38.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Background: Nursing education necessitates vigilance for clinical safety, a daunting challenge given the complex interchanges between students, patients and educators. As active learners, students offer a subjective understanding concerning safety in the practice milieu that merits further study. This study describes the viewpoints of senior undergraduate nursing students about compromised safety in the clinical learning environment. Methods: Q methodology was used to systematically elicit multiple viewpoints about unsafe clinical learning from the perspective of senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program offered at multiple sites in Ontario, Canada. Across two program sites, 59 fourth year students sorted 43 theoretical statement cards, descriptive of unsafe clinical practice. Q-analysis identified similarities and differences among participant viewpoints yielding discrete and consensus perspectives. Results: A total of six discrete viewpoints and two consensus perspectives were identified. The discrete viewpoints at one site were Endorsement of Uncritical Knowledge Transfer, Non-student Centered Program and Overt Patterns of Unsatisfactory Clinical Performance. In addition, a consensus perspective, labelled Contravening Practices was identified as responsible for compromised clinical safety at this site. At the other site, the discrete viewpoints were Premature and Inappropriate Clinical Progression, Non-patient Centered Practice and Negating Purposeful Interactions for Experiential Learning. There was consensus that Eroding Conventions compromised clinical safety from the perspective of students at this second site. Conclusions: Senior nursing students perceive that deficits in knowledge, patient-centered practice, professional morality and authenticity threaten safety in the clinical learning environment. In an effort to eradicate compromised safety associated with learning in the clinical milieu, students and educators must embody the ontological, epistemological and praxis fundamentals of nursing.

    @article{RefWorks:267,
      author={Laura Killam  A. and Phyllis Montgomery and June Raymond  M. and Sharolyn Mossey and Katherine Timmermans  E. and Janet Binette},
      year={2012},
      title={Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology},
      journal={BMC Nursing},
      volume={11},
      number={1},
      pages={26-38},
      note={ID: 2011886610},
      abstract={Background: Nursing education necessitates vigilance for clinical safety, a daunting challenge given the complex interchanges between students, patients and educators. As active learners, students offer a subjective understanding concerning safety in the practice milieu that merits further study. This study describes the viewpoints of senior undergraduate nursing students about compromised safety in the clinical learning environment. Methods: Q methodology was used to systematically elicit multiple viewpoints about unsafe clinical learning from the perspective of senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program offered at multiple sites in Ontario, Canada. Across two program sites, 59 fourth year students sorted 43 theoretical statement cards, descriptive of unsafe clinical practice. Q-analysis identified similarities and differences among participant viewpoints yielding discrete and consensus perspectives. Results: A total of six discrete viewpoints and two consensus perspectives were identified. The discrete viewpoints at one site were Endorsement of Uncritical Knowledge Transfer, Non-student Centered Program and Overt Patterns of Unsatisfactory Clinical Performance. In addition, a consensus perspective, labelled Contravening Practices was identified as responsible for compromised clinical safety at this site. At the other site, the discrete viewpoints were Premature and Inappropriate Clinical Progression, Non-patient Centered Practice and Negating Purposeful Interactions for Experiential Learning. There was consensus that Eroding Conventions compromised clinical safety from the perspective of students at this second site. Conclusions: Senior nursing students perceive that deficits in knowledge, patient-centered practice, professional morality and authenticity threaten safety in the clinical learning environment. In an effort to eradicate compromised safety associated with learning in the clinical milieu, students and educators must embody the ontological, epistemological and praxis fundamentals of nursing.},
      keywords={Q-Sort -- Methods; Student Attitudes -- Psychosocial Factors; Education, Nursing -- Evaluation; Human; Ontario; Patient Centered Care; Ethics, Professional; Knowledge; Patient Safety; Summated Rating Scaling; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate},
      isbn={1472-6955},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011886610&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • A., L. K., Montgomery, P., M., J. R., Mossey, S., E., K. T., & Binette, J.. (2012). Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology. BMC Nursing, 11(1), 26-38.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Background: Nursing education necessitates vigilance for clinical safety, a daunting challenge given the complex interchanges between students, patients and educators. As active learners, students offer a subjective understanding concerning safety in the practice milieu that merits further study. This study describes the viewpoints of senior undergraduate nursing students about compromised safety in the clinical learning environment. Methods: Q methodology was used to systematically elicit multiple viewpoints about unsafe clinical learning from the perspective of senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program offered at multiple sites in Ontario, Canada. Across two program sites, 59 fourth year students sorted 43 theoretical statement cards, descriptive of unsafe clinical practice. Q-analysis identified similarities and differences among participant viewpoints yielding discrete and consensus perspectives. Results: A total of six discrete viewpoints and two consensus perspectives were identified. The discrete viewpoints at one site were Endorsement of Uncritical Knowledge Transfer, Non-student Centered Program and Overt Patterns of Unsatisfactory Clinical Performance. In addition, a consensus perspective, labelled Contravening Practices was identified as responsible for compromised clinical safety at this site. At the other site, the discrete viewpoints were Premature and Inappropriate Clinical Progression, Non-patient Centered Practice and Negating Purposeful Interactions for Experiential Learning. There was consensus that Eroding Conventions compromised clinical safety from the perspective of students at this second site. Conclusions: Senior nursing students perceive that deficits in knowledge, patient-centered practice, professional morality and authenticity threaten safety in the clinical learning environment. In an effort to eradicate compromised safety associated with learning in the clinical milieu, students and educators must embody the ontological, epistemological and praxis fundamentals of nursing.

    @article{RefWorks:147,
      author={Laura Killam  A. and Phyllis Montgomery and June Raymond  M. and Sharolyn Mossey and Katherine Timmermans  E. and Janet Binette},
      year={2012},
      title={Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology},
      journal={BMC Nursing},
      volume={11},
      number={1},
      pages={26-38},
      note={ID: 2011886610},
      abstract={Background: Nursing education necessitates vigilance for clinical safety, a daunting challenge given the complex interchanges between students, patients and educators. As active learners, students offer a subjective understanding concerning safety in the practice milieu that merits further study. This study describes the viewpoints of senior undergraduate nursing students about compromised safety in the clinical learning environment. Methods: Q methodology was used to systematically elicit multiple viewpoints about unsafe clinical learning from the perspective of senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program offered at multiple sites in Ontario, Canada. Across two program sites, 59 fourth year students sorted 43 theoretical statement cards, descriptive of unsafe clinical practice. Q-analysis identified similarities and differences among participant viewpoints yielding discrete and consensus perspectives. Results: A total of six discrete viewpoints and two consensus perspectives were identified. The discrete viewpoints at one site were Endorsement of Uncritical Knowledge Transfer, Non-student Centered Program and Overt Patterns of Unsatisfactory Clinical Performance. In addition, a consensus perspective, labelled Contravening Practices was identified as responsible for compromised clinical safety at this site. At the other site, the discrete viewpoints were Premature and Inappropriate Clinical Progression, Non-patient Centered Practice and Negating Purposeful Interactions for Experiential Learning. There was consensus that Eroding Conventions compromised clinical safety from the perspective of students at this second site. Conclusions: Senior nursing students perceive that deficits in knowledge, patient-centered practice, professional morality and authenticity threaten safety in the clinical learning environment. In an effort to eradicate compromised safety associated with learning in the clinical milieu, students and educators must embody the ontological, epistemological and praxis fundamentals of nursing.},
      keywords={Q-Sort -- Methods; Student Attitudes -- Psychosocial Factors; Education, Nursing -- Evaluation; Human; Ontario; Patient Centered Care; Ethics, Professional; Knowledge; Patient Safety; Summated Rating Scaling; Descriptive Statistics; Data Analysis Software; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate},
      isbn={1472-6955},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011886610&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Armstrong, G., Headrick, L., Madigosky, W., & Ogrinc, G.. (2012). Designing education to improve care. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf, 38(1), 5-14.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Educators in all health care disciplines are increasingly aware of the importance and value of teaching improvement as an integral part of health professional development. Although faculty and learners can often identify needed changes in the clinical setting, many educators are not sure how to teach the improvement principles and methods needed to achieve and sustain those changes. DEFINING AND DEVELOPING COMPETENCY IN QI: Five developmental levels apply to physicians, nurses, and other members of an interprofessional quality improvement (QI) team: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. For example, the expert develops a vast repertoire of skills and a capacity for situational discrimination, performs tasks on a more intuitive level, and recognizes and immediately addresses essential problems. Improvement is an action, and learning about improvement must be action based. Certain skills and knowledge are required at each stage in this learning process so that students in the health professions achieve competence in QI before entering practice. GENERAL PRINCIPLES FOR EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN HEALTH CARE IMPROVEMENT: Four principles, which apply at any developmental level, can help answer educators’ questions about where to start: (1) The Learning Experience Should Be a Combination of Didactic and Project-Based Work; (2) Link with Health System Improvement Efforts; (3) Assess Education Outcomes; and (4) Role Model QI in Educational Processes. CONCLUSION: As educators teach future health professionals about improving care, the dissemination of exemplary models and emerging best practices will be increasingly important. Sustainability of improvements in patient outcomes will be dependent on both the value systems and skills of health professionals entering practice.

    @article{RefWorks:72,
      author={G. Armstrong and L. Headrick and W. Madigosky and G. Ogrinc},
      year={2012},
      month={Jan},
      title={Designing education to improve care},
      journal={Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf},
      volume={38},
      number={1},
      pages={5-14},
      note={Armstrong, Gail Headrick, Linda Madigosky, Wendy Ogrinc, Greg Journal Article United States},
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Educators in all health care disciplines are increasingly aware of the importance and value of teaching improvement as an integral part of health professional development. Although faculty and learners can often identify needed changes in the clinical setting, many educators are not sure how to teach the improvement principles and methods needed to achieve and sustain those changes. DEFINING AND DEVELOPING COMPETENCY IN QI: Five developmental levels apply to physicians, nurses, and other members of an interprofessional quality improvement (QI) team: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. For example, the expert develops a vast repertoire of skills and a capacity for situational discrimination, performs tasks on a more intuitive level, and recognizes and immediately addresses essential problems. Improvement is an action, and learning about improvement must be action based. Certain skills and knowledge are required at each stage in this learning process so that students in the health professions achieve competence in QI before entering practice. GENERAL PRINCIPLES FOR EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN HEALTH CARE IMPROVEMENT: Four principles, which apply at any developmental level, can help answer educators' questions about where to start: (1) The Learning Experience Should Be a Combination of Didactic and Project-Based Work; (2) Link with Health System Improvement Efforts; (3) Assess Education Outcomes; and (4) Role Model QI in Educational Processes. CONCLUSION: As educators teach future health professionals about improving care, the dissemination of exemplary models and emerging best practices will be increasingly important. Sustainability of improvements in patient outcomes will be dependent on both the value systems and skills of health professionals entering practice.},
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Education, Medical; Education, Nursing; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Personnel/*education; Humans; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Professional Role; Quality Improvement/*organization & administration},
      isbn={1553-7250 (Print) 1553-7250},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Butterworth, C.. (2012). How to achieve a person-centred writing style in care plans. Nursing Older People, 24(8), 21-26.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Staff in every type of organisation responsible for the care of older people must assess, set outcomes and devise a plan of care. Many organisations will aspire to a person-centred approach and it is appropriate for nurses and carers to try to reflect this in their care plans and records of care. However, this is not always easy to do because it requires a different style of writing compared with the traditional problem-solving approach. This article sets out some of the principles of person-centred care and provides examples of how to achieve a writing style that fits this approach. It is written with reference to the care home environment, but much of the advice would also be appropriate for staff working in hospital and community settings.

    @article{RefWorks:16,
      author={Cathy Butterworth},
      year={2012},
      month={10},
      title={How to achieve a person-centred writing style in care plans},
      journal={Nursing Older People},
      volume={24},
      number={8},
      pages={21-26},
      note={ID: 2011717664},
      abstract={Staff in every type of organisation responsible for the care of older people must assess, set outcomes and devise a plan of care. Many organisations will aspire to a person-centred approach and it is appropriate for nurses and carers to try to reflect this in their care plans and records of care. However, this is not always easy to do because it requires a different style of writing compared with the traditional problem-solving approach. This article sets out some of the principles of person-centred care and provides examples of how to achieve a writing style that fits this approach. It is written with reference to the care home environment, but much of the advice would also be appropriate for staff working in hospital and community settings.},
      keywords={Writing; Patient Centered Care; Gerontologic Nursing; Medical Records; Documentation -- Standards; Aged; Nursing Homes; Hospitals; Culture; Professional Role; Language; Aged, 80 and Over; Male},
      isbn={1472-0795},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011717664&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Disch, J.. (2012). Patient-centered care/student-centered learning. Nurs Outlook, 60(6), 340-1.
    [BibTeX]
    @article{RefWorks:51,
      author={J. Disch},
      year={2012},
      month={Nov-Dec},
      title={Patient-centered care/student-centered learning},
      journal={Nurs Outlook},
      volume={60},
      number={6},
      pages={340-1},
      note={1528-3968 Disch, Joanne Editorial United States Nurs Outlook. 2012 Nov-Dec;60(6):340-1. doi: 10.1016/j.outlook.2012.09.001.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing/*organization & administration; Humans; *Learning; *Patient-Centered Care; Students, Nursing/*psychology},
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Elbourne, H., & Andrée, L. M.. (2012). A multidisciplinary approach to person-centred practice. Nursing & Residential Care, 14(4), 199-202.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Dr Heather Elbourne and Dr Andrée Le May collate research from a facility providing intermediate care and outline what nursing homes can learn from this service model and working with a rehabilitation team.

    @article{RefWorks:7,
      author={Heather Elbourne and Le May  Andrée},
      year={2012},
      month={04},
      title={A multidisciplinary approach to person-centred practice},
      journal={Nursing & Residential Care},
      volume={14},
      number={4},
      pages={199-202},
      note={ID: 2011520254},
      abstract={Dr Heather Elbourne and Dr Andrée Le May collate research from a facility providing intermediate care and outline what nursing homes can learn from this service model and working with a rehabilitation team.},
      keywords={Multidisciplinary Care Team; Nursing Home Patients; Patient Centered Care; Program Development; Rehabilitation; Aged; Communication; Human; Interviews; Nurses; Occupational Therapists; Patient Satisfaction; Physical Therapists; Physicians; Questionnaires; Social Workers; United Kingdom},
      isbn={1465-9301},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011520254&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Fay-Hillier, T. M., Regan, R. V., & Gordon, G. M.. (2012). Communication and patient safety in simulation for mental health nursing education. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 33(11), 718-726.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) found that 65% of medical sentinel events or medical errors are associated with communication breakdowns. In addition to the JCAHO, The Institute of Medicine, in their Core Competencies for health care professional education, recommend improvement in professional communication, collaboration, and a patient-centered approach to provide safety. Consistency of opportunities for students to practice their communication and collaboration skills is limited based on the variety of clinical experiences that are available. Simulation would provide consistency in students’ experiences. Students can practice giving a structured report, providing and receiving peer feedback, and obtaining patient feedback in a safe setting through a simulation experience. A structured hand-off shift report using a technique such as SBAR communication has been found to improve patient safety in health care environments. This paper examines the implementation of a simulation experience for students taking a Mental Health course in a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program to support their practice of patient and professional communication, as well as, collaboration skills with a patient-centered approach using a standardized patient simulation.

    @article{RefWorks:45,
      author={T. M. Fay-Hillier and R. V. Regan and M. Gallagher Gordon},
      year={2012},
      month={Nov},
      title={Communication and patient safety in simulation for mental health nursing education},
      journal={Issues in Mental Health Nursing},
      volume={33},
      number={11},
      pages={718-726},
      note={JID: 7907126; ppublish},
      abstract={The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) found that 65% of medical sentinel events or medical errors are associated with communication breakdowns. In addition to the JCAHO, The Institute of Medicine, in their Core Competencies for health care professional education, recommend improvement in professional communication, collaboration, and a patient-centered approach to provide safety. Consistency of opportunities for students to practice their communication and collaboration skills is limited based on the variety of clinical experiences that are available. Simulation would provide consistency in students' experiences. Students can practice giving a structured report, providing and receiving peer feedback, and obtaining patient feedback in a safe setting through a simulation experience. A structured hand-off shift report using a technique such as SBAR communication has been found to improve patient safety in health care environments. This paper examines the implementation of a simulation experience for students taking a Mental Health course in a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program to support their practice of patient and professional communication, as well as, collaboration skills with a patient-centered approach using a standardized patient simulation.},
      keywords={Communication; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Humans; Interview, Psychological; Mental Disorders/nursing/psychology; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing, Team; Patient Safety; Patient Simulation; Psychiatric Nursing/education; Therapeutic Community},
      isbn={1096-4673; 0161-2840},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Finkelstein, J., Knight, A., Marinopoulos, S., Gibbons, M. C., Berger, Z., Aboumatar, H., Wilson, R. F., Lau, B. D., Sharma, R., & Bass, E. B.. (2012). Enabling patient-centered care through health information technology. Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep)(206), 1-1531.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVES: The main objective of the report is to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) that supports patient-centered care (PCC) on: health care processes; clinical outcomes; intermediate outcomes (patient or provider satisfaction, health knowledge and behavior, and cost); responsiveness to needs and preferences of patients; shared decisionmaking and patient-clinician communication; and access to information. Additional objectives were to identify barriers and facilitators for using health IT to deliver PCC, and to identify gaps in evidence and information needed by patients, providers, payers, and policymakers. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE(R), Embase(R), Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, INSPEC, and Compendex databases through July 31, 2010. METHODS: Paired members of our team reviewed citations to identify randomized controlled trials of PCC-related health IT interventions and studies that addressed barriers and facilitators for health IT for delivery of PCC. Independent assessors rated studies for quality. Paired reviewers abstracted data. RESULTS: The search identified 327 eligible articles, including 184 articles on the impact of health IT applications implemented to support PCC and 206 articles addressing barriers or facilitators for such health IT applications. Sixty-three articles addressed both questions. The study results suggested positive effects of PCC-related health IT interventions on health care process outcomes, disease-specific clinical outcomes (for diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cancer, and other health conditions), intermediate outcomes, responsiveness to the needs and preferences of patients, shared decisionmaking, patient-clinician communication, and access to medical information. Studies reported a number of barriers and facilitators for using health IT applications to enable PCC. Barriers included: lack of usability; problems with access to the health IT application due to older age, low income, education, cognitive impairment, and other factors; low computer literacy in patients and clinicians; insufficient basic formal training in health IT applications; physicians’ concerns about more work; workflow issues; problems related to new system implementation, including concerns about confidentiality of patient information; depersonalization; incompatibility with current health care practices; lack of standardization; and problems with reimbursement. Facilitators for the utilization of health IT included ease of use, perceived usefulness, efficiency of use, availability of support, comfort in use, and site location. CONCLUSIONS: Despite marked heterogeneity in study characteristics and quality, substantial evidence exists confirming that health IT applications with PCC-related components have a positive effect on health care outcomes. positive effect on health care outcomes.

    @article{RefWorks:136,
      author={J. Finkelstein and A. Knight and S. Marinopoulos and M. C. Gibbons and Z. Berger and H. Aboumatar and R. F. Wilson and B. D. Lau and R. Sharma and E. B. Bass},
      year={2012},
      month={Jun},
      title={Enabling patient-centered care through health information technology},
      journal={Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep)},
      number={206},
      pages={1-1531},
      note={Finkelstein, Joseph Knight, Amy Marinopoulos, Spyridon Gibbons, M Christopher Berger, Zackary Aboumatar, Hanan Wilson, Renee F Lau, Brandyn D Sharma, Ritu Bass, Eric B Journal Article United States Evid Rep Technol Assess (Full Rep). 2012 Jun;(206):1-1531.},
      abstract={OBJECTIVES: The main objective of the report is to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) that supports patient-centered care (PCC) on: health care processes; clinical outcomes; intermediate outcomes (patient or provider satisfaction, health knowledge and behavior, and cost); responsiveness to needs and preferences of patients; shared decisionmaking and patient-clinician communication; and access to information. Additional objectives were to identify barriers and facilitators for using health IT to deliver PCC, and to identify gaps in evidence and information needed by patients, providers, payers, and policymakers. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE(R), Embase(R), Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, INSPEC, and Compendex databases through July 31, 2010. METHODS: Paired members of our team reviewed citations to identify randomized controlled trials of PCC-related health IT interventions and studies that addressed barriers and facilitators for health IT for delivery of PCC. Independent assessors rated studies for quality. Paired reviewers abstracted data. RESULTS: The search identified 327 eligible articles, including 184 articles on the impact of health IT applications implemented to support PCC and 206 articles addressing barriers or facilitators for such health IT applications. Sixty-three articles addressed both questions. The study results suggested positive effects of PCC-related health IT interventions on health care process outcomes, disease-specific clinical outcomes (for diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cancer, and other health conditions), intermediate outcomes, responsiveness to the needs and preferences of patients, shared decisionmaking, patient-clinician communication, and access to medical information. Studies reported a number of barriers and facilitators for using health IT applications to enable PCC. Barriers included: lack of usability; problems with access to the health IT application due to older age, low income, education, cognitive impairment, and other factors; low computer literacy in patients and clinicians; insufficient basic formal training in health IT applications; physicians' concerns about more work; workflow issues; problems related to new system implementation, including concerns about confidentiality of patient information; depersonalization; incompatibility with current health care practices; lack of standardization; and problems with reimbursement. Facilitators for the utilization of health IT included ease of use, perceived usefulness, efficiency of use, availability of support, comfort in use, and site location. CONCLUSIONS: Despite marked heterogeneity in study characteristics and quality, substantial evidence exists confirming that health IT applications with PCC-related components have a positive effect on health care outcomes. positive effect on health care outcomes.},
      isbn={1530-4396 (Print) 1530-4396},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Forneris, S. G., Crownover, J. G., Dorsey, L., Leahy, N., Maas, N. A., Wong, L., Zabriskie, A., & Zavertnik, J. E.. (2012). Integrating QSEN and ACES: An NLN Simulation Leader Project. Nursing Education Perspectives, 33(3), 184-187.
    [BibTeX]
    @article{RefWorks:53,
      author={Susan G. Forneris and Joann G. Crownover and Laurie Dorsey and Nancy Leahy and Nancy A. Maas and Lorrie Wong and Anne Zabriskie and Jean Ellen Zavertnik},
      year={2012},
      title={Integrating QSEN and ACES: An NLN Simulation Leader Project},
      journal={Nursing Education Perspectives},
      volume={33},
      number={3},
      pages={184-187},
      note={tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Gerontologic Care; Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 6 ref. NLM UID: 101140025. PMID: 22860483},
      keywords={Education, Nursing -- Trends; Gerontologic Nursing -- Education; Simulations -- Utilization; Aged; Education, Competency-Based; Patient Centered Care -- Education; Patient Safety -- Education},
      isbn={1536-5026}
    }

  • Griffiths, J., Speed, S., Horne, M., & Keeley, P.. (2012). ‘A caring professional attitude’: What service users and carers seek in graduate nurses and the challenge for educators. Nurse education today, 32(2), 121-127.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Summary: With the publication of the new NMC standards for pre-registration nursing education, undergraduate curricula are being written in universities across England. There are many drivers for the curricula but one that has until recently received scant attention is the service user”s and carer”s voice. This paper discusses the findings of a qualitative study that asked 52 service users and carers about the qualities they sought in nurses and their views on nurse education. Eight focus groups were conducted with a broad range of service users and carers from primary and secondary care, and voluntary organisations. Data were analysed using the framework approach facilitated by a qualitative analysis software programme. The sample was diverse, but there were similarities in the qualities they valued in nurses. They sought technical competence, knowledge and willingness to seek information, but overwhelmingly prioritised ‘a caring professional attitude’. This was articulated as empathy, communication skills and non-judgmental patient centred care: major themes in the new NMC standards. Our participants also expressed concern about whether the educational preparation of nurses can develop these caring qualities. We discuss this concern, the challenges for nurse educators it presents and how we can engage service users and carers in shaping and delivering our new curricula.

    @article{RefWorks:5,
      author={Jane Griffiths and Shaun Speed and Maria Horne and Phillip Keeley},
      year={2012},
      month={02},
      title={'A caring professional attitude’: What service users and carers seek in graduate nurses and the challenge for educators},
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={32},
      number={2},
      pages={121-127},
      note={ID: 2011447938},
      abstract={Summary: With the publication of the new NMC standards for pre-registration nursing education, undergraduate curricula are being written in universities across England. There are many drivers for the curricula but one that has until recently received scant attention is the service user''s and carer''s voice. This paper discusses the findings of a qualitative study that asked 52 service users and carers about the qualities they sought in nurses and their views on nurse education. Eight focus groups were conducted with a broad range of service users and carers from primary and secondary care, and voluntary organisations. Data were analysed using the framework approach facilitated by a qualitative analysis software programme. The sample was diverse, but there were similarities in the qualities they valued in nurses. They sought technical competence, knowledge and willingness to seek information, but overwhelmingly prioritised ‘a caring professional attitude’. This was articulated as empathy, communication skills and non-judgmental patient centred care: major themes in the new NMC standards. Our participants also expressed concern about whether the educational preparation of nurses can develop these caring qualities. We discuss this concern, the challenges for nurse educators it presents and how we can engage service users and carers in shaping and delivering our new curricula.},
      keywords={Nurses; Caring; Communication Skills; Patient Centered Care; Nurse-Patient Relations; Professional Competence; Nurse Attitudes; Education, Nursing; Caregivers; Human; Focus Groups; Qualitative Studies; England; Patient Attitudes -- Evaluation; Curriculum Development; Thematic Analysis; Male; Female; Adult; Middle Age; Nursing Knowledge; Empathy; Family Attitudes -- Evaluation},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011447938&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • J., K. S.. (2012). Using nursing grand rounds to enforce Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies. Teaching & Learning in Nursing, 7(3), 118-120.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Creative teaching is critical to engaging students. Medical grand rounds emerged as a central teaching activity in United States medical schools for the first half of the past century but have faded as education has moved to the classroom. Combining this age-old Socratic teaching method with modern high-fidelity laboratory manikins makes for an optimal learning opportunity for nursing students. Development of activities with the structure of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies supports evidence-based practice and critical reasoning skills.

