Teamwork and Collaboration Bibliography

2013

  • (2013). Team-Based Learning: An Innovative Approach to Teaching Maternal-Newborn Nursing Care. Journal of Nursing Education, 52(2), 112-115.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Nursing education programs are charged with the task of transforming the way future nurses are educated to better meet the demands of an ever-changing health care system. The tradition of lecture-based theory courses and on-site clinical experiences is slowly being replaced by evidence-based teaching formats that focus on actively engaging students in their own learning. This article describes the process of integrating a new teaching strategy–team-based learning–into a maternal-newborn nursing course at a midwestern baccalaureate nursing program.

    @article{RefWorks:162,
      year={2013},
      month={02},
      title={Team-Based Learning: An Innovative Approach to Teaching Maternal-Newborn Nursing Care},
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={52},
      number={2},
      pages={112-115},
      note={ID: 2011914309},
      abstract={Nursing education programs are charged with the task of transforming the way future nurses are educated to better meet the demands of an ever-changing health care system. The tradition of lecture-based theory courses and on-site clinical experiences is slowly being replaced by evidence-based teaching formats that focus on actively engaging students in their own learning. This article describes the process of integrating a new teaching strategy--team-based learning--into a maternal-newborn nursing course at a midwestern baccalaureate nursing program.},
      keywords={Maternal-Child Nursing; Education, Nursing; Teaching Methods; Teamwork; Course Content; Learning Environment, Clinical; Outcomes of Education; Program Evaluation; Education Research; Collaboration; Nursing Skills; Human},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011914309&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Aase, I., Aase, K., & Dieckmann, P.. (2013). Teaching interprofessional teamwork in medical and nursing education in Norway: A content analysis. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 27(3), 238-245.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The notions of interprofessional education and interprofessional teamwork have attained widespread acceptance, partly because lack of teamwork has been tentatively linked to adverse incidents in healthcare. By analyzing data from 32 educational institutions, this study identifies the status of interprofessional teamwork in all nursing and medical education in Norway. The study programs issued by the 32 educational institutions were subject to content analysis, distilling the ambitions and goals for teaching interprofessional teamwork. Study program coordinators were approached and asked to what degree interprofessional teamwork was actually introduced in lecturing and clinical training. Results indicate that the medical and nursing schools clearly aspire to teach interprofessional teamwork and that this has largely been achieved when it comes to theoretical teaching. Although three of the four medical programs have integrated interprofessional teamwork into their clinical training, there is a gap in the nursing programs where introduction of interprofessional teamwork in clinical training has been limited. Current challenges are related to organizational issues (e.g. lack of institutional collaboration), practical difficulties (e.g. finding time to bring students of various professions together) and possibly managerial issues (e.g. lack of strategic perspective and change management).

    @article{RefWorks:160,
      author={Ingunn Aase and Karina Aase and Peter Dieckmann},
      year={2013},
      month={05},
      title={Teaching interprofessional teamwork in medical and nursing education in Norway: A content analysis},
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={27},
      number={3},
      pages={238-245},
      note={ID: 2012097207},
      abstract={The notions of interprofessional education and interprofessional teamwork have attained widespread acceptance, partly because lack of teamwork has been tentatively linked to adverse incidents in healthcare. By analyzing data from 32 educational institutions, this study identifies the status of interprofessional teamwork in all nursing and medical education in Norway. The study programs issued by the 32 educational institutions were subject to content analysis, distilling the ambitions and goals for teaching interprofessional teamwork. Study program coordinators were approached and asked to what degree interprofessional teamwork was actually introduced in lecturing and clinical training. Results indicate that the medical and nursing schools clearly aspire to teach interprofessional teamwork and that this has largely been achieved when it comes to theoretical teaching. Although three of the four medical programs have integrated interprofessional teamwork into their clinical training, there is a gap in the nursing programs where introduction of interprofessional teamwork in clinical training has been limited. Current challenges are related to organizational issues (e.g. lack of institutional collaboration), practical difficulties (e.g. finding time to bring students of various professions together) and possibly managerial issues (e.g. lack of strategic perspective and change management).},
      keywords={Education, Interdisciplinary -- Evaluation -- Norway; Teamwork -- Education; Education, Medical -- Evaluation; Education, Nursing -- Evaluation; Teaching Methods -- Evaluation; Funding Source; Human; Norway; Content Analysis; Surveys; Descriptive Research; Questionnaires; Descriptive Statistics},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012097207&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Breen, H.. (2013). Virtual collaboration in the online educational setting: a concept analysis. Nursing forum, 48(4), 262-270.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to explore the concept of virtual collaboration within the context of an online learning environment in an academic setting. METHOD: Rodgers’ method of evolutionary concept analysis was used to provide a contextual view of the concept to identify attributes, antecedents, and consequences of virtual collaboration. FINDINGS: Commonly used terms to describe virtual collaboration are collaborative and cooperative learning, group work, group interaction, group learning, and teamwork. A constructivist pedagogy, group-based process with a shared purpose, support, and web-based technology is required for virtual collaboration to take place. Consequences of virtual collaboration are higher order thinking and learning to work with others. CONCLUSION: A comprehensive definition of virtual collaboration is offered as an outcome of this analysis. Clarification of virtual collaboration prior to using it as a pedagogical tool in the online learning environment will enhance nursing education with the changes in nursing curriculum being implemented today. Further research is recommended to describe the developmental stages of the collaborative process among nursing students in online education and how virtual collaboration facilitates collaboration in practice.

    @article{RefWorks:166,
      author={H. Breen},
      year={2013},
      month={Oct-Dec},
      title={Virtual collaboration in the online educational setting: a concept analysis},
      journal={Nursing forum},
      volume={48},
      number={4},
      pages={262-270},
      note={CI: (c) 2013; JID: 0401006; OTO: NOTNLM; 2013/07/31 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={PURPOSE: This study was designed to explore the concept of virtual collaboration within the context of an online learning environment in an academic setting. METHOD: Rodgers' method of evolutionary concept analysis was used to provide a contextual view of the concept to identify attributes, antecedents, and consequences of virtual collaboration. FINDINGS: Commonly used terms to describe virtual collaboration are collaborative and cooperative learning, group work, group interaction, group learning, and teamwork. A constructivist pedagogy, group-based process with a shared purpose, support, and web-based technology is required for virtual collaboration to take place. Consequences of virtual collaboration are higher order thinking and learning to work with others. CONCLUSION: A comprehensive definition of virtual collaboration is offered as an outcome of this analysis. Clarification of virtual collaboration prior to using it as a pedagogical tool in the online learning environment will enhance nursing education with the changes in nursing curriculum being implemented today. Further research is recommended to describe the developmental stages of the collaborative process among nursing students in online education and how virtual collaboration facilitates collaboration in practice.},
      keywords={Collaboration; concept analysis; distance education; nursing; online education; virtual classroom},
      isbn={1744-6198; 0029-6473},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Brown, V., Jarosinski, J., Webster, D., Reid, T., & McDowell, D.. (2013). The Collaborative Panel: Fostering a Climate for Multidisciplinary Care. Nurse educator, 38(2), 52-53.
    [BibTeX] [Download PDF]
    @article{RefWorks:163,
      author={Voncelia Brown and Judith Jarosinski and Debra Webster and Tina Reid and Dorothea McDowell},
      year={2013},
      month={2013},
      title={The Collaborative Panel: Fostering a Climate for Multidisciplinary Care},
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={38},
      number={2},
      pages={52-53},
      note={ID: 2012039174},
      keywords={Community Health Nursing -- Education; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Collaboration; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Teamwork; Program Planning; Program Implementation; Program Evaluation},
      isbn={0363-3624},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012039174&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Chan, E. A., Lam, W., & Yeung, L. S. K.. (2013). Interprofessional competence: a qualitative exploration of social work and nursing students’ experience. The Journal of nursing education, 52(9), 509-515.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Being a professional in today’s health care system carries with it an expectation of becoming interprofessional. This study was designed to explore the perceived development of the participants’ interprofessional competence through interprofessional seminars and collaborative community practice. Data were collected from social work and nursing undergraduates through two interprofessional seminar discussions, followed by focus group interviews after the completion of 2 weeks of practice experience. Study findings included: (a) role clarification and enhancement, (b) evolving role emphasis, (c) understanding the importance of and various communications in teamwork, and (d) being more responsive to the meaning of teamwork and the understanding of collaborative interdependence. Through interprofessional collaborative practice, students developed an insight into teamwork, where they witnessed the merits of collaboration and gained an understanding of each other’s lack of holistic approach. In addition, not only the particular practice settings but also the role variations involved revealed various dimensions of interprofessional learning.

    @article{RefWorks:172,
      author={E. A. Chan and W. Lam and S. K. Lam Yeung},
      year={2013},
      month={Sep},
      title={Interprofessional competence: a qualitative exploration of social work and nursing students' experience},
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={52},
      number={9},
      pages={509-515},
      note={CI: Copyright 2013; JID: 7705432; 2013/01/13 [received]; 2013/04/17 [accepted]; 2013/08/23 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Being a professional in today's health care system carries with it an expectation of becoming interprofessional. This study was designed to explore the perceived development of the participants' interprofessional competence through interprofessional seminars and collaborative community practice. Data were collected from social work and nursing undergraduates through two interprofessional seminar discussions, followed by focus group interviews after the completion of 2 weeks of practice experience. Study findings included: (a) role clarification and enhancement, (b) evolving role emphasis, (c) understanding the importance of and various communications in teamwork, and (d) being more responsive to the meaning of teamwork and the understanding of collaborative interdependence. Through interprofessional collaborative practice, students developed an insight into teamwork, where they witnessed the merits of collaboration and gained an understanding of each other's lack of holistic approach. In addition, not only the particular practice settings but also the role variations involved revealed various dimensions of interprofessional learning.},
      keywords={Adolescent; Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Female; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Nursing Education Research; Qualitative Research; Social Work/education; Students, Nursing/psychology; Young Adult},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fortugno, M., Chandra, S., Espin, S., & Gucciardi, E.. (2013). Fostering successful interprofessional teamwork through an undergraduate student placement in a secondary school. Journal of interprofessional care, 27(4), 326-332.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This exploratory case study examined an interprofessional placement of undergraduate students from nutrition, nursing, early childhood education, and child and youth care who collaborated to develop and deliver four healthy-living modules to secondary school students in Canada. An inductive thematic analysis was used to describe the teamwork that occurred between students. Data collected included focus groups with undergraduate students and preceptors, undergraduate students’ reflections and secondary school students’ evaluations of the modules delivered. Two major themes that emerged from all data sources were "team functioning" and "shift in perspectives". The undergraduate students identified several ways that facilitated their successful and positive teamwork with one another and also expressed how the placement experience improved their interprofessional skills. Findings from this study are discussed in relation to contact theory (Allport, 1954) and self-presentation theory (Goffman, 1963). This study suggests that providing undergraduate students with interprofessional placements in an educational setting can enhance interprofessional teamwork opportunities for students of various disciplines.

    @article{RefWorks:181,
      author={M. Fortugno and S. Chandra and S. Espin and E. Gucciardi},
      year={2013},
      month={Jul},
      title={Fostering successful interprofessional teamwork through an undergraduate student placement in a secondary school},
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={27},
      number={4},
      pages={326-332},
      note={JID: 9205811; 2013/01/30 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={This exploratory case study examined an interprofessional placement of undergraduate students from nutrition, nursing, early childhood education, and child and youth care who collaborated to develop and deliver four healthy-living modules to secondary school students in Canada. An inductive thematic analysis was used to describe the teamwork that occurred between students. Data collected included focus groups with undergraduate students and preceptors, undergraduate students' reflections and secondary school students' evaluations of the modules delivered. Two major themes that emerged from all data sources were "team functioning" and "shift in perspectives". The undergraduate students identified several ways that facilitated their successful and positive teamwork with one another and also expressed how the placement experience improved their interprofessional skills. Findings from this study are discussed in relation to contact theory (Allport, 1954) and self-presentation theory (Goffman, 1963). This study suggests that providing undergraduate students with interprofessional placements in an educational setting can enhance interprofessional teamwork opportunities for students of various disciplines.},
      isbn={1469-9567; 1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Garbee, D. D., Paige, J., Barrier, K., Kozmenko, V., Kozmenko, L., Zamjahn, J., Bonanno, L., & Cefalu, J.. (2013). Interprofessional teamwork among students in simulated codes: a quasi-experimental study. Nursing education perspectives, 34(5), 339-344.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using crisis resource management (CRM) principles and high-fidelity human patient simulation (HFHPS) for interprofessional (IP) team training of students from undergraduate nursing, nurse anesthesia, medical, and respiratory therapy. BACKGROUND: IP education using simulation-based training has the potential to transform education by improving teamwork and communication and breaking down silos in education. METHOD: This one-year study used a quasi-experimental design to evaluate students’ acquisition and retention of teamwork and communication skills. A convenience sample consisted of 52 students in the fall semester, with 40 students returning in the spring. RESULTS: Mean scores increased after training, and skills were retained fairly well. Any loss was regained with repeat training in the spring. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that using CRM and HFHPS is an effective pedagogy for teaching communication and teamwork skills to IP student teams.

    @article{RefWorks:165,
      author={D. D. Garbee and J. Paige and K. Barrier and V. Kozmenko and L. Kozmenko and J. Zamjahn and L. Bonanno and J. Cefalu},
      year={2013},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Interprofessional teamwork among students in simulated codes: a quasi-experimental study},
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={34},
      number={5},
      pages={339-344},
      note={JID: 101140025; ppublish},
      abstract={AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using crisis resource management (CRM) principles and high-fidelity human patient simulation (HFHPS) for interprofessional (IP) team training of students from undergraduate nursing, nurse anesthesia, medical, and respiratory therapy. BACKGROUND: IP education using simulation-based training has the potential to transform education by improving teamwork and communication and breaking down silos in education. METHOD: This one-year study used a quasi-experimental design to evaluate students' acquisition and retention of teamwork and communication skills. A convenience sample consisted of 52 students in the fall semester, with 40 students returning in the spring. RESULTS: Mean scores increased after training, and skills were retained fairly well. Any loss was regained with repeat training in the spring. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that using CRM and HFHPS is an effective pedagogy for teaching communication and teamwork skills to IP student teams.},
      keywords={Adult; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Female; Humans; Male; Patient Care Team; Patient Simulation; Respiratory Therapy/education; Students, Nursing; Young Adult},
      isbn={1536-5026; 1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Garcia-Huidobro, D., Skewes, S., Barros, X., Pizarro, C., & Gawinski, B. A.. (2013). Learning together to work together: interprofessional education for students in a primary care setting in chile. Family medicine, 45(4), 272-275.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Interprofessional teamwork and collaboration are considered key elements for improving patient outcomes; however, few reports of interprofessional education experiences in primary care directed to students are found in the literature. We describe an educational program in primary care for medical, nursing, and psychology students and report the findings of their perceptions of learning. METHODS: To develop team-working skills and learn family-oriented collaborative care in primary care, the authors designed an interprofessional educational course in Santiago, Chile. Medical, nursing, and psychology students, in their last year of training, formed four groups and conducted weekly home visits or behavioral health counseling sessions. A family physician, nurse practitioner, social worker, and psychologist supervised each clinical activity in their area of expertise. After the clinical encounters, students and preceptors discussed comprehensive health plans and reflected on the interprofessional experience of care. At the end of the course the students evaluated the course and the methodology using quantitative and qualitative methods. RESULTS: A total of 72 students participated in the course (58 medical, eight nursing, six psychology students) from October 2009 to December 2010. The students ranked high global satisfaction, high achievement of course objectives, and high approval of the methodology used with quantitative and qualitative measurements. CONCLUSIONS: This interprofessional course for medical, nursing, and psychology students generated positive experiences for the participants. More research is needed to support interprofessional education programs in primary care.

    @article{RefWorks:177,
      author={D. Garcia-Huidobro and S. Skewes and X. Barros and C. Pizarro and B. A. Gawinski},
      year={2013},
      month={Apr},
      title={Learning together to work together: interprofessional education for students in a primary care setting in chile},
      journal={Family medicine},
      volume={45},
      number={4},
      pages={272-275},
      note={JID: 8306464; ppublish},
      abstract={BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Interprofessional teamwork and collaboration are considered key elements for improving patient outcomes; however, few reports of interprofessional education experiences in primary care directed to students are found in the literature. We describe an educational program in primary care for medical, nursing, and psychology students and report the findings of their perceptions of learning. METHODS: To develop team-working skills and learn family-oriented collaborative care in primary care, the authors designed an interprofessional educational course in Santiago, Chile. Medical, nursing, and psychology students, in their last year of training, formed four groups and conducted weekly home visits or behavioral health counseling sessions. A family physician, nurse practitioner, social worker, and psychologist supervised each clinical activity in their area of expertise. After the clinical encounters, students and preceptors discussed comprehensive health plans and reflected on the interprofessional experience of care. At the end of the course the students evaluated the course and the methodology using quantitative and qualitative methods. RESULTS: A total of 72 students participated in the course (58 medical, eight nursing, six psychology students) from October 2009 to December 2010. The students ranked high global satisfaction, high achievement of course objectives, and high approval of the methodology used with quantitative and qualitative measurements. CONCLUSIONS: This interprofessional course for medical, nursing, and psychology students generated positive experiences for the participants. More research is needed to support interprofessional education programs in primary care.},
      keywords={Adult; Chile; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods; Education, Nursing/methods; Female; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Patient Care Team; Primary Health Care; Program Evaluation; Psychology/education},
      isbn={1938-3800; 0742-3225},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Gonzalez, L.. (2013). Interprofessional teamwork: an immersive experience in the Dominican Republic. Journal of interprofessional care, 27(3), 277-278.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The goal of interprofessional education is to have health profession students deliberatively working together to learn from one another, about one another and with one another. This paper details one university’s experience traveling to the Dominican Republic with a group of nursing and medical students to care for patients in some of the most impoverished areas in the country. The goal of the mission was to deliver quality patient care. This could only be realized with teamwork. Using the concept of knowledge, skills and attitudes, the author will explore how the group of students and healthcare providers came together to efficiently see more than 800 patients in 6 days. Additionally, the students experienced shared learning firsthand by working as a team, resolving conflicts and problem solving.