    @article{RefWorks:34,
      author={Karin Sherrill  J.},
      year={2012},
      month={07},
      title={Using nursing grand rounds to enforce Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies},
      journal={Teaching & Learning in Nursing},
      volume={7},
      number={3},
      pages={118-120},
      note={ID: 2012020211},
      abstract={Creative teaching is critical to engaging students. Medical grand rounds emerged as a central teaching activity in United States medical schools for the first half of the past century but have faded as education has moved to the classroom. Combining this age-old Socratic teaching method with modern high-fidelity laboratory manikins makes for an optimal learning opportunity for nursing students. Development of activities with the structure of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies supports evidence-based practice and critical reasoning skills.},
      keywords={Patient Rounds -- Education; Learning Laboratories; Nursing Skills; Patient Safety; Education, Nursing, Associate; Vignettes; Curriculum; Nursing Practice, Evidence-Based; Quality Improvement; Teamwork; Patient Centered Care; Medical Informatics},
      isbn={1557-3087},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012020211&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Kalra, S., Magon, N., & Malik, S.. (2012). Patient-centered care and therapeutic patient education: Vedic inspiration. Journal of mid-life health, 3(2), 59-60.
    [BibTeX]
    @article{RefWorks:2,
      author={S. Kalra and N. Magon and S. Malik},
      year={2012},
      month={Jul},
      title={Patient-centered care and therapeutic patient education: Vedic inspiration},
      journal={Journal of mid-life health},
      volume={3},
      number={2},
      pages={59-60},
      note={LR: 20130408; JID: 101552746; OID: NLM: PMC3555025; ppublish},
      isbn={0976-7800},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lin, C. H., Tzeng, W. C., Chiang, S. L., & Chiang, L. C.. (2012). Clinical outcomes: the impact of patient-centered care. Hu li za zhi The journal of nursing, 59(6), 104-110.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    An extensive body of literature advocating a "patient-centered" approach to medical care has emerged over the past three decades. This approach is now a mainstream trend in healthcare. Despite its popularity, there remains little consensus regarding the content or definition of patient-centered care. Various quantitative and qualitative research studies have extracted core meanings from "doctor-patient relationship" perspectives and investigated the relationships of these meanings with patient satisfaction, compliance with health promoting behavior, and health status. Mead and Bower’s review of the conceptual and empirical literature represented the first attempt to develop a model of the doctor-patient relationship that considered the multiple aspects embraced by the "patient-centered" approach. However, any interpretation of the "patient-centered" concept that fails to consider the perspective of nursing is likely incomplete, as patient-centered care is the essence of nursing. This paper reviewed the concept of "patient-centered care", conducted a systematic review of randomized control trials to explore the effectiveness of patient-centered care, and integrated nursing-related studies that focused on patient-centered care. Our search covered articles published through the end of February 2011 in the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, JBI, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Pubmed, ProQuest, PsycInfo, and CEPS, with 13 relevant articles identified. The majority of trials addressed by these studies demonstrated a positive "patient-centered care" effect on self-care knowledge and skills but a limited/insignificant effect on disease improvement. The reviewed studies used traditional definitions of "patient-centered care" that were inconsistent with the concepts defined by Mead and Bower. Heterogeneities exist between reviewed studies and the lack of related research in Taiwan. We thus integrated outcome indicators related to "patient-centered care". This study may be referenced by nursing research and clinical care professionals responsible to improve and integrate medical care quality.

    @article{RefWorks:42,
      author={C. H. Lin and W. C. Tzeng and S. L. Chiang and L. C. Chiang},
      year={2012},
      month={Dec},
      title={Clinical outcomes: the impact of patient-centered care},
      journal={Hu li za zhi The journal of nursing},
      volume={59},
      number={6},
      pages={104-110},
      note={JID: 0073267; ppublish},
      abstract={An extensive body of literature advocating a "patient-centered" approach to medical care has emerged over the past three decades. This approach is now a mainstream trend in healthcare. Despite its popularity, there remains little consensus regarding the content or definition of patient-centered care. Various quantitative and qualitative research studies have extracted core meanings from "doctor-patient relationship" perspectives and investigated the relationships of these meanings with patient satisfaction, compliance with health promoting behavior, and health status. Mead and Bower's review of the conceptual and empirical literature represented the first attempt to develop a model of the doctor-patient relationship that considered the multiple aspects embraced by the "patient-centered" approach. However, any interpretation of the "patient-centered" concept that fails to consider the perspective of nursing is likely incomplete, as patient-centered care is the essence of nursing. This paper reviewed the concept of "patient-centered care", conducted a systematic review of randomized control trials to explore the effectiveness of patient-centered care, and integrated nursing-related studies that focused on patient-centered care. Our search covered articles published through the end of February 2011 in the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, JBI, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Pubmed, ProQuest, PsycInfo, and CEPS, with 13 relevant articles identified. The majority of trials addressed by these studies demonstrated a positive "patient-centered care" effect on self-care knowledge and skills but a limited/insignificant effect on disease improvement. The reviewed studies used traditional definitions of "patient-centered care" that were inconsistent with the concepts defined by Mead and Bower. Heterogeneities exist between reviewed studies and the lack of related research in Taiwan. We thus integrated outcome indicators related to "patient-centered care". This study may be referenced by nursing research and clinical care professionals responsible to improve and integrate medical care quality.},
      keywords={Humans; Patient-Centered Care; Physician-Patient Relations},
      isbn={0047-262X},
      language={chi}
    }

  • Morgan, S., & Yoder, L. H.. (2012). A concept analysis of person-centered care. J Holist Nurs, 30(1), 6-15.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The term person-centered care (PCC) has been frequently used in the literature, but there is no consensus about its meaning. This article uses Walker and Avants’s method of concept analysis as a framework to analyze PCC. A literature search was completed and data were collected using several search engines (CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane Review). The key words used were "individualized-care," "person-centered care," "patient-centered care," "client-centered care," and "resident-centered care." Attributes, antecedents, and consequences of PCC were identified. Empirical referents were provided to measure PCC from the perspective of the person receiving care and finally, a model case provides an exemplar of the concept.

    @article{RefWorks:64,
      author={S. Morgan and L. H. Yoder},
      year={2012},
      month={Mar},
      title={A concept analysis of person-centered care},
      journal={J Holist Nurs},
      volume={30},
      number={1},
      pages={6-15},
      note={1552-5724 Morgan, Stephanie Yoder, Linda H Journal Article United States J Holist Nurs. 2012 Mar;30(1):6-15. doi: 10.1177/0898010111412189. Epub 2011 Jul 19.},
      abstract={The term person-centered care (PCC) has been frequently used in the literature, but there is no consensus about its meaning. This article uses Walker and Avants's method of concept analysis as a framework to analyze PCC. A literature search was completed and data were collected using several search engines (CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane Review). The key words used were "individualized-care," "person-centered care," "patient-centered care," "client-centered care," and "resident-centered care." Attributes, antecedents, and consequences of PCC were identified. Empirical referents were provided to measure PCC from the perspective of the person receiving care and finally, a model case provides an exemplar of the concept.},
      keywords={Concept Formation; *Holistic Health; Holistic Nursing/*methods; Humans; Individualized Medicine/*methods; Models, Nursing; *Nurse's Role; *Nurse-Patient Relations; Patient Advocacy; Patient Care Planning/organization & administration; Patient Compliance/psychology; Patient Participation/methods; Patient-Centered Care/ethics/*organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Quality of Health Care},
      isbn={0898-0101},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Penner, L. A., & Roger, K.. (2012). The person in the room: how relating holistically contributes to an effective patient-care provider alliance. Commun Med, 9(1), 49-58.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how relating to the ‘whole’ person–both the physical body and the invisible aspects of the ‘self’–is essential in the establishment of a strong therapeutic alliance between patients and health care providers. Our work is based on interviews conducted with individuals affected by neurological illnesses (patients and family care providers). Hsieh and Shannon’s (2005) conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Under the broad theme of ‘maintaining a coherent sense of self’ we identified four distinct sub-themes related to interactions with health care providers. The results elucidate the more complex and deep needs of patients who must access care on an ongoing basis, and highlight the important role that care providers play in supporting individuals who are experiencing physical, spiritual and social losses. Care must attend to the deep needs of these individuals by communicating in a style that addresses both emotional and cognitive needs of patients, by thorough and holistic assessment and by appropriate referrals.

    @article{RefWorks:63,
      author={L. A. Penner and K. Roger},
      year={2012},
      title={The person in the room: how relating holistically contributes to an effective patient-care provider alliance},
      journal={Commun Med},
      volume={9},
      number={1},
      pages={49-58},
      note={Penner, Leslie A Roger, Kerstin Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't England Commun Med. 2012;9(1):49-58.},
      abstract={The purpose of this paper is to explore how relating to the 'whole' person--both the physical body and the invisible aspects of the 'self'--is essential in the establishment of a strong therapeutic alliance between patients and health care providers. Our work is based on interviews conducted with individuals affected by neurological illnesses (patients and family care providers). Hsieh and Shannon's (2005) conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Under the broad theme of 'maintaining a coherent sense of self' we identified four distinct sub-themes related to interactions with health care providers. The results elucidate the more complex and deep needs of patients who must access care on an ongoing basis, and highlight the important role that care providers play in supporting individuals who are experiencing physical, spiritual and social losses. Care must attend to the deep needs of these individuals by communicating in a style that addresses both emotional and cognitive needs of patients, by thorough and holistic assessment and by appropriate referrals.},
      keywords={Canada; Cooperative Behavior; Empathy; *Holistic Nursing; Humans; Narration; Nervous System Diseases/psychology; *Patient-Centered Care; *Professional-Patient Relations; Qualitative Research; Self Concept},
      isbn={1612-1783 (Print) 1612-1783},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pope, T.. (2012). How person-centred care can improve nurses’ attitudes to hospitalised older patients. Nursing Older People, 24(1), 32-37.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The relationship between the attitudes and behaviours of nurses and the resulting care that they provide to older people is explored. It aims to raise nurses’ awareness and encourages them to reflect on their personal values and behaviours. The person-centred framework developed by McCormack and McCance (2010) is presented as one approach to improve care. The biographical approach (Clarke et al 2003) is also described as a means to enable nurses to see patients as people first and place them at the heart of health care.

    @article{RefWorks:15,
      author={Tina Pope},
      year={2012},
      month={02},
      title={How person-centred care can improve nurses' attitudes to hospitalised older patients},
      journal={Nursing Older People},
      volume={24},
      number={1},
      pages={32-37},
      note={ID: 2011456605},
      abstract={The relationship between the attitudes and behaviours of nurses and the resulting care that they provide to older people is explored. It aims to raise nurses' awareness and encourages them to reflect on their personal values and behaviours. The person-centred framework developed by McCormack and McCance (2010) is presented as one approach to improve care. The biographical approach (Clarke et al 2003) is also described as a means to enable nurses to see patients as people first and place them at the heart of health care.},
      keywords={Patient Centered Care; Nurse Attitudes; Quality Improvement; Aged, Hospitalized; Nursing Practice; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Quality of Nursing Care; Aged; Ageism; Life Experiences; Models, Theoretical; Organizational Culture; Nursing Units; Professional Competence; Patient Advocacy; Values Clarification; Personal Values; Inpatients; Sick Role; Communication; Life History Review; Staff Development},
      isbn={1472-0795},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011456605&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Rae, A.. (2012). Flexible learning to support safe, person-centred care. Nurs Manag (Harrow), 18(9), 32-3.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Effective Practitioner is an educational initiative that supports nurses, midwives and allied health professionals to deliver person-centred, safe and effective care. It offers access to flexible work-based learning and development resources. This article describes the progress of the initiative and sets out the expected effects on service delivery, as well as exploring the Scottish context and the initiative’s relevance to the rest of the UK and abroad.

    @article{RefWorks:52,
      author={A. Rae},
      year={2012},
      month={Feb},
      title={Flexible learning to support safe, person-centred care},
      journal={Nurs Manag (Harrow)},
      volume={18},
      number={9},
      pages={32-3},
      note={Rae, Ann Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't England Nurs Manag (Harrow). 2012 Feb;18(9):32-3.},
      abstract={Effective Practitioner is an educational initiative that supports nurses, midwives and allied health professionals to deliver person-centred, safe and effective care. It offers access to flexible work-based learning and development resources. This article describes the progress of the initiative and sets out the expected effects on service delivery, as well as exploring the Scottish context and the initiative's relevance to the rest of the UK and abroad.},
      keywords={*Education, Nursing, Continuing; Humans; *Internet; *Patient-Centered Care; Safety Management; Scotland; State Medicine},
      isbn={1354-5760 (Print) 1354-5760},
      language={eng}
    }

2011

  • Campinha-Bacote, J.. (2011). Delivering Patient-Centered Care in the Midst of a Cultural Conflict: The Role of Cultural Competence . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(2), 1-1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    At the core of both patient centeredness and cultural competence is the importance of seeing the patient as a unique person. For the purpose of this article, cultural competence is viewed as an expansion of patient-centered care. More specifically, cultural competence can be seen as a necessary set of skills for nurses to attain in order to render effective patient-centered care. However, a vexing question remains, "How does the nurse deliver patient-centered care when the patient’s health beliefs, practices, and values are in direct conflict with medical and nursing guidelines?" The purpose of this article is to provide nurses with a set of culturally competent skills that will enhance the delivery of patient-centered care in the midst of a cultural conflict. I will begin by offering a conceptual framework for cultural competence and a description of the cultural skill needed to formulate a mutually acceptable and culturally relevant treatment plan for each patient. Next I will describe effective approaches for cultural encounters. Finally I will present a vignette that illustrates how the nurse can deliver patient-centered care when the patient’s health beliefs, practices, and values are in direct conflict with medical and nursing guidelines. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:581,
      author={J. Campinha-Bacote},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Delivering Patient-Centered Care in the Midst of a Cultural Conflict: The Role of Cultural Competence },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-1},
      note={id: 5276},
      abstract={At the core of both patient centeredness and cultural competence is the importance of seeing the patient as a unique person. For the purpose of this article, cultural competence is viewed as an expansion of patient-centered care. More specifically, cultural competence can be seen as a necessary set of skills for nurses to attain in order to render effective patient-centered care. However, a vexing question remains, "How does the nurse deliver patient-centered care when the patient's health beliefs, practices, and values are in direct conflict with medical and nursing guidelines?" The purpose of this article is to provide nurses with a set of culturally competent skills that will enhance the delivery of patient-centered care in the midst of a cultural conflict. I will begin by offering a conceptual framework for cultural competence and a description of the cultural skill needed to formulate a mutually acceptable and culturally relevant treatment plan for each patient. Next I will describe effective approaches for cultural encounters. Finally I will present a vignette that illustrates how the nurse can deliver patient-centered care when the patient's health beliefs, practices, and values are in direct conflict with medical and nursing guidelines. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1091-3734},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011167230&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Carver, M. C., & Jessie, A. T.. (2011). Patient-Centered Care in a Medical Home . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(2), 1-1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    There is general consensus that our current healthcare delivery system will not be able to supply an adequate workforce, contain costs, and meet the ever-increasing chronic-care needs of the growing and aging population in the United States (US). Some of the major challenges to the U.S. healthcare system are faced by those on the front lines, namely the healthcare workers in primary care. Part of the emerging solution for primary care is the adoption of the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model. The intent of this model is to provide coordinated and comprehensive care rooted in a strong collaborative relationship. Carilion Clinic in Southwestern Virginia is implementing this patient-centered model in which a proactive, multidisciplinary care team collectively takes responsibility for each patient. In this article we will elaborate on the concepts of patient-centered care and patient-centered medical homes, after which we will offer an exemplar describing the process that Carilion Clinic is using to establish patient-centered medical homes throughout their primary care departments. Limitations of the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model will also be discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:582,
      author={M. C. Carver and A. T. Jessie},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Patient-Centered Care in a Medical Home },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-1},
      note={id: 5280},
      abstract={There is general consensus that our current healthcare delivery system will not be able to supply an adequate workforce, contain costs, and meet the ever-increasing chronic-care needs of the growing and aging population in the United States (US). Some of the major challenges to the U.S. healthcare system are faced by those on the front lines, namely the healthcare workers in primary care. Part of the emerging solution for primary care is the adoption of the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model. The intent of this model is to provide coordinated and comprehensive care rooted in a strong collaborative relationship. Carilion Clinic in Southwestern Virginia is implementing this patient-centered model in which a proactive, multidisciplinary care team collectively takes responsibility for each patient. In this article we will elaborate on the concepts of patient-centered care and patient-centered medical homes, after which we will offer an exemplar describing the process that Carilion Clinic is using to establish patient-centered medical homes throughout their primary care departments. Limitations of the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model will also be discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1091-3734},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011167238&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Hall, P., Marshall, D., Weaver, L., Boyle, A., & Taniguchi, A.. (2011). A Method to Enhance Student Teams in Palliative Care: Piloting the McMaster-Ottawa Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter . Journal of palliative medicine, 14(6), 744-750.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Background: The need for palliative and end-of-life care (PEOLC) education in prelicensure education has been identified. PEOLC requires effective collaborative teamwork. The competencies required for effective collaborative teamwork are only now emerging and methods to evaluate them must be developed. Objective: The adaptation of the traditional Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) for assessment of a student team addressing palliative care issues was undertaken. The McMaster-Ottawa Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter (TOSCE) is intended as a formative evaluation tool for both competencies in interprofessional collaboration for patient-centered practice and PEOLC. Methods: Three stations based on palliative care scenarios were developed. From January 2007 to January 2008, a total of 141 students and 38 observers participated in the evaluation of three stations, with 6-7 students per group and two observers per station. Observers completed checklists for both PEOLC and interprofessional collaborative competencies and, after completing the TOSCEs, students and observers completed questionnaires on their feasibility and acceptability. Results: Eighty-nine percent of the students and 44% of the observers were from medicine. Students and observers found the TOSCE to be an acceptable and feasible assessment tool for both sets of competencies. Reliability and validity data show that the items in both the clinical and interprofessional checklists fit well together, and interrater reliability is readily achieved. Conclusions: The new formative evaluation TOSCE tool, adapted from the traditional OSCE, was acceptable and feasible to students and observers. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:583,
      author={P. Hall and D. Marshall and L. Weaver and A. Boyle and A. Taniguchi},
      year={2011},
      month={06},
      title={A Method to Enhance Student Teams in Palliative Care: Piloting the McMaster-Ottawa Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter },
      journal={Journal of palliative medicine},
      volume={14},
      number={6},
      pages={744-750},
      note={id: 5305},
      abstract={Background: The need for palliative and end-of-life care (PEOLC) education in prelicensure education has been identified. PEOLC requires effective collaborative teamwork. The competencies required for effective collaborative teamwork are only now emerging and methods to evaluate them must be developed. Objective: The adaptation of the traditional Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) for assessment of a student team addressing palliative care issues was undertaken. The McMaster-Ottawa Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter (TOSCE) is intended as a formative evaluation tool for both competencies in interprofessional collaboration for patient-centered practice and PEOLC. Methods: Three stations based on palliative care scenarios were developed. From January 2007 to January 2008, a total of 141 students and 38 observers participated in the evaluation of three stations, with 6-7 students per group and two observers per station. Observers completed checklists for both PEOLC and interprofessional collaborative competencies and, after completing the TOSCEs, students and observers completed questionnaires on their feasibility and acceptability. Results: Eighty-nine percent of the students and 44% of the observers were from medicine. Students and observers found the TOSCE to be an acceptable and feasible assessment tool for both sets of competencies. Reliability and validity data show that the items in both the clinical and interprofessional checklists fit well together, and interrater reliability is readily achieved. Conclusions: The new formative evaluation TOSCE tool, adapted from the traditional OSCE, was acceptable and feasible to students and observers. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Palliative Care -- Education; Terminal Care -- Education; Education, Competency-Based; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Patient Centered Care; Patient Simulation; Education, Interdisciplinary; Human; Pilot Studies; Descriptive Statistics; Students, Medical; Teamwork; Pediatric Care -- Education; Seminars and Workshops; Observational Methods; Checklists; Suffering; Communication; Education, Medical; Scales; Summated Rating Scaling; Psychometrics; Internal Consistency; Interrater Reliability; Questionnaires; Interprofessional Relations; Students, Nursing; Students, Occupational Therapy; Students, Physical Therapy; Students, Social Work; Academic Medical Centers; Multicenter Studies; Ontario; Feedback; Student Attitudes},
      isbn={1096-6218},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011164098&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Hoke, M. M., & Robbins, L. K.. (2011). Continuing the cultural competency journey through exploration of knowledge, attitudes, and skills with advanced practice psychiatric nursing students: an exemplar . Nursing Clinics of North America, 46(2), 201-205.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Numerous training and education programs have evolved to address culturally competent health care delivery. This article describes an exemplar educational approach used to teach cultural competency to beginning graduate psychiatric mental health nursing students. Using interactive strategies delivered within the 4 phases of the curriculum, the approach has been shown to facilitate students’ ongoing journey to cultural competence. Building on baccalaureate nursing competencies, the course addresses attitudes, knowledge, skills, and cultural humility to strengthen cultural self-assessment, cross-cultural clinical practice expertise, and the use of culturally appropriate research for graduate students. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:584,
      author={M. M. Hoke and L. K. Robbins},
      year={2011},
      month={06},
      title={Continuing the cultural competency journey through exploration of knowledge, attitudes, and skills with advanced practice psychiatric nursing students: an exemplar },
      journal={Nursing Clinics of North America},
      volume={46},
      number={2},
      pages={201-205},
      note={id: 5307},
      abstract={Numerous training and education programs have evolved to address culturally competent health care delivery. This article describes an exemplar educational approach used to teach cultural competency to beginning graduate psychiatric mental health nursing students. Using interactive strategies delivered within the 4 phases of the curriculum, the approach has been shown to facilitate students' ongoing journey to cultural competence. Building on baccalaureate nursing competencies, the course addresses attitudes, knowledge, skills, and cultural humility to strengthen cultural self-assessment, cross-cultural clinical practice expertise, and the use of culturally appropriate research for graduate students. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Advanced Practice Nurses -- Education; Cultural Competence -- Education; Psychiatric Nursing -- Education; Student Attitudes; Student Knowledge; Behavioral Objectives; Reflection; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011161274&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Hughes, R. G.. (2011). Overview and Summary: Patient-Centered Care: Challenges and Rewards . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(2), 1-1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    In this issue, six articles have been brought together to share some unique insights into the challenges and impact of putting patient- and family-centered care into everyday practice. Key topics discussed include defining patient- and family-centered care (or person-centered care); describing essential components of patient-centered care; and developing strategies to educate clinicians regarding effective, patient-centered care. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:585,
      author={R. G. Hughes},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Overview and Summary: Patient-Centered Care: Challenges and Rewards },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-1},
      note={id: 5279},
      abstract={In this issue, six articles have been brought together to share some unique insights into the challenges and impact of putting patient- and family-centered care into everyday practice. Key topics discussed include defining patient- and family-centered care (or person-centered care); describing essential components of patient-centered care; and developing strategies to educate clinicians regarding effective, patient-centered care. (Source: Publisher) 
     },
      isbn={1091-3734},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011167237&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Johnson, L., & Smith, C. M.. (2011). A Hybrid Course for the RN-to-Baccalaureate Curriculum: Patient-Centered Care and Quality . Nurse educator, 36(4), 155-160.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Teaching RN-to-baccalaureate nursing students to incorporate patient-centered care and quality concepts into the practice environment presents challenges and opportunities for nurse educators. The authors describe development, deployment, and evaluation of an RN-to-baccalaureate hybrid course focused on patient-centered care and quality improvement. Course teaching strategies and evaluation of student learning and the efficacy of using a hybrid instructional design are discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:586,
      author={L. Johnson and C. M. Smith},
      year={2011},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={A Hybrid Course for the RN-to-Baccalaureate Curriculum: Patient-Centered Care and Quality },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={36},
      number={4},
      pages={155-160},
      note={id: 5344; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={Teaching RN-to-baccalaureate nursing students to incorporate patient-centered care and quality concepts into the practice environment presents challenges and opportunities for nurse educators. The authors describe development, deployment, and evaluation of an RN-to-baccalaureate hybrid course focused on patient-centered care and quality improvement. Course teaching strategies and evaluation of student learning and the efficacy of using a hybrid instructional design are discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9855; 0363-3624},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lait, J., Suter, E., Arthur, N., & Deutschlander, S.. (2011). Interprofessional mentoring: Enhancing students’ clinical learning . Nurse Education in Practice, 11(3), 211-215.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Interprofessional (IP) collaboration is recognized as critical for patient-centred care. The clinical setting is an ideal environment for students to learn the competencies required to effectively work with providers from other professions. To enhance traditional clinical placements, we propose an IP mentoring approach, defined as learning that takes place between providers and students who are from different disciplines or health professions. In IP mentoring, students have primary relationships with their preceptors, but also have interactions with providers from other professions. We implemented IP mentoring with the support of two faculties of nursing in Alberta, Canada who provided an IP clinical focus for interested fourth year students. We emphasized to providers and students that there are no prescribed interactions that comprise IP mentoring; experiences between providers and students are context-specific and often informal. Through our evaluation we demonstrated that in IP mentoring, provider commitment was important, students engaged in IP activities of varying complexity, and students learned about roles of other professions and how to work together to provide patient-centred care. IP mentoring is an effective learning strategy to enhance students’ knowledge and skills in IP collaboration without radical changes to the structure of the placements or to the educational curricula. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:588,
      author={J. Lait and E. Suter and N. Arthur and S. Deutschlander},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Interprofessional mentoring: Enhancing students' clinical learning },
      journal={Nurse Education in Practice},
      volume={11},
      number={3},
      pages={211-215},
      note={id: 5311},
      abstract={Interprofessional (IP) collaboration is recognized as critical for patient-centred care. The clinical setting is an ideal environment for students to learn the competencies required to effectively work with providers from other professions. To enhance traditional clinical placements, we propose an IP mentoring approach, defined as learning that takes place between providers and students who are from different disciplines or health professions. In IP mentoring, students have primary relationships with their preceptors, but also have interactions with providers from other professions. We implemented IP mentoring with the support of two faculties of nursing in Alberta, Canada who provided an IP clinical focus for interested fourth year students. We emphasized to providers and students that there are no prescribed interactions that comprise IP mentoring; experiences between providers and students are context-specific and often informal. Through our evaluation we demonstrated that in IP mentoring, provider commitment was important, students engaged in IP activities of varying complexity, and students learned about roles of other professions and how to work together to provide patient-centred care. IP mentoring is an effective learning strategy to enhance students' knowledge and skills in IP collaboration without radical changes to the structure of the placements or to the educational curricula. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Clinical -- Trends; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate -- Trends -- Alberta; Interprofessional Relations; Mentorship; Patient Centered Care -- Education; Preceptorship; Program Development; Alberta; Coding; Convenience Sample; Data Analysis Software; Multicenter Studies; Outcomes of Education; Program Evaluation; Program Implementation; Schools, Nursing; Semi-Structured Interview; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Teaching Methods; Thematic Analysis},
      isbn={1471-5953},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011033048&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • McCance, T., McCormack, B., & Dewing, J.. (2011). An Exploration of Person-Centredness in Practice . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(2), 1-1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    "Person-centredness" is a term that is becoming increasingly familiar within health and social care at a global level; it is being used to describe a standard of care that ensures the patient/client is at the centre of care delivery. In this article we explore the relevance of person-centredness in the context of nursing, taking account of the ongoing critical debate and dialogue regarding developments in this field. Person-centredness is recognised as a multidimensional concept. The complexity of the concept contributes to the challenge of articulating its shared meaning and describing how it can be applied in practice. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the issues pertaining to language and conceptual clarity, with a view to making connections and increasing our shared understanding of person-centred care in a way that can impact nursing practice. We begin by describing the development of the concept of person-centredness, after which we discuss the synergies with patient-centredness and other related terms, and consider how nurses can operationalise person-centredness in their practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:589,
      author={T. McCance and B. McCormack and J. Dewing},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={An Exploration of Person-Centredness in Practice },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-1},
      note={id: 5275},
      abstract={"Person-centredness" is a term that is becoming increasingly familiar within health and social care at a global level; it is being used to describe a standard of care that ensures the patient/client is at the centre of care delivery. In this article we explore the relevance of person-centredness in the context of nursing, taking account of the ongoing critical debate and dialogue regarding developments in this field. Person-centredness is recognised as a multidimensional concept. The complexity of the concept contributes to the challenge of articulating its shared meaning and describing how it can be applied in practice. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the issues pertaining to language and conceptual clarity, with a view to making connections and increasing our shared understanding of person-centred care in a way that can impact nursing practice. We begin by describing the development of the concept of person-centredness, after which we discuss the synergies with patient-centredness and other related terms, and consider how nurses can operationalise person-centredness in their practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1091-3734},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011167229&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • McCormack, B., Dewing, J., & McCance, T.. (2011). Developing Person-Centred Care: Addressing Contextual Challenges Through Practice Development . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(2), 1-1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Developing person-centred care is not a one-time event; rather it requires a sustained commitment from organisations to the ongoing facilitation of developments, a commitment both in clinical teams and across organizations. Contextual factors pose the greatest challenge to person-centredness and the development of cultures that can sustain person-centred care. We will begin with a general comment on ‘context’ and its meaning before exploring three particular factors that influence the practice context, namely, workplace culture, learning culture, and the physical environment. Next we explore a particular approach to developing person-centred care through emancipatory practice development. We highlight the importance of facilitation through emancipatory practice development programmes and describe how person-centred care can be developed through the presentation of a case study that illustrates the principles and processes of emancipatory practice development as well as the outcomes achieved. We conclude with an application to clinical practice. A key consideration for all organisations in the development of person-centred care is to move from what we suggest are ‘person-centred moments’ (individual, ad hoc experiences of person-centredness) to ‘person-centred care’ as an underpinning culture of teams and organisations. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:590,
      author={B. McCormack and J. Dewing and T. McCance},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Developing Person-Centred Care: Addressing Contextual Challenges Through Practice Development },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-1},
      note={id: 5277},
      abstract={Developing person-centred care is not a one-time event; rather it requires a sustained commitment from organisations to the ongoing facilitation of developments, a commitment both in clinical teams and across organizations. Contextual factors pose the greatest challenge to person-centredness and the development of cultures that can sustain person-centred care. We will begin with a general comment on 'context' and its meaning before exploring three particular factors that influence the practice context, namely, workplace culture, learning culture, and the physical environment. Next we explore a particular approach to developing person-centred care through emancipatory practice development. We highlight the importance of facilitation through emancipatory practice development programmes and describe how person-centred care can be developed through the presentation of a case study that illustrates the principles and processes of emancipatory practice development as well as the outcomes achieved. We conclude with an application to clinical practice. A key consideration for all organisations in the development of person-centred care is to move from what we suggest are 'person-centred moments' (individual, ad hoc experiences of person-centredness) to 'person-centred care' as an underpinning culture of teams and organisations. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1091-3734},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011167231&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Rhodes, M. K., Morris, A. H., & Lazenby, R. B.. (2011). Nursing at its Best: Competent and Caring . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(2), 1-1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    An award-winning journalist spoke to a group of students during their first month in a baccalaureate nursing program, challenging the nursing profession to abandon its image of nurses as angels and promote an image of nurses as competent professionals who are both knowledgeable and caring. This presentation elicited an unanticipated level of emotion, primarily anger, on the part of the students. This unexpected reaction prompted faculty to explore the students’ motivations for entering the nursing profession and their perceptions of the relative importance of competence and caring in nursing. The authors begin this article by reviewing the literature related to motivations for selecting a profession and the contributions of competence and caring to nursing care. Next they describe their survey method and analysis and report their findings regarding student motivations and perceptions of competence and caring in nursing. Emerging themes for motivation reflected nursing values, especially altruism, and coincided with students’ beliefs of self-efficacy and goal attainment. Student responses indicated their understanding of the need for competence and revealed idealistic perceptions of caring. The authors conclude with a discussion of these themes and recommendations for student recruitment, curricular emphasis, and future research in this area. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:591,
      author={M. K. Rhodes and A. H. Morris and R. B. Lazenby},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Nursing at its Best: Competent and Caring },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-1},
      note={id: 5631},
      abstract={An award-winning journalist spoke to a group of students during their first month in a baccalaureate nursing program, challenging the nursing profession to abandon its image of nurses as angels and promote an image of nurses as competent professionals who are both knowledgeable and caring. This presentation elicited an unanticipated level of emotion, primarily anger, on the part of the students. This unexpected reaction prompted faculty to explore the students' motivations for entering the nursing profession and their perceptions of the relative importance of competence and caring in nursing. The authors begin this article by reviewing the literature related to motivations for selecting a profession and the contributions of competence and caring to nursing care. Next they describe their survey method and analysis and report their findings regarding student motivations and perceptions of competence and caring in nursing. Emerging themes for motivation reflected nursing values, especially altruism, and coincided with students' beliefs of self-efficacy and goal attainment. Student responses indicated their understanding of the need for competence and revealed idealistic perceptions of caring. The authors conclude with a discussion of these themes and recommendations for student recruitment, curricular emphasis, and future research in this area. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Motivation; Caring; Student Attitudes; Clinical Competence; Human; Professional Image; Alabama; Adult; Male; Female; Surveys; Survey Research; Middle Age; Data Analysis Software; Content Analysis; Grounded Theory; Attitude Measures; Qualitative Studies},
      isbn={1091-3734},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011167236&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Small, D., & Small, R. M.. (2011). Patients First! Engaging the Hearts and Minds of Nurses with a Patient-Centered Practice Model . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(2), 1-1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Like every healthcare system today, the Cleveland Clinic health system is a combination of medical hospitals, institutes, and services in which the implementation of uniform care methodologies faces significant barriers. The guiding principle of the Cleveland Clinic, ‘Patients First,’ focuses on the principle of patient- and family-centered care (PFCC) but deliberately lacks details due to the wide scope of care delivered by the organization. The Stanley Shalom Zielony Institute of Nursing Excellence (the Nursing Institute) at the Cleveland Clinic was charged with standardizing nursing practice across a system with 11,000 registered nurses and 800 advanced practice nurses. The challenge involved providing firm direction on delivering PFCC that was appropriate for all clinical disciplines and could be implemented quickly across existing practices and technologies. Successful implementation required full engagement in the concept of PFCC by what the Institute for Healthcare Improvement has termed the ‘hearts and minds’ of nurses. To achieve these ends, development of a systemwide nursing practice model was initiated. In this article the authors identify the essence of PFCC, consider barriers to PFCC, review their process of developing PFCC, and describe how the Cleveland Clinic health system has implemented a PFCC nursing practice model. In doing so the authors explore how the concept of ‘Passion for Nursing’ was used to stimulate nurse engagement in PFCC. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:592,
      author={DC Small and R. M. Small},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Patients First! Engaging the Hearts and Minds of Nurses with a Patient-Centered Practice Model },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-1},
      note={id: 5281},
      abstract={Like every healthcare system today, the Cleveland Clinic health system is a combination of medical hospitals, institutes, and services in which the implementation of uniform care methodologies faces significant barriers. The guiding principle of the Cleveland Clinic, 'Patients First,' focuses on the principle of patient- and family-centered care (PFCC) but deliberately lacks details due to the wide scope of care delivered by the organization. The Stanley Shalom Zielony Institute of Nursing Excellence (the Nursing Institute) at the Cleveland Clinic was charged with standardizing nursing practice across a system with 11,000 registered nurses and 800 advanced practice nurses. The challenge involved providing firm direction on delivering PFCC that was appropriate for all clinical disciplines and could be implemented quickly across existing practices and technologies. Successful implementation required full engagement in the concept of PFCC by what the Institute for Healthcare Improvement has termed the 'hearts and minds' of nurses. To achieve these ends, development of a systemwide nursing practice model was initiated. In this article the authors identify the essence of PFCC, consider barriers to PFCC, review their process of developing PFCC, and describe how the Cleveland Clinic health system has implemented a PFCC nursing practice model. In doing so the authors explore how the concept of 'Passion for Nursing' was used to stimulate nurse engagement in PFCC. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1091-3734},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011167239&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Smith-Stoner, M.. (2011). Teaching Patient-Centered Care During the Silver Hour . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 16(2), 1-1.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Teaching students and clinicians about end-of-life care is an important part of healthcare. Utilizing the framework of the Silver Hour is one method of illustrating the urgent, intense comfort needs required by patients and families throughout the imminently dying process, wherever the patient may be receiving services. When death is imminent, it is extremely important to provide patient- and family-centered care as the waning moments of life transition to the first moments of death. A variety of instructional methods can be used can be used to teach students to provide multidimensional, patient-centered care at the end of life. The author begins by describing the basic concept of patient-centered care and by discussing the importance of teaching students about this level of care. Next she describes the concept of the Silver Hour, along with a discussion of how the Silver Hour relates to nursing education. She also notes the importance of both role modeling in providing patient-centered care and of drawing upon the five ways of knowing to strengthen the teaching of students about care during the Silver Hour. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:593,
      author={M. Smith-Stoner},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Teaching Patient-Centered Care During the Silver Hour },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={1-1},
      note={id: 5282},
      abstract={Teaching students and clinicians about end-of-life care is an important part of healthcare. Utilizing the framework of the Silver Hour is one method of illustrating the urgent, intense comfort needs required by patients and families throughout the imminently dying process, wherever the patient may be receiving services. When death is imminent, it is extremely important to provide patient- and family-centered care as the waning moments of life transition to the first moments of death. A variety of instructional methods can be used can be used to teach students to provide multidimensional, patient-centered care at the end of life. The author begins by describing the basic concept of patient-centered care and by discussing the importance of teaching students about this level of care. Next she describes the concept of the Silver Hour, along with a discussion of how the Silver Hour relates to nursing education. She also notes the importance of both role modeling in providing patient-centered care and of drawing upon the five ways of knowing to strengthen the teaching of students about care during the Silver Hour. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1091-3734},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011167240&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

2010

  • (2010). Patient-Centered Communication Standards and Advancing Effective Communication, Cultural Competence, and Patient- and Family-Centered Care: A Roadmap for Hospitals . Oakbrook Terrace, IL: The Joint Commission.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Roadmap for Hospitals was developed by The Joint Commission to inspire hospitals to integrate concepts from the communication, cultural competence, and patient- and family-centered care fields into their organizations. It provides recommendations to help hospitals address unique patient needs, meet the new Patient-Centered Communication standards, and comply with existing Joint Commission requirements. Example practices, information on laws and regulations, and links to supplemental information, model policies, and educational tools are also included. The Patient-Centered Communication standards will be presented in a separate appendix that provides self-assessment guidelines and example practices for each standard. (Source: Publisher)