    @article{RefWorks:180,
      author={L. Gonzalez},
      year={2013},
      month={May},
      title={Interprofessional teamwork: an immersive experience in the Dominican Republic},
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={27},
      number={3},
      pages={277-278},
      note={JID: 9205811; 2013/02/08 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={The goal of interprofessional education is to have health profession students deliberatively working together to learn from one another, about one another and with one another. This paper details one university's experience traveling to the Dominican Republic with a group of nursing and medical students to care for patients in some of the most impoverished areas in the country. The goal of the mission was to deliver quality patient care. This could only be realized with teamwork. Using the concept of knowledge, skills and attitudes, the author will explore how the group of students and healthcare providers came together to efficiently see more than 800 patients in 6 days. Additionally, the students experienced shared learning firsthand by working as a team, resolving conflicts and problem solving.},
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Dominican Republic; Education, Medical/organization & administration; Education, Nursing/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Medical Missions, Official/organization & administration; Problem-Based Learning; Quality of Health Care/organization & administration},
      isbn={1469-9567; 1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Gum, L. F., Richards, J. N., Walters, L., Forgan, J., Lopriore, M., & Nobes, C.. (2013). Immersing undergraduates into an interprofessional longitudinal rural placement. Rural and remote health, 13(1), 2271.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    INTRODUCTION: An Integrated Multidisciplinary Model of Education in Rural Settings (IMMERSe) program was piloted in 2010 in a rural region of South Australia. The aim of the program was to place students from different health programs together, in a rural environment, for one or two semesters of the academic year to promote interprofessional learning. Students were given the opportunity to participate in joint fortnightly education sessions with an emphasis on interprofessional relations and teamwork, undertaking activities such as case studies, role plays, journal club, work shadowing and invited speakers. METHODS: A qualitative approach was used to explore student perspectives of a rural interprofessional clinical placement. Students were invited to participate in focus groups and reflective writing exercises. This data was analysed in relation to the students’ thoughts and reflections around professionalism, teamwork and collegial relationships. RESULTS: The analysis resulted in three major themes: (1) interprofessional interactions with other students; (2) interprofessional interactions with other health professionals; and (3) interprofessional interactions with the community. Students in our study demonstrated a new level of respect for health professionals outside of their discipline, and gained a sense of how their own independent roles can blend or partner with others’ roles, to draw on each other’s expertise. CONCLUSIONS: Student learning experiences can be enhanced through engagement and integration in a rural community context. Interprofessional learning in a rural community placement can increase students’ understanding of professionalism, teamwork and collegiality, which are all important components of collaborative practice. Reflective journaling is a useful method for evaluating the student experience.

    @article{RefWorks:179,
      author={L. F. Gum and J. N. Richards and L. Walters and J. Forgan and M. Lopriore and C. Nobes},
      year={2013},
      month={Jan-Mar},
      title={Immersing undergraduates into an interprofessional longitudinal rural placement},
      journal={Rural and remote health},
      volume={13},
      number={1},
      pages={2271},
      note={LR: 20131018; JID: 101174860; 2013/02/27 [epublish]; ppublish},
      abstract={INTRODUCTION: An Integrated Multidisciplinary Model of Education in Rural Settings (IMMERSe) program was piloted in 2010 in a rural region of South Australia. The aim of the program was to place students from different health programs together, in a rural environment, for one or two semesters of the academic year to promote interprofessional learning. Students were given the opportunity to participate in joint fortnightly education sessions with an emphasis on interprofessional relations and teamwork, undertaking activities such as case studies, role plays, journal club, work shadowing and invited speakers. METHODS: A qualitative approach was used to explore student perspectives of a rural interprofessional clinical placement. Students were invited to participate in focus groups and reflective writing exercises. This data was analysed in relation to the students' thoughts and reflections around professionalism, teamwork and collegial relationships. RESULTS: The analysis resulted in three major themes: (1) interprofessional interactions with other students; (2) interprofessional interactions with other health professionals; and (3) interprofessional interactions with the community. Students in our study demonstrated a new level of respect for health professionals outside of their discipline, and gained a sense of how their own independent roles can blend or partner with others' roles, to draw on each other's expertise. CONCLUSIONS: Student learning experiences can be enhanced through engagement and integration in a rural community context. Interprofessional learning in a rural community placement can increase students' understanding of professionalism, teamwork and collegiality, which are all important components of collaborative practice. Reflective journaling is a useful method for evaluating the student experience.},
      keywords={Emotions; Humans; Job Satisfaction; Nurse's Role; Nursing Administration Research; Stress, Psychological},
      isbn={1445-6354; 1445-6354},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hood, K., Cant, R., Baulch, J., Gilbee, A., Leech, M., Anderson, A., & Davies, K.. (2013). Prior experience of interprofessional learning enhances undergraduate nursing and healthcare students’ professional identity and attitudes to teamwork. Nurse education in practice.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: How willing are today’s medical, nursing and other healthcare students to undertake some of their studies as shared learning? There is a lack of evidence of students’ views by discipline despite this being a priority task for higher education sectors. This study explored the views of nursing, midwifery, nursing-emergency health (paramedic), medical, physiotherapy and nutrition-dietetics students. METHODS: Senior undergraduate students from six disciplines at one university completed the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale prior to participating in interprofessional clinical learning modules. RESULTS: For 741 students, the highest ranked response was agreement about a need for teamwork (mean 4.42 of 5 points). Nursing students held significantly more positive attitudes towards Teamwork/Collaboration, and were more positive about Professional Identity than medical students (p < .001). Midwifery and nursing-emergency-health students rejected uncertainty about Roles/Responsibilities compared with medical students (p < .001). One-third of all students who had prior experience of interprofessional learning held more positive attitudes in each of four attitude domains (p < .05). CONCLUSION: Overall, students’ attitudes towards interprofessional learning were positive and all student groups were willing to engage in learning interprofessionally. Early introduction of IPL is recommended. Further studies should explore the trajectory of students’ attitudes throughout the university degree.

    @article{RefWorks:173,
      author={K. Hood and R. Cant and J. Baulch and A. Gilbee and M. Leech and A. Anderson and K. Davies},
      year={2013},
      month={Aug 9},
      title={Prior experience of interprofessional learning enhances undergraduate nursing and healthcare students' professional identity and attitudes to teamwork},
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      note={CI: (c) 2013; JID: 101090848; OTO: NOTNLM; 2012/11/08 [received]; 2013/06/14 [revised]; 2013/07/23 [accepted]; aheadofprint},
      abstract={BACKGROUND: How willing are today's medical, nursing and other healthcare students to undertake some of their studies as shared learning? There is a lack of evidence of students' views by discipline despite this being a priority task for higher education sectors. This study explored the views of nursing, midwifery, nursing-emergency health (paramedic), medical, physiotherapy and nutrition-dietetics students. METHODS: Senior undergraduate students from six disciplines at one university completed the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale prior to participating in interprofessional clinical learning modules. RESULTS: For 741 students, the highest ranked response was agreement about a need for teamwork (mean 4.42 of 5 points). Nursing students held significantly more positive attitudes towards Teamwork/Collaboration, and were more positive about Professional Identity than medical students (p < .001). Midwifery and nursing-emergency-health students rejected uncertainty about Roles/Responsibilities compared with medical students (p < .001). One-third of all students who had prior experience of interprofessional learning held more positive attitudes in each of four attitude domains (p < .05). CONCLUSION: Overall, students' attitudes towards interprofessional learning were positive and all student groups were willing to engage in learning interprofessionally. Early introduction of IPL is recommended. Further studies should explore the trajectory of students' attitudes throughout the university degree.},
      keywords={Attitude; Interprofessional; Interprofessional learning; Nursing; Undergraduate students},
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Hood, K., Cant, R., Leech, M., Baulch, J., & Gilbee, A.. (2013). Trying on the professional self: nursing students’ perceptions of learning about roles, identity and teamwork in an interprofessional clinical placement. Applied Nursing Research : ANR.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: This study aims to describe how senior nursing students viewed the clinical learning environment and matured their professional identity through interprofessional learning in a student-led hospital ‘ward’. BACKGROUND: Undergraduate nursing and medical student teams participated in a trial of ward-based interprofessional clinical learning, managing patients over 2weeks in a rehabilitation ward. METHODS: Qualitative and quantitative program evaluation was conducted using exit student focus groups and a satisfaction survey. RESULTS: Twenty-three nursing and medical students in three placement rounds provided positive feedback. Five main themes emerged describing their engagement in ‘trying on’ a professional role: ‘experiencing independence and autonomy’; ‘seeing clearly what nursing’s all about’; ‘altered images of other professions’; ‘ways of communicating and collaborating’ and ‘becoming a functioning team’. CONCLUSIONS: Ward-based interprofessional clinical placements offer senior students authentic ideal clinical experiences. We consider this essential learning for future interprofessional collaboration which should be included in senior nursing students’ education.

    @article{RefWorks:169,
      author={K. Hood and R. Cant and M. Leech and J. Baulch and A. Gilbee},
      year={2013},
      month={Sep 16},
      title={Trying on the professional self: nursing students' perceptions of learning about roles, identity and teamwork in an interprofessional clinical placement},
      journal={Applied Nursing Research : ANR},
      note={CI: (c) 2013; JID: 8901557; OTO: NOTNLM; 2013/05/06 [received]; 2013/07/21 [revised]; 2013/07/25 [accepted]; aheadofprint},
      abstract={AIM: This study aims to describe how senior nursing students viewed the clinical learning environment and matured their professional identity through interprofessional learning in a student-led hospital 'ward'. BACKGROUND: Undergraduate nursing and medical student teams participated in a trial of ward-based interprofessional clinical learning, managing patients over 2weeks in a rehabilitation ward. METHODS: Qualitative and quantitative program evaluation was conducted using exit student focus groups and a satisfaction survey. RESULTS: Twenty-three nursing and medical students in three placement rounds provided positive feedback. Five main themes emerged describing their engagement in 'trying on' a professional role: 'experiencing independence and autonomy'; 'seeing clearly what nursing's all about'; 'altered images of other professions'; 'ways of communicating and collaborating' and 'becoming a functioning team'. CONCLUSIONS: Ward-based interprofessional clinical placements offer senior students authentic ideal clinical experiences. We consider this essential learning for future interprofessional collaboration which should be included in senior nursing students' education.},
      keywords={Clinical learning environment; Interprofessional learning; Medical undergraduate; Nursing; Student; Training ward; Undergraduate students},
      isbn={1532-8201; 0897-1897},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Lachmann, H., Ponzer, S., Johansson, U. B., Benson, L., & Karlgren, K.. (2013). Capturing students’ learning experiences and academic emotions at an interprofessional training ward. Journal of interprofessional care, 27(2), 137-145.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    An important goal for interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical settings is to support healthcare students in collaboratively developing their understanding of interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to investigate students’ learning experiences and academic emotions as they occur in actual context in relation to collaborative and trialogical activities during a clinical IPE course. The contextual activity sampling system methodology was used to collect data via mobile phones. Thirty-seven healthcare students (medical, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy) reported their experiences, learning activities and academic emotions several times a day via their mobile phones during their 2-week course at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). The results provided understanding of the students’ experiences of their academic emotions and how they created new knowledge collaboratively. These collaborative knowledge creation activities occurred mostly when students from different professions were collaborating as a team (e.g. discussing patient care or participating in a ward round) and were also significantly related to optimal experiences, i.e. "flow" (high challenge in combination with high competence). In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of collaboration among students during IPTW courses. Our results might help to optimize the design of IPE learning activities in clinical healthcare contexts.

    @article{RefWorks:186,
      author={H. Lachmann and S. Ponzer and U. B. Johansson and L. Benson and K. Karlgren},
      year={2013},
      month={Mar},
      title={Capturing students' learning experiences and academic emotions at an interprofessional training ward},
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={27},
      number={2},
      pages={137-145},
      note={JID: 9205811; 2012/10/08 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={An important goal for interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical settings is to support healthcare students in collaboratively developing their understanding of interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to investigate students' learning experiences and academic emotions as they occur in actual context in relation to collaborative and trialogical activities during a clinical IPE course. The contextual activity sampling system methodology was used to collect data via mobile phones. Thirty-seven healthcare students (medical, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy) reported their experiences, learning activities and academic emotions several times a day via their mobile phones during their 2-week course at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). The results provided understanding of the students' experiences of their academic emotions and how they created new knowledge collaboratively. These collaborative knowledge creation activities occurred mostly when students from different professions were collaborating as a team (e.g. discussing patient care or participating in a ward round) and were also significantly related to optimal experiences, i.e. "flow" (high challenge in combination with high competence). In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of collaboration among students during IPTW courses. Our results might help to optimize the design of IPE learning activities in clinical healthcare contexts.},
      keywords={Adult; Cooperative Behavior; Female; Health Occupations/education; Humans; Interdisciplinary Studies; Interprofessional Relations; Learning; Male; Middle Aged; Patient Care Team; Questionnaires; Students, Health Occupations/psychology; Young Adult},
      isbn={1469-9567; 1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lamb, G., & Shraiky, J.. (2013). Designing for competence: spaces that enhance collaboration readiness in healthcare. Journal of interprofessional care, 27 Suppl 2, 14-23.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Many universities in the United States are investing in classrooms and campuses designed to increase collaboration and teamwork among the health professions. To date, we know little about whether these learning spaces are having the intended impact on student performance. Recent advances in the identification of interprofessional teamwork competencies provide a much-needed step toward a defined outcome metric. Rigorous study of the relationship between design and student competence in collaboration also requires clear specification of design concepts and development of testable frameworks. Such theory-based evaluation is crucial for design to become an integral part of interprofessional education strategies and initiatives. Current classroom and campus designs were analyzed for common themes and features in collaborative spaces as a starting place for specification of design concepts and model development. Four major themes were identified: flexibility, visual transparency/proximity, technology and environmental infrastructure. Potential models linking this preliminary set of design concepts to student competencies are proposed and used to generate hypotheses for future study of the impact of collaborative design spaces on student outcomes.

    @article{RefWorks:174,
      author={G. Lamb and J. Shraiky},
      year={2013},
      month={Sep},
      title={Designing for competence: spaces that enhance collaboration readiness in healthcare},
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={27 Suppl 2},
      pages={14-23},
      note={JID: 9205811; 2013/05/16 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Many universities in the United States are investing in classrooms and campuses designed to increase collaboration and teamwork among the health professions. To date, we know little about whether these learning spaces are having the intended impact on student performance. Recent advances in the identification of interprofessional teamwork competencies provide a much-needed step toward a defined outcome metric. Rigorous study of the relationship between design and student competence in collaboration also requires clear specification of design concepts and development of testable frameworks. Such theory-based evaluation is crucial for design to become an integral part of interprofessional education strategies and initiatives. Current classroom and campus designs were analyzed for common themes and features in collaborative spaces as a starting place for specification of design concepts and model development. Four major themes were identified: flexibility, visual transparency/proximity, technology and environmental infrastructure. Potential models linking this preliminary set of design concepts to student competencies are proposed and used to generate hypotheses for future study of the impact of collaborative design spaces on student outcomes.},
      isbn={1469-9567; 1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lin, Y. C., Chan, T. F., Lai, C. S., Chin, C. C., Chou, F. H., & Lin, H. J.. (2013). The impact of an interprofessional problem-based learning curriculum of clinical ethics on medical and nursing students’ attitudes and ability of interprofessional collaboration: a pilot study. The Kaohsiung journal of medical sciences, 29(9), 505-511.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Clinical ethic situations in modern multiprofessional healthcare systems may involve different healthcare professions who work together for patient care. The undergraduate interprofessional education of clinical ethics would help to incubate healthcare students’ ability of interprofessional collaboration in solving ethical problems. However, the impact from an interprofessional educational model on student’s attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration should be carefully evaluated during the process of curricular development. This study aimed to conduct a pilot interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics and evaluate the curricular impact on interprofessional students’ attitude and confidence of collaborative teamwork. Thirty-six medical and nursing students volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into three groups (medical group, nursing group, and mixed group). Tutors were recruited from the Medical School and the College of Nursing. The pilot curriculum included one lecture of clinical ethics, one PBL case study with two tutorial sessions, and one session of group discussion and feedback. A narrative story with multiple story lines and a multiperspective problem analysis tool were used in the PBL tutorials. The students’ self-evaluation of learning questionnaire was used to evaluate students’ learning of clinical ethics and interprofessional collaborative skills and attitude. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach alpha, and the criterion-related validity of the questionnaire was evaluated through associations between the dimension scores with the student group by one-way analysis of variance test (ANOVA) test and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD) comparison. There was significant difference among different groups in students’ ability and attitudes about "interprofessional communication and collaboration" (p = 0.0184). The scores in the mixed group (37.58 +/- 3.26) were higher than the medical group (32.10 +/- 4.98). In conclusion, our model for the interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics is practicable and will produce positive impacts on students’ attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration.