    @book{RefWorks:572,
      year={2010},
      title={
    Patient-Centered Communication Standards and Advancing Effective Communication, Cultural Competence, and Patient- and Family-Centered Care: A Roadmap for Hospitals },
      publisher={The Joint Commission},
      address={Oakbrook Terrace, IL},
      note={id: 4782},
      abstract={The Roadmap for Hospitals was developed by The Joint Commission to inspire hospitals to integrate concepts from the communication, cultural competence, and patient- and family-centered care fields into their organizations. It provides recommendations to help hospitals address unique patient needs, meet the new Patient-Centered Communication standards, and comply with existing Joint Commission requirements. Example practices, information on laws and regulations, and links to supplemental information, model policies, and educational tools are also included. The Patient-Centered Communication standards will be presented in a separate appendix that provides self-assessment guidelines and example practices for each standard. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Amerson, R.. (2010). The impact of service-learning on cultural competence . Nursing education perspectives, 31(1), 18-22.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Service-learning provides an excellent pedagogy for introducing students to clients of different cultural backgrounds, helping students become aware of the issues these clients face related to culture and health care, and teaching culturally appropriate care. The Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool was used to evaluate self-perceived cultural competence in a convenience sample of 60 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a community health nursing course following the completion of service-learning projects with local and international communities. Pre- and posttests were analyzed based on total scores and subscale (cognitive, practical, and affective) scores. A paired-samples t test compared the mean pretest total score to the mean posttest total score, which demonstrated a significant increase. In addition, paired-samples t tests demonstrated a significant increase in each subscale. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:573,
      author={R. Amerson},
      year={2010},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={The impact of service-learning on cultural competence },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={31},
      number={1},
      pages={18-22},
      note={id: 4647; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={Service-learning provides an excellent pedagogy for introducing students to clients of different cultural backgrounds, helping students become aware of the issues these clients face related to culture and health care, and teaching culturally appropriate care. The Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool was used to evaluate self-perceived cultural competence in a convenience sample of 60 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a community health nursing course following the completion of service-learning projects with local and international communities. Pre- and posttests were analyzed based on total scores and subscale (cognitive, practical, and affective) scores. A paired-samples t test compared the mean pretest total score to the mean posttest total score, which demonstrated a significant increase. In addition, paired-samples t tests demonstrated a significant increase in each subscale. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Community Health Nursing/education; Cultural Competency/education/psychology; Cultural Diversity; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Female; Guatemala; Humans; International Educational Exchange; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Nursing Education Research; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; Self Efficacy; South Carolina; Students, Nursing/psychology; Transcultural Nursing/education},
      isbn={1536-5026; 1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ardoin, K. B., & Wilson, K. B.. (2010). Cultural diversity: what role does it play in patient safety? . Nursing for women’s health, 14(4), 322-326.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Many nurses today are likely to be caring for a culturally diverse group of patients. Professional nursing practice must adapt to the changing values and beliefs of the population it serves, and as part of that commitment, nurses are required to assure that all patients are safe, regardless of their cultural background. Language variations and other unknown barriers can put some patients at risk for having a negative health care experience. The purpose of this article is to promote achievement of safe and quality outcomes of care for all populations. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:596,
      author={K. B. Ardoin and K. B. Wilson},
      year={2010},
      month={Aug},
      title={Cultural diversity: what role does it play in patient safety? },
      journal={Nursing for women's health},
      volume={14},
      number={4},
      pages={322-326},
      note={id: 4865; JID: 101304602; ppublish },
      abstract={Many nurses today are likely to be caring for a culturally diverse group of patients. Professional nursing practice must adapt to the changing values and beliefs of the population it serves, and as part of that commitment, nurses are required to assure that all patients are safe, regardless of their cultural background. Language variations and other unknown barriers can put some patients at risk for having a negative health care experience. The purpose of this article is to promote achievement of safe and quality outcomes of care for all populations. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Acculturation; Adult; Cultural Competency; Cultural Diversity; Female; Humans; Nursing/standards; Patient-Centered Care; Transcultural Nursing/education/standards},
      isbn={1751-486X; 1751-4851},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Axtell, S. A., Avery, M., & Westra, B.. (2010). Incorporating cultural competence content into graduate nursing curricula through community-university collaboration . Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 21(2), 183-191.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Health professionals are reorienting workforce education to better prepare students for working with increasingly diverse populations. The authors describe a community-based curriculum deliberation process in which community leaders and health workers deliberated with faculty and students to make recommendations about a graduate nursing curriculum. There were five areas of competencies recommended for graduate nursing to improve care of diverse populations: self-awareness, basic knowledge of culture and identity, attitudes that promote cross-cultural communication, cross-cultural clinical skills, and advocacy skills. The school now is in the process of phasing in recommendations gained from the deliberation. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:574,
      author={S. A. Axtell and M. Avery and B. Westra},
      year={2010},
      month={04},
      title={Incorporating cultural competence content into graduate nursing curricula through community-university collaboration },
      journal={Journal of Transcultural Nursing},
      volume={21},
      number={2},
      pages={183-191},
      note={id: 4719},
      abstract={Health professionals are reorienting workforce education to better prepare students for working with increasingly diverse populations. The authors describe a community-based curriculum deliberation process in which community leaders and health workers deliberated with faculty and students to make recommendations about a graduate nursing curriculum. There were five areas of competencies recommended for graduate nursing to improve care of diverse populations: self-awareness, basic knowledge of culture and identity, attitudes that promote cross-cultural communication, cross-cultural clinical skills, and advocacy skills. The school now is in the process of phasing in recommendations gained from the deliberation. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cultural Competence -- Education; Education, Nursing, Graduate; Attitude; Collaboration; Committees; Communities; Culture; Curriculum; Faculty, Nursing; Goals and Objectives; Midwestern United States; Nursing Skills; Schools, Nursing; Social Identity; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={1043-6596},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010604933&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Brunero, S., Lamont, S., & Coates, M.. (2010). A review of empathy education in nursing . Nursing inquiry, 17(1), 65-74.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The ability for nurse educators to improve the empathy skill set of nurses has been the subject of several studies with varied outcomes. The aim of this paper is to review the evidence for empathy education programmes in nursing and make recommendations for future nurse education. A review of CINAHL, Medline, Psych Info and Google Scholar was undertaken using the keywords empathy, person centredness, patient centredness, client centredness, education and nursing. The studies included were required to have measured the effectiveness of empathy training in postgraduate and or undergraduate nurses. The included studies incorporated both qualitative and quantitative methods and were published in peer-reviewed journals. Studies were ranked for level of evidence according to The Joanna Briggs Institute criteria. Seventeen studies from the literature review were found that met the inclusion criteria. Of the 17 studies, 11 reported statistically significant improvements in empathy scores versus six studies that did not. Several variables may affect empathy education that need to be accounted in future studies such as; gender, cultural values and clinical speciality experience. Models of education that show most promise are those that use experiential styles of learning. The studies reviewed demonstrated that it is possible to increase nurses’ empathic ability. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:575,
      author={S. Brunero and S. Lamont and M. Coates},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar},
      title={A review of empathy education in nursing },
      journal={Nursing inquiry},
      volume={17},
      number={1},
      pages={65-74},
      note={id: 4691; JID: 9505881; RF: 52; ppublish },
      abstract={The ability for nurse educators to improve the empathy skill set of nurses has been the subject of several studies with varied outcomes. The aim of this paper is to review the evidence for empathy education programmes in nursing and make recommendations for future nurse education. A review of CINAHL, Medline, Psych Info and Google Scholar was undertaken using the keywords empathy, person centredness, patient centredness, client centredness, education and nursing. The studies included were required to have measured the effectiveness of empathy training in postgraduate and or undergraduate nurses. The included studies incorporated both qualitative and quantitative methods and were published in peer-reviewed journals. Studies were ranked for level of evidence according to The Joanna Briggs Institute criteria. Seventeen studies from the literature review were found that met the inclusion criteria. Of the 17 studies, 11 reported statistically significant improvements in empathy scores versus six studies that did not. Several variables may affect empathy education that need to be accounted in future studies such as; gender, cultural values and clinical speciality experience. Models of education that show most promise are those that use experiential styles of learning. The studies reviewed demonstrated that it is possible to increase nurses' empathic ability. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Empathy; Humanism; Humans; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Problem-Based Learning; Qualitative Research; Research Design},
      isbn={1440-1800; 1320-7881},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dacey, M., Murphy, J. I., Anderson, D. C., & McCloskey, W. W.. (2010). An interprofessional service-learning course: uniting students across educational levels and promoting patient-centered care . The Journal of nursing education, 49(12), 696-699.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Recognizing the importance of interprofessional education, we developed a pilot interprofessional education course at our institution that included a total of 10 nursing, BS health psychology, premedical, and pharmacy students. Course goals were for students to: 1) learn about, practice, and enhance their skills as members of an interprofessional team, and 2) create and deliver a community-based service-learning program to help prevent or slow the progression of cardiovascular disease in older adults. Teaching methods included lecture, role-play, case studies, peer editing, oral and poster presentation, and discussion. Interprofessional student teams created and delivered two different health promotion programs at an older adult care facility. Despite barriers such as scheduling conflicts and various educational experiences, this course enabled students to gain greater respect for the contributions of other professions and made them more patient centered. In addition, inter-professional student teams positively influenced the health attitudes and behaviors of the older adults whom they encountered. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:597,
      author={M. Dacey and J. I. Murphy and D. C. Anderson and W. W. McCloskey},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec},
      title={An interprofessional service-learning course: uniting students across educational levels and promoting patient-centered care },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={12},
      pages={696-699},
      note={id: 4863; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 7705432; 2009/12/02 [received]; 2010/02/03 [accepted]; 2010/08/31 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Recognizing the importance of interprofessional education, we developed a pilot interprofessional education course at our institution that included a total of 10 nursing, BS health psychology, premedical, and pharmacy students. Course goals were for students to: 1) learn about, practice, and enhance their skills as members of an interprofessional team, and 2) create and deliver a community-based service-learning program to help prevent or slow the progression of cardiovascular disease in older adults. Teaching methods included lecture, role-play, case studies, peer editing, oral and poster presentation, and discussion. Interprofessional student teams created and delivered two different health promotion programs at an older adult care facility. Despite barriers such as scheduling conflicts and various educational experiences, this course enabled students to gain greater respect for the contributions of other professions and made them more patient centered. In addition, inter-professional student teams positively influenced the health attitudes and behaviors of the older adults whom they encountered. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Behavioral Medicine/education; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Organizational Objectives; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Pilot Projects; Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration; Program Evaluation},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dumont, S., Briere, N., Morin, D., Houle, N., & Iloko-Fundi, M.. (2010). Implementing an interfaculty series of courses on interprofessional collaboration in prelicensure health science curriculums . Education for Health: Change in Learning & Practice (Network: Towards Unity for Health), 23(1), 12p-12p.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Introduction: Interprofessional collaborative practices are increasingly recognized as an effective way to deal with complex health problems. However, health sciences students continue to be trained in specialized programs and have little occasion for learning in interdisciplinary contexts. Program Development: The project’s purpose was to develop content and an educational design for new prelicensure interfaculty courses on interprofessional collaboration in patient and family-centered care which embedded interprofessional education principles where participants learn with, from and about each other. Implementation: Intensive training was part of a 45-hour program, offered each semester, which was divided into three 15-hour courses given on weekends, to enhance accessibility. Evaluation: A total of 215 students completed questionnaires following the courses, to assess their satisfaction with the educational content. Pre/post measures assessed perception of skills acquisition and perceived benefits of interprofessional collaboration training. Results showed a significant increase from the students’ point of view in the knowledge and benefits to be gained from interprofessional collaboration training. Conclusion: The implementation of an interfaculty training curriculum on interprofessional collaborative practice is challenging in many ways, though it offers a true opportunity to prepare future health human resources for contemporary practice requirements. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:598,
      author={S. Dumont and N. Briere and D. Morin and N. Houle and M. Iloko-Fundi},
      year={2010},
      month={04},
      title={Implementing an interfaculty series of courses on interprofessional collaboration in prelicensure health science curriculums },
      journal={Education for Health: Change in Learning & Practice (Network: Towards Unity for Health)},
      volume={23},
      number={1},
      pages={12p-12p},
      note={id: 4982},
      abstract={Introduction: Interprofessional collaborative practices are increasingly recognized as an effective way to deal with complex health problems. However, health sciences students continue to be trained in specialized programs and have little occasion for learning in interdisciplinary contexts. Program Development: The project's purpose was to develop content and an educational design for new prelicensure interfaculty courses on interprofessional collaboration in patient and family-centered care which embedded interprofessional education principles where participants learn with, from and about each other. Implementation: Intensive training was part of a 45-hour program, offered each semester, which was divided into three 15-hour courses given on weekends, to enhance accessibility. Evaluation: A total of 215 students completed questionnaires following the courses, to assess their satisfaction with the educational content. Pre/post measures assessed perception of skills acquisition and perceived benefits of interprofessional collaboration training. Results showed a significant increase from the students' point of view in the knowledge and benefits to be gained from interprofessional collaboration training. Conclusion: The implementation of an interfaculty training curriculum on interprofessional collaborative practice is challenging in many ways, though it offers a true opportunity to prepare future health human resources for contemporary practice requirements. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration -- Education; Family Centered Care -- Education; Interprofessional Relations -- Education; Patient Centered Care -- Education; Students, Allied Health -- Psychosocial Factors; Female; Funding Source; Human; Male; Pretest-Posttest Design; Questionnaires; Self Report; Summated Rating Scaling},
      isbn={1357-6283},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010702904&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Frampton, S. B., & Guastello, S.. (2010). Putting patients first: patient-centered care: more than the sum of its parts . The American Journal of Nursing, 110(9), 49-53.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This is the seventh and last in a series of articles from Planetree, an international non profit organization founded in 1978 that’s "committed to improving medical care from the patient’s perspective." Criteria for Planetree designation include whether hospitals balance patients’ needs with their safety, whether transparency remains a priority even when something unexpected occurs, whether the work environment is supportive of staff, and whether patient-centered approaches are applied to billing and community outreach. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:599,
      author={S. B. Frampton and S. Guastello},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep},
      title={Putting patients first: patient-centered care: more than the sum of its parts },
      journal={The American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={110},
      number={9},
      pages={49-53},
      note={id: 4864; LR: 20110114; JID: 0372646; CIN: Am J Nurs. 2011 Jan;111(1):12. PMID: 21191212; CIN: Am J Nurs. 2011 Jan;111(1):12. PMID: 21191211; ppublish },
      abstract={This is the seventh and last in a series of articles from Planetree, an international non profit organization founded in 1978 that's "committed to improving medical care from the patient's perspective." Criteria for Planetree designation include whether hospitals balance patients' needs with their safety, whether transparency remains a priority even when something unexpected occurs, whether the work environment is supportive of staff, and whether patient-centered approaches are applied to billing and community outreach. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Benchmarking; Health Plan Implementation; Humans; North America; Nurse's Role; Organizational Culture; Patient-Centered Care/standards; Quality Assurance, Health Care/methods},
      isbn={1538-7488; 0002-936X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Griffin, T.. (2010). Bringing change-of-shift report to the bedside: a patient- and family-centered approach . The Journal of perinatal & neonatal nursing, 24(4), 348-53; quiz 354-5.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Change-of-shift report is the time when responsibility and accountability for the care of a patient is transferred from one nurse to another. The communication that ensues during this process is linked to both patient safety and continuity of care giving. While many nurses already recognize the value of bringing report to the patient’s bedside and have practiced in this manner, this remains relatively uncommon. Typically, nurse change-of-shift report has occurred at a nurses’ station, conference room, or hallway and may be face to face, audio-taped, recorded on a telephone service, or in a written format. When report is given away from the bedside, the opportunity to visualize the patient and include the patient and family in an exchange of information and care planning is lost. Yet, patients and families, also stewards of patient safety, are given an opportunity to hear and participate in the exchange of information when report is brought to the bedside. Welcoming patients and families into the report process may be a new and challenging process for nursing staff. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:600,
      author={T. Griffin},
      year={2010},
      month={Oct-Dec},
      title={Bringing change-of-shift report to the bedside: a patient- and family-centered approach },
      journal={The Journal of perinatal & neonatal nursing},
      volume={24},
      number={4},
      pages={348-53; quiz 354-5},
      note={id: 4861; JID: 8801387; ppublish },
      abstract={Change-of-shift report is the time when responsibility and accountability for the care of a patient is transferred from one nurse to another. The communication that ensues during this process is linked to both patient safety and continuity of care giving. While many nurses already recognize the value of bringing report to the patient's bedside and have practiced in this manner, this remains relatively uncommon. Typically, nurse change-of-shift report has occurred at a nurses' station, conference room, or hallway and may be face to face, audio-taped, recorded on a telephone service, or in a written format. When report is given away from the bedside, the opportunity to visualize the patient and include the patient and family in an exchange of information and care planning is lost. Yet, patients and families, also stewards of patient safety, are given an opportunity to hear and participate in the exchange of information when report is brought to the bedside. Welcoming patients and families into the report process may be a new and challenging process for nursing staff. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1550-5073; 0893-2190},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kantor, S. A.. (2010). Pedagogical change in nursing education: one instructor’s experience . Journal of Nursing Education, 49(7), 414-417.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Rapid health care changes and increasing client complexity have begun to transform expectations for nursing care. This has prompted nurse educators to explore curriculum changes in an effort to prepare nurse graduates for the challenges they will face. Significant curriculum revisions within a collaborative Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program presented the opportunity for self- reflection and a subsequent change in pedagogy. The author’s shift from a traditional didactic and content-driven instructional method to a student-centered concept-based approach is explored. This change, described through the use of one learning tool example, the Know-Be-Do (KBD), illustrates an innovative approach to teaching and learning. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:587,
      author={S. A. Kantor},
      year={2010},
      month={07},
      title={Pedagogical change in nursing education: one instructor's experience },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={49},
      number={7},
      pages={414-417},
      note={id: 5312},
      abstract={Rapid health care changes and increasing client complexity have begun to transform expectations for nursing care. This has prompted nurse educators to explore curriculum changes in an effort to prepare nurse graduates for the challenges they will face. Significant curriculum revisions within a collaborative Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree program presented the opportunity for self- reflection and a subsequent change in pedagogy. The author's shift from a traditional didactic and content-driven instructional method to a student-centered concept-based approach is explored. This change, described through the use of one learning tool example, the Know-Be-Do (KBD), illustrates an innovative approach to teaching and learning. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Patient Centered Care; Students, Nursing; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010708737&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Laird-Fick, H. S., Solomon, D., Jodoin, C., Dwamena, F. C., Alexander, K., Rawsthorne, L., Banker, T., Gourineni, N., Aloka, F., Frankel, R. M., & Smith, R. C.. (2010). Training residents and nurses to work as a patient-centered care team on a medical ward . Patient education and counseling, 2010 Jun 14. [Epub ahead of print].
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: To train medical residents and nurses to work together as a patient-centered care (PCC) team on a medical ward and test its feasibility, nurses’ learning, and patient outcomes. METHOD: Working with administrative leadership, we consolidated residents’ patients on one 32-bed ward. Already training residents in an evidence-based patient-centered method, we now trained 5 nurse leaders similarly, and they then trained all staff nurses. A national consultant visited twice. Specific team-building activities for nurses and residents fostered ward interactions. We used a retrospective pre/post/6-month post-design to evaluate nurses’ knowledge and self-efficacy of patient-centered skills. Patients were assigned non-randomly to our unit or comparison units from our emergency room; using a post-test only design, the primary endpoint was patient satisfaction. RESULTS: 28 trained nurses showed improvement in knowledge (p=0.02) and self-efficacy (p=0.001). 81 treatment patients showed no improvement in satisfaction (p=0.44). CONCLUSION: Training nurses in patient-centered practices were effective. Unique in this country, we also trained nurses and residents together as a PCC team on a medical ward and showed it was feasible and well accepted. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: We provide a template for team training and urge that others explore this important new area and contribute to its further development. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:576,
      author={H. S. Laird-Fick and D. Solomon and C. Jodoin and F. C. Dwamena and K. Alexander and L. Rawsthorne and T. Banker and N. Gourineni and F. Aloka and R. M. Frankel and R. C. Smith},
      year={2010},
      month={Jun 14},
      title={Training residents and nurses to work as a patient-centered care team on a medical ward },
      journal={Patient education and counseling},
      volume={2010 Jun 14. [Epub ahead of print]},
      note={id: 4690; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; JID: 8406280; 2010/01/12 [received]; 2010/05/11 [revised]; 2010/05/16 [accepted]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: To train medical residents and nurses to work together as a patient-centered care (PCC) team on a medical ward and test its feasibility, nurses' learning, and patient outcomes. METHOD: Working with administrative leadership, we consolidated residents' patients on one 32-bed ward. Already training residents in an evidence-based patient-centered method, we now trained 5 nurse leaders similarly, and they then trained all staff nurses. A national consultant visited twice. Specific team-building activities for nurses and residents fostered ward interactions. We used a retrospective pre/post/6-month post-design to evaluate nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy of patient-centered skills. Patients were assigned non-randomly to our unit or comparison units from our emergency room; using a post-test only design, the primary endpoint was patient satisfaction. RESULTS: 28 trained nurses showed improvement in knowledge (p=0.02) and self-efficacy (p=0.001). 81 treatment patients showed no improvement in satisfaction (p=0.44). CONCLUSION: Training nurses in patient-centered practices were effective. Unique in this country, we also trained nurses and residents together as a PCC team on a medical ward and showed it was feasible and well accepted. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: We provide a template for team training and urge that others explore this important new area and contribute to its further development. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1873-5134; 0738-3991},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Macdonald, M.. (2010). Patient safety: examining the adequacy of the 5 rights of medication administration . Clinical nurse specialist CNS, 24(4), 196-201.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this article was to examine the adequacy of the 5 rights (5 R’s) for nurses and for including patients in medication administration while considering patient safety. Patient safety related to medication adverse events will be discussed; the 5 R’s will be examined and critiqued and the importance of patient-centered care and patient participation in care will be presented. A path forward is offered based on the expressive-collaborative model. Suggestions for introduction of the model are outlined, and implications for practice, research, and education are discussed. BACKGROUND: Nurses have been guided by the 5 R’s of medication administration in both education and practice for many decades. Many have found the 5 R’s to be lacking and proceeded to propose the addition of a variety of rights from right indication to the rights of nurses to have legible orders and timely access to information. Patients are no longer passive recipients of care and are choosing to play increasingly greater roles in the process of care. INNOVATION: In a collaborative patient-centered environment, an expressive-collaborative model of approaching systems of care is needed. In this model, individuals negotiate with one another to find out what people need to know and to strategize on the means to acquiring the necessary information. Providers are no longer expected to be all knowing. CONCLUSION: Medication administration is no longer simply the 5 R’s. Medication administration is a process with many interconnected players including patients. We need to collaboratively restructure medication use in this era in which all involved in the process share the responsibility for a safe medication use system. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:601,
      author={M. Macdonald},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Patient safety: examining the adequacy of the 5 rights of medication administration },
      journal={Clinical nurse specialist CNS},
      volume={24},
      number={4},
      pages={196-201},
      note={id: 4869; JID: 8709115; ppublish },
      abstract={PURPOSE: The purpose of this article was to examine the adequacy of the 5 rights (5 R's) for nurses and for including patients in medication administration while considering patient safety. Patient safety related to medication adverse events will be discussed; the 5 R's will be examined and critiqued and the importance of patient-centered care and patient participation in care will be presented. A path forward is offered based on the expressive-collaborative model. Suggestions for introduction of the model are outlined, and implications for practice, research, and education are discussed. BACKGROUND: Nurses have been guided by the 5 R's of medication administration in both education and practice for many decades. Many have found the 5 R's to be lacking and proceeded to propose the addition of a variety of rights from right indication to the rights of nurses to have legible orders and timely access to information. Patients are no longer passive recipients of care and are choosing to play increasingly greater roles in the process of care. INNOVATION: In a collaborative patient-centered environment, an expressive-collaborative model of approaching systems of care is needed. In this model, individuals negotiate with one another to find out what people need to know and to strategize on the means to acquiring the necessary information. Providers are no longer expected to be all knowing. CONCLUSION: Medication administration is no longer simply the 5 R's. Medication administration is a process with many interconnected players including patients. We need to collaboratively restructure medication use in this era in which all involved in the process share the responsibility for a safe medication use system. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Humans; Medication Errors/prevention & control; Patient-Centered Care; Safety Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1538-9782; 0887-6274},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Macdonald, M. B., Bally, J. M., Ferguson, L. M., Murray, L. B., Fowler-Kerry, S. E., & Anonson, J. M.. (2010). Knowledge of the professional role of others: a key interprofessional competency . Nurse education in practice, 10(4), 238-242.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In this paper, the authors present the results of a study which delineated six key competencies of interprofessional collaborative practice for patient-centred care: communication; strength in one’s professional role; knowledge of professional role of others; leadership; team function; and negotiation for conflict resolution. While all of these competencies are important and require special attention, this paper examines and discusses the competency knowledge of professional role of others and its associated behavioural indicators, especially as these relate to the interprofessional education of nursing students. The identification of these competencies and their behavioural indicators serve two purposes. It forms the basis for the preparation of students, preceptors, and faculty for interprofessional practice, and it develops a tool for assessing student performance in such practice. Consequently, we believe that the utilization of this key competency and its behavioural indicators will contribute to the development of programs that include specific knowledge and skills related to interprofessional nursing education. This will enable educators to support and evaluate students in interprofessional educational experiences more efficiently and effectively. Ultimately, as nursing students practice and become fully functioning practitioners, client care will be optimized. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:602,
      author={M. B. Macdonald and J. M. Bally and L. M. Ferguson and B. Lee Murray and S. E. Fowler-Kerry and J. M. Anonson},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul},
      title={Knowledge of the professional role of others: a key interprofessional competency },
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      volume={10},
      number={4},
      pages={238-242},
      note={id: 4870; CI: Copyright 2009; JID: 101090848; 2008/10/18 [received]; 2009/10/22 [revised]; 2009/11/15 [accepted]; 2010/03/21 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={In this paper, the authors present the results of a study which delineated six key competencies of interprofessional collaborative practice for patient-centred care: communication; strength in one's professional role; knowledge of professional role of others; leadership; team function; and negotiation for conflict resolution. While all of these competencies are important and require special attention, this paper examines and discusses the competency knowledge of professional role of others and its associated behavioural indicators, especially as these relate to the interprofessional education of nursing students. The identification of these competencies and their behavioural indicators serve two purposes. It forms the basis for the preparation of students, preceptors, and faculty for interprofessional practice, and it develops a tool for assessing student performance in such practice. Consequently, we believe that the utilization of this key competency and its behavioural indicators will contribute to the development of programs that include specific knowledge and skills related to interprofessional nursing education. This will enable educators to support and evaluate students in interprofessional educational experiences more efficiently and effectively. Ultimately, as nursing students practice and become fully functioning practitioners, client care will be optimized. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Competency-Based Education/methods; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/methods/organization & administration; Professional Role},
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Moretz, J. G.. (2010). Strengthening patient- and family-centered care: learning through webinars . Pediatric nursing, 36(3), 168-170.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Despite growing recognition of patient- and family-centered care as the gold standard of care for children and their families, the implementation of these practices in day-to-day care can pose certain challenges for even the most committed health care providers and institutions. Ongoing education of nurses and other clinicians is critically important and can help address these challenges, but finding opportunities for such education is more difficult within the current economic environment. To help address these concerns in an effective and efficient way, the Institute for Family-Centered Care has developed a series of Webinars addressing key issues or challenges in implementing patient- and family-centered care within health care institutions. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:603,
      author={J. G. Moretz},
      year={2010},
      month={2010},
      title={Strengthening patient- and family-centered care: learning through webinars },
      journal={Pediatric nursing},
      volume={36},
      number={3},
      pages={168-170},
      note={id: 4983},
      abstract={Despite growing recognition of patient- and family-centered care as the gold standard of care for children and their families, the implementation of these practices in day-to-day care can pose certain challenges for even the most committed health care providers and institutions. Ongoing education of nurses and other clinicians is critically important and can help address these challenges, but finding opportunities for such education is more difficult within the current economic environment. To help address these concerns in an effective and efficient way, the Institute for Family-Centered Care has developed a series of Webinars addressing key issues or challenges in implementing patient- and family-centered care within health care institutions. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Family Centered Care -- Education; Pediatric Nursing -- Education; Seminars and Workshops; World Wide Web; Education, Non-Traditional; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Organizations, Nonprofit},
      isbn={0097-9805},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010703926&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Orn, M.. (2010). Impact of incorporating a patient-centered care model . Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization, 26(4), 164-169.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The author describes a program that educates nurses to use the Relationship & Results Oriented Healthcare concepts to increase patient and staff satisfaction and decrease nurse turnover. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:604,
      author={M. Orn},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Impact of incorporating a patient-centered care model },
      journal={Journal for nurses in staff development : JNSD : official journal of the National Nursing Staff Development Organization},
      volume={26},
      number={4},
      pages={164-169},
      note={id: 4866; JID: 9809908; ppublish },
      abstract={The author describes a program that educates nurses to use the Relationship & Results Oriented Healthcare concepts to increase patient and staff satisfaction and decrease nurse turnover. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9049; 1098-7886},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pelzang, R.. (2010). Time to learn: understanding patient-centred care . British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing), 19(14), 912-917.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article is a literature review of the definition, models and methods of implementation of patient-centred care (PCC). Modern healthcare systems are rapidly changing to adopt a more patient-centred approach to care. However, the implementation of PCC can be hampered by the lack of a clear definition and methods of measurement. It is increasingly important for healthcare providers to understand the core elements of PCC. This article examines the literature to carry out a concept analysis of PCC, including definition, concepts and theoretical perspectives. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:605,
      author={R. Pelzang},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul 22-Aug 11},
      title={Time to learn: understanding patient-centred care },
      journal={British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)},
      volume={19},
      number={14},
      pages={912-917},
      note={id: 4867; JID: 9212059; RF: 48; ppublish },
      abstract={This article is a literature review of the definition, models and methods of implementation of patient-centred care (PCC). Modern healthcare systems are rapidly changing to adopt a more patient-centred approach to care. However, the implementation of PCC can be hampered by the lack of a clear definition and methods of measurement. It is increasingly important for healthcare providers to understand the core elements of PCC. This article examines the literature to carry out a concept analysis of PCC, including definition, concepts and theoretical perspectives. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Communication; Continuity of Patient Care; Cooperative Behavior; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Family/psychology; Humans; Models, Nursing; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Evaluation Research; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Patient Advocacy; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Social Support},
      isbn={0966-0461; 0966-0461},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Scheckel, M., Emery, N., & Nosek, C.. (2010). Addressing health literacy: the experiences of undergraduate nursing students . Journal of clinical nursing, 19(5-6), 794-802.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe undergraduate nursing students’ experiences of learning and providing patient education. BACKGROUND: To teach nursing students principles and practices of patient education, nurse educators design instructional strategies using educational and clinical practice guidelines, research and theories. This means teachers’ approaches to teaching patient education are derived from evidence and support the evidence-based teaching movement. Despite their efforts, research shows that students lack knowledge and skills needed for proficiency in providing patient education. However, this research does not explicate students’ experiences of learning and providing patient education, which can inform teachers of ways to structure approaches to teaching students this nursing practice. DESIGN: The philosophical background for this study was interpretive phenomenology. METHODS: Eight undergraduate nursing students in their final semester of a baccalaureate nursing programme were interviewed using face-to-face, unstructured interviews. Data were collected using unstructured interviews and analysed using hermeneutics. RESULTS: Common meanings from the analysis of data shows that a primary practice of students’ learning and providing patient education is addressing health literacy. Three sub-themes: (1) respecting languages: learning persistence (2) helping patients understand: learning to teach and (3) promoting engagement: learning sensitivity, exemplify how students are addressing health literacy. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to literature on students’ lack of proficiency in providing patient education, the findings of this study reveal extraordinary competencies students already have in addressing health literacy. The results of this study show the paramount need for teachers to design instructional strategies that deepen students’ extant knowledge and skills in health literacy prior to graduation from nursing programmes. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Using the findings of this study, teachers will gain novel approaches to teaching patient education that specifically target instructing students in the practices of health literacy. These practices can ameliorate and mitigate problems many students encounter when addressing health literacy. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:578,
      author={M. Scheckel and N. Emery and C. Nosek},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar},
      title={Addressing health literacy: the experiences of undergraduate nursing students },
      journal={Journal of clinical nursing},
      volume={19},
      number={5-6},
      pages={794-802},
      note={id: 4752; JID: 9207302; ppublish },
      abstract={AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe undergraduate nursing students' experiences of learning and providing patient education. BACKGROUND: To teach nursing students principles and practices of patient education, nurse educators design instructional strategies using educational and clinical practice guidelines, research and theories. This means teachers' approaches to teaching patient education are derived from evidence and support the evidence-based teaching movement. Despite their efforts, research shows that students lack knowledge and skills needed for proficiency in providing patient education. However, this research does not explicate students' experiences of learning and providing patient education, which can inform teachers of ways to structure approaches to teaching students this nursing practice. DESIGN: The philosophical background for this study was interpretive phenomenology. METHODS: Eight undergraduate nursing students in their final semester of a baccalaureate nursing programme were interviewed using face-to-face, unstructured interviews. Data were collected using unstructured interviews and analysed using hermeneutics. RESULTS: Common meanings from the analysis of data shows that a primary practice of students' learning and providing patient education is addressing health literacy. Three sub-themes: (1) respecting languages: learning persistence (2) helping patients understand: learning to teach and (3) promoting engagement: learning sensitivity, exemplify how students are addressing health literacy. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to literature on students' lack of proficiency in providing patient education, the findings of this study reveal extraordinary competencies students already have in addressing health literacy. The results of this study show the paramount need for teachers to design instructional strategies that deepen students' extant knowledge and skills in health literacy prior to graduation from nursing programmes. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Using the findings of this study, teachers will gain novel approaches to teaching patient education that specifically target instructing students in the practices of health literacy. These practices can ameliorate and mitigate problems many students encounter when addressing health literacy. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2702; 0962-1067},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Staun, M., Bergstrom, B., & Wadensten, B.. (2010). Evaluation of a PBL strategy in clinical supervision of nursing students: Patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms . Nurse education today, 30(7), 631-7.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The present study aimed at investigating staff members’ and nursing students’ perception of and satisfaction with an intervention involving patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms during clinical supervision. BACKGROUND: It is well known that clinical education is important and that the clinical learning environment influences the development of nursing students’ ability to solve clinical problems. In the present study, an intervention using a problem-based learning (PBL) strategy was introduced and evaluated in clinical education. The PBL strategy is called ‘Patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms’. DESIGN AND METHODS: Descriptive; both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A questionnaire and focus group interviews were used. RESULT: Most participants found the PBL strategy to be highly satisfactory, both for staff and for students. The students seemed to feel that their time in clinical education had been used efficiently. CONCLUSION: Integration of theory and practice during clinical training has been emphasized as a necessary component, and the new strategy, which involves a method of promoting students’ reflection, represents one way of facilitating such integration, in that it may bridge the gap between theory and practice. More extensive and more specific research is need in the future. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:579,
      author={M. Staun and B. Bergstrom and B. Wadensten},
      year={2010},
      month={Jan 8},
      title={Evaluation of a PBL strategy in clinical supervision of nursing students: Patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={30},
      number={7},
      pages={631-7},
      note={id: 4657; CI: Copyright (c) 2009; JID: 8511379; 2009/04/02 [received]; 2009/12/01 [revised]; 2009/12/12 [accepted]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={AIM: The present study aimed at investigating staff members' and nursing students' perception of and satisfaction with an intervention involving patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms during clinical supervision. BACKGROUND: It is well known that clinical education is important and that the clinical learning environment influences the development of nursing students' ability to solve clinical problems. In the present study, an intervention using a problem-based learning (PBL) strategy was introduced and evaluated in clinical education. The PBL strategy is called 'Patient-centred training in student-dedicated treatment rooms'. DESIGN AND METHODS: Descriptive; both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A questionnaire and focus group interviews were used. RESULT: Most participants found the PBL strategy to be highly satisfactory, both for staff and for students. The students seemed to feel that their time in clinical education had been used efficiently. CONCLUSION: Integration of theory and practice during clinical training has been emphasized as a necessary component, and the new strategy, which involves a method of promoting students' reflection, represents one way of facilitating such integration, in that it may bridge the gap between theory and practice. More extensive and more specific research is need in the future. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Taylor, J., & Rutherford, P.. (2010). The pursuit of genuine partnerships with patients and family members: the challenge and opportunity for executive leaders . Frontiers of health services management, 26(4), 3-14.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Empowering patients to control their own healthcare experiences, sharing decisions with patients and family members, being open and transparent, and anticipating patient needs create fresh partnerships between healthcare professionals and patients. The "new rules" the Institute of Medicine (IOM) defined in its 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm provide guidance for leading a cultural transformation in which clinic and hospital staff truly partner with patients and their family members. The resulting experiences inspire patients to say, "They give me exactly the care I want and need, exactly where and how I want and need it" (Berwick 2009). Improved health outcomes and patients who control their own hospital stays are simple concepts that are difficult to execute. Some may view these new relationships as disruptive to clinical decision making; others may see no need to change the way they’ve always done things. Executives are called to lead a cultural transformation–that is, to shape the views, perspectives, and behaviors of the individuals throughout their organization to achieve patient- and family-centered care. This article uses Kouzes and Posner’s (2007) leadership framework to outline how executive leaders might embrace this challenge and accomplish profound change. We support this idea with examples from our practice at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:594,
      author={J. Taylor and P. Rutherford},
      year={2010},
      month={Summer},
      title={The pursuit of genuine partnerships with patients and family members: the challenge and opportunity for executive leaders },
      journal={Frontiers of health services management},
      volume={26},
      number={4},
      pages={3-14},
      note={id: 4808; JID: 8501389; ppublish },
      abstract={Empowering patients to control their own healthcare experiences, sharing decisions with patients and family members, being open and transparent, and anticipating patient needs create fresh partnerships between healthcare professionals and patients. The "new rules" the Institute of Medicine (IOM) defined in its 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm provide guidance for leading a cultural transformation in which clinic and hospital staff truly partner with patients and their family members. The resulting experiences inspire patients to say, "They give me exactly the care I want and need, exactly where and how I want and need it" (Berwick 2009). Improved health outcomes and patients who control their own hospital stays are simple concepts that are difficult to execute. Some may view these new relationships as disruptive to clinical decision making; others may see no need to change the way they've always done things. Executives are called to lead a cultural transformation--that is, to shape the views, perspectives, and behaviors of the individuals throughout their organization to achieve patient- and family-centered care. This article uses Kouzes and Posner's (2007) leadership framework to outline how executive leaders might embrace this challenge and accomplish profound change. We support this idea with examples from our practice at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Hospital Administrators; Humans; Leadership; Organizational Culture; Professional-Family Relations},
      isbn={0748-8157; 0748-8157},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ursel, K. L., & Aquino-Russell, C. E.. (2010). Illuminating person-centered care with Parse’s teaching-learning model . Nursing science quarterly, 23(2), 118-123.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Person-centered care is illuminated in this paper through the lens of Parse’s teaching-learning model for students who were engaged in patient-centered care during a practicum on an acute care unit. Students’ perspectives changed as they tried on strategies for person-centered care and lived true presence with persons, while experiencing the satisfaction of knowing that they made a difference in the quality of life of the persons they were with. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:595,
      author={K. L. Ursel and C. E. Aquino-Russell},
      year={2010},
      month={04},
      title={Illuminating person-centered care with Parse's teaching-learning model },
      journal={Nursing science quarterly},
      volume={23},
      number={2},
      pages={118-123},
      note={id: 5310},
      abstract={Person-centered care is illuminated in this paper through the lens of Parse's teaching-learning model for students who were engaged in patient-centered care during a practicum on an acute care unit. Students' perspectives changed as they tried on strategies for person-centered care and lived true presence with persons, while experiencing the satisfaction of knowing that they made a difference in the quality of life of the persons they were with. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Education, Nursing, Theory-Based; Parse's Theory of Human Becoming; Patient Centered Care; Education, Clinical; Student Attitudes; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate},
      isbn={0894-3184},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010621967&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Zavertnik, J. E., Huff, T. A., & Munro, C. L.. (2010). Innovative Approach to Teaching Communication Skills to Nursing Students . The Journal of nursing education, 49(2), 65-71.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a learner-centered simulation intervention designed to improve the communication skills of preprofessional sophomore nursing students. An innovative teaching strategy in which communication skills are taught to nursing students by using trained actors who served as standardized family members in a clinical learning laboratory setting was evaluated using a two-group posttest design. In addition to current standard education, the intervention group received a formal training session presenting a framework for communication and a 60-minute practice session with the standardized family members. Four domains of communication-introduction, gathering of information, imparting information, and clarifying goals and expectations-were evaluated in the control and intervention groups in individual testing sessions with a standardized family member. The intervention group performed better than the control group in all four tested domains related to communication skills, and the difference was statistically significant in the domain of gathering information (p = 0.0257). (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:635,
      author={J. E. Zavertnik and T. A. Huff and C. L. Munro},
      year={2010},
      month={Oct 9},
      title={Innovative Approach to Teaching Communication Skills to Nursing Students },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={2},
      pages={65-71},
      note={id: 4267; CI: Copyright 2009; JID: 7705432; 2007/07/23 [received]; 2008/11/03 [accepted]; aheadofprint; SO: J Nurs Educ. 2009 Oct 9:1-7. doi: 10.3928/01484834-20090918-06. },
      abstract={This study assessed the effectiveness of a learner-centered simulation intervention designed to improve the communication skills of preprofessional sophomore nursing students. An innovative teaching strategy in which communication skills are taught to nursing students by using trained actors who served as standardized family members in a clinical learning laboratory setting was evaluated using a two-group posttest design. In addition to current standard education, the intervention group received a formal training session presenting a framework for communication and a 60-minute practice session with the standardized family members. Four domains of communication-introduction, gathering of information, imparting information, and clarifying goals and expectations-were evaluated in the control and intervention groups in individual testing sessions with a standardized family member. The intervention group performed better than the control group in all four tested domains related to communication skills, and the difference was statistically significant in the domain of gathering information (p = 0.0257). (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={ENG}
    }