    @article{RefWorks:170,
      author={Y. C. Lin and T. F. Chan and C. S. Lai and C. C. Chin and F. H. Chou and H. J. Lin},
      year={2013},
      month={Sep},
      title={The impact of an interprofessional problem-based learning curriculum of clinical ethics on medical and nursing students' attitudes and ability of interprofessional collaboration: a pilot study},
      journal={The Kaohsiung journal of medical sciences},
      volume={29},
      number={9},
      pages={505-511},
      note={CI: Copyright (c) 2013; JID: 100960562; OTO: NOTNLM; 2011/01/24 [received]; 2013/02/04 [accepted]; 2013/06/25 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Clinical ethic situations in modern multiprofessional healthcare systems may involve different healthcare professions who work together for patient care. The undergraduate interprofessional education of clinical ethics would help to incubate healthcare students' ability of interprofessional collaboration in solving ethical problems. However, the impact from an interprofessional educational model on student's attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration should be carefully evaluated during the process of curricular development. This study aimed to conduct a pilot interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics and evaluate the curricular impact on interprofessional students' attitude and confidence of collaborative teamwork. Thirty-six medical and nursing students volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into three groups (medical group, nursing group, and mixed group). Tutors were recruited from the Medical School and the College of Nursing. The pilot curriculum included one lecture of clinical ethics, one PBL case study with two tutorial sessions, and one session of group discussion and feedback. A narrative story with multiple story lines and a multiperspective problem analysis tool were used in the PBL tutorials. The students' self-evaluation of learning questionnaire was used to evaluate students' learning of clinical ethics and interprofessional collaborative skills and attitude. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach alpha, and the criterion-related validity of the questionnaire was evaluated through associations between the dimension scores with the student group by one-way analysis of variance test (ANOVA) test and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD) comparison. There was significant difference among different groups in students' ability and attitudes about "interprofessional communication and collaboration" (p = 0.0184). The scores in the mixed group (37.58 +/- 3.26) were higher than the medical group (32.10 +/- 4.98). In conclusion, our model for the interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics is practicable and will produce positive impacts on students' attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration.},
      keywords={Clinical ethics; Clinical ethics education; Interprofessional education; Narrative story; Problem-based learning},
      isbn={1607-551X; 1607-551X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Olenick, M., & Allen, L. R.. (2013). Faculty intent to engage in interprofessional education. Journal of multidisciplinary healthcare, 6, 149-161.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: This descriptive correlational and comparative study explored health-care faculty (HCF) attitudes toward interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional health-care teams, HCF perceptions of subjective norms, the influence of subjective norms on HCF intent to engage in IPE, and HCF intent to engage in IPE. In addition, differences among seven disciplines of HCF were explored. METHODS: Nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistants, and social work faculty were identified. Stratified random sampling was used to ensure that the population surveyed was representative of the target population. The total sample for this study included 439 HCF from the seven identified health-care professions in the US. Data collection included measures of attitudes toward IPE and attitudes toward interprofessional health-care teams. Subjective norms were measured using two 7-point rating scales. Intent to engage in IPE was measured using a 10-point rating scale. RESULTS: There were no significant differences among HCF groups regarding attitudes toward IPE or interprofessional health-care teams. Administrative faculty reported greater intent to engage in IPE than teaching faculty. HCF who were currently in or had previously engaged in IPE reported greater intent to engage in or continue to engage, and had higher attitude and subjective norm scores than faculty without IPE experience. The combination of perceived pressure from school administrators and attitudes toward IPE was the best predictor of intent to engage in IPE. CONCLUSION: IPE has the potential to influence patient quality of care and lead to better working relationships between health-care providers. HCF are more likely to engage in IPE when they believe their school’s administrators think they should engage in IPE and when they have positive attitudes toward IPE.

    @article{RefWorks:175,
      author={M. Olenick and L. R. Allen},
      year={2013},
      month={Apr 19},
      title={Faculty intent to engage in interprofessional education},
      journal={Journal of multidisciplinary healthcare},
      volume={6},
      pages={149-161},
      note={LR: 20130506; JID: 101512691; OID: NLM: PMC3634315; OTO: NOTNLM; 2013 [ppublish]; 2013/04/19 [epublish]; epublish},
      abstract={BACKGROUND: This descriptive correlational and comparative study explored health-care faculty (HCF) attitudes toward interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional health-care teams, HCF perceptions of subjective norms, the influence of subjective norms on HCF intent to engage in IPE, and HCF intent to engage in IPE. In addition, differences among seven disciplines of HCF were explored. METHODS: Nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistants, and social work faculty were identified. Stratified random sampling was used to ensure that the population surveyed was representative of the target population. The total sample for this study included 439 HCF from the seven identified health-care professions in the US. Data collection included measures of attitudes toward IPE and attitudes toward interprofessional health-care teams. Subjective norms were measured using two 7-point rating scales. Intent to engage in IPE was measured using a 10-point rating scale. RESULTS: There were no significant differences among HCF groups regarding attitudes toward IPE or interprofessional health-care teams. Administrative faculty reported greater intent to engage in IPE than teaching faculty. HCF who were currently in or had previously engaged in IPE reported greater intent to engage in or continue to engage, and had higher attitude and subjective norm scores than faculty without IPE experience. The combination of perceived pressure from school administrators and attitudes toward IPE was the best predictor of intent to engage in IPE. CONCLUSION: IPE has the potential to influence patient quality of care and lead to better working relationships between health-care providers. HCF are more likely to engage in IPE when they believe their school's administrators think they should engage in IPE and when they have positive attitudes toward IPE.},
      keywords={IPE; health-care; interdisciplinary; multidisciplinary; teamwork},
      isbn={1178-2390; 1178-2390},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pittenger, A. L., Westberg, S., Rowan, M., & Schweiss, S.. (2013). An interprofessional diabetes experience to improve pharmacy and nursing students’ competency in collaborative practice. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 77(9), 197.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: To improve pharmacy and nursing students’ competency in collaborative practice by having them participate in an interprofessional diabetes experience involving social networking. DESIGN: An existing elective course on diabetes management was modified to include interprofessional content based on Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competency domains. Web-based collaborative tools (social networking and video chat) were used to allow nursing and pharmacy students located on 2 different campuses to apply diabetes management content as an interprofessional team. ASSESSMENT: Mixed-method analyses demonstrated an increase in students’ knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the other profession and developed an understanding of interprofessional communication strategies and their central role in effective teamwork. CONCLUSION: Interprofessional content and activities can be effectively integrated into an existing course and offered successfully to students from other professional programs and on remote campuses.

    @article{RefWorks:164,
      author={A. L. Pittenger and S. Westberg and M. Rowan and S. Schweiss},
      year={2013},
      month={Nov 12},
      title={An interprofessional diabetes experience to improve pharmacy and nursing students' competency in collaborative practice},
      journal={American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education},
      volume={77},
      number={9},
      pages={197},
      note={JID: 0372650; OID: NLM: PMC3831408; OTO: NOTNLM; 2013/03/01 [received]; 2013/04/17 [accepted]; ppublish},
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: To improve pharmacy and nursing students' competency in collaborative practice by having them participate in an interprofessional diabetes experience involving social networking. DESIGN: An existing elective course on diabetes management was modified to include interprofessional content based on Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competency domains. Web-based collaborative tools (social networking and video chat) were used to allow nursing and pharmacy students located on 2 different campuses to apply diabetes management content as an interprofessional team. ASSESSMENT: Mixed-method analyses demonstrated an increase in students' knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the other profession and developed an understanding of interprofessional communication strategies and their central role in effective teamwork. CONCLUSION: Interprofessional content and activities can be effectively integrated into an existing course and offered successfully to students from other professional programs and on remote campuses.},
      keywords={diabetes; interprofessional education; nursing; pharmacy students; social networking},
      isbn={1553-6467; 0002-9459},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Robb, M., & Gerwick, M.. (2013). Team teaching: a resource guide for nurse educators. Teaching & Learning in Nursing, 8(3), 78-82.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The shortage of qualified nursing faculty and the decreased financial budgets have prompted nursing programs to find innovative methods that promote an efficient use of instructional resources. Team teaching is one approach that programs are using to provide quality educational experiences without limiting course options. Literature regarding how to effectively implement team teaching in nursing education is limited. This article provides nurse educators with a resource guide to use when assigned to a team-taught course.

    @article{RefWorks:161,
      author={Meigan Robb and Michete Gerwick},
      year={2013},
      month={07},
      title={Team teaching: a resource guide for nurse educators},
      journal={Teaching & Learning in Nursing},
      volume={8},
      number={3},
      pages={78-82},
      note={ID: 2012186801},
      abstract={The shortage of qualified nursing faculty and the decreased financial budgets have prompted nursing programs to find innovative methods that promote an efficient use of instructional resources. Team teaching is one approach that programs are using to provide quality educational experiences without limiting course options. Literature regarding how to effectively implement team teaching in nursing education is limited. This article provides nurse educators with a resource guide to use when assigned to a team-taught course.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Associate; Faculty, Nursing; Teaching Methods; Teamwork; Collaboration; Faculty Role; Planning Techniques; Communication},
      isbn={1557-3087},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2012186801&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Sawyer, T., Laubach, V. A., Hudak, J., Yamamura, K., & Pocrnich, A.. (2013). Improvements in teamwork during neonatal resuscitation after interprofessional TeamSTEPPS training. Neonatal network : NN, 32(1), 26-33.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: To determine the impact of interprofessional Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS ) training on teamwork skills during neonatal resuscitation. DESIGN: Teams of physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists participated in TeamSTEPPS training that included simulation with an event-based approach. During the simulations, scripted medication order and performance errors were used to test teamwork skills. Measures of teamwork skills were obtained before and after the training using a prospective pretest-posttest design. SAMPLE: Forty-two physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists. MAIN OUTCOME VARIABLE: Teamwork skills. RESULT: Significant improvements in teamwork skills were seen in team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication (p ,.001). Challenges by nurses to a scripted medication order error doubled from 38 percent before the training to 77 percent after the training. The odds of a nurse challenging an incorrect medication dose from an attending neonatologist improved significantly. Detection and correction of inadequate chest compressions increased from 61.5 to 84.6 percent after the training.

    @article{RefWorks:182,
      author={T. Sawyer and V. A. Laubach and J. Hudak and K. Yamamura and A. Pocrnich},
      year={2013},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={Improvements in teamwork during neonatal resuscitation after interprofessional TeamSTEPPS training},
      journal={Neonatal network : NN},
      volume={32},
      number={1},
      pages={26-33},
      note={JID: 8503921; ppublish},
      abstract={PURPOSE: To determine the impact of interprofessional Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS ) training on teamwork skills during neonatal resuscitation. DESIGN: Teams of physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists participated in TeamSTEPPS training that included simulation with an event-based approach. During the simulations, scripted medication order and performance errors were used to test teamwork skills. Measures of teamwork skills were obtained before and after the training using a prospective pretest-posttest design. SAMPLE: Forty-two physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists. MAIN OUTCOME VARIABLE: Teamwork skills. RESULT: Significant improvements in teamwork skills were seen in team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication (p ,.001). Challenges by nurses to a scripted medication order error doubled from 38 percent before the training to 77 percent after the training. The odds of a nurse challenging an incorrect medication dose from an attending neonatologist improved significantly. Detection and correction of inadequate chest compressions increased from 61.5 to 84.6 percent after the training.},
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Educational Measurement; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Interdisciplinary Communication; Leadership; Neonatal Nursing/education/methods; Patient Care Team; Patient Safety; Problem-Based Learning/methods; Resuscitation/education/methods; Staff Development/methods},
      isbn={1539-2880; 0730-0832},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Smith, M., & Rogers, J.. (2013). Understanding nursing students’ perspectives on the grading of group work assessments. Nurse education in practice.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Grading group work assessments so that students perceive the grade to be fair to all group members is sometimes challenging. This is particularly important in a higher education environment that is increasingly concerned with student perceptions of teaching quality and satisfaction. This article reports on research that compared undergraduate nursing students perceptions of two different approaches to the grading of group work assessment. A survey design was used to identify students’ perspectives and preferences for different group work assessment methods. Participants were undergraduate bachelor of nursing students from a large, metropolitan university in Australia. Data analysis indicated that the perceptions of students around group work assessments changed little as they progressed across the program, although students who had experienced the calculation of individual grades for a group assessment preferred this approach. Many believed the grading of group assessments penalised good students and were less reliable than individual assessments. Students maintained the belief that teamwork skills were essential for the registered nurse role. In conclusion group work assessment should only be used when it is the best assessment method to demonstrate student learning of specific objectives. The weighted mark approach is the group work assessment grading approach of choice.

    @article{RefWorks:171,
      author={M. Smith and J. Rogers},
      year={2013},
      month={Aug 16},
      title={Understanding nursing students' perspectives on the grading of group work assessments},
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      note={CI: (c) 2013; JID: 101090848; OTO: NOTNLM; 2012/11/07 [received]; 2013/05/15 [revised]; 2013/07/19 [accepted]; aheadofprint},
      abstract={Grading group work assessments so that students perceive the grade to be fair to all group members is sometimes challenging. This is particularly important in a higher education environment that is increasingly concerned with student perceptions of teaching quality and satisfaction. This article reports on research that compared undergraduate nursing students perceptions of two different approaches to the grading of group work assessment. A survey design was used to identify students' perspectives and preferences for different group work assessment methods. Participants were undergraduate bachelor of nursing students from a large, metropolitan university in Australia. Data analysis indicated that the perceptions of students around group work assessments changed little as they progressed across the program, although students who had experienced the calculation of individual grades for a group assessment preferred this approach. Many believed the grading of group assessments penalised good students and were less reliable than individual assessments. Students maintained the belief that teamwork skills were essential for the registered nurse role. In conclusion group work assessment should only be used when it is the best assessment method to demonstrate student learning of specific objectives. The weighted mark approach is the group work assessment grading approach of choice.},
      keywords={Assessment; Education; Group work; Nursing},
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={ENG}
    }

2012

  • K., G. M.. (2012). Patient Safety and Nursing Education. International Journal of Nursing Education, 4(2), 92-96.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The primary responsibility for all nursing professionals as patient advocates, is delivering safe, effective and prudent care. Creating a culture of safety in healthcare systems is the goal of leaders in the patient safety movement. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses1 (QSEN) recommended that nurses are to be prepared with essential quality and safety competencies such as patient-centered care, evidencebased practice, teamwork and collaboration, quality improvement and informatics. Educators of both pre and post-licensure nurses are challenged to prepare nurses to match with the competencies needed to integrate quality and safety with systems approach in creating a patient safety culture. Inclusion of Human Factor Theory (HFT) and Human Factors Analysis and Classifi cation System (HFACS) in the nursing curriculum could act as a foundation towards quality education, to produce competent safe practitioners. Nursing education system ensures patient safety by modifications to curricula content, facilitation of multi-disciplinary processes, inclusion of educational methods facilitating the core competencies and faculty development. Educators are encouraged to engage in a culture shift whereby student error is considered from an education systems perspective. Educators and schools are challenged to look within and systematically review how program structures and processes may be contributing to student error and undermining patient safety. Graduates prepared with necessary competencies will become leaders in shifting the healthcare culture to strengthen patient safety thus nursing education act as catalyst for the patient safety movement.

    @article{RefWorks:158,
      author={Girija Madhavanpraphakaran  K.},
      year={2012},
      month={2012},
      title={Patient Safety and Nursing Education},
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={4},
      number={2},
      pages={92-96},
      note={ID: 2011793117},
      abstract={The primary responsibility for all nursing professionals as patient advocates, is delivering safe, effective and prudent care. Creating a culture of safety in healthcare systems is the goal of leaders in the patient safety movement. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses1 (QSEN) recommended that nurses are to be prepared with essential quality and safety competencies such as patient-centered care, evidencebased practice, teamwork and collaboration, quality improvement and informatics. Educators of both pre and post-licensure nurses are challenged to prepare nurses to match with the competencies needed to integrate quality and safety with systems approach in creating a patient safety culture. Inclusion of Human Factor Theory (HFT) and Human Factors Analysis and Classifi cation System (HFACS) in the nursing curriculum could act as a foundation towards quality education, to produce competent safe practitioners. Nursing education system ensures patient safety by modifications to curricula content, facilitation of multi-disciplinary processes, inclusion of educational methods facilitating the core competencies and faculty development. Educators are encouraged to engage in a culture shift whereby student error is considered from an education systems perspective. Educators and schools are challenged to look within and systematically review how program structures and processes may be contributing to student error and undermining patient safety. Graduates prepared with necessary competencies will become leaders in shifting the healthcare culture to strengthen patient safety thus nursing education act as catalyst for the patient safety movement.},
      keywords={Patient Safety -- Education; Education, Nursing; Patient Centered Care; Organizational Culture; Curriculum; Theory; Education, Clinical},
      isbn={0974-9349},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011793117&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Sullivan, D. T., & Godfrey, N. S.. (2012). Preparing nursing students to be effective health team partners through interprofessional education. Creative nursing, 18(2), 57-63.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article will provide an overview of recent significant activities related to interprofessional education to promote care quality through teamwork and collaboration, followed by a discussion of what nursing schools can do to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values to enhance health care team performance and care outcomes.

    @article{RefWorks:188,
      author={D. T. Sullivan and N. S. Godfrey},
      year={2012},
      title={Preparing nursing students to be effective health team partners through interprofessional education},
      journal={Creative nursing},
      volume={18},
      number={2},
      pages={57-63},
      note={JID: 9505022; ppublish},
      abstract={This article will provide an overview of recent significant activities related to interprofessional education to promote care quality through teamwork and collaboration, followed by a discussion of what nursing schools can do to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values to enhance health care team performance and care outcomes.},
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/standards; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Professional Competence},
      isbn={1078-4535; 1078-4535},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Yang, K., R., G. W., & T., J. M.. (2012). Collaborative learning among undergraduate students in community health nursing. Nurse Education in Practice, 12(2), 72-76.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Teamwork can benefit students, enhancing their ability to think critically, solve problems creatively, and collaborate effectively. We piloted a collaborative learning project with undergraduate community health nursing students N = 83) that entailed working in teams to explore epidemiologic data, synthesize the literature, and develop an evidence-based plan for nursing intervention and evaluation pertaining to a public health issue. Project evaluation consisted of pre- and post-project surveys by students, peer evaluation, and formative and summative evaluation by faculty. Having students work in teams, while challenging both for faculty and students, may be a viable strategy for preparing the next generation of nurses for inter- and intraprofessional collaboration. Our experience suggests that instituting a collabo-rative learning experience as part of an undergraduate course in community health nursing can be an effective way to expose students to constructive approaches to teamwork and prepare them for evidence-based nursing practice in the future.

    @article{RefWorks:156,
      author={Kyeongra Yang and Gail Woomera  R. and Judith Matthews  T.},
      year={2012},
      month={03},
      title={Collaborative learning among undergraduate students in community health nursing},
      journal={Nurse Education in Practice},
      volume={12},
      number={2},
      pages={72-76},
      note={ID: 2011522204},
      abstract={Teamwork can benefit students, enhancing their ability to think critically, solve problems creatively, and collaborate effectively. We piloted a collaborative learning project with undergraduate community health nursing students N = 83) that entailed working in teams to explore epidemiologic data, synthesize the literature, and develop an evidence-based plan for nursing intervention and evaluation pertaining to a public health issue. Project evaluation consisted of pre- and post-project surveys by students, peer evaluation, and formative and summative evaluation by faculty. Having students work in teams, while challenging both for faculty and students, may be a viable strategy for preparing the next generation of nurses for inter- and intraprofessional collaboration. Our experience suggests that instituting a collabo-rative learning experience as part of an undergraduate course in community health nursing can be an effective way to expose students to constructive approaches to teamwork and prepare them for evidence-based nursing practice in the future.},
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Community Health Nursing -- Education; Learning Methods; Collaboration; Education, Post-RN; Teamwork; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Schools, Nursing -- Pennsylvania; Pennsylvania; Program Implementation; Student Attitudes -- Evaluation; Faculty Attitudes -- Evaluation; Feedback; Peer Group},
      isbn={1471-5953},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2011522204&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Yang, K., Woomer, G. R., & Matthews, J. T.. (2012). Collaborative learning among undergraduate students in community health nursing. Nurse education in practice, 12(2), 72-76.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Teamwork can benefit students, enhancing their ability to think critically, solve problems creatively, and collaborate effectively. We piloted a collaborative learning project with undergraduate community health nursing students (N = 83) that entailed working in teams to explore epidemiologic data, synthesize the literature, and develop an evidence-based plan for nursing intervention and evaluation pertaining to a public health issue. Project evaluation consisted of pre- and post-project surveys by students, peer evaluation, and formative and summative evaluation by faculty. Having students work in teams, while challenging both for faculty and students, may be a viable strategy for preparing the next generation of nurses for inter- and intraprofessional collaboration. Our experience suggests that instituting a collaborative learning experience as part of an undergraduate course in community health nursing can be an effective way to expose students to constructive approaches to teamwork and prepare them for evidence-based nursing practice in the future.

    @article{RefWorks:191,
      author={K. Yang and G. R. Woomer and J. T. Matthews},
      year={2012},
      month={Mar},
      title={Collaborative learning among undergraduate students in community health nursing},
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      volume={12},
      number={2},
      pages={72-76},
      note={CI: Copyright A(c) 2011; JID: 101090848; 2010/09/28 [received]; 2011/05/23 [revised]; 2011/07/14 [accepted]; 2011/08/05 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
      abstract={Teamwork can benefit students, enhancing their ability to think critically, solve problems creatively, and collaborate effectively. We piloted a collaborative learning project with undergraduate community health nursing students (N = 83) that entailed working in teams to explore epidemiologic data, synthesize the literature, and develop an evidence-based plan for nursing intervention and evaluation pertaining to a public health issue. Project evaluation consisted of pre- and post-project surveys by students, peer evaluation, and formative and summative evaluation by faculty. Having students work in teams, while challenging both for faculty and students, may be a viable strategy for preparing the next generation of nurses for inter- and intraprofessional collaboration. Our experience suggests that instituting a collaborative learning experience as part of an undergraduate course in community health nursing can be an effective way to expose students to constructive approaches to teamwork and prepare them for evidence-based nursing practice in the future.},
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Community Health Nursing/education; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Female; Humans; Learning; Male; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={eng}
    }

2011

  • Bartunek, J. M.. (2011). Intergroup relationships and quality improvement in healthcare . BMJ quality & safety, 20 Suppl 1, i62-6.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Intergroup problems among physicians, nurses and administrators in healthcare settings sometimes retard such settings’ ability to foster enhanced quality of care. Without knowledge of the social dynamics that generate the difficulties, it is impossible to address some crucial issues that may affect quality initiatives. METHODS: This paper reviews three types of dynamics, social identity, communities of practice and socialisation into particular professional identities that affect relationships among professional groups in healthcare settings. RECOMMENDATIONS: A suggestion is made for the creation of cross-boundary communities of practice, socialisation into them and dual, superordinate identities as a means to foster more effective intergroup dynamics and, thus, contribute to a greater quality of care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:820,
      author={J. M. Bartunek},
      year={2011},
      month={Apr},
      title={Intergroup relationships and quality improvement in healthcare },
      journal={BMJ quality & safety},
      volume={20 Suppl 1},
      pages={i62-6},
      note={id: 5431; LR: 20110728; JID: 101546984; OID: NLM: PMC3066847; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Intergroup problems among physicians, nurses and administrators in healthcare settings sometimes retard such settings' ability to foster enhanced quality of care. Without knowledge of the social dynamics that generate the difficulties, it is impossible to address some crucial issues that may affect quality initiatives. METHODS: This paper reviews three types of dynamics, social identity, communities of practice and socialisation into particular professional identities that affect relationships among professional groups in healthcare settings. RECOMMENDATIONS: A suggestion is made for the creation of cross-boundary communities of practice, socialisation into them and dual, superordinate identities as a means to foster more effective intergroup dynamics and, thus, contribute to a greater quality of care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Delivery of Health Care/standards; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Interprofessional Relations; Quality Improvement; Social Identification},
      isbn={2044-5423; 2044-5415},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Berwick, D. M., & Bisognano, M.. (2011). [Commentary on] Preparing Nurses for Participation in and Leadership of Continual Improvement . Journal of Nursing Education, 50(6), 322-327.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Modern health care demands continual system improvement to better meet social needs for safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. Nurses, like all other health professionals, need skills and support to participate effectively in that endeavor, and, often, to lead it. Nursing education is poised to accelerate progress by embedding health care improvement skills in all phases of professional formation. Following are recommendations intended to support this vision: 1. Preparation of nurses should include mastery of knowledge of systems, interpretation of variation, human psychology in complex systems, and approaches to gaining knowledge in real-world contexts. 2. During professional preparation, nurses-in-training should experience and reflect upon active involvement in multidisciplinary quality improvement projects and work settings that foster day-to-day change and improvement. 3. During professional preparation, nurses-in-training should experience, reflect upon, and develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that create competence in patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. 4. Preparation of nurses-teachers and nurse-executives should include acquiring and practicing skills and methods for the leadership and management of continual improvement. 5. Organizations that license and certify nurses or accredit nursing education programs should require evidence of nurses’ preparation for participation in or leadership of teams that work to continuously improve health care systems and individual and population health. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:821,
      author={D. M. Berwick and M. Bisognano},
      year={2011},
      month={06},
      title={[Commentary on] Preparing Nurses for Participation in and Leadership of Continual Improvement },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={50},
      number={6},
      pages={322-327},
      note={id: 5635},
      abstract={Modern health care demands continual system improvement to better meet social needs for safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. Nurses, like all other health professionals, need skills and support to participate effectively in that endeavor, and, often, to lead it. Nursing education is poised to accelerate progress by embedding health care improvement skills in all phases of professional formation. Following are recommendations intended to support this vision: 1. Preparation of nurses should include mastery of knowledge of systems, interpretation of variation, human psychology in complex systems, and approaches to gaining knowledge in real-world contexts. 2. During professional preparation, nurses-in-training should experience and reflect upon active involvement in multidisciplinary quality improvement projects and work settings that foster day-to-day change and improvement. 3. During professional preparation, nurses-in-training should experience, reflect upon, and develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that create competence in patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. 4. Preparation of nurses-teachers and nurse-executives should include acquiring and practicing skills and methods for the leadership and management of continual improvement. 5. Organizations that license and certify nurses or accredit nursing education programs should require evidence of nurses' preparation for participation in or leadership of teams that work to continuously improve health care systems and individual and population health. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Quality Improvement; Leadership; Knowledge; Systems Analysis; Psychology; Nursing Management; Outcomes (Health Care); Change Management},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011213619&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Clark, P. G.. (2011). Examining the interface between interprofessional practice and education: lessons learned from Norway for promoting teamwork . Journal of interprofessional care, 25(1), 26-32.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Promoting teamwork in health and social care requires an understanding of the interface between interprofessional practice (IPP) and interprofessional education (IPE). A study with two parts, one qualitative and one quantitative, examined this interface in Norway. The first used focus groups to assess IPP rewards, barriers, and facilitating factors among practitioners in clinical settings. The second utilized an online survey to measure IPE attitudes, barriers, and facilitating factors among senior administrators in the educational system. Results of Part 1 indicate that providers report many intrinsic rewards of IPP; however, the more extrinsic impacts of collaborative practice on patient care need to be emphasized to system managers. Results of Part 2 suggest strong general support by academic deans and directors for IPE, though addressing specific potential barriers to its implementation has become increasingly important. Overall, bridging the IPP-IPE gap requires educating leaders in both settings about the resources needed for teamwork, linking clinical and educational settings through continuing professional development, and generally advocating more effectively for both IPP and IPE. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:824,
      author={P. G. Clark},
      year={2011},
      month={Jan},
      title={Examining the interface between interprofessional practice and education: lessons learned from Norway for promoting teamwork },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={25},
      number={1},
      pages={26-32},
      note={id: 5326; JID: 9205811; 2010/08/26 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Promoting teamwork in health and social care requires an understanding of the interface between interprofessional practice (IPP) and interprofessional education (IPE). A study with two parts, one qualitative and one quantitative, examined this interface in Norway. The first used focus groups to assess IPP rewards, barriers, and facilitating factors among practitioners in clinical settings. The second utilized an online survey to measure IPE attitudes, barriers, and facilitating factors among senior administrators in the educational system. Results of Part 1 indicate that providers report many intrinsic rewards of IPP; however, the more extrinsic impacts of collaborative practice on patient care need to be emphasized to system managers. Results of Part 2 suggest strong general support by academic deans and directors for IPE, though addressing specific potential barriers to its implementation has become increasingly important. Overall, bridging the IPP-IPE gap requires educating leaders in both settings about the resources needed for teamwork, linking clinical and educational settings through continuing professional development, and generally advocating more effectively for both IPP and IPE. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude; Cooperative Behavior; Focus Groups; Health Personnel/education/organization & administration; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Norway; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Social Work/education/organization & administration},
      isbn={1469-9567; 1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Deering, S., Johnston, L. C., & Colacchio, K.. (2011). Multidisciplinary teamwork and communication training . Seminars in perinatology, 35(2), 89-96.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Every delivery is a multidisciplinary event, involving nursing, obstetricians, anesthesiologists, and pediatricians. Patients are often in labor across multiple provider shifts, necessitating numerous handoffs between teams. Each handoff provides an opportunity for errors. Although a traditional approach to improving patient outcomes has been to address individual knowledge and skills, it is now recognized that a significant number of complications result from team, rather than individual, failures. In 2004, a Sentinel Alert issued by the Joint Commission revealed that most cases of perinatal death and injury are caused by problems with an organization’s culture and communication failures. It was recommended that hospitals implement teamwork training programs in an effort to improve outcomes. Instituting a multidisciplinary teamwork training program that uses simulation offers a risk-free environment to practice skills, including communication, role clarification, and mutual support. This experience should improve patient safety and outcomes, as well as enhance employee morale. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:826,
      author={S. Deering and L. C. Johnston and K. Colacchio},
      year={2011},
      month={Apr},
      title={Multidisciplinary teamwork and communication training },
      journal={Seminars in perinatology},
      volume={35},
      number={2},
      pages={89-96},
      note={id: 5296; CI: Published by Elsevier Inc.; JID: 7801132; ppublish },
      abstract={Every delivery is a multidisciplinary event, involving nursing, obstetricians, anesthesiologists, and pediatricians. Patients are often in labor across multiple provider shifts, necessitating numerous handoffs between teams. Each handoff provides an opportunity for errors. Although a traditional approach to improving patient outcomes has been to address individual knowledge and skills, it is now recognized that a significant number of complications result from team, rather than individual, failures. In 2004, a Sentinel Alert issued by the Joint Commission revealed that most cases of perinatal death and injury are caused by problems with an organization's culture and communication failures. It was recommended that hospitals implement teamwork training programs in an effort to improve outcomes. Instituting a multidisciplinary teamwork training program that uses simulation offers a risk-free environment to practice skills, including communication, role clarification, and mutual support. This experience should improve patient safety and outcomes, as well as enhance employee morale. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Delivery, Obstetric/education/methods; Female; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient Simulation; Pregnancy},
      isbn={1558-075X; 0146-0005},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fougner, M., & Horntvedt, T.. (2011). Students’ reflections on shadowing interprofessional teamwork: a Norwegian case study . Journal of interprofessional care, 25(1), 33-38.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article reports the students’ reflections on interprofessional teamwork during brief exposures to real-life experiences in hospitals or home-based rehabilitation service. Each of the 10 interprofessional groups, comprising three students, followed a rehabilitation team for a day. The composition of each student group correlated with the rehabilitation team. Data were collected from interviews with the student groups and subjected to a thematic analysis. The following four main themes were identified for which the students seemed to affect collaboration: sharing knowledge; team setting and position within the organisation; patient centred focus; and challenges in crossing professional borders when performing tasks. Each of these themes is presented and discussed in relation to the educational literature. In conclusion, the data suggest that a well organized, one-day observation-based learning experience helped to motivate students and helped to enable them to relate theory and practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:827,
      author={M. Fougner and T. Horntvedt},
      year={2011},
      month={Jan},
      title={Students' reflections on shadowing interprofessional teamwork: a Norwegian case study },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={25},
      number={1},
      pages={33-38},
      note={id: 5325; JID: 9205811; 2010/08/26 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={This article reports the students' reflections on interprofessional teamwork during brief exposures to real-life experiences in hospitals or home-based rehabilitation service. Each of the 10 interprofessional groups, comprising three students, followed a rehabilitation team for a day. The composition of each student group correlated with the rehabilitation team. Data were collected from interviews with the student groups and subjected to a thematic analysis. The following four main themes were identified for which the students seemed to affect collaboration: sharing knowledge; team setting and position within the organisation; patient centred focus; and challenges in crossing professional borders when performing tasks. Each of these themes is presented and discussed in relation to the educational literature. In conclusion, the data suggest that a well organized, one-day observation-based learning experience helped to motivate students and helped to enable them to relate theory and practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Health Personnel/education/psychology; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Norway; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Rehabilitation/organization & administration; Social Work/education},
      isbn={1469-9567; 1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Gordon, M. B., Melvin, P., Graham, D., Fifer, E., Chiang, V. W., Sectish, T. C., & Landrigan, C. P.. (2011). Unit-based care teams and the frequency and quality of physician-nurse communications . Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 165(5), 424-428.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether reorganizing physicians into unit-based teams in general pediatric wards is associated with greater ability to identify other care team members, increased face-to-face communication between physicians and nurses, greater perception that their patient care concerns were met, and decreased number of pages to residents. DESIGN: Prospective intervention study with data collected before and at 2 time points after implementation of unit-based teams. SETTING: General pediatric wards at an urban, tertiary care, freestanding children’s hospital from April 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009. PARTICIPANTS: Pediatric residents rotating in the medical wards (n = 60) and ward-based pediatric nurses (n = 154). INTERVENTION: We reorganized resident-physician care teams to be based on specific inpatient units, with residents admitting and caring only for patients on their assigned unit. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anonymous physician and nurse self-reports of communication practices and number of pages residents received. RESULTS: In the unit-based team system, physicians were more likely to be able to identify the nurse for their patients with the most complex conditions (62.3% vs 82.8% vs 82.5%, P = .05), to report contacting (27.3% vs 64.9% vs 56.9%, P = .01) and being contacted by (7.7% vs 48.2% vs 55.2%, P = .002) that nurse in person, and to believe their patient care concerns were met (44.2% vs 82.1% vs 81.8%, P = .009). Nurses reported parallel improvements in communication patterns. The mean number of pages per day to residents decreased by 42.1% (19 vs 10 vs 11, P