2009

  • Adamson, E., King, L., Moody, J., & Waugh, A.. (2009). Developing a nursing education project in partnership: leadership in compassionate care . Nursing times, 105(35), 23-26.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The prominence of the caring dimension has never had such a high profile in healthcare practice before. As a result of this, the Leadership in Compassionate Care Project has evolved. A unique feature is the partnership between Edinburgh Napier University and NHS Lothian. Engaging with and helping qualified and student nurses to value and promote the delivery of compassionate care is a primary focus of the project. This article outlines key policy drivers, the project’s four main strands, and the aims, processes and perceived impact on practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:621,
      author={E. Adamson and L. King and J. Moody and A. Waugh},
      year={2009},
      month={09/08},
      title={Developing a nursing education project in partnership: leadership in compassionate care },
      journal={Nursing times},
      volume={105},
      number={35},
      pages={23-26},
      note={id: 4418},
      abstract={The prominence of the caring dimension has never had such a high profile in healthcare practice before. As a result of this, the Leadership in Compassionate Care Project has evolved. A unique feature is the partnership between Edinburgh Napier University and NHS Lothian. Engaging with and helping qualified and student nurses to value and promote the delivery of compassionate care is a primary focus of the project. This article outlines key policy drivers, the project's four main strands, and the aims, processes and perceived impact on practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nursing Care; Nursing Practice; Patient Centered Care; Program Development; Collaboration; Colleges and Universities; Curriculum; Education, Nursing; Leadership; National Health Programs; Nurse-Patient Relations; Program Implementation; Staff Development},
      isbn={0954-7762},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010411581&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Berwick, D. M.. (2009). What ‘Patient-Centered’ Should Mean: Confessions Of An Extremist . Health affairs (Project Hope).
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    "Patient-centeredness" is a dimension of health care quality in its own right, not just because of its connection with other desired aims, like safety and effectiveness. Its proper incorporation into new health care designs will involve some radical, unfamiliar, and disruptive shifts in control and power, out of the hands of those who give care and into the hands of those who receive it. Such a consumerist view of the quality of care, itself, has important differences from the more classical, professionally dominated definitions of "quality." New designs, like the so-called medical home, should incorporate that change. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:607,
      author={D. M. Berwick},
      year={2009},
      month={May 19},
      title={What 'Patient-Centered' Should Mean: Confessions Of An Extremist },
      journal={Health affairs (Project Hope)},
      note={id: 3995; JID: 8303128; aheadofprint },
      abstract={"Patient-centeredness" is a dimension of health care quality in its own right, not just because of its connection with other desired aims, like safety and effectiveness. Its proper incorporation into new health care designs will involve some radical, unfamiliar, and disruptive shifts in control and power, out of the hands of those who give care and into the hands of those who receive it. Such a consumerist view of the quality of care, itself, has important differences from the more classical, professionally dominated definitions of "quality." New designs, like the so-called medical home, should incorporate that change. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1544-5208},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Boscart, V. M.. (2009). A communication intervention for nursing staff in chronic care . Journal of advanced nursing, 65(9), 1823-1832.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The paper is a report of a study conducted to evaluate the effect of a brief, focused educational intervention on the quality of verbal interactions between nursing staff and patients in a chronic care facility. BACKGROUND: Positive nurse-patient communication in chronic care is crucial to the quality of life and well-being of patients. Despite this, patients are dissatisfied with these interactions and nursing staff indicate the need for additional training. METHOD: A repeated-measures design was used to collect data between April 2003 and February 2004, by audiotaping verbal interactions between nursing staff and patients during morning care. Baseline data were analysed and an educational intervention was developed based on the results of the pretest. Five months after the educational intervention, interactions between the same nursing staff and patients were audiotaped. Twenty-seven randomly chosen patients and selected nursing staff participated in the study. Data were analysed using a qualitative comparative method, and a quantification technique was developed to compare the quality of the interactions before and after the intervention. FINDINGS: Preintervention interactions were task-oriented, superficial and dominated by nursing staff. Results statistically significantly improved after the intervention was implemented. Nursing staff were less authoritative, used more solution-focused communication and interactions had a statistically significantly higher positive ratio. CONCLUSION: Brief interventions can change nursing staff’s communication practice and they realized the importance of effective communication as a fundamental component to deliver patient-focused care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:622,
      author={V. M. Boscart},
      year={2009},
      month={Sep},
      title={A communication intervention for nursing staff in chronic care },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={65},
      number={9},
      pages={1823-1832},
      note={id: 4588; JID: 7609811; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: The paper is a report of a study conducted to evaluate the effect of a brief, focused educational intervention on the quality of verbal interactions between nursing staff and patients in a chronic care facility. BACKGROUND: Positive nurse-patient communication in chronic care is crucial to the quality of life and well-being of patients. Despite this, patients are dissatisfied with these interactions and nursing staff indicate the need for additional training. METHOD: A repeated-measures design was used to collect data between April 2003 and February 2004, by audiotaping verbal interactions between nursing staff and patients during morning care. Baseline data were analysed and an educational intervention was developed based on the results of the pretest. Five months after the educational intervention, interactions between the same nursing staff and patients were audiotaped. Twenty-seven randomly chosen patients and selected nursing staff participated in the study. Data were analysed using a qualitative comparative method, and a quantification technique was developed to compare the quality of the interactions before and after the intervention. FINDINGS: Preintervention interactions were task-oriented, superficial and dominated by nursing staff. Results statistically significantly improved after the intervention was implemented. Nursing staff were less authoritative, used more solution-focused communication and interactions had a statistically significantly higher positive ratio. CONCLUSION: Brief interventions can change nursing staff's communication practice and they realized the importance of effective communication as a fundamental component to deliver patient-focused care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Attitude of Health Personnel; Chronic Disease/nursing; Education, Nursing/methods; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Education Research; Patient Satisfaction; Patient-Centered Care/methods; Verbal Behavior},
      isbn={1365-2648; 0309-2402},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cappabianca, A., Julliard, K., Raso, R., & Ruggiero, J.. (2009). Strengthening the nurse-patient relationship: "What is the most important thing I can do for you today?" . Creative nursing, 15(3), 151-156.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    We asked our patients, "What is the most important thing I can do for you today?" and analyzed the self-identified patient needs. Eleven themes emerged; we used these findings to drive a unit-based project and a hospital-based project, hard-wiring strategies into the infrastructure of Relationship-Centered Care to build relationships between patients/families and staff and to establish a healing and caring environment. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:623,
      author={A. Cappabianca and K. Julliard and R. Raso and J. Ruggiero},
      year={2009},
      title={Strengthening the nurse-patient relationship: "What is the most important thing I can do for you today?" },
      journal={Creative nursing},
      volume={15},
      number={3},
      pages={151-156},
      note={id: 4414; JID: 9505022; ppublish },
      abstract={We asked our patients, "What is the most important thing I can do for you today?" and analyzed the self-identified patient needs. Eleven themes emerged; we used these findings to drive a unit-based project and a hospital-based project, hard-wiring strategies into the infrastructure of Relationship-Centered Care to build relationships between patients/families and staff and to establish a healing and caring environment. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cultural Diversity; Documentation; Empathy; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Models, Nursing; New York City; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Records; Patient Care Planning/organization & administration; Patient Participation/methods/psychology; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Program Development; Program Evaluation},
      isbn={1078-4535},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Corless, I. B., Michel, T. H., Nicholas, M., Jameson, D., Purtilo, R., & Dirkes, A. M.. (2009). Educating health professions students about the issues involved in communicating effectively: a novel approach . The Journal of nursing education, 48(7), 367-373.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Schwartz Center Educational Rounds, the first Schwartz Center Rounds held at an educational institution, emphasize the overall theme of difficult conversations faced by students and professionals with patients, families, and other members of the health care team. Students in the health care professions do not have sufficient opportunities to practice the communication and decision making skills integral to compassionate caregiving. Such practice enhances communication with patients and families, as well as with other members of the interdisciplinary team. This article presents the underlying assumptions for this change-oriented project and describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Rounds for an interdisciplinary group of graduate students during a 4-year period. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:624,
      author={I. B. Corless and T. H. Michel and M. Nicholas and D. Jameson and R. Purtilo and A. M. Dirkes},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul},
      title={Educating health professions students about the issues involved in communicating effectively: a novel approach },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={7},
      pages={367-373},
      note={id: 4283; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={The Schwartz Center Educational Rounds, the first Schwartz Center Rounds held at an educational institution, emphasize the overall theme of difficult conversations faced by students and professionals with patients, families, and other members of the health care team. Students in the health care professions do not have sufficient opportunities to practice the communication and decision making skills integral to compassionate caregiving. Such practice enhances communication with patients and families, as well as with other members of the interdisciplinary team. This article presents the underlying assumptions for this change-oriented project and describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Rounds for an interdisciplinary group of graduate students during a 4-year period. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Continuing/organization & administration; Health Occupations/education; Humans; Interpersonal Relations; Massachusetts; Multilingualism; Nursing Education Research; Organizational Objectives; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care; Professional Competence/standards; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; Social Support},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cravens, C., & Earp, J. A.. (2009). Disclosure and apology: patient-centered approaches to the public health problem of medical error . North Carolina medical journal, 70(2), 140-146.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Our goal in this commentary is to define patient safety and the scope of medical errors, look briefly at root causes, and then identify disclosure and apology as a specific set of solutions for addressing medical errors in health care settings. Although a small but growing body of evidence exists on systematically addressing ways to ensure patient safety at regulatory, legislative, and organizational levels, in this commentary we place special emphasis on increasing patient safety through improving patient-provider communication. In practice this means more frequent, more prompt disclosure of medical errors’ occurrence and quicker, more earnest apologies once they have occurred. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:608,
      author={C. Cravens and J. A. Earp},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Disclosure and apology: patient-centered approaches to the public health problem of medical error },
      journal={North Carolina medical journal},
      volume={70},
      number={2},
      pages={140-146},
      note={id: 4130; JID: 2984805R; ppublish },
      abstract={Our goal in this commentary is to define patient safety and the scope of medical errors, look briefly at root causes, and then identify disclosure and apology as a specific set of solutions for addressing medical errors in health care settings. Although a small but growing body of evidence exists on systematically addressing ways to ensure patient safety at regulatory, legislative, and organizational levels, in this commentary we place special emphasis on increasing patient safety through improving patient-provider communication. In practice this means more frequent, more prompt disclosure of medical errors’ occurrence and quicker, more earnest apologies once they have occurred. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={0029-2559},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Donahue, L. L.. (2009). A Pod Design for Nursing Assignments . AJN, American Journal of Nursing, 109(11 Supplement TCAB), 38-40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The pod design for patient care assignments has improved patient satisfaction by increasing the visibility and accessibility of nurses and has enhanced nurses’ ability to provide safe and reliable care. This care assignment design has also improved staff vitality by reducing the number of unnecessary steps nurses take during a shift. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:626,
      author={L. L. Donahue},
      year={2009},
      month={November},
      title={A Pod Design for Nursing Assignments },
      journal={AJN, American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={109},
      number={11 Supplement TCAB},
      pages={38-40},
      note={id: 4296},
      abstract={The pod design for patient care assignments has improved patient satisfaction by increasing the visibility and accessibility of nurses and has enhanced nurses' ability to provide safe and reliable care. This care assignment design has also improved staff vitality by reducing the number of unnecessary steps nurses take during a shift. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • French, E. A., Gilkey, M. B., & Earp, J. A.. (2009). Patient advocacy: putting the vocabulary of patient-centered care into action . North Carolina medical journal, 70(2), 114-119.
    [BibTeX]
    @article{RefWorks:609,
      author={E. A. French and M. B. Gilkey and J. A. Earp},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Patient advocacy: putting the vocabulary of patient-centered care into action },
      journal={North Carolina medical journal},
      volume={70},
      number={2},
      pages={114-119},
      note={id: 4132; JID: 2984805R; ppublish },
      isbn={0029-2559},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Goodrich, J.. (2009). Exploring the wide range of terminology used to describe care that is patient-centred . Nursing times, 105(20), 14-17.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: During the planning phase of The King’s Fund’s The Point of Care programme, we undertook a literature review, starting with the term ‘patient-centred care’. We soon discovered the term not only had different meanings for different people but also that there were many related phrases with specific connotations in various professional contexts. When looking at the terminology that policymakers use, it seems that different terms–variations on ‘patient-centred care’–have been favoured over the years. AIM AND METHOD: We decided to carry out our own research to investigate what language staff working in hospitals preferred to use when describing their care of patients. We collected data using focus groups and paired and single in-depth interviews. RESULTS: It seemed that the language hospital workers preferred to use was different, and that staff (some groups more than others) did not like much of the language that academics and policymakers use. CONCLUSION: It is important when working in a hospital context to use language that staff prefer. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:610,
      author={J. Goodrich},
      year={2009},
      month={May 26-Jun 1},
      title={Exploring the wide range of terminology used to describe care that is patient-centred },
      journal={Nursing times},
      volume={105},
      number={20},
      pages={14-17},
      note={id: 4129; JID: 0423236; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: During the planning phase of The King's Fund's The Point of Care programme, we undertook a literature review, starting with the term 'patient-centred care'. We soon discovered the term not only had different meanings for different people but also that there were many related phrases with specific connotations in various professional contexts. When looking at the terminology that policymakers use, it seems that different terms--variations on 'patient-centred care'--have been favoured over the years. AIM AND METHOD: We decided to carry out our own research to investigate what language staff working in hospitals preferred to use when describing their care of patients. We collected data using focus groups and paired and single in-depth interviews. RESULTS: It seemed that the language hospital workers preferred to use was different, and that staff (some groups more than others) did not like much of the language that academics and policymakers use. CONCLUSION: It is important when working in a hospital context to use language that staff prefer. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0954-7762},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Halloran, L.. (2009). Teaching Transcultural Nursing Through Literature . The Journal of nursing education, 48(9), 523-528.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    One of the biggest challenges in nursing education is to develop culturally sensitive graduates. Although theory and lecture are appropriate to introduce cultural issues, the application of those skills is limited by the kinds of clinical experiences and patient populations students may treat. Literary works are a rich source of information for nursing. This assignment was created to sensitize the students to the influence of cultural diversity. Students were assigned to read one novel from an approved list and answer the questions posed on the Cultural Discovery worksheet. The only direction that was given regarding novel selection was that the novel had to represent a culture other than the student’s own. The focus was to expose students to a different culture. Classroom discussion, based on worksheet answers, followed. The assignment’s good, bad, and ugly outcomes are discussed. Suggestions for adaptation of this assignment to an online format are also provided. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:627,
      author={L. Halloran},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul 27},
      title={Teaching Transcultural Nursing Through Literature },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={9},
      pages={523-528},
      note={id: 4280; CI: Copyright 2009; JID: 7705432; 2006/03/02 [received]; 2008/10/20 [accepted]; aheadofprint; SO: J Nurs Educ. 2009 Jul 27:1-6. doi: 10.3928/01484834-20090610-07. },
      abstract={One of the biggest challenges in nursing education is to develop culturally sensitive graduates. Although theory and lecture are appropriate to introduce cultural issues, the application of those skills is limited by the kinds of clinical experiences and patient populations students may treat. Literary works are a rich source of information for nursing. This assignment was created to sensitize the students to the influence of cultural diversity. Students were assigned to read one novel from an approved list and answer the questions posed on the Cultural Discovery worksheet. The only direction that was given regarding novel selection was that the novel had to represent a culture other than the student's own. The focus was to expose students to a different culture. Classroom discussion, based on worksheet answers, followed. The assignment's good, bad, and ugly outcomes are discussed. Suggestions for adaptation of this assignment to an online format are also provided. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Hobbs, J. L.. (2009). A dimensional analysis of patient-centered care . Nursing research, 58(1), 52-62.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Patient-centered care (PCC) is a poorly conceptualized phenomenon and can indicate anything from soothing room design, emotional support of patients, customization of meals, to support of patient decision making. This inconsistency across the clinical and research literature makes the application of PCC difficult. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to identify dimensions of PCC as found in the literature. METHODS: A dimensional analysis of PCC was conducted from 69 clinical and research articles published from 2000 to 2006. Coding of the literature for the perspective, context, conditions, process, and consequences of PCC was completed. These codes were used to determine literature selected for inclusion, organize article content, and frame the delineation of PCC. RESULTS: Alleviating vulnerabilities, consisting of both compromised physiological states and threats to individual identity, was constant throughout the literature. Therapeutic engagement was the process sustaining the patient during an illness episode that necessitated service use and involved allocating time, carrying out information practices, knowing the patient, and developing a relationship. This process occurs during nurse-patient interaction, sustained during successive interactions, and reinforced by the information practices of a particular setting. DISCUSSION: The interaction between nurse and patient is central to the effective study and application of PCC. Appropriate use of PCC can improve study outcomes and measurements by clarifying the variables involved, and PCC holds great promise to frame patient outcome and satisfaction research by analyzing how and with what effect nurses alleviate patient vulnerability. Moreover, consideration of information practices as a critical supporting structure of nurse-patient interaction can be explored. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:611,
      author={J. L. Hobbs},
      year={2009},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={A dimensional analysis of patient-centered care },
      journal={Nursing research},
      volume={58},
      number={1},
      pages={52-62},
      note={id: 4124; JID: 0376404; RF: 103; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Patient-centered care (PCC) is a poorly conceptualized phenomenon and can indicate anything from soothing room design, emotional support of patients, customization of meals, to support of patient decision making. This inconsistency across the clinical and research literature makes the application of PCC difficult. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to identify dimensions of PCC as found in the literature. METHODS: A dimensional analysis of PCC was conducted from 69 clinical and research articles published from 2000 to 2006. Coding of the literature for the perspective, context, conditions, process, and consequences of PCC was completed. These codes were used to determine literature selected for inclusion, organize article content, and frame the delineation of PCC. RESULTS: Alleviating vulnerabilities, consisting of both compromised physiological states and threats to individual identity, was constant throughout the literature. Therapeutic engagement was the process sustaining the patient during an illness episode that necessitated service use and involved allocating time, carrying out information practices, knowing the patient, and developing a relationship. This process occurs during nurse-patient interaction, sustained during successive interactions, and reinforced by the information practices of a particular setting. DISCUSSION: The interaction between nurse and patient is central to the effective study and application of PCC. Appropriate use of PCC can improve study outcomes and measurements by clarifying the variables involved, and PCC holds great promise to frame patient outcome and satisfaction research by analyzing how and with what effect nurses alleviate patient vulnerability. Moreover, consideration of information practices as a critical supporting structure of nurse-patient interaction can be explored. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Decision Making, Organizational; Efficiency, Organizational; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Interior Design and Furnishings; Internal-External Control; Models, Nursing; Models, Organizational; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Process; Nursing Research/organization & administration; Nursing Staff/organization & administration/psychology; Patient Participation/methods/psychology; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Power (Psychology); Self Care; Social Support; Sociology, Medical; Total Quality Management/organization & administration; Vulnerable Populations},
      isbn={1538-9847},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Johnson, B. H., Abraham, M. R., & Shelton, T. L.. (2009). Patient- and family-centered care: partnerships for quality and safety . North Carolina medical journal, 70(2), 125-130.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The state of North Carolina is well positioned to support expanded partnerships among physicians and other health care professionals, community and state leaders, and patient and family advisors to continue building a system of care that is patient- and family-centered and enhances outcomes, quality, safety, and cost effectiveness. Ongoing initiatives in the state such as developing the medical home and redesigning primary care, expanding health care facilities, integrating patient- and family-centered concepts into graduate and undergraduate medical education, and health services research provide timely opportunities as does the state’s record in incorporating family-centered care principles in children’s mental health and most recently in adolescent substance abuse and juvenile justice. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:612,
      author={B. H. Johnson and M. R. Abraham and T. L. Shelton},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Patient- and family-centered care: partnerships for quality and safety },
      journal={North Carolina medical journal},
      volume={70},
      number={2},
      pages={125-130},
      note={id: 4131; JID: 2984805R; ppublish },
      abstract={The state of North Carolina is well positioned to support expanded partnerships among physicians and other health care professionals, community and state leaders, and patient and family advisors to continue building a system of care that is patient- and family-centered and enhances outcomes, quality, safety, and cost effectiveness. Ongoing initiatives in the state such as developing the medical home and redesigning primary care, expanding health care facilities, integrating patient- and family-centered concepts into graduate and undergraduate medical education, and health services research provide timely opportunities as does the state’s record in incorporating family-centered care principles in children’s mental health and most recently in adolescent substance abuse and juvenile justice. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={0029-2559},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kramer, M., Schmalenberg, C., Maguire, P., Brewer, B. B., Burke, R., Chmielewski, L., Cox, K., Kishner, J., Krugman, M., Meeks-Sjostrom, D., & Waldo, M.. (2009). Walk the talk: promoting control of nursing practice and a patient-centered culture . Critical care nurse, 29(3), 77-93.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    To “walk the talk”—putting values into action, leading by example, practicing what you preach—is a best practice related to 2 of the 8 attributes or work processes identified by staff nurses as essential to a healthy work environment. These 2 attributes, control of nursing practice and a culture in which concern for the patient is paramount, are the focus of this article. After clarifying and illustrating the walk-the-talk metaphor and the constructs control of nursing practice and shared governance, we present the results of research that pertain to control of nursing practice and a patient-centered culture. We then suggest ways in which clinical nurses can operationalize the walk aspect of the talk, the values and beliefs inherent in control of nursing practice and a patient-centered culture. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:613,
      author={M. Kramer and C. Schmalenberg and P. Maguire and B. B. Brewer and R. Burke and L. Chmielewski and K. Cox and J. Kishner and M. Krugman and D. Meeks-Sjostrom and M. Waldo},
      year={2009},
      month={Jun},
      title={Walk the talk: promoting control of nursing practice and a patient-centered culture },
      journal={Critical care nurse},
      volume={29},
      number={3},
      pages={77-93},
      note={id: 4123; JID: 8207799; ppublish },
      abstract={To “walk the talk”—putting values into action, leading by example, practicing what you preach—is a best practice related to 2 of the 8 attributes or work processes identified by staff nurses as essential to a healthy work environment. These 2 attributes, control of nursing practice and a culture in which concern for the patient is paramount, are the focus of this article. After clarifying and illustrating the walk-the-talk metaphor and the constructs control of nursing practice and shared governance, we present the results of research that pertain to control of nursing practice and a patient-centered culture. We then suggest ways in which clinical nurses can operationalize the walk aspect of the talk, the values and beliefs inherent in control of nursing practice and a patient-centered culture. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={0279-5442},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Madsen, W. C.. (2009). Collaborative helping: a practice framework for family-centered services . Family process, 48(1), 103-116.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article offers a framework for collaborative family-centered practice that can rein-vigorate our work with families who have not responded to more traditional approaches. Collaborative Helping is grounded in family-centered principles that include: striving for cultural curiosity, believing in resourcefulness, working in partnership, and making our work more accountable to the clients we serve. The article introduces collaborative inquiry as an organizing metaphor for clinical practice and offers a five-step practice framework with clinical illustrations and sample questions. The framework draws from appreciative inquiry, motivational interviewing, the signs of safety approach to child protection work, and solution-focused and narrative therapies. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:614,
      author={W. C. Madsen},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar},
      title={Collaborative helping: a practice framework for family-centered services },
      journal={Family process},
      volume={48},
      number={1},
      pages={103-116},
      note={id: 4133; JID: 0400666; ppublish },
      abstract={This article offers a framework for collaborative family-centered practice that can rein-vigorate our work with families who have not responded to more traditional approaches. Collaborative Helping is grounded in family-centered principles that include: striving for cultural curiosity, believing in resourcefulness, working in partnership, and making our work more accountable to the clients we serve. The article introduces collaborative inquiry as an organizing metaphor for clinical practice and offers a five-step practice framework with clinical illustrations and sample questions. The framework draws from appreciative inquiry, motivational interviewing, the signs of safety approach to child protection work, and solution-focused and narrative therapies. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Family Therapy/methods/organization & administration; Humans; Narration; Social Work},
      isbn={0014-7370},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Mattila, E., Leino, K., Paavilainen, E., & Åstedt-Kurki, P.. (2009). Nursing intervention studies on patients and family members: a systematic literature review . Scandinavian journal of caring sciences, 23(3), 611-622.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The development of evidence-based practice is a major current challenge in the fields of nursing practice and nursing research. A concerted effort is needed to develop and test interventions and to assess their impacts. The illness of one family member inevitably affects other family members and the whole family. Nursing interventions should be so designed that they support and enhance the life situation of both patients and their families. The aim of this study is to undertake a systematic review of nursing intervention studies on patients and family members published in international databases in 2001-2006. The main focus was on the targets, methods and impacts of interventions. The articles for the review were searched from Medline and Cinahl (n = 31) and analysed by content analysis and the RE-AIM evaluation model. The results showed that the interventions were targeted at patients with chronic diseases and individual family members. In addition to support components, the interventions included elements of teaching, counselling and education. The preliminary evidence indicated that the interventions were effective in relieving the burden of care and depressive symptoms of family members of Alzheimer, cancer, stroke and schizophrenia patients as well as in promoting their quality of life and coping. Nursing interventions are still in the development and testing phase. The challenge for the future is to broaden the scope and application of interventions in different nursing environments. Assessments of the efficacy of interventions should also consider their adaptation, implementation and maintenance in practical nursing. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:628,
      author={E. Mattila and K. Leino and E. Paavilainen and P. Åstedt-Kurki},
      year={2009},
      month={09},
      title={Nursing intervention studies on patients and family members: a systematic literature review },
      journal={Scandinavian journal of caring sciences},
      volume={23},
      number={3},
      pages={611-622},
      note={id: 4419},
      abstract={The development of evidence-based practice is a major current challenge in the fields of nursing practice and nursing research. A concerted effort is needed to develop and test interventions and to assess their impacts. The illness of one family member inevitably affects other family members and the whole family. Nursing interventions should be so designed that they support and enhance the life situation of both patients and their families. The aim of this study is to undertake a systematic review of nursing intervention studies on patients and family members published in international databases in 2001-2006. The main focus was on the targets, methods and impacts of interventions. The articles for the review were searched from Medline and Cinahl (n = 31) and analysed by content analysis and the RE-AIM evaluation model. The results showed that the interventions were targeted at patients with chronic diseases and individual family members. In addition to support components, the interventions included elements of teaching, counselling and education. The preliminary evidence indicated that the interventions were effective in relieving the burden of care and depressive symptoms of family members of Alzheimer, cancer, stroke and schizophrenia patients as well as in promoting their quality of life and coping. Nursing interventions are still in the development and testing phase. The challenge for the future is to broaden the scope and application of interventions in different nursing environments. Assessments of the efficacy of interventions should also consider their adaptation, implementation and maintenance in practical nursing. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Family Centered Care; Nursing Interventions; Patient Centered Care; CINAHL Database; Computerized Literature Searching; Funding Source; Medline; Systematic Review},
      isbn={0283-9318},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010378569&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • McKeon, L. M., Cunningham, P. D., & Oswaks, J. S.. (2009). Improving patient safety: patient-focused, high-reliability team training . Journal of nursing care quality, 24(1), 76-82.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Healthcare systems are recognizing "human factor" flaws that result in adverse outcomes. Nurses work around system failures, although increasing healthcare complexity makes this harder to do without risk of error. Aviation and military organizations achieve ultrasafe outcomes through high-reliability practice. We describe how reliability principles were used to teach nurses to improve patient safety at the front line of care. Outcomes include safety-oriented, teamwork communication competency; reflections on safety culture and clinical leadership are discussed.(Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:615,
      author={L. M. McKeon and P. D. Cunningham and J. S. Oswaks},
      year={2009},
      month={Jan-Mar},
      title={Improving patient safety: patient-focused, high-reliability team training },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={24},
      number={1},
      pages={76-82},
      note={id: 4125; JID: 9200672; ppublish },
      abstract={Healthcare systems are recognizing "human factor" flaws that result in adverse outcomes. Nurses work around system failures, although increasing healthcare complexity makes this harder to do without risk of error. Aviation and military organizations achieve ultrasafe outcomes through high-reliability practice. We describe how reliability principles were used to teach nurses to improve patient safety at the front line of care. Outcomes include safety-oriented, teamwork communication competency; reflections on safety culture and clinical leadership are discussed.(Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Humans; Inservice Training/methods/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/standards; Organizational Culture; Patient Care Team/standards; Patient-Centered Care/standards; Quality Assurance, Health Care/methods/organization & administration; Safety},
      isbn={1550-5065},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McKeon, L. M., Norris, T., Cardell, B., & Britt, T.. (2009). Developing patient-centered care competencies among prelicensure nursing students using simulation . The Journal of nursing education, 48(12), 711-715.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Health care improvement requires collaboration between academia and practice to bridge gaps in nurse education and achievement of quality outcomes. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses identified six domains, including patient-centered care, that should be addressed during prelicensure education. Simulation is a recommended strategy to teach safe clinical practice; however, cost, space, and faculty resources are barriers to its use. Computer-based social simulation is less resource intensive and effective in improving critical-thinking skills. A pilot study was conducted to compare required resources and student learning outcomes for traditional versus computer-based simulation. Fifty-three baccalaureate nursing students participated in the study; 34 completed the computer-based simulation and 31 completed the traditional simulation. Group patient-centered care competency scores improved similarly (p