    @article{RefWorks:828,
      author={M. B. Gordon and P. Melvin and D. Graham and E. Fifer and V. W. Chiang and T. C. Sectish and C. P. Landrigan},
      year={2011},
      month={May},
      title={Unit-based care teams and the frequency and quality of physician-nurse communications },
      journal={Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine},
      volume={165},
      number={5},
      pages={424-428},
      note={id: 5634; GR: T32 HP10018/PHS HHS/United States; JID: 9422751; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: To determine whether reorganizing physicians into unit-based teams in general pediatric wards is associated with greater ability to identify other care team members, increased face-to-face communication between physicians and nurses, greater perception that their patient care concerns were met, and decreased number of pages to residents. DESIGN: Prospective intervention study with data collected before and at 2 time points after implementation of unit-based teams. SETTING: General pediatric wards at an urban, tertiary care, freestanding children's hospital from April 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009. PARTICIPANTS: Pediatric residents rotating in the medical wards (n = 60) and ward-based pediatric nurses (n = 154). INTERVENTION: We reorganized resident-physician care teams to be based on specific inpatient units, with residents admitting and caring only for patients on their assigned unit. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anonymous physician and nurse self-reports of communication practices and number of pages residents received. RESULTS: In the unit-based team system, physicians were more likely to be able to identify the nurse for their patients with the most complex conditions (62.3% vs 82.8% vs 82.5%, P = .05), to report contacting (27.3% vs 64.9% vs 56.9%, P = .01) and being contacted by (7.7% vs 48.2% vs 55.2%, P = .002) that nurse in person, and to believe their patient care concerns were met (44.2% vs 82.1% vs 81.8%, P = .009). Nurses reported parallel improvements in communication patterns. The mean number of pages per day to residents decreased by 42.1% (19 vs 10 vs 11, P },
      keywords={Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Hospitals, Urban; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Interprofessional Relations; Intervention Studies; Male; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Pediatrics/organization & administration; Physician-Nurse Relations; Prospective Studies; Total Quality Management; United States},
      isbn={1538-3628; 1072-4710},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hall, P., Marshall, D., Weaver, L., Boyle, A., & Taniguchi, A.. (2011). A method to enhance student teams in palliative care: Piloting the McMaster-Ottawa Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter . Journal of palliative medicine, 14(6), 744-750.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: The need for palliative and end-of-life care (PEOLC) education in prelicensure education has been identified. PEOLC requires effective collaborative teamwork. The competencies required for effective collaborative teamwork are only now emerging and methods to evaluate them must be developed. OBJECTIVE: The adaptation of the traditional Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) for assessment of a student team addressing palliative care issues was undertaken. The McMaster-Ottawa Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter (TOSCE) is intended as a formative evaluation tool for both competencies in interprofessional collaboration for patient-centered practice and PEOLC. METHODS: Three stations based on palliative care scenarios were developed. From January 2007 to January 2008, a total of 141 students and 38 observers participated in the evaluation of three stations, with 6-7 students per group and two observers per station. Observers completed checklists for both PEOLC and interprofessional collaborative competencies and, after completing the TOSCEs, students and observers completed questionnaires on their feasibility and acceptability. RESULTS: Eighty-nine percent of the students and 44% of the observers were from medicine. Students and observers found the TOSCE to be an acceptable and feasible assessment tool for both sets of competencies. Reliability and validity data show that the items in both the clinical and interprofessional checklists fit well together, and interrater reliability is readily achieved. CONCLUSIONS: The new formative evaluation TOSCE tool, adapted from the traditional OSCE, was acceptable and feasible to students and observers. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:829,
      author={P. Hall and D. Marshall and L. Weaver and A. Boyle and A. Taniguchi},
      year={2011},
      month={Jun},
      title={A method to enhance student teams in palliative care: Piloting the McMaster-Ottawa Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter },
      journal={Journal of palliative medicine},
      volume={14},
      number={6},
      pages={744-750},
      note={id: 5319; JID: 9808462; 2011/04/27 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: The need for palliative and end-of-life care (PEOLC) education in prelicensure education has been identified. PEOLC requires effective collaborative teamwork. The competencies required for effective collaborative teamwork are only now emerging and methods to evaluate them must be developed. OBJECTIVE: The adaptation of the traditional Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) for assessment of a student team addressing palliative care issues was undertaken. The McMaster-Ottawa Team Observed Structured Clinical Encounter (TOSCE) is intended as a formative evaluation tool for both competencies in interprofessional collaboration for patient-centered practice and PEOLC. METHODS: Three stations based on palliative care scenarios were developed. From January 2007 to January 2008, a total of 141 students and 38 observers participated in the evaluation of three stations, with 6-7 students per group and two observers per station. Observers completed checklists for both PEOLC and interprofessional collaborative competencies and, after completing the TOSCEs, students and observers completed questionnaires on their feasibility and acceptability. RESULTS: Eighty-nine percent of the students and 44% of the observers were from medicine. Students and observers found the TOSCE to be an acceptable and feasible assessment tool for both sets of competencies. Reliability and validity data show that the items in both the clinical and interprofessional checklists fit well together, and interrater reliability is readily achieved. CONCLUSIONS: The new formative evaluation TOSCE tool, adapted from the traditional OSCE, was acceptable and feasible to students and observers. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1557-7740; 1557-7740},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Husebo, S. E., Rystedt, H., & Friberg, F.. (2011). Educating for teamwork – nursing students’ coordination in simulated cardiac arrest situations . Journal of advanced nursing.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Aim. The overarching aim was to explore and describe the communicative modes students employ to coordinate the team in a simulation-based environment designed for resuscitation team training. Background. Verbal communication is often considered essential for effective coordination in resuscitation teams and enhancing patient safety. Although simulation is a promising method for improving coordination skills, previous studies have overlooked the necessity of addressing the multifaceted interplay between verbal and non-verbal forms of communication. Method. Eighty-one nursing students participated in the study. The data were collected in February and March, 2008. Video recordings from 28 simulated cardiac arrest situations in a nursing programme were analysed. Firstly, all communicative actions were coded and quantified according to content analysis. Secondly, interaction analysis was performed to capture the significance of verbal and non-verbal communication, respectively, in the moment-to-moment coordination of the team. Findings. Three phases of coordination in the resuscitation team were identified: Stating unconsciousness, Preparing for resuscitation, Initiating resuscitation. Coordination of joint assessments and actions in these phases involved a broad range of verbal and non-verbal communication modes that were necessary for achieving mutual understandings of how to continue to the next step in the algorithm. This was accomplished through a complex interplay of taking position, pointing and through verbal statements and directives. Conclusion. Simulation-based environments offer a promising solution in nursing education for training the coordination necessary in resuscitation teams as they give the opportunity to practice the complex interplay of verbal and non-verbal communication modes that would otherwise not be possible. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:831,
      author={S. E. Husebo and H. Rystedt and F. Friberg},
      year={2011},
      month={Apr 6},
      title={Educating for teamwork - nursing students' coordination in simulated cardiac arrest situations },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      note={id: 5295; CI: (c) 2011; JID: 7609811; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Aim. The overarching aim was to explore and describe the communicative modes students employ to coordinate the team in a simulation-based environment designed for resuscitation team training. Background. Verbal communication is often considered essential for effective coordination in resuscitation teams and enhancing patient safety. Although simulation is a promising method for improving coordination skills, previous studies have overlooked the necessity of addressing the multifaceted interplay between verbal and non-verbal forms of communication. Method. Eighty-one nursing students participated in the study. The data were collected in February and March, 2008. Video recordings from 28 simulated cardiac arrest situations in a nursing programme were analysed. Firstly, all communicative actions were coded and quantified according to content analysis. Secondly, interaction analysis was performed to capture the significance of verbal and non-verbal communication, respectively, in the moment-to-moment coordination of the team. Findings. Three phases of coordination in the resuscitation team were identified: Stating unconsciousness, Preparing for resuscitation, Initiating resuscitation. Coordination of joint assessments and actions in these phases involved a broad range of verbal and non-verbal communication modes that were necessary for achieving mutual understandings of how to continue to the next step in the algorithm. This was accomplished through a complex interplay of taking position, pointing and through verbal statements and directives. Conclusion. Simulation-based environments offer a promising solution in nursing education for training the coordination necessary in resuscitation teams as they give the opportunity to practice the complex interplay of verbal and non-verbal communication modes that would otherwise not be possible. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2648; 0309-2402},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Kelley, A., & Aston, L.. (2011). An evaluation of using champions to enhance inter-professional learning in the practice setting . Nurse Education in Practice, 11(1), 36-40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The promotion of interprofessional working is a key government target for healthcare professionals. This article outlines one approach to establish inter-professional learning in the practice setting using systems based on current clinical placement allocation of students from a variety of health and social care professions. By utilising current unprofessional support systems for developing the learning environment, inter-professional learning opportunities were created for students. Interprofessional ‘champions’ in a targeted number of placements self selected themselves to participate in a new innovation. These healthcare professionals were given preparation, support and facilitator training. Interprofessional learning opportunities were developed using a variety of formats. Evaluations of the innovation demonstrated the usefulness of this approach for qualified staff as well as for students. A key target of sustainability was achieved and expansion of the initiative has been guaranteed through further funding. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:832,
      author={A. Kelley and L. Aston},
      year={2011},
      title={An evaluation of using champions to enhance inter-professional learning in the practice setting },
      journal={Nurse Education in Practice},
      volume={11},
      number={1},
      pages={36-40},
      note={id: 5331},
      abstract={The promotion of interprofessional working is a key government target for healthcare professionals. This article outlines one approach to establish inter-professional learning in the practice setting using systems based on current clinical placement allocation of students from a variety of health and social care professions. By utilising current unprofessional support systems for developing the learning environment, inter-professional learning opportunities were created for students. Interprofessional 'champions' in a targeted number of placements self selected themselves to participate in a new innovation. These healthcare professionals were given preparation, support and facilitator training. Interprofessional learning opportunities were developed using a variety of formats. Evaluations of the innovation demonstrated the usefulness of this approach for qualified staff as well as for students. A key target of sustainability was achieved and expansion of the initiative has been guaranteed through further funding. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Clinical; Education, Interdisciplinary; Program Evaluation; Teaching Methods; Comparative Studies; Faculty Attitudes; Funding Source; Human; Learning Environment; Program Development; Qualitative Studies; Student Attitudes; Students, Allied Health; Students, Medical; Students, Nursing; Students, Physical Therapy},
      isbn={1471-5953},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010923514&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Kesten, K. S.. (2011). Role-play using SBAR technique to improve observed communication skills in senior nursing students . The Journal of nursing education, 50(2), 79-87.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Patients in the care of clinically expert professionals suffer medical errors with alarming frequency. The Joint Commission’s National Patient Safety Goals strives to improve the effectiveness of communication among caregivers by recommending the implementation of a standardized tool known as SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation). This experimental study evaluated data from undergraduate nursing students (N = 115) on their performance using a standardized communication tool SBAR. The mean performance scores of the didactic plus role-play students were significantly higher than those who had didactic instruction alone (t = -2.6, p = 0.005). Findings suggest role-play may have a place in teaching communication skills in nursing schools as well as continuing education and training in hospitals and other health care settings. Interdisciplinary communication training may provide even more effective learning. The link between effective communication and improved patient outcomes also should be studied. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:833,
      author={K. S. Kesten},
      year={2011},
      month={Feb},
      title={Role-play using SBAR technique to improve observed communication skills in senior nursing students },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={50},
      number={2},
      pages={79-87},
      note={id: 5303; CI: Copyright 2011; JID: 7705432; 2010/01/18 [received]; 2010/05/19 [accepted]; 2010/12/30 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Patients in the care of clinically expert professionals suffer medical errors with alarming frequency. The Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goals strives to improve the effectiveness of communication among caregivers by recommending the implementation of a standardized tool known as SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation). This experimental study evaluated data from undergraduate nursing students (N = 115) on their performance using a standardized communication tool SBAR. The mean performance scores of the didactic plus role-play students were significantly higher than those who had didactic instruction alone (t = -2.6, p = 0.005). Findings suggest role-play may have a place in teaching communication skills in nursing schools as well as continuing education and training in hospitals and other health care settings. Interdisciplinary communication training may provide even more effective learning. The link between effective communication and improved patient outcomes also should be studied. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Communication; Education, Nursing/methods; Female; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Middle Aged; Nursing Assessment; Role Playing; United States},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lait, J., Suter, E., Arthur, N., & Deutschlander, S.. (2011). Interprofessional mentoring: Enhancing students’ clinical learning . Nurse Education in Practice, 11(3), 211-215.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Interprofessional (IP) collaboration is recognized as critical for patient-centred care. The clinical setting is an ideal environment for students to learn the competencies required to effectively work with providers from other professions. To enhance traditional clinical placements, we propose an IP mentoring approach, defined as learning that takes place between providers and students who are from different disciplines or health professions. In IP mentoring, students have primary relationships with their preceptors, but also have interactions with providers from other professions. We implemented IP mentoring with the support of two faculties of nursing in Alberta, Canada who provided an IP clinical focus for interested fourth year students. We emphasized to providers and students that there are no prescribed interactions that comprise IP mentoring; experiences between providers and students are context-specific and often informal. Through our evaluation we demonstrated that in IP mentoring, provider commitment was important, students engaged in IP activities of varying complexity, and students learned about roles of other professions and how to work together to provide patient-centred care. IP mentoring is an effective learning strategy to enhance students’ knowledge and skills in IP collaboration without radical changes to the structure of the placements or to the educational curricula. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:835,
      author={J. Lait and E. Suter and N. Arthur and S. Deutschlander},
      year={2011},
      month={05},
      title={Interprofessional mentoring: Enhancing students' clinical learning },
      journal={Nurse Education in Practice},
      volume={11},
      number={3},
      pages={211-215},
      note={id: 5311},
      abstract={Interprofessional (IP) collaboration is recognized as critical for patient-centred care. The clinical setting is an ideal environment for students to learn the competencies required to effectively work with providers from other professions. To enhance traditional clinical placements, we propose an IP mentoring approach, defined as learning that takes place between providers and students who are from different disciplines or health professions. In IP mentoring, students have primary relationships with their preceptors, but also have interactions with providers from other professions. We implemented IP mentoring with the support of two faculties of nursing in Alberta, Canada who provided an IP clinical focus for interested fourth year students. We emphasized to providers and students that there are no prescribed interactions that comprise IP mentoring; experiences between providers and students are context-specific and often informal. Through our evaluation we demonstrated that in IP mentoring, provider commitment was important, students engaged in IP activities of varying complexity, and students learned about roles of other professions and how to work together to provide patient-centred care. IP mentoring is an effective learning strategy to enhance students' knowledge and skills in IP collaboration without radical changes to the structure of the placements or to the educational curricula. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Clinical -- Trends; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate -- Trends -- Alberta; Interprofessional Relations; Mentorship; Patient Centered Care -- Education; Preceptorship; Program Development; Alberta; Coding; Convenience Sample; Data Analysis Software; Multicenter Studies; Outcomes of Education; Program Evaluation; Program Implementation; Schools, Nursing; Semi-Structured Interview; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Teaching Methods; Thematic Analysis},
      isbn={1471-5953},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2011033048&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • McCulloch, P., Rathbone, J., & Catchpole, K.. (2011). Interventions to improve teamwork and communications among healthcare staff . The British journal of surgery, 98(4), 469-479.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Concern over the frequency of unintended harm to patients has focused attention on the importance of teamwork and communication in avoiding errors. This has led to experiments with teamwork training programmes for clinical staff, mostly based on aviation models. These are widely assumed to be effective in improving patient safety, but the extent to which this assumption is justified by evidence remains unclear. METHODS: A systematic literature review on the effects of teamwork training for clinical staff was performed. Information was sought on outcomes including staff attitudes, teamwork skills, technical performance, efficiency and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Of 1036 relevant abstracts identified, 14 articles were analysed in detail: four randomized trials and ten non-randomized studies. Overall study quality was poor, with particular problems over blinding, subjective measures and Hawthorne effects. Few studies reported on every outcome category. Most reported improved staff attitudes, and six of eight reported significantly better teamwork after training. Five of eight studies reported improved technical performance, improved efficiency or reduced errors. Three studies reported evidence of clinical benefit, but this was modest or of borderline significance in each case. Studies with a stronger intervention were more likely to report benefits than those providing less training. None of the randomized trials found evidence of technical or clinical benefit. CONCLUSION: The evidence for technical or clinical benefit from teamwork training in medicine is weak. There is some evidence of benefit from studies with more intensive training programmes, but better quality research and cost-benefit analysis are needed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:837,
      author={P. McCulloch and J. Rathbone and K. Catchpole},
      year={2011},
      month={Apr},
      title={Interventions to improve teamwork and communications among healthcare staff },
      journal={The British journal of surgery},
      volume={98},
      number={4},
      pages={469-479},
      note={id: 5322; CI: Copyright (c) 2011; JID: 0372553; 2010/12/17 [accepted]; 2011/02/08 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Concern over the frequency of unintended harm to patients has focused attention on the importance of teamwork and communication in avoiding errors. This has led to experiments with teamwork training programmes for clinical staff, mostly based on aviation models. These are widely assumed to be effective in improving patient safety, but the extent to which this assumption is justified by evidence remains unclear. METHODS: A systematic literature review on the effects of teamwork training for clinical staff was performed. Information was sought on outcomes including staff attitudes, teamwork skills, technical performance, efficiency and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Of 1036 relevant abstracts identified, 14 articles were analysed in detail: four randomized trials and ten non-randomized studies. Overall study quality was poor, with particular problems over blinding, subjective measures and Hawthorne effects. Few studies reported on every outcome category. Most reported improved staff attitudes, and six of eight reported significantly better teamwork after training. Five of eight studies reported improved technical performance, improved efficiency or reduced errors. Three studies reported evidence of clinical benefit, but this was modest or of borderline significance in each case. Studies with a stronger intervention were more likely to report benefits than those providing less training. None of the randomized trials found evidence of technical or clinical benefit. CONCLUSION: The evidence for technical or clinical benefit from teamwork training in medicine is weak. There is some evidence of benefit from studies with more intensive training programmes, but better quality research and cost-benefit analysis are needed. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Bias (Epidemiology); Communication; Health Personnel/education/standards; Interprofessional Relations; Job Satisfaction; Patient Care Team; Professional Competence/standards},
      isbn={1365-2168; 0007-1323},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Pelling, S., Kalen, A., Hammar, M., & Wahlstrom, O.. (2011). Preparation for becoming members of health care teams: findings from a 5-year evaluation of a student interprofessional training ward . Journal of interprofessional care, 25(5), 328-332.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Setting. An orthopaedic interprofessional training ward manned by students at a University Hospital.Objective. To assess to what extent students from different undergraduate programmes evaluated the effects of a 2-week rotation at the ward on their professional roles and the value of teamwork within health care.Method. A questionnaire was filled in by 841 students by the end of a 2-week rotation at the ward over 5 years. Questions concerned students’ estimate of how the rotation had strengthened their insight into their own future professional role, into other students’ professional roles and into the value of teamwork within health care. Differences between the different student categories and possible associations between the different estimates were statistically analysed.Results. Students from all programmes reported that the rotation at the student ward had dramatically strengthened their insight about their own future professional role as well as the roles of the other professions and the value of teamwork within health care.Conclusion. Health care is a complicated system based on cooperation and professionalism. We suggest that interprofessional training of students from all professions within health care should be a part of their education as a worthwhile preparation for their future professional work and to ensure high-quality health care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:838,
      author={S. Pelling and A. Kalen and M. Hammar and O. Wahlstrom},
      year={2011},
      month={Jun 2},
      title={Preparation for becoming members of health care teams: findings from a 5-year evaluation of a student interprofessional training ward },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={25},
      number={5},
      pages={328-332},
      note={id: 5318; JID: 9205811; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Setting. An orthopaedic interprofessional training ward manned by students at a University Hospital.Objective. To assess to what extent students from different undergraduate programmes evaluated the effects of a 2-week rotation at the ward on their professional roles and the value of teamwork within health care.Method. A questionnaire was filled in by 841 students by the end of a 2-week rotation at the ward over 5 years. Questions concerned students' estimate of how the rotation had strengthened their insight into their own future professional role, into other students' professional roles and into the value of teamwork within health care. Differences between the different student categories and possible associations between the different estimates were statistically analysed.Results. Students from all programmes reported that the rotation at the student ward had dramatically strengthened their insight about their own future professional role as well as the roles of the other professions and the value of teamwork within health care.Conclusion. Health care is a complicated system based on cooperation and professionalism. We suggest that interprofessional training of students from all professions within health care should be a part of their education as a worthwhile preparation for their future professional work and to ensure high-quality health care. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1469-9567; 1356-1820},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Rosenfield, D., Oandasan, I., & Reeves, S.. (2011). Perceptions versus reality: A qualitative study of students’ expectations and experiences of interprofessional education . Medical education, 45(5), 471-477.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    CONTEXT: Interprofessional education (IPE) has been gaining traction in post-secondary institutions. Many schools introduce IPE early to their health professional students, often in the context of a large-scale event in Year 1. This paper presents findings from a study undertaken by a medical student (a classmate of the research participants) and details Year 1 students’ initial perceptions of IPE. METHODS: Using an exploratory case study approach, eight focus groups of medical, pharmacy, dental, occupational therapy and social work students were gathered over 2 years (2007 and 2008). All participants had attended an IPE event delivered to nearly 1200 students each year. All data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach. RESULTS: The data indicated that, although students were generally positive towards IPE, many expressed dissatisfaction with the way their initial IPE event had been implemented. In particular, students felt that delivering IPE as a large-scale activity limited the amount of meaningful interprofessional interaction that could be achieved. A number of students also expressed concern about the ‘artificial’ nature of some of their interprofessional activities, which again limited their value. Students went on to offer various suggestions to improve their first exposure to IPE. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reinforce the notion that students value IPE, but offer some new insights into how introductory IPE programming might be organised. Although large-scale activities can provide IPE activities to a wide range of students, which is advantageous from a specifically administrative perspective, students’ opinions reveal that this form of IPE involves a number of challenges in their initial engagement with concepts of interprofessional teamwork and collaboration. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:840,
      author={D. Rosenfield and I. Oandasan and S. Reeves},
      year={2011},
      month={May},
      title={Perceptions versus reality: A qualitative study of students' expectations and experiences of interprofessional education },
      journal={Medical education},
      volume={45},
      number={5},
      pages={471-477},
      note={id: 5321; CI: (c) Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011; JID: 7605655; ppublish },
      abstract={CONTEXT: Interprofessional education (IPE) has been gaining traction in post-secondary institutions. Many schools introduce IPE early to their health professional students, often in the context of a large-scale event in Year 1. This paper presents findings from a study undertaken by a medical student (a classmate of the research participants) and details Year 1 students' initial perceptions of IPE. METHODS: Using an exploratory case study approach, eight focus groups of medical, pharmacy, dental, occupational therapy and social work students were gathered over 2 years (2007 and 2008). All participants had attended an IPE event delivered to nearly 1200 students each year. All data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach. RESULTS: The data indicated that, although students were generally positive towards IPE, many expressed dissatisfaction with the way their initial IPE event had been implemented. In particular, students felt that delivering IPE as a large-scale activity limited the amount of meaningful interprofessional interaction that could be achieved. A number of students also expressed concern about the 'artificial' nature of some of their interprofessional activities, which again limited their value. Students went on to offer various suggestions to improve their first exposure to IPE. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reinforce the notion that students value IPE, but offer some new insights into how introductory IPE programming might be organised. Although large-scale activities can provide IPE activities to a wide range of students, which is advantageous from a specifically administrative perspective, students' opinions reveal that this form of IPE involves a number of challenges in their initial engagement with concepts of interprofessional teamwork and collaboration. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2923; 0308-0110},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Sommerfeldt, S. C., Barton, S. S., Stayko, P., Patterson, S. K., & Pimlott, J.. (2011). Creating interprofessional clinical learning units: Developing an acute-care model . Nurse education in practice, 11(4), 273-277.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In exploring innovative approaches to enhanced patient care, an acute care interprofessional clinical learning unit (IPCLU) was established in a medical unit of a large metropolitan hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Part of a larger, community based, participatory mixed method research project, this acute-care model involved several post-secondary institution health science faculties, students, academics, and other post-secondary institutions partnering with the hospital to coordinate and enhance student clinical learning and improve patient care. Pre-implementation data collected from the existing acute-care unit patient-care team, students, and faculty identified areas of strength and enhancement opportunities in interprofessional education (IPE). Interested members of several professions from the patient-care units and students constituted the working group that developed the model. This paper discusses clinical IPE and its relevance in nursing education, explains the processes and mechanisms in creating the IPCLU, details the initiatives that were developed to facilitate enhanced interprofessional care, and offers considerations in advancing IPE in an acute-care setting. The work plan included initiatives that enhance interprofessional teaching and learning culture, increase awareness surrounding interprofessional teamwork and professional roles, promote interprofessional communication and decision-making strategies, and further develop clinical reflection. Insights regarding sustainability are offered. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:842,
      author={S. C. Sommerfeldt and S. S. Barton and P. Stayko and S. K. Patterson and J. Pimlott},
      year={2011},
      month={Jul},
      title={Creating interprofessional clinical learning units: Developing an acute-care model },
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      volume={11},
      number={4},
      pages={273-277},
      note={id: 5323; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; JID: 101090848; 2010/06/16 [received]; 2010/12/01 [revised]; 2010/12/04 [accepted]; 2011/01/03 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={In exploring innovative approaches to enhanced patient care, an acute care interprofessional clinical learning unit (IPCLU) was established in a medical unit of a large metropolitan hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Part of a larger, community based, participatory mixed method research project, this acute-care model involved several post-secondary institution health science faculties, students, academics, and other post-secondary institutions partnering with the hospital to coordinate and enhance student clinical learning and improve patient care. Pre-implementation data collected from the existing acute-care unit patient-care team, students, and faculty identified areas of strength and enhancement opportunities in interprofessional education (IPE). Interested members of several professions from the patient-care units and students constituted the working group that developed the model. This paper discusses clinical IPE and its relevance in nursing education, explains the processes and mechanisms in creating the IPCLU, details the initiatives that were developed to facilitate enhanced interprofessional care, and offers considerations in advancing IPE in an acute-care setting. The work plan included initiatives that enhance interprofessional teaching and learning culture, increase awareness surrounding interprofessional teamwork and professional roles, promote interprofessional communication and decision-making strategies, and further develop clinical reflection. Insights regarding sustainability are offered. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Thibault, G. E.. (2011). Interprofessional education: an essential strategy to accomplish the future of nursing goals . The Journal of nursing education, 50(6), 313-317.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Institute of Medicine’s Future of Nursing report has called for broad changes in the nursing profession for the benefit of society. Interprofessional education is one strategy to improve nursing education and enhance the role of nurses as collaborative leaders in the health care system. These are important lessons that have been learned from recent interprofessional educational initiatives and some encouraging examples of successful initiatives that are breaking down barriers across professional schools. The ultimate beneficiary of these changes will be our patients, who will receive better care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:843,
      author={G. E. Thibault},
      year={2011},
      month={Jun},
      title={Interprofessional education: an essential strategy to accomplish the future of nursing goals },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={50},
      number={6},
      pages={313-317},
      note={id: 5316; CI: Copyright 2011; JID: 7705432; 2011/02/16 [received]; 2011/02/16 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report has called for broad changes in the nursing profession for the benefit of society. Interprofessional education is one strategy to improve nursing education and enhance the role of nurses as collaborative leaders in the health care system. These are important lessons that have been learned from recent interprofessional educational initiatives and some encouraging examples of successful initiatives that are breaking down barriers across professional schools. The ultimate beneficiary of these changes will be our patients, who will receive better care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Nursing/trends; Forecasting; Foundations; Goals; Humans; Institute of Medicine (U.S.); Interdisciplinary Communication; Interprofessional Relations; United States},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Wilhelmsson, M., Ponzer, S., Dahlgren, L. O., Timpka, T., & Faresjo, T.. (2011). Are female students in general and nursing students more ready for teamwork and interprofessional collaboration in healthcare? . BMC medical education, 11, 15.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Interprofessional Education (IPE) is now spreading worldwide and many universities are now including IPE in their curricula. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not such student characteristics as gender, previous working experience in healthcare, educational progress and features of the learning environment, such as educational programmes and curriculum design, have an impact on their open-mindedness about co-operation with other professions. METHODS: Medical and nursing students at two Swedish universities were invited to fill in the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). Totally, 955 students were invited and 70.2% (n=670) participated in the study. A factor analysis of the RIPLS revealed four item groupings (factors) for our empirical data, but only one had sufficient internal consistency. This factor was labelled "Team Player". RESULTS: Regardless of the educational programme, female students were more positive to teamwork than male students. Nursing students in general displayed more positive beliefs about teamwork and collaboration than medical students. Exposure to different interprofessional curricula and previous exposure to interprofessional education were only to a minor extent associated with a positive attitude towards teamwork. Educational progress did not seem to influence these beliefs. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of interprofessional teamwork is a major challenge for modern healthcare. This study indicates some directions for more successful interprofessional education. Efforts should be directed at informing particularly male medical students about the need for teamwork in modern healthcare systems. The results also imply that study of other factors, such as the student’s personality, is needed for fully understanding readiness for teamwork and interprofessional collaboration in healthcare. We also believe that the RIPL Scale still can be further adjusted. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:844,
      author={M. Wilhelmsson and S. Ponzer and L. O. Dahlgren and T. Timpka and T. Faresjo},
      year={2011},
      month={Apr 21},
      title={Are female students in general and nursing students more ready for teamwork and interprofessional collaboration in healthcare? },
      journal={BMC medical education},
      volume={11},
      pages={15},
      note={id: 5320; JID: 101088679; OID: NLM: PMC3110123; 2010/06/13 [received]; 2011/04/21 [accepted]; 2011/04/21 [aheadofprint]; epublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Interprofessional Education (IPE) is now spreading worldwide and many universities are now including IPE in their curricula. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not such student characteristics as gender, previous working experience in healthcare, educational progress and features of the learning environment, such as educational programmes and curriculum design, have an impact on their open-mindedness about co-operation with other professions. METHODS: Medical and nursing students at two Swedish universities were invited to fill in the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). Totally, 955 students were invited and 70.2% (n=670) participated in the study. A factor analysis of the RIPLS revealed four item groupings (factors) for our empirical data, but only one had sufficient internal consistency. This factor was labelled "Team Player". RESULTS: Regardless of the educational programme, female students were more positive to teamwork than male students. Nursing students in general displayed more positive beliefs about teamwork and collaboration than medical students. Exposure to different interprofessional curricula and previous exposure to interprofessional education were only to a minor extent associated with a positive attitude towards teamwork. Educational progress did not seem to influence these beliefs. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of interprofessional teamwork is a major challenge for modern healthcare. This study indicates some directions for more successful interprofessional education. Efforts should be directed at informing particularly male medical students about the need for teamwork in modern healthcare systems. The results also imply that study of other factors, such as the student's personality, is needed for fully understanding readiness for teamwork and interprofessional collaboration in healthcare. We also believe that the RIPL Scale still can be further adjusted. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1472-6920; 1472-6920},
      language={eng}
    }

2010

  • Aggarwal, R., Mytton, O. T., Derbrew, M., Hananel, D., Heydenburg, M., Issenberg, B., MacAulay, C., Mancini, M. E., Morimoto, T., Soper, N., Ziv, A., & Reznick, R.. (2010). Training and simulation for patient safety . Quality & Safety in Health Care, 19, i34-43.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Background Simulation-based medical education enables knowledge, skills and attitudes to be acquired for all healthcare professionals in a safe, educationally orientated and efficient manner. Procedure-based skills, communication, leadership and team working can be learnt, be measured and have the potential to be used as a mode of certification to become an independent practitioner. Results Simulation-based training initially began with life-like manikins and now encompasses an entire range of systems, from synthetic models through to high fidelity simulation suites. These models can also be used for training in new technologies, for the application of existing technologies to new environments and in prototype testing. The level of simulation must be appropriate to the learners’ needs and can range from focused tuition to mass trauma scenarios. The development of simulation centres is a global phenomenon which should be encouraged, although the facilities should be used within appropriate curricula that are methodologically sound and cost-effective. Discussion A review of current techniques reveals that simulation can successfully promote the competencies of medical expert, communicator and collaborator. Further work is required to develop the exact role of simulation as a training mechanism for scholarly skills, professionalism, management and health advocacy. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:864,
      author={R. Aggarwal and O. T. Mytton and M. Derbrew and D. Hananel and M. Heydenburg and B. Issenberg and C. MacAulay and M. E. Mancini and T. Morimoto and N. Soper and A. Ziv and R. Reznick},
      year={2010},
      month={08/02},
      title={Training and simulation for patient safety },
      journal={Quality & Safety in Health Care},
      volume={19},
      pages={i34-43},
      note={id: 4918},
      abstract={Background Simulation-based medical education enables knowledge, skills and attitudes to be acquired for all healthcare professionals in a safe, educationally orientated and efficient manner. Procedure-based skills, communication, leadership and team working can be learnt, be measured and have the potential to be used as a mode of certification to become an independent practitioner. Results Simulation-based training initially began with life-like manikins and now encompasses an entire range of systems, from synthetic models through to high fidelity simulation suites. These models can also be used for training in new technologies, for the application of existing technologies to new environments and in prototype testing. The level of simulation must be appropriate to the learners' needs and can range from focused tuition to mass trauma scenarios. The development of simulation centres is a global phenomenon which should be encouraged, although the facilities should be used within appropriate curricula that are methodologically sound and cost-effective. Discussion A review of current techniques reveals that simulation can successfully promote the competencies of medical expert, communicator and collaborator. Further work is required to develop the exact role of simulation as a training mechanism for scholarly skills, professionalism, management and health advocacy. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Medical -- History; Health Personnel -- Education; Simulations -- Utilization; Communication Skills; Cost Benefit Analysis; Education, Competency-Based; Leadership; Learning Environment; Medical Practice -- Education; Organizational Change; Patient Safety; Professionalism; Teamwork},
      isbn={1475-3898},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010765075&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Anderson, E. S., & Thorpe, L.. (2010). Learning together in practice: An interprofessional education programme to appreciate teamwork . The clinical teacher, 7(1), 19-25.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: the paper reports on the first 100 students who completed ward-based interprofessional learning using the Leicester Model of Interprofessional Education. Pre-registration health and social care students were placed in small groups (n = 2-5) to learn together on a care of the elderly ward. The students cared for one in-patient to analyse the care package and the contributions of all members of the ward clinical team. At the end of the week the student team presented their patient case to the ward team offering solutions to problems in an interactive feedback session. METHOD: a multi-method evaluation aimed to assess the impact of the learning. Tutors completed a post-course questionnaire. RESULTS: the results confirmed that the learning was worthwhile. Students learned about related policy, patient involvement in discharge, the roles and responsibilities of team members in care delivery, the importance of effective communication, the complexity of teamworking and team decisions on discharge. They highlighted the added benefit of learning interprofessionally. All tutors saw the value of the interprofessional learning and welcomed student feedback which could be used to improve patient care. Clinicians had to balance clinical work and teaching. DISCUSSION: interprofessional learning in clinical areas requires effective models which engage students and ward teams. The Leicester Model can be applied in hospital settings to establish student team learning that is experiential, reflective and contributes to improving the quality of patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:819,
      author={E. S. Anderson and L. Thorpe},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar},
      title={Learning together in practice: An interprofessional education programme to appreciate teamwork },
      journal={The clinical teacher},
      volume={7},
      number={1},
      pages={19-25},
      note={id: 5324; CI: Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010; JID: 101227511; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: the paper reports on the first 100 students who completed ward-based interprofessional learning using the Leicester Model of Interprofessional Education. Pre-registration health and social care students were placed in small groups (n = 2-5) to learn together on a care of the elderly ward. The students cared for one in-patient to analyse the care package and the contributions of all members of the ward clinical team. At the end of the week the student team presented their patient case to the ward team offering solutions to problems in an interactive feedback session. METHOD: a multi-method evaluation aimed to assess the impact of the learning. Tutors completed a post-course questionnaire. RESULTS: the results confirmed that the learning was worthwhile. Students learned about related policy, patient involvement in discharge, the roles and responsibilities of team members in care delivery, the importance of effective communication, the complexity of teamworking and team decisions on discharge. They highlighted the added benefit of learning interprofessionally. All tutors saw the value of the interprofessional learning and welcomed student feedback which could be used to improve patient care. Clinicians had to balance clinical work and teaching. DISCUSSION: interprofessional learning in clinical areas requires effective models which engage students and ward teams. The Leicester Model can be applied in hospital settings to establish student team learning that is experiential, reflective and contributes to improving the quality of patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Data Collection; Education, Medical/methods/organization & administration; Educational Status; Great Britain; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Learning; Models, Educational; Physician-Nurse Relations; Professional Role; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; Self Concept; Students, Medical/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology; Time Factors},
      isbn={1743-498X; 1743-4971},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ardahan, M., Akcasu, B., & Engin, E.. (2010). Professional collaboration in students of Medicine Faculty and School of Nursing . Nurse education today, 30(4), 350-354.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This descriptive study has been planned to analyze the professional collaboration among the students of Ege University, Faculty of Medicine and School of Nursing. The study group consisted of 137 5th and 6th grade students from the Faculty of Medicine and 142 3rd and 4th grade students from the School of Nursing. The participation rate is 94%. For data collection, a questionnaire form (30 questions) which was specially developed for the purpose of the study and the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (15 questions) were used. Permission was granted for the research by Ege University School of Nursing Ethical Committee and the Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. The professional collaboration mean score of the students from the Faculty of Medicine who participated in the study was 30.40+/-5.82 and the professional collaboration mean score of the students from the School of Nursing was 26.11+/-5.27. The difference between the mean scores of professional collaboration was found to be significant in terms of their profession (p