    @article{RefWorks:577,
      author={L. M. McKeon and T. Norris and B. Cardell and T. Britt},
      year={2009},
      month={Dec},
      title={Developing patient-centered care competencies among prelicensure nursing students using simulation },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={12},
      pages={711-715},
      note={id: 4692; JID: 7705432; 2009/04/08 [received]; 2009/09/14 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={Health care improvement requires collaboration between academia and practice to bridge gaps in nurse education and achievement of quality outcomes. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses identified six domains, including patient-centered care, that should be addressed during prelicensure education. Simulation is a recommended strategy to teach safe clinical practice; however, cost, space, and faculty resources are barriers to its use. Computer-based social simulation is less resource intensive and effective in improving critical-thinking skills. A pilot study was conducted to compare required resources and student learning outcomes for traditional versus computer-based simulation. Fifty-three baccalaureate nursing students participated in the study; 34 completed the computer-based simulation and 31 completed the traditional simulation. Group patient-centered care competency scores improved similarly (p },
      keywords={Competency-Based Education/methods; Computer Simulation; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Patient Simulation; Patient-Centered Care; Pilot Projects; Program Evaluation; Tennessee},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Munoz, C. C., DoBroka, C. C., & Mohammad, S.. (2009). Development of a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence for nursing and human service professions . Journal of Nursing Education, 48(9), 495-503.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    A multidisciplinary teaching model was used to develop a pilot course for students in the human service professions of nursing, education, and social work to gain additional knowledge and skills in providing diverse clients with culturally appropriate services during field and clinical experiences. This article focuses on the process of developing a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence that is consistent with a university mission to prepare students for leadership and service in an increasingly diverse society. Using the theoretical framework of Campinha-Bacote’s process of cultural competence and the six developmental stages of intercultural competence in Bennett’s developmental model of intercultural sensitivity, the course content covered the five components of cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural skills, cultural encounters, and cultural desire. Students’ written reflections indicated growth in acquisition of cultural knowledge, skills, and desire. Faculty collaboration across disciplines included the benefits of an enriched knowledge base and shared scholarship. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:629,
      author={C. C. Munoz and C. C. DoBroka and S. Mohammad},
      year={2009},
      month={09},
      title={Development of a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence for nursing and human service professions },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={48},
      number={9},
      pages={495-503},
      note={id: 4316},
      abstract={A multidisciplinary teaching model was used to develop a pilot course for students in the human service professions of nursing, education, and social work to gain additional knowledge and skills in providing diverse clients with culturally appropriate services during field and clinical experiences. This article focuses on the process of developing a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence that is consistent with a university mission to prepare students for leadership and service in an increasingly diverse society. Using the theoretical framework of Campinha-Bacote's process of cultural competence and the six developmental stages of intercultural competence in Bennett's developmental model of intercultural sensitivity, the course content covered the five components of cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural skills, cultural encounters, and cultural desire. Students' written reflections indicated growth in acquisition of cultural knowledge, skills, and desire. Faculty collaboration across disciplines included the benefits of an enriched knowledge base and shared scholarship. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010403199&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • O’Connor, S. J.. (2009). Building the knowledge base for patient-centred care: improving the use of qualitative study findings through meta-analysis and systematic reviews . European Journal of Cancer Care, 18(5), 433-436.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    It behoves those of us engaged in the softer side of cancer research … to select ‘the right method’ for the question, population or phenomenon under investigation, rather than adapting the research question to our preferred methodological approach. This should include where necessary, consideration of the need for fresh meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the findings of smaller, more descriptive studies, so that the results of these become synthesised into an expanding knowledge base and better meet the requirements of clinical colleagues and service users alike for comprehensive, rigorous and well-explicated expositions of the established knowledge base, and the development of hierarchical knowledge structures which serve to inform both clinical practice and research activities in the future. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:630,
      author={S. J. O'Connor},
      year={2009},
      month={09},
      title={Building the knowledge base for patient-centred care: improving the use of qualitative study findings through meta-analysis and systematic reviews },
      journal={European Journal of Cancer Care},
      volume={18},
      number={5},
      pages={433-436},
      note={id: 4417},
      abstract={It behoves those of us engaged in the softer side of cancer research ... to select 'the right method' for the question, population or phenomenon under investigation, rather than adapting the research question to our preferred methodological approach. This should include where necessary, consideration of the need for fresh meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the findings of smaller, more descriptive studies, so that the results of these become synthesised into an expanding knowledge base and better meet the requirements of clinical colleagues and service users alike for comprehensive, rigorous and well-explicated expositions of the established knowledge base, and the development of hierarchical knowledge structures which serve to inform both clinical practice and research activities in the future. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Meta Analysis; Patient Centered Care; Qualitative Studies; Systematic Review},
      isbn={0961-5423},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010385240&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • de Pheils, P. B., & Saul, N. M.. (2009). Communicating with Latino Patients . Journal of Nursing Education, 48(9), 515-518.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This article describes the efforts of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing to develop the Spanish language and cultural competency skills of advanced practice nursing students by establishing an elective course, Communicating with the Latino Patient. The need for this training is reflected in the literature, which has shown that language barriers decrease patient satisfaction and quality of care and increase the likelihood of medical error. Fifty-seven first-year master’s students participated in this course. The effectiveness of the training was monitored during and after each course by self-assessment surveys of the participants’ language acquisition. The data suggest that the most successful outcomes result from limiting class size, emphasizing high interactivity, and incorporating clinical experiences in the instruction, as well as focusing exclusively on intermediate-level speakers when resources are limited. Training can be time consuming and costly, yet graduates agreed that the training was imperative and valuable. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:625,
      author={P. B. de Pheils and N. M. Saul},
      year={2009},
      month={09},
      title={Communicating with Latino Patients },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={48},
      number={9},
      pages={515-518},
      note={id: 4317},
      abstract={This article describes the efforts of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing to develop the Spanish language and cultural competency skills of advanced practice nursing students by establishing an elective course, Communicating with the Latino Patient. The need for this training is reflected in the literature, which has shown that language barriers decrease patient satisfaction and quality of care and increase the likelihood of medical error. Fifty-seven first-year master's students participated in this course. The effectiveness of the training was monitored during and after each course by self-assessment surveys of the participants' language acquisition. The data suggest that the most successful outcomes result from limiting class size, emphasizing high interactivity, and incorporating clinical experiences in the instruction, as well as focusing exclusively on intermediate-level speakers when resources are limited. Training can be time consuming and costly, yet graduates agreed that the training was imperative and valuable. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010403204&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Radwin, L. E., Cabral, H. J., & Wilkes, G.. (2009). Relationships between patient-centered cancer nursing interventions and desired health outcomes in the context of the health care system . Research in nursing & health, 32(1), 4-17.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A non-experimental longitudinal prospective study was conducted to examine the relationships between patient-centered nursing interventions (PCNIs), system characteristics, patient characteristics, and desired health outcomes (DHOs) for 173 hematology-oncology patients. Forty-nine nurse participants provided system characteristics data. Confirmatory factor analyses yielded parsimonious scales to operationalize the variables. In the path model, one PCNI-individualization-was positively related to three subsequent DHOs: authentic self-representation, optimism, and sense of well-being. Two additional PCNIs-responsiveness and proficiency-were positively related to subsequent trust in nurses. PCNIs did not vary with patient race, ethnicity, age, gender, or educational level. Patient-centeredness of care for cancer patients may be enhanced by quality improvement activities that measure and monitor these PCNIs and resultant outcomes. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:616,
      author={L. E. Radwin and H. J. Cabral and G. Wilkes},
      year={2009},
      month={Feb},
      title={Relationships between patient-centered cancer nursing interventions and desired health outcomes in the context of the health care system },
      journal={Research in nursing & health},
      volume={32},
      number={1},
      pages={4-17},
      note={id: 4128; CI: 2008; GR: HS K08 11625/HS/AHRQ HHS/United States; JID: 7806136; ppublish },
      abstract={A non-experimental longitudinal prospective study was conducted to examine the relationships between patient-centered nursing interventions (PCNIs), system characteristics, patient characteristics, and desired health outcomes (DHOs) for 173 hematology-oncology patients. Forty-nine nurse participants provided system characteristics data. Confirmatory factor analyses yielded parsimonious scales to operationalize the variables. In the path model, one PCNI-individualization-was positively related to three subsequent DHOs: authentic self-representation, optimism, and sense of well-being. Two additional PCNIs-responsiveness and proficiency-were positively related to subsequent trust in nurses. PCNIs did not vary with patient race, ethnicity, age, gender, or educational level. Patient-centeredness of care for cancer patients may be enhanced by quality improvement activities that measure and monitor these PCNIs and resultant outcomes. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adaptation, Psychological; Adult; Data Collection/methods; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Female; Health Status; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Models, Theoretical; Neoplasms/nursing; New England; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Evaluation Research/methods/statistics & numerical data; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)/methods/statistics & numerical data; Patient Satisfaction; Patient-Centered Care; Prospective Studies; Research Design},
      isbn={1098-240X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Slater, P., McCormack, B., & Bunting, B.. (2009). The development and pilot testing of an instrument to measure nurses’ working environment: the Nursing Context Index . Worldviews on evidence-based nursing / Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing, 6(3), 173-182.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Evidence shows that adopting a person-centered approach to nursing alters the work environment, reduces anxiety levels among nurses in the long term, promotes teamwork among staff, and increases job satisfaction. However, few studies have attempted to quantify the outcomes from the adoption of person-centered nursing. The lack of outcome measurement is in part influenced by the lack of a standardized instrument to measure person-centered nursing. AIMS: The aim of this study was to develop an instrument (the Nursing Context Index) to inform the development of person-centered nursing and outcomes arising. METHODS: The Nursing Context Index (NCI) was developed through three stages. Stage 1 involved a systematic literature review to identify the key characteristics that needed to be considered in the instrument. Stage 2 involved the identification and selection of items for inclusion in the instrument identified through focus group discussions. A 19-construct instrument was developed. Face validity and content validity were gauged. In Stage 3, a pilot study (n = 23) was conducted to test the instrument. Measures of internal consistency were ensured using Cronbach’s alpha. Criterion-related validity of the instrument was ensured through comparison between factors contained in the instrument. RESULTS: Findings show that the NCI is an accurate representation of the factors influenced by a clinical setting’s progression to person-centered nursing. The factors were deemed appropriate to the clinical settings, and possessed face and content validity. Initial statistical findings confirm the validity and usability of the NCI. IMPLICATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS: The process used for the development and testing of the instrument was found to be effective. The NCI was deemed to be an effective measure of factors influenced by the implementation of person-centered nursing and would help in redressing a scarcity of quantitative evidence to examine the benefits of nurses working in a person-centered manner. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:631,
      author={P. Slater and B. McCormack and B. Bunting},
      year={2009},
      title={The development and pilot testing of an instrument to measure nurses' working environment: the Nursing Context Index },
      journal={Worldviews on evidence-based nursing / Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing},
      volume={6},
      number={3},
      pages={173-182},
      note={id: 4382; JID: 101185267; 2009/07/27 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Evidence shows that adopting a person-centered approach to nursing alters the work environment, reduces anxiety levels among nurses in the long term, promotes teamwork among staff, and increases job satisfaction. However, few studies have attempted to quantify the outcomes from the adoption of person-centered nursing. The lack of outcome measurement is in part influenced by the lack of a standardized instrument to measure person-centered nursing. AIMS: The aim of this study was to develop an instrument (the Nursing Context Index) to inform the development of person-centered nursing and outcomes arising. METHODS: The Nursing Context Index (NCI) was developed through three stages. Stage 1 involved a systematic literature review to identify the key characteristics that needed to be considered in the instrument. Stage 2 involved the identification and selection of items for inclusion in the instrument identified through focus group discussions. A 19-construct instrument was developed. Face validity and content validity were gauged. In Stage 3, a pilot study (n = 23) was conducted to test the instrument. Measures of internal consistency were ensured using Cronbach's alpha. Criterion-related validity of the instrument was ensured through comparison between factors contained in the instrument. RESULTS: Findings show that the NCI is an accurate representation of the factors influenced by a clinical setting's progression to person-centered nursing. The factors were deemed appropriate to the clinical settings, and possessed face and content validity. Initial statistical findings confirm the validity and usability of the NCI. IMPLICATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS: The process used for the development and testing of the instrument was found to be effective. The NCI was deemed to be an effective measure of factors influenced by the implementation of person-centered nursing and would help in redressing a scarcity of quantitative evidence to examine the benefits of nurses working in a person-centered manner. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Burnout, Professional/prevention & control/psychology; Cooperative Behavior; Data Collection/methods; Evidence-Based Nursing/organization & administration; Health Facility Environment/organization & administration; Humanism; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Job Satisfaction; Models, Nursing; Nursing Methodology Research/methods; Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Culture; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Pilot Projects; Psychometrics; Qualitative Research; Questionnaires/standards; Workplace/organization & administration/psychology},
      isbn={1741-6787},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Struth, D.. (2009). TCAB in the curriculum: creating a safer environment through nursing education . The American Journal of Nursing, 109(11 Suppl), 55-58.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Successfully integrating learning activities that support the TCAB framework required first transforming the faculty. TCAB champions needed to be identified, and those innovators and early adopters helped the nursing school’s leadership create a transformative environment. The key to success was that in order to teach TCAB principles, the faculty first had to adopt the processes into our operations. In the past, quality improvement wasn’t taught until the end of leadership courses. We realized that students need to learn about quality and safety from Day 1. Unless tools that promote patient safety and effective teamwork are constantly used, they may be forgotten once students transition to the cultures of the organizations in which they work. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:632,
      author={D. Struth},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov},
      title={TCAB in the curriculum: creating a safer environment through nursing education },
      journal={The American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={109},
      number={11 Suppl},
      pages={55-58},
      note={id: 4413; JID: 0372646; ppublish },
      abstract={Successfully integrating learning activities that support the TCAB framework required first transforming the faculty. TCAB champions needed to be identified, and those innovators and early adopters helped the nursing school's leadership create a transformative environment. The key to success was that in order to teach TCAB principles, the faculty first had to adopt the processes into our operations.
    In the past, quality improvement wasn't taught until the end of leadership courses. We realized that students need to learn about quality and safety from Day 1. Unless tools that promote patient safety and effective teamwork are constantly used, they may be forgotten once students transition to the cultures of the organizations in which they work. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Academies and Institutes/organization & administration; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing/organization & administration; Foundations/organization & administration; Health Facility Environment/organization & administration; Humans; Interinstitutional Relations; Needs Assessment; Nursing Assessment; Organizational Innovation; Organizational Objectives; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Pennsylvania; Professional Competence; Program Development; Safety Management/organization & administration; Schools, Nursing/organization & administration; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1538-7488},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Voorhis, V. K. T., & Willis, T. S.. (2009). Implementing a pediatric rapid response system to improve quality and patient safety . Pediatric clinics of North America, 56(4), 919-933.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Life-threatening events are common in today’s hospitals, where an increasing proportion of patients with urgent admission are cared for by understaffed, often inexperienced personnel. Medical errors play a key role in causing adverse events and failure to rescue deteriorating patients. In-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes are generally poor, but these events are often preceded by a pattern of deterioration with abnormal vital signs and mental status. When hospital staff or family members observe warning signs and trigger timely intervention by a rapid response team, rates of cardiac arrest and mortality can be reduced. Rapid response team involvement can be used to trigger careful review of preceding events to help uncover important systems issues and allow for further improvements in patient safety. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:633,
      author={K. T. Van Voorhis and T. S. Willis},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug},
      title={Implementing a pediatric rapid response system to improve quality and patient safety },
      journal={Pediatric clinics of North America},
      volume={56},
      number={4},
      pages={919-933},
      note={id: 4214; JID: 0401126; ppublish },
      abstract={Life-threatening events are common in today's hospitals, where an increasing proportion of patients with urgent admission are cared for by understaffed, often inexperienced personnel. Medical errors play a key role in causing adverse events and failure to rescue deteriorating patients. In-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes are generally poor, but these events are often preceded by a pattern of deterioration with abnormal vital signs and mental status. When hospital staff or family members observe warning signs and trigger timely intervention by a rapid response team, rates of cardiac arrest and mortality can be reduced. Rapid response team involvement can be used to trigger careful review of preceding events to help uncover important systems issues and allow for further improvements in patient safety. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Child; Emergency Medical Services/standards/trends; Emergency Service, Hospital/standards; Heart Arrest/diagnosis/therapy; Hospitals, Pediatric/standards; Humans; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Medical Records; North Carolina; Organizational Case Studies; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Pediatrics/standards; Quality of Health Care/standards/trends; Safety Management; United States},
      isbn={1557-8240},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Wyllie, S., & Gains, V.. (2009). Rhetoric into reality: the journey towards becoming person-centred . Working with Older People: Community Care Policy & Practice, 13(3), 38-41.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Barchester Healthcare’s Memory Lane Communities programme is gaining recognition for its standards in specialist care for people with dementia. In this article, Sheena Wyllie and Val Gains explain the company’s philosophy, which recognises that every person is an individual. It is practised by staff who undergo training in Barchester’s bespoke dementia care programme, which places the family at the heart of the process of understanding the person with dementia. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:634,
      author={S. Wyllie and V. Gains},
      year={2009},
      month={09},
      title={Rhetoric into reality: the journey towards becoming person-centred },
      journal={Working with Older People: Community Care Policy & Practice},
      volume={13},
      number={3},
      pages={38-41},
      note={id: 4421},
      abstract={Barchester Healthcare's Memory Lane Communities programme is gaining recognition for its standards in specialist care for people with dementia. In this article, Sheena Wyllie and Val Gains explain the company's philosophy, which recognises that every person is an individual. It is practised by staff who undergo training in Barchester's bespoke dementia care programme, which places the family at the heart of the process of understanding the person with dementia. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Dementia -- Therapy; Nursing Homes -- Standards; Patient Centered Care; Attitude to Aging; Disruptive Behavior; Holistic Care; Life History Review; Organizational Culture; Patient Care Plans; Psychological Well-Being; Support, Psychosocial; Teamwork},
      isbn={1366-3666},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010431382&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