    @article{RefWorks:898,
      author={M. Ardahan and B. Akcasu and E. Engin},
      year={2010},
      month={May},
      title={Professional collaboration in students of Medicine Faculty and School of Nursing },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={30},
      number={4},
      pages={350-354},
      note={id: 4671; CI: Published by Elsevier Ltd.; JID: 8511379; 2008/09/10 [received]; 2009/07/25 [revised]; 2009/09/03 [accepted]; 2009/10/04 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={This descriptive study has been planned to analyze the professional collaboration among the students of Ege University, Faculty of Medicine and School of Nursing. The study group consisted of 137 5th and 6th grade students from the Faculty of Medicine and 142 3rd and 4th grade students from the School of Nursing. The participation rate is 94%. For data collection, a questionnaire form (30 questions) which was specially developed for the purpose of the study and the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (15 questions) were used. Permission was granted for the research by Ege University School of Nursing Ethical Committee and the Office of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. The professional collaboration mean score of the students from the Faculty of Medicine who participated in the study was 30.40+/-5.82 and the professional collaboration mean score of the students from the School of Nursing was 26.11+/-5.27. The difference between the mean scores of professional collaboration was found to be significant in terms of their profession (p},
      keywords={Adult; Analysis of Variance; Attitude of Health Personnel/ethnology; Career Choice; Cooperative Behavior; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Male; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Methodology Research; Physician's Role/psychology; Physician-Nurse Relations; Professional Competence/standards; Questionnaires; Sex Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Students, Medical/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology; Turkey},
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Carney, B. T., West, P., Neily, J., Mills, P. D., & Bagian, J. P.. (2010). Differences in nurse and surgeon perceptions of teamwork: implications for use of a briefing checklist in the OR . AORN Journal, 91(6), 722-729.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The quality of teamwork among health care professionals is known to affect patient outcomes. In the OR, surgeons report more favorable perceptions of communication during procedures and of teamwork effectiveness than do nurses. We undertook a quality improvement project in the Veterans Health Administration to confirm reported teamwork differences between perioperative nurses and surgeons and to examine the implications of these differences for improving practice patterns in the OR. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, which measures safety culture, including the quality of communication and collaboration among health care providers who routinely work together, was administered in 34 hospitals. Perioperative nurses who participated in the survey rated teamwork higher with other nurses than with surgeons, but surgeons rated teamwork high with each other and with nurses. On five of six communication and collaboration items, surgeons had a significantly more favorable perception than did perioperative nurses. To increase the likelihood of success when implementing the use of checklist-based crew resource management tools, such as the World Health Organization’s Surgical Safety Checklist, project leaders should anticipate differences in perception between members of the different professions that must be overcome if teamwork is to be improved. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:899,
      author={B. T. Carney and P. West and J. Neily and P. D. Mills and J. P. Bagian},
      year={2010},
      month={06},
      title={Differences in nurse and surgeon perceptions of teamwork: implications for use of a briefing checklist in the OR },
      journal={AORN Journal},
      volume={91},
      number={6},
      pages={722-729},
      note={id: 4714},
      abstract={The quality of teamwork among health care professionals is known to affect patient outcomes. In the OR, surgeons report more favorable perceptions of communication during procedures and of teamwork effectiveness than do nurses. We undertook a quality improvement project in the Veterans Health Administration to confirm reported teamwork differences between perioperative nurses and surgeons and to examine the implications of these differences for improving practice patterns in the OR. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, which measures safety culture, including the quality of communication and collaboration among health care providers who routinely work together, was administered in 34 hospitals. Perioperative nurses who participated in the survey rated teamwork higher with other nurses than with surgeons, but surgeons rated teamwork high with each other and with nurses. On five of six communication and collaboration items, surgeons had a significantly more favorable perception than did perioperative nurses. To increase the likelihood of success when implementing the use of checklist-based crew resource management tools, such as the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist, project leaders should anticipate differences in perception between members of the different professions that must be overcome if teamwork is to be improved. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0001-2092},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010684039&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Catchpole, K., Sellers, R., Goldman, A., McCulloch, P., & Hignett, S.. (2010). Patient handovers within the hospital: translating knowledge from motor racing to healthcare . Quality & Safety in Health Care, 19(4), 318-322.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    INTRODUCTION: This paper expands the analogy between motor racing team pit stops and patient handovers. Previous studies demonstrated how the handover of patients following surgery could be improved by learning from a motor racing team. This has been extended to include contributions from several motor racing teams, and by examining transfers at several different interfaces at a non-specialist UK teaching hospital. METHODS: Letters of invitation were sent to the technical managers of nine Formula 1 motor racing teams. Semistructured interviews were carried out at a UK teaching hospital with 10 clinical staff involved in the handover of patients from surgery to recovery and intensive care. RESULTS: Three themes emerged from the motor racing responses; (1) proactive learning with briefings and checklists to prevent errors; (2) active management using technology to transfer information, and (3) post hoc learning from the storage and analysis of electronic data records. The eight healthcare themes were: historical working practice; problems during transfer; poor awareness of handover protocols; poor team coordination; time pressure; lack of consistency in handover practice; poor communication of important information; and awareness that handover was a potential threat to patient safety. CONCLUSIONS: The lessons from motor racing can be applied to healthcare for proactive planning, active management and post hoc learning. Other high-risk industries see standardisation of working practices, interpersonal communication, consistency and continuous development as fundamental for success. The application of these concepts would result in improvements in the quality and safety of the patient handover process. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:865,
      author={K. Catchpole and R. Sellers and A. Goldman and P. McCulloch and S. Hignett},
      year={2010},
      month={08},
      title={Patient handovers within the hospital: translating knowledge from motor racing to healthcare },
      journal={Quality & Safety in Health Care},
      volume={19},
      number={4},
      pages={318-322},
      note={id: 4914},
      abstract={INTRODUCTION: This paper expands the analogy between motor racing team pit stops and patient handovers. Previous studies demonstrated how the handover of patients following surgery could be improved by learning from a motor racing team. This has been extended to include contributions from several motor racing teams, and by examining transfers at several different interfaces at a non-specialist UK teaching hospital. METHODS: Letters of invitation were sent to the technical managers of nine Formula 1 motor racing teams. Semistructured interviews were carried out at a UK teaching hospital with 10 clinical staff involved in the handover of patients from surgery to recovery and intensive care. RESULTS: Three themes emerged from the motor racing responses; (1) proactive learning with briefings and checklists to prevent errors; (2) active management using technology to transfer information, and (3) post hoc learning from the storage and analysis of electronic data records. The eight healthcare themes were: historical working practice; problems during transfer; poor awareness of handover protocols; poor team coordination; time pressure; lack of consistency in handover practice; poor communication of important information; and awareness that handover was a potential threat to patient safety. CONCLUSIONS: The lessons from motor racing can be applied to healthcare for proactive planning, active management and post hoc learning. Other high-risk industries see standardisation of working practices, interpersonal communication, consistency and continuous development as fundamental for success. The application of these concepts would result in improvements in the quality and safety of the patient handover process. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Motor Sports; Surgical Patients; Teamwork; Transfer, Intrahospital; Academic Medical Centers -- United Kingdom; Checklists -- Utilization; Communication Skills; Computerized Patient Record; Electronic Data Interchange; Funding Source; Human; Learning; Post Hoc Analysis; Protocols -- Utilization; Qualitative Studies; Recovery; Semi-Structured Interview; Thematic Analysis; Time Factors; United Kingdom},
      isbn={1475-3898},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010765101&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Chan, E. A., Chi, S., Ching, S., & Lam, S.. (2010). Interprofessional education: The interface of nursing and social work . Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19(1-2), 168-176.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Aims. To examine the influence of interdisciplinary seminars on undergraduate nursing and social work students’ perceptions of their learning. Background. Collaboration is considered to be important for health professionals in working towards good patient care, and interdisciplinary education is seen as one way of addressing this need for greater collaboration and team work. Today’s health professionals are dealing with an increasing number of older and chronically ill patients. The biopsychosocial dimensions inherent in such chronic illnesses bring about a closer working relationship between the nursing and social work professions to foster good patient care. No local research in Hong Kong, however, has looked specifically at how these two professions can develop their collaborative skills and qualities through interdisciplinary education. Design. Mixed methods design. Method. Data from questionnaires, videotape recordings of the sessions and follow-up phone interviews were used for quantitative and qualitative analyses. Results. The findings revealed three themes: an increased awareness of each other’s professional values and personal judgement, a recognition of each other’s disciplinary knowledge emphases and more, and an appreciation for, and learning about each other’s roles for future collaboration. Conclusions. Whilst, it is usual to identify health professionals as non-judgemental, it is also important to recognise the existence of their personal and professional values and beliefs that shape their decision-making. Equally beneficial for students is their reported understanding of the other discipline’s emphasis on the physical or social aspects of care, and the interrelationships and complementary values that lead to students’ appreciation of each other’s roles and the possibility for their future collaboration in the holistic care of patients. Relevance to clinical practice. The sharing of each other’s knowledge and their appreciation of the corresponding roles enhanced students’ decision-making capacity and the extension of the holistic approach beyond one profession, which is essential for good patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:823,
      author={E. A. Chan and SPM Chi and S. Ching and SKS Lam},
      year={2010},
      title={Interprofessional education: The interface of nursing and social work },
      journal={Journal of Clinical Nursing},
      volume={19},
      number={1-2},
      pages={168-176},
      note={id: 5332},
      abstract={Aims. To examine the influence of interdisciplinary seminars on undergraduate nursing and social work students' perceptions of their learning. Background. Collaboration is considered to be important for health professionals in working towards good patient care, and interdisciplinary education is seen as one way of addressing this need for greater collaboration and team work. Today's health professionals are dealing with an increasing number of older and chronically ill patients. The biopsychosocial dimensions inherent in such chronic illnesses bring about a closer working relationship between the nursing and social work professions to foster good patient care. No local research in Hong Kong, however, has looked specifically at how these two professions can develop their collaborative skills and qualities through interdisciplinary education. Design. Mixed methods design. Method. Data from questionnaires, videotape recordings of the sessions and follow-up phone interviews were used for quantitative and qualitative analyses. Results. The findings revealed three themes: an increased awareness of each other's professional values and personal judgement, a recognition of each other's disciplinary knowledge emphases and more, and an appreciation for, and learning about each other's roles for future collaboration. Conclusions. Whilst, it is usual to identify health professionals as non-judgemental, it is also important to recognise the existence of their personal and professional values and beliefs that shape their decision-making. Equally beneficial for students is their reported understanding of the other discipline's emphasis on the physical or social aspects of care, and the interrelationships and complementary values that lead to students' appreciation of each other's roles and the possibility for their future collaboration in the holistic care of patients. Relevance to clinical practice. The sharing of each other's knowledge and their appreciation of the corresponding roles enhanced students' decision-making capacity and the extension of the holistic approach beyond one profession, which is essential for good patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Interdisciplinary; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate -- Trends; Education, Social Work -- Trends; Seminars and Workshops; Student Attitudes; Students, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Students, Social Work; Collaboration; Descriptive Statistics; Elder Abuse; Funding Source; Hong Kong; Human; Interviews; Outcomes of Education; Questionnaires; Scales; Self Report; Summated Rating Scaling; Videorecording},
      isbn={0962-1067},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010510255&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Curran, V. R., Heath, O., Kearney, A., & Button, P.. (2010). Evaluation of an interprofessional collaboration workshop for post-graduate residents, nursing and allied health professionals . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 24(3), 315-318.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Recent national commissions and policy documents in Canada identify the importance of reshaping the educational preparation and professional training of healthcare professionals to reflect the importance of interprofessional collaboration. This report outlines an evaluation of a combined one-day interprofessional collaboration workshop for pre-licensure trainees and post-licensure health care providers which was introduced at our institution. The key goal of the evaluation study was to examine the relevance of the CanMEDS Collaborator competencies and to evaluate the effect of this combined approach to post graduate education and continuing professional development on satisfaction and attitudinal outcome measures. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:825,
      author={V. R. Curran and O. Heath and A. Kearney and P. Button},
      year={2010},
      month={05},
      title={Evaluation of an interprofessional collaboration workshop for post-graduate residents, nursing and allied health professionals },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={24},
      number={3},
      pages={315-318},
      note={id: 4718},
      abstract={Recent national commissions and policy documents in Canada identify the importance of reshaping the educational preparation and professional training of healthcare professionals to reflect the importance of interprofessional collaboration. This report outlines an evaluation of a combined one-day interprofessional collaboration workshop for pre-licensure trainees and post-licensure health care providers which was introduced at our institution. The key goal of the evaluation study was to examine the relevance of the CanMEDS Collaborator competencies and to evaluate the effect of this combined approach to post graduate education and continuing professional development on satisfaction and attitudinal outcome measures. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Allied Health Personnel -- Psychosocial Factors; Collaboration -- Evaluation; Interns and Residents -- Psychosocial Factors; Interprofessional Relations; Nurses -- Psychosocial Factors; Seminars and Workshops -- Evaluation; Coefficient Alpha; Descriptive Statistics; Human; P-Value; Pretest-Posttest Design; Summated Rating Scaling; Surveys; T-Tests},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010627595&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Dacey, M., Murphy, J. I., Anderson, D. C., & McCloskey, W. W.. (2010). An interprofessional service-learning course: uniting students across educational levels and promoting patient-centered care . The Journal of nursing education, 49(12), 696-699.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Recognizing the importance of interprofessional education, we developed a pilot interprofessional education course at our institution that included a total of 10 nursing, BS health psychology, premedical, and pharmacy students. Course goals were for students to: 1) learn about, practice, and enhance their skills as members of an interprofessional team, and 2) create and deliver a community-based service-learning program to help prevent or slow the progression of cardiovascular disease in older adults. Teaching methods included lecture, role-play, case studies, peer editing, oral and poster presentation, and discussion. Interprofessional student teams created and delivered two different health promotion programs at an older adult care facility. Despite barriers such as scheduling conflicts and various educational experiences, this course enabled students to gain greater respect for the contributions of other professions and made them more patient centered. In addition, inter-professional student teams positively influenced the health attitudes and behaviors of the older adults whom they encountered. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:867,
      author={M. Dacey and J. I. Murphy and D. C. Anderson and W. W. McCloskey},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec},
      title={An interprofessional service-learning course: uniting students across educational levels and promoting patient-centered care },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={12},
      pages={696-699},
      note={id: 4863; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 7705432; 2009/12/02 [received]; 2010/02/03 [accepted]; 2010/08/31 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Recognizing the importance of interprofessional education, we developed a pilot interprofessional education course at our institution that included a total of 10 nursing, BS health psychology, premedical, and pharmacy students. Course goals were for students to: 1) learn about, practice, and enhance their skills as members of an interprofessional team, and 2) create and deliver a community-based service-learning program to help prevent or slow the progression of cardiovascular disease in older adults. Teaching methods included lecture, role-play, case studies, peer editing, oral and poster presentation, and discussion. Interprofessional student teams created and delivered two different health promotion programs at an older adult care facility. Despite barriers such as scheduling conflicts and various educational experiences, this course enabled students to gain greater respect for the contributions of other professions and made them more patient centered. In addition, inter-professional student teams positively influenced the health attitudes and behaviors of the older adults whom they encountered. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Behavioral Medicine/education; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Organizational Objectives; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Pilot Projects; Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration; Program Evaluation},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dumont, S., Briere, N., Morin, D., Houle, N., & Iloko-Fundi, M.. (2010). Implementing an interfaculty series of courses on interprofessional collaboration in prelicensure health science curriculums . Education for Health: Change in Learning & Practice (Network: Towards Unity for Health), 23(1), 12p-12p.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Introduction: Interprofessional collaborative practices are increasingly recognized as an effective way to deal with complex health problems. However, health sciences students continue to be trained in specialized programs and have little occasion for learning in interdisciplinary contexts. Program Development: The project’s purpose was to develop content and an educational design for new prelicensure interfaculty courses on interprofessional collaboration in patient and family-centered care which embedded interprofessional education principles where participants learn with, from and about each other. Implementation: Intensive training was part of a 45-hour program, offered each semester, which was divided into three 15-hour courses given on weekends, to enhance accessibility. Evaluation: A total of 215 students completed questionnaires following the courses, to assess their satisfaction with the educational content. Pre/post measures assessed perception of skills acquisition and perceived benefits of interprofessional collaboration training. Results showed a significant increase from the students’ point of view in the knowledge and benefits to be gained from interprofessional collaboration training. Conclusion: The implementation of an interfaculty training curriculum on interprofessional collaborative practice is challenging in many ways, though it offers a true opportunity to prepare future health human resources for contemporary practice requirements. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:868,