2008

  • A, W., KK, L., CL, C., AL, K., & E., G.. (2008). One Size Does Not Fit All: Meeting the Health Care Needs of Diverse Populations (Hospitals, Language, and Culture Study). The Joint Commission.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    As the diversity of our nation continues to grow, the multiplicity of languages, dialects, and cultures that hospitals and their staff encounter can be overwhelming. Hospitals, Language, and Culture: A Snapshot of the Nation (HLC) is a cross-sectional qualitative study, funded by The California Endowment, designed to explore how 60 hospitals across the country provide health care to culturally and linguistically diverse patient populations. This report provides a framework for hospitals to develop and employ practices for meeting diverse patient needs. (Source: Publisher)

    @techreport{RefWorks:1092,
      author={Wilson-Stronks A and Lee KK and Cordero CL and Kopp AL and Galvez E.},
      year={2008},
      title={One Size Does Not Fit All: Meeting the Health Care Needs of Diverse Populations },
      institution={The Joint Commission},
      type={Hospitals, Language, and Culture Study},
      note={id: 2312},
      abstract={As the diversity of our nation continues to grow, the multiplicity of languages, dialects, and cultures that hospitals and their staff encounter can be overwhelming. Hospitals, Language, and Culture: A Snapshot of the Nation (HLC) is a cross-sectional qualitative study, funded by The California Endowment, designed to explore how 60 hospitals across the country provide health care to culturally and linguistically diverse patient populations. This report provides a framework for hospitals to develop and employ practices for meeting diverse patient needs. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Baker, C., Pulling, C., McGraw, R., Dagnone, J. D., Hopkins-Rosseel, D., & Medves, J.. (2008). Simulation in interprofessional education for patient-centred collaborative care . Journal of advanced nursing, 64(4), 372-379.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: This paper is a report of preliminary evaluations of an interprofessional education through simulation project by focusing on learner and teacher reactions to the pilot modules. BACKGROUND: Approaches to interprofessional education vary widely. Studies indicate, however, that active, experiential learning facilitate it. Patient simulators require learners to incorporate knowing, being and doing in action. A theoretically based competency framework was developed to guide interprofessional education using simulation. The framework includes a typology of shared, complementary and profession-specific competencies. Each competency type is associated with an intraprofessional, multiprofessional, or interprofessional teaching modality and with the professional composition of learner groups. METHOD: The project is guided by an action research approach in which ongoing evaluation generates knowledge to modify and further develop it. Preliminary evaluations of the first pilot module, cardiac resuscitation rounds, among 101 nursing students, 42 medical students and 70 junior medical residents were conducted in 2005-2007 using a questionnaire with rating scales and open-ended questions. Another 20 medical students, 7 junior residents and 45 nursing students completed a questionnaire based on the Interdisciplinary Education Perception scale. FINDINGS: Simulation-based learning provided students with interprofessional activities they saw as relevant for their future as practitioners. They embraced both the interprofessional and simulation components enthusiastically. Attitudinal scores and responses were consistently positive among both medical and nursing students. CONCLUSION: Interprofessional education through simulation offers a promising approach to preparing future healthcare professionals for the collaborative models of healthcare delivery being developed internationally.

    @article{RefWorks:1075,
      author={C. Baker and C. Pulling and R. McGraw and J. D. Dagnone and D. Hopkins-Rosseel and J. Medves},
      year={2008},
      month={Nov},
      title={Simulation in interprofessional education for patient-centred collaborative care },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={64},
      number={4},
      pages={372-379},
      note={id: 2878; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 7609811; 2008/09/01 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: This paper is a report of preliminary evaluations of an interprofessional education through simulation project by focusing on learner and teacher reactions to the pilot modules. BACKGROUND: Approaches to interprofessional education vary widely. Studies indicate, however, that active, experiential learning facilitate it. Patient simulators require learners to incorporate knowing, being and doing in action. A theoretically based competency framework was developed to guide interprofessional education using simulation. The framework includes a typology of shared, complementary and profession-specific competencies. Each competency type is associated with an intraprofessional, multiprofessional, or interprofessional teaching modality and with the professional composition of learner groups. METHOD: The project is guided by an action research approach in which ongoing evaluation generates knowledge to modify and further develop it. Preliminary evaluations of the first pilot module, cardiac resuscitation rounds, among 101 nursing students, 42 medical students and 70 junior medical residents were conducted in 2005-2007 using a questionnaire with rating scales and open-ended questions. Another 20 medical students, 7 junior residents and 45 nursing students completed a questionnaire based on the Interdisciplinary Education Perception scale. FINDINGS: Simulation-based learning provided students with interprofessional activities they saw as relevant for their future as practitioners. They embraced both the interprofessional and simulation components enthusiastically. Attitudinal scores and responses were consistently positive among both medical and nursing students. CONCLUSION: Interprofessional education through simulation offers a promising approach to preparing future healthcare professionals for the collaborative models of healthcare delivery being developed internationally. },
      isbn={1365-2648},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Brown, J., Nolan, M., & Davies, S.. (2008). Bringing caring and competence into focus in gerontological nursing: a longitudinal, multi-method study . International journal of nursing studies, 45(5), 654-667.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature suggests that caring has become increasingly devalued as health systems focus primarily on cure. This is a worrying trend, particularly for gerontological nursing, where cure is often not possible. Consequently, work with older people is often not seen as an attractive career option, a perception that is frequently reinforced during students’ practise placements, which exert a considerable influence on the values that inform their future professional practise. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore longitudinally the way that students experience their placement, and to identify the characteristics of an ‘enriched’ environment of care that potentially creates a positive view of work with older people. METHODS: A multi-method longitudinal study using a constructivist methodology and comprising both conceptual and empirical phases was undertaken. This paper concentrates on the results emerging from 57 focus groups completed over a 3 year period in four School’s of Nursing in England, short visits to 33 placement areas and in-depth visits to seven placement areas. FINDINGS: The paper describes a temporal model of the student placement experience in which their focus of attention and effort varies over time. Five ‘foci’ are identified-self as focus, course as focus, professional care as focus, patient as focus, person as focus. The extent to which students are able to achieve person as focus is crucially dependant upon the input of their mentor, and their exposure to enriched environments of care that can be understood in terms of the ‘senses framework’. RELEVANCE TO PRACTISE: The paper describes several important ways in which students’ placement experiences can be enhanced, enabling them to form and consolidate a more rounded and positive view of gerontological nursing. Numerous practical suggestions for achieving an ‘enriched’ environment of learning that enables students to appreciate the value of care as well as cure are identified.

    @article{RefWorks:1076,
      author={J. Brown and M. Nolan and S. Davies},
      year={2008},
      month={May},
      title={Bringing caring and competence into focus in gerontological nursing: a longitudinal, multi-method study },
      journal={International journal of nursing studies},
      volume={45},
      number={5},
      pages={654-667},
      note={id: 2785; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 0400675; 2006/04/04 [received]; 2006/11/17 [revised]; 2007/01/13 [accepted]; 2007/03/08 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: The recent literature suggests that caring has become increasingly devalued as health systems focus primarily on cure. This is a worrying trend, particularly for gerontological nursing, where cure is often not possible. Consequently, work with older people is often not seen as an attractive career option, a perception that is frequently reinforced during students' practise placements, which exert a considerable influence on the values that inform their future professional practise. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore longitudinally the way that students experience their placement, and to identify the characteristics of an 'enriched' environment of care that potentially creates a positive view of work with older people. METHODS: A multi-method longitudinal study using a constructivist methodology and comprising both conceptual and empirical phases was undertaken. This paper concentrates on the results emerging from 57 focus groups completed over a 3 year period in four School's of Nursing in England, short visits to 33 placement areas and in-depth visits to seven placement areas. FINDINGS: The paper describes a temporal model of the student placement experience in which their focus of attention and effort varies over time. Five 'foci' are identified-self as focus, course as focus, professional care as focus, patient as focus, person as focus. The extent to which students are able to achieve person as focus is crucially dependant upon the input of their mentor, and their exposure to enriched environments of care that can be understood in terms of the 'senses framework'. RELEVANCE TO PRACTISE: The paper describes several important ways in which students' placement experiences can be enhanced, enabling them to form and consolidate a more rounded and positive view of gerontological nursing. Numerous practical suggestions for achieving an 'enriched' environment of learning that enables students to appreciate the value of care as well as cure are identified. },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Career Choice; Clinical Competence; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Empathy; England; Focus Groups; Geriatric Nursing/education/organization & administration; Holistic Health; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Longitudinal Studies; Mentors/psychology; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Preceptorship/organization & administration; Self Concept; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0020-7489},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Campesino, M.. (2008). Beyond transculturalism: critiques of cultural education in nursing . The Journal of nursing education, 47(7), 298-304.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    New and innovative educational approaches are needed to prepare a workforce that responds to diverse needs of people from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds, languages, and worldviews. Despite some movement toward standardization of cultural curricular content, there remains a lack of consensus regarding pedagogical approaches to cultural education in nursing. An increasing number of nurse scholars have identified significant limitations in the process of cultural education in nursing and transcultural nursing theory. These critiques reflect a schism in the discipline regarding foundational theoretical perspectives and conceptualizations of culturally competent health care. This article offers a synthesis of transcultural nursing critiques that have appeared in the nursing literature over the past decade and explicates the philosophical tensions that underlie the varying pedagogical approaches to cultural education in nursing.

    @article{RefWorks:1077,
      author={M. Campesino},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul},
      title={Beyond transculturalism: critiques of cultural education in nursing },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={47},
      number={7},
      pages={298-304},
      note={id: 2800; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; RF: 64; ppublish },
      abstract={New and innovative educational approaches are needed to prepare a workforce that responds to diverse needs of people from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds, languages, and worldviews. Despite some movement toward standardization of cultural curricular content, there remains a lack of consensus regarding pedagogical approaches to cultural education in nursing. An increasing number of nurse scholars have identified significant limitations in the process of cultural education in nursing and transcultural nursing theory. These critiques reflect a schism in the discipline regarding foundational theoretical perspectives and conceptualizations of culturally competent health care. This article offers a synthesis of transcultural nursing critiques that have appeared in the nursing literature over the past decade and explicates the philosophical tensions that underlie the varying pedagogical approaches to cultural education in nursing. },
      keywords={Consensus; Cultural Diversity; Curriculum; Dissent and Disputes; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Guidelines as Topic; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Theory; Paternalism; Philosophy, Nursing; Power (Psychology); Transcultural Nursing/education/organization & administration},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Engebretson, J., Mahoney, J., & Carlson, E. D.. (2008). Cultural competence in the era of evidence-based practice . Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 24(3), 172-178.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Cultural competence has become an important concern for contemporary health care delivery, with ethical and legal implications. Numerous educational approaches have been developed to orient clinicians, and standards and position statements promoting cultural competence have been published by both the American Medical Association and the American Nurses Association. Although a number of health care regulatory agencies have developed standards or recommendations, clinical application to patient care has been challenging. These challenges include the abstract nature of the concept, essentializing culture to race or ethnicity, and the attempts to associate culture with health disparities. To make cultural competence relevant to clinical practice, we linked a cultural competency continuum that identifies the levels of cultural competency (cultural destructiveness, cultural incapacity, cultural blindness, cultural precompetence, and cultural proficiency) to well-established values in health care. This situates cultural competence and proficiency in alignment with patient-centered care. A model integrating the cultural competency continuum with the components of evidence-based care (i.e., best research practice, clinical expertise, and patient’s values and circumstances) is presented.

    @article{RefWorks:1078,
      author={J. Engebretson and J. Mahoney and E. D. Carlson},
      year={2008},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Cultural competence in the era of evidence-based practice },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={24},
      number={3},
      pages={172-178},
      note={id: 2781; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511298; RF: 55; 2007/03/14 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Cultural competence has become an important concern for contemporary health care delivery, with ethical and legal implications. Numerous educational approaches have been developed to orient clinicians, and standards and position statements promoting cultural competence have been published by both the American Medical Association and the American Nurses Association. Although a number of health care regulatory agencies have developed standards or recommendations, clinical application to patient care has been challenging. These challenges include the abstract nature of the concept, essentializing culture to race or ethnicity, and the attempts to associate culture with health disparities. To make cultural competence relevant to clinical practice, we linked a cultural competency continuum that identifies the levels of cultural competency (cultural destructiveness, cultural incapacity, cultural blindness, cultural precompetence, and cultural proficiency) to well-established values in health care. This situates cultural competence and proficiency in alignment with patient-centered care. A model integrating the cultural competency continuum with the components of evidence-based care (i.e., best research practice, clinical expertise, and patient's values and circumstances) is presented. },
      keywords={Attitude to Health/ethnology; Benchmarking; Cultural Competency/education/ethics/organization & administration; Cultural Diversity; Delivery of Health Care/ethics/organization & administration; Disease Management; Evidence-Based Medicine/education/ethics/organization & administration; Government Regulation; Guidelines as Topic; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Health Status Disparities; Healthcare Disparities; Humans; Models, Nursing; Nurse's Role; Patient Care Planning/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/ethics/organization & administration; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Prejudice; Principle-Based Ethics; Social Justice; Social Values; Transcultural Nursing/education/organization & administration; United States},
      isbn={1532-8481},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Grosch, K., Medvene, L., & Wolcott, H.. (2008). Person-centered caregiving instruction for geriatric nursing assistant students: development and evaluation . Journal of gerontological nursing, 34(8), 23-31; quiz 32-3.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This research describes the development and evaluation of a 2-hour program that taught geriatric nursing assistant students person-centered caregiving skills. The person centeredness of caregiving skills among students who completed the training, as well as those who did not, was evaluated by coding their videotaped interactions with a standardized long-term care resident. Residents reported more satisfaction with students who had completed the special training, although there was little difference between the actual behavior of students in the intervention and control conditions. Students’ interpersonal cognitive complexity was associated with their ability to provide care in person-centered ways.

    @article{RefWorks:1079,
      author={K. Grosch and L. Medvene and H. Wolcott},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={Person-centered caregiving instruction for geriatric nursing assistant students: development and evaluation },
      journal={Journal of gerontological nursing},
      volume={34},
      number={8},
      pages={23-31; quiz 32-3},
      note={id: 2778; PUBM: Print; JID: 7510258; ppublish },
      abstract={This research describes the development and evaluation of a 2-hour program that taught geriatric nursing assistant students person-centered caregiving skills. The person centeredness of caregiving skills among students who completed the training, as well as those who did not, was evaluated by coding their videotaped interactions with a standardized long-term care resident. Residents reported more satisfaction with students who had completed the special training, although there was little difference between the actual behavior of students in the intervention and control conditions. Students' interpersonal cognitive complexity was associated with their ability to provide care in person-centered ways. },
      keywords={Adult; Aged; Educational Measurement; Female; Geriatric Nursing/education; Humans; Middle Aged; Nurses' Aides/education; Patient-Centered Care; Problem-Based Learning; Teaching/methods; United States; Videotape Recording},
      isbn={0098-9134},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hunter, J. L.. (2008). Applying constructivism to nursing education in cultural competence: a course that bears repeating . Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 19(4), 354-362.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    A graduate course on culture, diversity, and cultural competence was developed based on constructivist learning theory and Campinha-Bacote’s constructs of cultural awareness, knowledge, skill, and encounters. The epistemology, structure, assignments, and activities used in both online and classroom courses were highly effective and well received by the students. Student course evaluations and outcome assessments of students’ cultural competence levels, as compared to precourse levels, provided supportive evidence that the course design produced intended outcomes. Course resources are shared, making them available for use by others in cultural competence education.

    @article{RefWorks:1080,
      author={J. L. Hunter},
      year={2008},
      month={10},
      title={Applying constructivism to nursing education in cultural competence: a course that bears repeating },
      journal={Journal of Transcultural Nursing},
      volume={19},
      number={4},
      pages={354-362},
      note={id: 2832; Accession Number: 2010055918. Language: English. Entry Date: 20081107. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 29 ref. NLM UID: 9001407. },
      abstract={A graduate course on culture, diversity, and cultural competence was developed based on constructivist learning theory and Campinha-Bacote's constructs of cultural awareness, knowledge, skill, and encounters. The epistemology, structure, assignments, and activities used in both online and classroom courses were highly effective and well received by the students. Student course evaluations and outcome assessments of students' cultural competence levels, as compared to precourse levels, provided supportive evidence that the course design produced intended outcomes. Course resources are shared, making them available for use by others in cultural competence education. },
      keywords={Cultural Competence -- Education; Education, Nursing, Masters; Collaboration; Conceptual Framework; Course Content; Cultural Sensitivity; Curriculum; Knowledge; Learning Theory; Program Evaluation; Teaching Materials},
      isbn={1043-6596},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010055918&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Johnson, B., Abraham, M., & et al Conway, J.. (2008). Partnering with Patients and Families to Design a Patient- and Family-Centered Health Care System: Recommendations and Promising Practices Institute for Family-Centered Care and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This publication, with funding support from the California HealthCare Foundation, is based on the deliberations and key recommendations that emerged from a unique meeting convened by the Institute for Family-Centered Care in collaboration with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Highlighted are examples of best practices drawn from hospitals, ambulatory programs, medical and nursing schools, funders of health care, patient- and family-led organizations, and other health care entities. These organizations are making exemplary progress in partnering with patients and families to enhance quality and safety and to improve the experience of care. (Source: Publisher)

    @techreport{RefWorks:1081,
      author={B. Johnson and M. Abraham and J. et al Conway},
      year={2008},
      title={Partnering with Patients and Families to Design a Patient- and Family-Centered Health Care System: Recommendations and Promising Practices },
      institution={Institute for Family-Centered Care and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement},
      note={id: 2278},
      abstract={This publication, with funding support from the California HealthCare Foundation, is based on the deliberations and key recommendations that emerged from a unique meeting convened by the Institute for Family-Centered Care in collaboration with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Highlighted are examples of best practices drawn from hospitals, ambulatory programs, medical and nursing schools, funders of health care, patient- and family-led organizations, and other health care entities. These organizations are making exemplary progress in partnering with patients and families to enhance quality and safety and to improve the experience of care. (Source: Publisher) },
      url={http://www.familycenteredcare.org/pdf/PartneringwithPatientsandFamilies.pdf}
    }

  • Lampley, T. M., Little, K. E., Beck-Little, R., & Xu, Y.. (2008). Cultural competence of North Carolina nurses: a journey from novice to expert . Home Health Care Management & Practice, 20(6), 454-461.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This study reports the survey findings of self-reported cultural competence of a convenience sample of 66 registered nurses of varying ages, gender, ethnicity, educational backgrounds, and experience in North Carolina. Campinha-Bacote’s model of cultural competence and Benner’s model of clinical skills acquisition serve as the conceptual frameworks. The process of cultural competence among health care professionals, developed by Campinha-Bacote, is used to measure cultural competence in participants. In addition to descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis of variance was conducted to compare means of cultural competence scores of different groups. Findings indicate that level of education, nursing experience, and continuing education are factors that promote cultural competence, whereas gender and race/ethnicity have no bearing. In addition, qualitative data generated four themes: language or verbal communication barrier, religious beliefs, different health beliefs and behaviors, and culturally inappropriate nonverbal communication. Implications of these findings for nursing education, practice, and future research are elaborated.

    @article{RefWorks:1082,
      author={T. M. Lampley and K. E. Little and R. Beck-Little and Y. Xu},
      year={2008},
      month={10},
      title={Cultural competence of North Carolina nurses: a journey from novice to expert },
      journal={Home Health Care Management & Practice},
      volume={20},
      number={6},
      pages={454-461},
      note={id: 2863; Accession Number: 2010035706. Language: English. Entry Date: 20081107. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Home Health Care. Instrumentation: Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professionals (IAPCC). No. of Refs: 25 ref. NLM UID: 9607039. },
      abstract={This study reports the survey findings of self-reported cultural competence of a convenience sample of 66 registered nurses of varying ages, gender, ethnicity, educational backgrounds, and experience in North Carolina. Campinha-Bacote's model of cultural competence and Benner's model of clinical skills acquisition serve as the conceptual frameworks. The process of cultural competence among health care professionals, developed by Campinha-Bacote, is used to measure cultural competence in participants. In addition to descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis of variance was conducted to compare means of cultural competence scores of different groups. Findings indicate that level of education, nursing experience, and continuing education are factors that promote cultural competence, whereas gender and race/ethnicity have no bearing. In addition, qualitative data generated four themes: language or verbal communication barrier, religious beliefs, different health beliefs and behaviors, and culturally inappropriate nonverbal communication. Implications of these findings for nursing education, practice, and future research are elaborated. },
      keywords={Cultural Competence -- Evaluation; Nurses -- Evaluation -- North Carolina; Adult; Conceptual Framework; Content Analysis; Cross Sectional Studies; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Male; Middle Age; North Carolina; Nurse-Patient Relations; One-Way Analysis of Variance; P-Value; Professional-Family Relations; Questionnaires; Self Report; Survey Research; T-Tests},
      isbn={1084-8223},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010035706&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Mitchell, P. H.. (2008). Patient-centered care–a new focus on a time-honored concept . Nursing outlook, 56(5), 197-198.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The IOM series of reports on improving the quality of care in America has provided a strong impetus as well as some new focus on person-centered care that should guide the way for nursing and medicine to come together across the professions. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1084,
      author={P. H. Mitchell},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Patient-centered care--a new focus on a time-honored concept },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={5},
      pages={197-198},
      note={id: 2745; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; ppublish },
      abstract={The IOM series of reports on improving the quality of care in America has provided a strong impetus as well as some new focus on person-centered care that should guide the way for nursing and medicine to come together across the professions. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1528-3968},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Nelson, D. P., & Polst, G.. (2008). An interdisciplinary team approach to evidence-based improvement in family-centered care . Critical care nursing quarterly, 31(2), 110-118.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Family-centered care has become an integral part of total patient care in today’s healthcare setting. Meeting family needs can be challenging for staff nurses already overwhelmed with escalating patient acuity and ever-increasing technical and documentation burdens. In the year 2000, an Interdisciplinary team in a tertiary hospital in the midwest employed a collaborative process to design and pioneer an award-winning nursing role in family-centered care. This article describes the methods used by this hospital to meet the ever-increasing challenge of family needs integrated into holistic patient care.

    @article{RefWorks:1085,
      author={D. P. Nelson and G. Polst},
      year={2008},
      month={Apr-Jun},
      title={An interdisciplinary team approach to evidence-based improvement in family-centered care },
      journal={Critical care nursing quarterly},
      volume={31},
      number={2},
      pages={110-118},
      note={id: 2782; PUBM: Print; JID: 8704517; ppublish },
      abstract={Family-centered care has become an integral part of total patient care in today's healthcare setting. Meeting family needs can be challenging for staff nurses already overwhelmed with escalating patient acuity and ever-increasing technical and documentation burdens. In the year 2000, an Interdisciplinary team in a tertiary hospital in the midwest employed a collaborative process to design and pioneer an award-winning nursing role in family-centered care. This article describes the methods used by this hospital to meet the ever-increasing challenge of family needs integrated into holistic patient care. },
      keywords={Adult; Cooperative Behavior; Critical Care/organization & administration/psychology; Evidence-Based Medicine; Family/psychology; Family Nursing/organization & administration; Humans; Midwestern United States; Needs Assessment; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Evaluation Research; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Professional-Family Relations; Program Evaluation; Social Support; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={0887-9303},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ponte, R. P., & Peterson, K.. (2008). A patient- and family-centered care model paves the way for a culture of quality and safety . Critical care nursing clinics of North America, 20(4), 451-464.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Over the past 13 years, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has embraced a patient- and family-centered model of care and culture of quality and safety. The authors discuss how their care delivery model and quality and safety efforts reinforce one another, and how they have shaped the organization’s practice environment, governance structures, and systems and processes that support care delivery. The authors also discuss key values, structures, and processes that must be upheld to assure the advancement of patient- and family-centered care and quality and safety efforts within an institution. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:617,
      author={P. Reid Ponte and K. Peterson},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={A patient- and family-centered care model paves the way for a culture of quality and safety },
      journal={Critical care nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={20},
      number={4},
      pages={451-464},
      note={id: 4127; LR: 20090520; JID: 8912620; ppublish },
      abstract={Over the past 13 years, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has embraced a patient- and family-centered model of care and culture of quality and safety. The authors discuss how their care delivery model and quality and safety efforts reinforce one another, and how they have shaped the organization's practice environment, governance structures, and systems and processes that support care delivery. The authors also discuss key values, structures, and processes that must be upheld to assure the advancement of patient- and family-centered care and quality and safety efforts within an institution. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Boston; Decision Making, Organizational; Humans; Models, Organizational; Organizational Culture; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Physician-Nurse Relations; Professional-Family Relations; Quality of Health Care; Safety Management},
      isbn={1558-3481},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Robinson, J. H., Callister, L. C., Berry, J. A., & Dearing, K. A.. (2008). Patient-centered care and adherence: definitions and applications to improve outcomes . Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 20(12), 600-607.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: The implementation of patient-centered care (PCC) has been hampered by the lack of a clear definition and method of measurement. The purpose of this review is to identify the fundamental characteristics of PCC to clarify its definition, propose a method for measurement of PCC, and recommend effective PCC practices. DATA SOURCES: Review of literature related to PCC, adherence and communication from Cinahl, PubMed Academic Search Premier, and Cochrane Library databases. CONCLUSIONS: Research has shown that patient-centered interactions promote adherence and lead to improved health outcomes. The fundamental characteristics of PCC were identified as (a) patient involvement in care and (b) the individualization of patient care. The use of a numeric rating scale to measure the presence of these characteristics allows quantification from the patient perspective. Effective PCC practices were related to communication, shared decision making, and patient education. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: PCC is a measure of the quality of health care. Understanding the characteristics of PCC facilitates its implementation and measurement. Promoting PCC activities will improve adherence and encourage patient responsibility for health status. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:618,
      author={J. H. Robinson and L. C. Callister and J. A. Berry and K. A. Dearing},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={Patient-centered care and adherence: definitions and applications to improve outcomes },
      journal={Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners},
      volume={20},
      number={12},
      pages={600-607},
      note={id: 3714; JID: 8916634; RF: 51; ppublish },
      abstract={PURPOSE: The implementation of patient-centered care (PCC) has been hampered by the lack of a clear definition and method of measurement. The purpose of this review is to identify the fundamental characteristics of PCC to clarify its definition, propose a method for measurement of PCC, and recommend effective PCC practices. DATA SOURCES: Review of literature related to PCC, adherence and communication from Cinahl, PubMed Academic Search Premier, and Cochrane Library databases. CONCLUSIONS: Research has shown that patient-centered interactions promote adherence and lead to improved health outcomes. The fundamental characteristics of PCC were identified as (a) patient involvement in care and (b) the individualization of patient care. The use of a numeric rating scale to measure the presence of these characteristics allows quantification from the patient perspective. Effective PCC practices were related to communication, shared decision making, and patient education. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: PCC is a measure of the quality of health care. Understanding the characteristics of PCC facilitates its implementation and measurement. Promoting PCC activities will improve adherence and encourage patient responsibility for health status. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Decision Making; Holistic Health; Humans; Models, Nursing; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Evaluation Research/organization & administration; Outcome Assessment (Health Care)/organization & administration; Paternalism; Patient Care Planning/organization & administration; Patient Compliance/psychology; Patient Education as Topic; Patient Participation/methods/psychology; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Quality of Health Care/organization & administration; Self Care/methods/psychology; Social Support; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1745-7599},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rosenzweig, M., Hravnak, M., Magdic, K., Beach, M., Clifton, M., & Arnold, R.. (2008). Patient communication simulation laboratory for students in an acute care nurse practitioner program . American Journal of Critical Care : An Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 17(4), 364-372.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Effective communication skills for clinical practice are essential for all advanced practice nurses. However, competence in these skills is not necessarily intuitive. Advanced communication skills should be taught in a way that is similar to the way other psychomotor skills in advanced nursing practice programs are taught. OBJECTIVES: To develop a patient communication simulation laboratory for the acute care nurse practitioner program at a major university and to evaluate students’ perceived confidence and communication effectiveness before and immediately as well as 4 months after completion of the laboratory. METHODS: The communication simulation laboratory was developed in collaboration with faculty from the schools of nursing and medicine. Students participated in a didactic session and then completed a 2-hour communication simulation in the laboratory. Content and simulation concentrated on breaking "bad news," empathetic communication, motivational interviewing, and the "angry" patient. Students’ self-reported confidence and perceived skill in communication were measured via a Likert scale before, immediately after, and 4 months after completion of the laboratory simulation. Students also evaluated the experience by responding to open-ended questions. RESULTS: Compared with baseline findings (before the lecture and simulation), students’ confidence in initiating difficult conversations increased significantly both immediately (P

    @article{RefWorks:1087,
      author={M. Rosenzweig and M. Hravnak and K. Magdic and M. Beach and M. Clifton and R. Arnold},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul},
      title={Patient communication simulation laboratory for students in an acute care nurse practitioner program },
      journal={American Journal of Critical Care : An Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses},
      volume={17},
      number={4},
      pages={364-372},
      note={id: 2885; PUBM: Print; JID: 9211547; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Effective communication skills for clinical practice are essential for all advanced practice nurses. However, competence in these skills is not necessarily intuitive. Advanced communication skills should be taught in a way that is similar to the way other psychomotor skills in advanced nursing practice programs are taught. OBJECTIVES: To develop a patient communication simulation laboratory for the acute care nurse practitioner program at a major university and to evaluate students' perceived confidence and communication effectiveness before and immediately as well as 4 months after completion of the laboratory. METHODS: The communication simulation laboratory was developed in collaboration with faculty from the schools of nursing and medicine. Students participated in a didactic session and then completed a 2-hour communication simulation in the laboratory. Content and simulation concentrated on breaking "bad news," empathetic communication, motivational interviewing, and the "angry" patient. Students' self-reported confidence and perceived skill in communication were measured via a Likert scale before, immediately after, and 4 months after completion of the laboratory simulation. Students also evaluated the experience by responding to open-ended questions. RESULTS: Compared with baseline findings (before the lecture and simulation), students' confidence in initiating difficult conversations increased significantly both immediately (P},
      isbn={1062-3264},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rouf, E., Chumley, H., & Dobbie, A.. (2008). Patient-centered interviewing and student performance in a comprehensive clinical skills examination: Is there an association? . Patient education and counseling.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: Communication skills, including patient-centered interviewing (PCI), have become a major priority for educational and licensing organizations in the United States. While patient-centered interviewing is associated with positive patient outcomes and improved diagnostic accuracy, it is unknown if an association exists between patient-centered interviewing and student performance in high-stakes clinical skills assessment (CSA) examinations. The purpose of this study was to determine if generic communication skills and patient-centered interviewing skills were associated with students’ overall student performance on a multi-station clinical skills assessment (CSA) examination. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study to assess student performance with standardized patients (SPs). We conducted a retrospective review of 30 videotaped SP encounters of Third year medical students (class of 2006) at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. We measured correlations between observed PCI scores, overall CSA scores and CSA interpersonal and communication (ICS) skills scores of student-SP encounters. RESULTS: PCI scores, as measured with the Four Habits Coding Scheme, a measurement tool of patient-centered communication, were not correlated with either overall CSA scores or ICS scores. Students’ PCI scores were lower than the ICS scores (57% vs. 85% of correct items). The students performed poorly (30% mean score of correct items) in eliciting patient perspectives, compared to three other domains (Invest in the beginning, Demonstrate empathy, and Invest in end) of patient-centered interviewing. CONCLUSIONS: Our study failed to demonstrate any association between student performance and patient-centered interviewing skills (PCI) in the setting of a comprehensive in-house CSA examination. Third-year medical students in our study did not practice some elements of patient-centered interviewing. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Given the increasing importance of patient-centered communication, the high-stakes in-house clinical skills examinations may consider assessing patient-centered interviewing using a more comprehensive and valid checklist.

    @article{RefWorks:1088,
      author={E. Rouf and H. Chumley and A. Dobbie},
      year={2008},
      month={Nov 13},
      title={Patient-centered interviewing and student performance in a comprehensive clinical skills examination: Is there an association? },
      journal={Patient education and counseling},
      note={id: 2835; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 8406280; 2008/03/24 [received]; 2008/09/04 [revised]; 2008/09/26 [accepted]; aheadofprint; SO: Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Nov 13. },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: Communication skills, including patient-centered interviewing (PCI), have become a major priority for educational and licensing organizations in the United States. While patient-centered interviewing is associated with positive patient outcomes and improved diagnostic accuracy, it is unknown if an association exists between patient-centered interviewing and student performance in high-stakes clinical skills assessment (CSA) examinations. The purpose of this study was to determine if generic communication skills and patient-centered interviewing skills were associated with students' overall student performance on a multi-station clinical skills assessment (CSA) examination. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study to assess student performance with standardized patients (SPs). We conducted a retrospective review of 30 videotaped SP encounters of Third year medical students (class of 2006) at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. We measured correlations between observed PCI scores, overall CSA scores and CSA interpersonal and communication (ICS) skills scores of student-SP encounters. RESULTS: PCI scores, as measured with the Four Habits Coding Scheme, a measurement tool of patient-centered communication, were not correlated with either overall CSA scores or ICS scores. Students' PCI scores were lower than the ICS scores (57% vs. 85% of correct items). The students performed poorly (30% mean score of correct items) in eliciting patient perspectives, compared to three other domains (Invest in the beginning, Demonstrate empathy, and Invest in end) of patient-centered interviewing. CONCLUSIONS: Our study failed to demonstrate any association between student performance and patient-centered interviewing skills (PCI) in the setting of a comprehensive in-house CSA examination. Third-year medical students in our study did not practice some elements of patient-centered interviewing. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Given the increasing importance of patient-centered communication, the high-stakes in-house clinical skills examinations may consider assessing patient-centered interviewing using a more comprehensive and valid checklist. },
      isbn={0738-3991},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Saha, S., Beach, M. C., & Cooper, L. A.. (2008). Patient centeredness, cultural competence and healthcare quality . Journal of the National Medical Association, 100(11), 1275-1285.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Cultural competence and patient centeredness are approaches to improving healthcare quality that have been promoted extensively in recent years. In this paper, we explore the historical evolution of both cultural competence and patient centeredness. In doing so, we demonstrate that early conceptual models of cultural competence and patient centeredness focused on how healthcare providers and patients might interact at the interpersonal level and that later conceptual models were expanded to consider how patients might be treated by the healthcare system as a whole. We then compare conceptual models for both cultural competence and patient centeredness at both the interpersonal and healthcare system levels to demonstrate similarities and differences. We conclude that, although the concepts have had different histories and foci, many of the core features of cultural competence and patient centeredness are the same. Each approach holds promise for improving the quality of healthcare for individual patients, communities and populations. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:619,
      author={S. Saha and M. C. Beach and L. A. Cooper},
      year={2008},
      month={Nov},
      title={Patient centeredness, cultural competence and healthcare quality },
      journal={Journal of the National Medical Association},
      volume={100},
      number={11},
      pages={1275-1285},
      note={id: 3261; GR: K24HL083113/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States; JID: 7503090; ppublish },
      abstract={Cultural competence and patient centeredness are approaches to improving healthcare quality that have been promoted extensively in recent years. In this paper, we explore the historical evolution of both cultural competence and patient centeredness. In doing so, we demonstrate that early conceptual models of cultural competence and patient centeredness focused on how healthcare providers and patients might interact at the interpersonal level and that later conceptual models were expanded to consider how patients might be treated by the healthcare system as a whole. We then compare conceptual models for both cultural competence and patient centeredness at both the interpersonal and healthcare system levels to demonstrate similarities and differences. We conclude that, although the concepts have had different histories and foci, many of the core features of cultural competence and patient centeredness are the same. Each approach holds promise for improving the quality of healthcare for individual patients, communities and populations. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cultural Competency; Models, Theoretical; Patient-Centered Care; Quality of Health Care},
      isbn={0027-9684},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Spade, C. M.. (2008). Psychosocial vital signs: using simulation to introduce a new concept . Nurse educator, 33(4), 181-186.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Psychosocial vital signs (PVS) is a tool used for defining and measuring essential psychosocial variables of health. Because nurse-patient interaction is basic to PVS, simulation is the methodology used for introducing this new concept to students. When learning PVS as a fundamental nursing skill, students’ thinking is informed and guided toward a holistic view of their patients. The author discusses components of PVS and the curriculum used for teaching students how to use PVS.

    @article{RefWorks:1089,
      author={C. M. Spade},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Psychosocial vital signs: using simulation to introduce a new concept },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={33},
      number={4},
      pages={181-186},
      note={id: 2779; PUBM: Print; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={Psychosocial vital signs (PVS) is a tool used for defining and measuring essential psychosocial variables of health. Because nurse-patient interaction is basic to PVS, simulation is the methodology used for introducing this new concept to students. When learning PVS as a fundamental nursing skill, students' thinking is informed and guided toward a holistic view of their patients. The author discusses components of PVS and the curriculum used for teaching students how to use PVS. },
      keywords={Adaptation, Psychological; Anxiety/nursing/prevention & control/psychology; Attitude to Health; Clinical Competence; Communication; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Holistic Health; Humans; Mental Health; Models, Nursing; Models, Psychological; Nurse-Patient Relations; Nursing Assessment/methods; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Process; Patient-Centered Care; Pilot Projects; Role Playing; Social Support; Students, Nursing/psychology; Thinking},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Suikkala, A., Leino-Kilpi, H., & Katajisto, J.. (2008). Nursing student-patient relationships: a descriptive study of students’ and patients’ views . International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 5(1), 1-11.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This study was designed to describe and compare nursing students’ and patients’ perceptions of the relationship between students and patients. The data was collected in Finland from a convenience sample of nursing students (n=290) and patients (n=242) using questionnaires especially designed for this study. The results indicated that students viewed the relationship as more authoritative and facilitative, while patients regarded the relationship as more mechanistic. Furthermore, students’ and patients’ views on their relationships differed significantly. These results have important implications for nursing education. They particularly highlight the need to further strengthen nursing student-patient interactions and relationships.

    @article{RefWorks:1091,
      author={A. Suikkala and H. Leino-Kilpi and J. Katajisto},
      year={2008},
      title={Nursing student-patient relationships: a descriptive study of students' and patients' views },
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship},
      volume={5},
      number={1},
      pages={1-11},
      note={id: 2341; Accession Number: 2009894637. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080418. Revision Date: 20080711. Publication Type: journal article; questionnaire/scale; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 27 ref. NLM UID: 101214977. },
      abstract={This study was designed to describe and compare nursing students' and patients' perceptions of the relationship between students and patients. The data was collected in Finland from a convenience sample of nursing students (n=290) and patients (n=242) using questionnaires especially designed for this study. The results indicated that students viewed the relationship as more authoritative and facilitative, while patients regarded the relationship as more mechanistic. Furthermore, students' and patients' views on their relationships differed significantly. These results have important implications for nursing education. They particularly highlight the need to further strengthen nursing student-patient interactions and relationships. },
      keywords={Patient Attitudes; Student Attitudes; Student-Patient Relations; Students, Nursing -- Psychosocial Factors; Academic Medical Centers; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and Over; Coefficient Alpha; Comparative Studies; Convenience Sample; Data Analysis Software; Descriptive Research; Descriptive Statistics; Education, Nursing -- Psychosocial Factors; Female; Finland; Internal Medicine -- Education; Male; Middle Age; Pilot Studies; Registered Nurses -- Education; Structured Questionnaires; Summated Rating Scaling},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009894637&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Wiggins, S. M.. (2008). The partnership care delivery model: an examination of the core concept and the need for a new model of care . Journal of nursing management, 16(5), 629-638.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: This article describes the foundation of an emerging care delivery model based on partnership. It also reflects on and synthesizes the findings of earlier concept analyses of its core concept. BACKGROUND: Changes in the delivery of health care services in the United States have been driven significantly by cost containment over the last 20 years. This has resulted in an unprecedented pace of work, fragmentation of care, and medical errors. Fundamental changes are needed to meet the needs of today’s health care environment. METHODS: A literature search was done in electronic data bases. Concept analysis papers were reviewed and synthesized. Results The antecedents, attributes and consequences of partnership are described and linked to the supporting literature and theoretical models. CONCLUSIONS: Engaging and empowering the patient through partnership seem to be crucial to developing a cohesive and effective model of care delivery. Partnerships among patients, their families, physicians, nurses and other clinicians positively impact on safety, quality of care, satisfaction, outcomes and job fulfillment. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers need to foster an environment that allows for stronger reciprocal relationships. They need to facilitate changes in practice that support the development of partnerships among patients, their families and all care providers.

    @article{RefWorks:1090,
      author={M. Splaine Wiggins},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul},
      title={The partnership care delivery model: an examination of the core concept and the need for a new model of care },
      journal={Journal of nursing management},
      volume={16},
      number={5},
      pages={629-638},
      note={id: 2834; PUBM: Print; JID: 9306050; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: This article describes the foundation of an emerging care delivery model based on partnership. It also reflects on and synthesizes the findings of earlier concept analyses of its core concept. BACKGROUND: Changes in the delivery of health care services in the United States have been driven significantly by cost containment over the last 20 years. This has resulted in an unprecedented pace of work, fragmentation of care, and medical errors. Fundamental changes are needed to meet the needs of today's health care environment. METHODS: A literature search was done in electronic data bases. Concept analysis papers were reviewed and synthesized. Results The antecedents, attributes and consequences of partnership are described and linked to the supporting literature and theoretical models. CONCLUSIONS: Engaging and empowering the patient through partnership seem to be crucial to developing a cohesive and effective model of care delivery. Partnerships among patients, their families, physicians, nurses and other clinicians positively impact on safety, quality of care, satisfaction, outcomes and job fulfillment. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers need to foster an environment that allows for stronger reciprocal relationships. They need to facilitate changes in practice that support the development of partnerships among patients, their families and all care providers. },
      keywords={Concept Formation; Evidence-Based Medicine; Family Nursing; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Nursing; Nurse Administrators/organization & administration; Nursing, Supervisory/organization & administration; Patient Satisfaction; Patient-Centered Care; Power (Psychology); United States},
      isbn={1365-2834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Wolf, D. M., Lehman, L., Quinlin, R., Zullo, T., & Hoffman, L.. (2008). Effect of patient-centered care on patient satisfaction and quality of care . Journal of nursing care quality, 23(4), 316-321.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A clinical randomized study (posttest design) was conducted to examine whether patient-centered care (PCC) impacts patient satisfaction, perception of nursing care, and quality of care. Differences were seen in 2 of 3 subscales within the Baker and Taylor Measurement Scale. The PCC group rated satisfaction (P = .04) and quality of services (P = .03) higher than controls. PCC may impact patients’ perception of the level of satisfaction and quality of care received.

    @article{RefWorks:1093,
      author={D. M. Wolf and L. Lehman and R. Quinlin and T. Zullo and L. Hoffman},
      year={2008},
      month={Oct-Dec},
      title={Effect of patient-centered care on patient satisfaction and quality of care },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={23},
      number={4},
      pages={316-321},
      note={id: 2801; PUBM: Print; JID: 9200672; ppublish },
      abstract={A clinical randomized study (posttest design) was conducted to examine whether patient-centered care (PCC) impacts patient satisfaction, perception of nursing care, and quality of care. Differences were seen in 2 of 3 subscales within the Baker and Taylor Measurement Scale. The PCC group rated satisfaction (P = .04) and quality of services (P = .03) higher than controls. PCC may impact patients' perception of the level of satisfaction and quality of care received. },
      isbn={1550-5065},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Wolf, D., Lehman, L., Quinlin, R., Rosenzweig, M., Friede, S., Zullo, T., & Hoffman, L.. (2008). Can nurses impact patient outcomes using a patient-centered care model? . The Journal of nursing administration, 38(12), 532-540.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine if nurses, using patient-centered care (PCC), affect patient satisfaction, perceptions of nursing care, and quality outcomes. BACKGROUND: The Institute of Medicine proposed PCC as 1 of 6 national quality aims, whereas the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services highlighted integration of PCC as 1 of 12 actions for quality improvement. METHODS: A total of 116 patients were randomized into an intervention (PCC) or control group. Patients who were to receive PCC were called before admission and cared for by nurses who trained to administer/practice PCC. Control patients received usual care. Both groups completed questionnaires and received postdischarge calls. Length of stay, falls, infections, and adverse events were measured to assess quality of care. RESULTS: No significant differences were found between groups for length of stay, infection, falls, postoperative complications, quality of care, satisfaction level, or perceptions of nursing care. CONCLUSIONS: Patient-centered care did not affect patient’s level of satisfaction or quality of care. However, findings yielded clinically relevant results regarding patient/staff responses. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:620,
      author={D. Wolf and L. Lehman and R. Quinlin and M. Rosenzweig and S. Friede and T. Zullo and L. Hoffman},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={Can nurses impact patient outcomes using a patient-centered care model? },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={38},
      number={12},
      pages={532-540},
      note={id: 4126; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine if nurses, using patient-centered care (PCC), affect patient satisfaction, perceptions of nursing care, and quality outcomes. BACKGROUND: The Institute of Medicine proposed PCC as 1 of 6 national quality aims, whereas the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services highlighted integration of PCC as 1 of 12 actions for quality improvement. METHODS: A total of 116 patients were randomized into an intervention (PCC) or control group. Patients who were to receive PCC were called before admission and cared for by nurses who trained to administer/practice PCC. Control patients received usual care. Both groups completed questionnaires and received postdischarge calls. Length of stay, falls, infections, and adverse events were measured to assess quality of care. RESULTS: No significant differences were found between groups for length of stay, infection, falls, postoperative complications, quality of care, satisfaction level, or perceptions of nursing care. CONCLUSIONS: Patient-centered care did not affect patient's level of satisfaction or quality of care. However, findings yielded clinically relevant results regarding patient/staff responses. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Accidental Falls/statistics & numerical data; Adult; Cross Infection/epidemiology; Female; Gastric Bypass/nursing/psychology; Hospitals, Community; Humans; Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data; Male; Middle Aged; Models, Nursing; Multivariate Analysis; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration/psychology; Outcome Assessment (Health Care)/organization & administration; Patient Satisfaction; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Pennsylvania/epidemiology; Quality Indicators, Health Care/organization & administration; Questionnaires; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1539-0721},
      language={eng}
    }

2007

  • London, M. R., & Lundstedt, J.. (2007). Families speak about inpatient end-of-life care . Journal of nursing care quality, 22(2), 152-158.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Death is an emotional event that leaves lasting memories for the bereaved. This article describes the qualitative analysis of a mailed family survey addressing experiences with community hospital inpatient end-of-life care. Family members identified and appreciated symptom management and caring behaviors such as compassion and communication; they also noted the absence of these caring behaviors. Effective application of these behaviors to the dying experience should improve family satisfaction with end-of-life care.

    @article{RefWorks:1083,
      author={M. R. London and J. Lundstedt},
      year={2007},
      month={Apr-Jun},
      title={Families speak about inpatient end-of-life care },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={22},
      number={2},
      pages={152-158},
      note={id: 3039; JID: 9200672; ppublish },
      abstract={Death is an emotional event that leaves lasting memories for the bereaved. This article describes the qualitative analysis of a mailed family survey addressing experiences with community hospital inpatient end-of-life care. Family members identified and appreciated symptom management and caring behaviors such as compassion and communication; they also noted the absence of these caring behaviors. Effective application of these behaviors to the dying experience should improve family satisfaction with end-of-life care. },
      keywords={Attitude to Death; Bereavement; Communication; Empathy; Health Care Surveys; Hospitals, Community/standards; Humans; Oregon; Patient Satisfaction; Professional-Family Relations; Quality of Health Care; Terminal Care/psychology/standards},
      isbn={1057-3631},
      language={eng}
    }

2006

  • (2006). Improving Communication – Improving Care (An Ethical Force Program Consensus Report). Ethical Force Program. American Medical Association.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Describes how health care organizations can ensure effective, patient-centered communication with people from diverse populations. (Source: Publisher)

    @techreport{RefWorks:1074,
      year={2006},
      title={Improving Communication - Improving Care },
      institution={Ethical Force Program. American Medical Association},
      type={An Ethical Force Program Consensus Report},
      note={id: 2311},
      abstract={Describes how health care organizations can ensure effective, patient-centered communication with people from diverse populations. (Source: Publisher) },
      url={http://www.mihealthandsafety.org/pdfs/06-improving-communication1.pdf}
    }