      author={S. Dumont and N. Briere and D. Morin and N. Houle and M. Iloko-Fundi},
      year={2010},
      month={04},
      title={Implementing an interfaculty series of courses on interprofessional collaboration in prelicensure health science curriculums },
      journal={Education for Health: Change in Learning & Practice (Network: Towards Unity for Health)},
      volume={23},
      number={1},
      pages={12p-12p},
      note={id: 4982},
      abstract={Introduction: Interprofessional collaborative practices are increasingly recognized as an effective way to deal with complex health problems. However, health sciences students continue to be trained in specialized programs and have little occasion for learning in interdisciplinary contexts. Program Development: The project's purpose was to develop content and an educational design for new prelicensure interfaculty courses on interprofessional collaboration in patient and family-centered care which embedded interprofessional education principles where participants learn with, from and about each other. Implementation: Intensive training was part of a 45-hour program, offered each semester, which was divided into three 15-hour courses given on weekends, to enhance accessibility. Evaluation: A total of 215 students completed questionnaires following the courses, to assess their satisfaction with the educational content. Pre/post measures assessed perception of skills acquisition and perceived benefits of interprofessional collaboration training. Results showed a significant increase from the students' point of view in the knowledge and benefits to be gained from interprofessional collaboration training. Conclusion: The implementation of an interfaculty training curriculum on interprofessional collaborative practice is challenging in many ways, though it offers a true opportunity to prepare future health human resources for contemporary practice requirements. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration -- Education; Family Centered Care -- Education; Interprofessional Relations -- Education; Patient Centered Care -- Education; Students, Allied Health -- Psychosocial Factors; Female; Funding Source; Human; Male; Pretest-Posttest Design; Questionnaires; Self Report; Summated Rating Scaling},
      isbn={1357-6283},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010702904&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Enlow, M., Shanks, L., Guhde, J., & Perkins, M.. (2010). Incorporating interprofessional communication skills (ISBARR) into an undergraduate nursing curriculum . Nurse educator, 35(4), 176-180.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The AACN, in their 2008 Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice, recommends that colleges of nursing faculty incorporate competencies into their baccalaureate curriculum that focus on the development of professional communication skills. The authors provide a plan to incorporate a standardized communication tool (ISBARR) throughout all levels of an undergraduate curriculum. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:902,
      author={M. Enlow and L. Shanks and J. Guhde and M. Perkins},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Incorporating interprofessional communication skills (ISBARR) into an undergraduate nursing curriculum },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={35},
      number={4},
      pages={176-180},
      note={id: 4631; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={The AACN, in their 2008 Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice, recommends that colleges of nursing faculty incorporate competencies into their baccalaureate curriculum that focus on the development of professional communication skills. The authors provide a plan to incorporate a standardized communication tool (ISBARR) throughout all levels of an undergraduate curriculum. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1538-9855; 0363-3624},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fernandez, R., Tran, D. T., Johnson, M., & Jones, S.. (2010). Interdisciplinary communication in general medical and surgical wards using two different models of nursing care delivery . Journal of nursing management, 18(3), 265-274.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: To compare two models of care on nurses’ perception of interdisciplinary communication in general medical and surgical wards. BACKGROUND: Effective interdisciplinary collaboration remains the cornerstone of efficient and successful functioning of health care teams and contributes substantially to patient safety. METHODS: In May 2007, participants were recruited from a tertiary teaching hospital in Australia. The multifaceted Shared Care in Nursing (SCN) model of nursing care involved team work, leadership and professional development. In the Patient Allocation (PA) model one nurse was responsible for the care of a discrete group of patients. Differences in interdisciplinary communication were assessed at the 6-month follow-up. RESULTS: Completed questionnaires were returned by 125 participants. At the 6-month follow-up, there was a significant reduction in scores in the SCN group in the subscales relating to communication openness (P = 0.03) and communication accuracy (P = 0.02) when compared with baseline values. There were no significant differences in the two groups at the 6-month follow-up in any of the other subscales. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for effective training programmes to assist nurses in working together within a nursing team and an interdisciplinary ward team. The SCN and the PA models of care have been found by nurses to support most aspects of interdisciplinary and intradisciplinary communication. The applicability of both models of care to wards with a varying skill mix of nurses is suggested. Further studies of larger samples with varying compositions of skill mix and varying models of care are required. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers can use varying models of care to support interdisciplinary communication and enhance patient safety. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:903,
      author={R. Fernandez and D. T. Tran and M. Johnson and S. Jones},
      year={2010},
      month={Apr},
      title={Interdisciplinary communication in general medical and surgical wards using two different models of nursing care delivery },
      journal={Journal of nursing management},
      volume={18},
      number={3},
      pages={265-274},
      note={id: 4758; JID: 9306050; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: To compare two models of care on nurses' perception of interdisciplinary communication in general medical and surgical wards. BACKGROUND: Effective interdisciplinary collaboration remains the cornerstone of efficient and successful functioning of health care teams and contributes substantially to patient safety. METHODS: In May 2007, participants were recruited from a tertiary teaching hospital in Australia. The multifaceted Shared Care in Nursing (SCN) model of nursing care involved team work, leadership and professional development. In the Patient Allocation (PA) model one nurse was responsible for the care of a discrete group of patients. Differences in interdisciplinary communication were assessed at the 6-month follow-up. RESULTS: Completed questionnaires were returned by 125 participants. At the 6-month follow-up, there was a significant reduction in scores in the SCN group in the subscales relating to communication openness (P = 0.03) and communication accuracy (P = 0.02) when compared with baseline values. There were no significant differences in the two groups at the 6-month follow-up in any of the other subscales. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for effective training programmes to assist nurses in working together within a nursing team and an interdisciplinary ward team. The SCN and the PA models of care have been found by nurses to support most aspects of interdisciplinary and intradisciplinary communication. The applicability of both models of care to wards with a varying skill mix of nurses is suggested. Further studies of larger samples with varying compositions of skill mix and varying models of care are required. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers can use varying models of care to support interdisciplinary communication and enhance patient safety. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2834; 0966-0429},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Gilliss, C. L.. (2010). On interdisciplinarity and why it matters … A lesson from primary care . Nursing outlook, 58(3), 119-121.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The limitation to the disciplinary perspective lies in the tendency to bring the same basic set of information and solutions to novel problems. The problems we face are diverse and complex, and many require novel solutions. The content and problem-solving approaches used within the discipline of nursing will be enhanced through closer educational exchange with other disciplines, practice, and research partnerships that expand our point of view. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:904,
      author={C. L. Gilliss},
      year={2010},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={On interdisciplinarity and why it matters ... A lesson from primary care },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={58},
      number={3},
      pages={119-121},
      note={id: 4637; JID: 0401075; ppublish },
      abstract={The limitation to the disciplinary perspective lies in the tendency to bring the same basic set of information and solutions to novel problems. The problems we face are diverse and complex, and many require novel solutions. The content and problem-solving approaches used within the discipline of nursing will be enhanced through closer educational exchange with other disciplines, practice, and research partnerships that expand our point of view. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1528-3968; 0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Graybeal, C., Long, R., Scalise-Smith, D., & Zeibig, E.. (2010). The Art and Science of Interprofessional Education . Journal of allied health, 39(3), 232-237.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is increasingly accepted as a core element of health professions education. Its primary function is to prepare health professions students to engage in and deliver interprofessional, team-based healthcare, with the ultimate goal of improving the health and well-being of patients and clients. This paper summarizes findings from 10 interviews with institutional leaders in the field. The goal was to discover core themes than contribute to the art and science of IPE. Thematic challenges and successes are reviewed, and recommendations are provided for further research and for those interested in developing or improving IPE in their own institutions. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:870,
      author={C. Graybeal and R. Long and D. Scalise-Smith and E. Zeibig},
      year={2010},
      month={08/02},
      title={The Art and Science of Interprofessional Education },
      journal={Journal of allied health},
      volume={39},
      number={3},
      pages={232-237},
      note={id: 4917},
      abstract={Interprofessional education (IPE) is increasingly accepted as a core element of health professions education. Its primary function is to prepare health professions students to engage in and deliver interprofessional, team-based healthcare, with the ultimate goal of improving the health and well-being of patients and clients. This paper summarizes findings from 10 interviews with institutional leaders in the field. The goal was to discover core themes than contribute to the art and science of IPE. Thematic challenges and successes are reviewed, and recommendations are provided for further research and for those interested in developing or improving IPE in their own institutions. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Interdisciplinary; Art; Science; Teamwork; Quality of Health Care; Thematic Analysis; Unstructured Interview; Leadership; Qualitative Studies; Exploratory Research; Commitment; Organizational Culture; Community-Institutional Relations; Financial Support; Theory Construction},
      isbn={0090-7421},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010829949&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Guise, J., Lowe, N. K., Deering, S., Lewis, P. O., O’Haire, C., Irwin, L. K., Blaser, M., Wood, L. S., & Kanki, B. G.. (2010). Mobile in situ obstetric emergency simulation and teamwork training to improve maternal-fetal safety in hospitals . Joint Commission Journal on Quality & Patient Safety, 36(10), 443-453.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Background: Evidence from other high-risk industries has demonstrated that teamwork skills can be taught and effective teamwork may improve safety. Increasingly, health care providers, hospital administrators, and quality and safety professionals are considering simulation as a strategy to improve quality and patient safety. Mobile Obstetric Simulation and Team Training Program: A mobile obstetric emergency simulation and team training program was created to bring simulation technology and teamwork training used routinely in other high reliability fields directly to health care institutions. A mobile unit constituted a practical approach, given the expense of simulation equipment, the time required for staff to develop educational materials and simulation scenarios, and the need to have a standardized program to promote consistent evaluation across sites. Between 2007 and 2009, in situ simulation of obstetric emergencies and teamwork training was tested with more than 150 health care professionals in labor and delivery units across four rural and two community hospitals in Oregon. How Do Organizations Determine Which Type of Simulation Is Best for Them? Because simulation technologies are relatively costly to start and maintain, it can be challenging for hospitals and health care professionals to determine which format (send staff to a simulation center, develop in-house simulation program, develop a consortium of hospitals that run a simulation program, or use a mobile simulation program) is best for them. Conclusions: In situ simulation is an effective way to develop new skills, to maintain infrequently used clinical skills even among experienced clinical teams, and to uncover and address latent safety threats in the clinical setting. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:871,
      author={J. Guise and N. K. Lowe and S. Deering and P. O. Lewis and C. O'Haire and L. K. Irwin and M. Blaser and L. S. Wood and B. G. Kanki},
      year={2010},
      month={10},
      title={Mobile in situ obstetric emergency simulation and teamwork training to improve maternal-fetal safety in hospitals },
      journal={Joint Commission Journal on Quality & Patient Safety},
      volume={36},
      number={10},
      pages={443-453},
      note={id: 4913},
      abstract={Background: Evidence from other high-risk industries has demonstrated that teamwork skills can be taught and effective teamwork may improve safety. Increasingly, health care providers, hospital administrators, and quality and safety professionals are considering simulation as a strategy to improve quality and patient safety. Mobile Obstetric Simulation and Team Training Program: A mobile obstetric emergency simulation and team training program was created to bring simulation technology and teamwork training used routinely in other high reliability fields directly to health care institutions. A mobile unit constituted a practical approach, given the expense of simulation equipment, the time required for staff to develop educational materials and simulation scenarios, and the need to have a standardized program to promote consistent evaluation across sites. Between 2007 and 2009, in situ simulation of obstetric emergencies and teamwork training was tested with more than 150 health care professionals in labor and delivery units across four rural and two community hospitals in Oregon. How Do Organizations Determine Which Type of Simulation Is Best for Them? Because simulation technologies are relatively costly to start and maintain, it can be challenging for hospitals and health care professionals to determine which format (send staff to a simulation center, develop in-house simulation program, develop a consortium of hospitals that run a simulation program, or use a mobile simulation program) is best for them. Conclusions: In situ simulation is an effective way to develop new skills, to maintain infrequently used clinical skills even among experienced clinical teams, and to uncover and address latent safety threats in the clinical setting. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Obstetric Emergencies -- Education; Simulations; Staff Development; Teamwork -- Education; Course Content; Curriculum Development; Educational Technology; Female; Hospitals, Community -- Oregon; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Oregon; Patient Safety; Pregnancy; Program Development; Quality of Health Care; Rural Areas},
      isbn={1553-7250},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010810133&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Gum, L., Greenhill, J., & Dix, K.. (2010). Clinical simulation in maternity (CSiM): interprofessional learning through simulation team training . Quality & Safety in Health Care, 19(5), e19-e19.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    BACKGROUND: Focusing on interprofessional relations in team performance to improve patient safety is an emerging priority in obstetrics. A review of the literature found little information on roles and teamwork in obstetric emergency training. Qualitative research was undertaken through a Clinical Simulation in Maternity programme which gives interprofessional rural clinicians the opportunity to learn collaboratively through simulated obstetric emergencies. This research aimed to determine how interprofessional simulation team training improved maternity emergency care and team performance. METHOD: This research used thematic inductive analysis using data from in-depth interviews. In total 17 participants and four facilitators who took part in the Clinical Simulation in Maternity workshops were invited to participate in an interview 1-2 weeks postworkshop and then again 3-6 months later. Data were deidentified then coded manually and with the assistance of computer program NVivo 7 (QSR International). FINDINGS: Of the major themes identified, Collaboration in Teambuilding was separated into four subthemes (Personal Role Awareness, Interpositional Knowledge, Mutuality and Leadership). CONCLUSION: This research highlights the significance of interprofessional training, particularly through simulation learning in a team where rural clinicians are able to learn more about each other and gain role clarity, leadership skills and mutuality in a safe environment. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:872,
      author={L. Gum and J. Greenhill and K. Dix},
      year={2010},
      month={10},
      title={Clinical simulation in maternity (CSiM): interprofessional learning through simulation team training },
      journal={Quality & Safety in Health Care},
      volume={19},
      number={5},
      pages={e19-e19},
      note={id: 4910},
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Focusing on interprofessional relations in team performance to improve patient safety is an emerging priority in obstetrics. A review of the literature found little information on roles and teamwork in obstetric emergency training. Qualitative research was undertaken through a Clinical Simulation in Maternity programme which gives interprofessional rural clinicians the opportunity to learn collaboratively through simulated obstetric emergencies. This research aimed to determine how interprofessional simulation team training improved maternity emergency care and team performance. METHOD: This research used thematic inductive analysis using data from in-depth interviews. In total 17 participants and four facilitators who took part in the Clinical Simulation in Maternity workshops were invited to participate in an interview 1-2 weeks postworkshop and then again 3-6 months later. Data were deidentified then coded manually and with the assistance of computer program NVivo 7 (QSR International). FINDINGS: Of the major themes identified, Collaboration in Teambuilding was separated into four subthemes (Personal Role Awareness, Interpositional Knowledge, Mutuality and Leadership). CONCLUSION: This research highlights the significance of interprofessional training, particularly through simulation learning in a team where rural clinicians are able to learn more about each other and gain role clarity, leadership skills and mutuality in a safe environment. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Interdisciplinary; Obstetric Emergencies; Patient Simulation -- Utilization; Teaching Methods; Data Analysis Software; Human; Interviews; Knowledge; Leadership; Outcomes of Education; Prospective Studies; Role; Rural Health; Teamwork; Thematic Analysis},
      isbn={1475-3898},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010846781&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Helmich, E., Derksen, E., Prevoo, M., Laan, R., Bolhuis, S., & Koopmans, R.. (2010). Medical students’ professional identity development in an early nursing attachment . Medical education, 44(7), 674-682.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Medical Education 2010: 44: 674-682 Objectives The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an assistant nurse while training to be a doctor may offer valuable learning experiences, but may also present the student with difficulties with respect to identity and identification issues. The aim of the present study was to describe first-year medical students’ perceptions of nurses, doctors and their own future roles as doctors before and after a nursing attachment. Methods A questionnaire containing open questions concerning students’ perceptions of nurses, doctors and their own future roles as doctors was administered to all Year 1 medical students ( n = 347) before and directly after a 4-week nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes. We carried out two confirmatory focus group interviews. We analysed the data using qualitative and quantitative content analyses. Results The questionnaire was completed by 316 students (response rate 91%). Before starting the attachment students regarded nurses as empathic, communicative and responsible. After the attachment students reported nurses had more competencies and responsibilities than they had expected. Students’ views of doctors were ambivalent. Before and after the attachment, doctors were seen as interested and reliable, but also as arrogant, detached and insensible. However, students maintained positive views of their own future roles as doctors. Students’ perceptions were influenced by age, gender and place of attachment. Conclusions An early nursing attachment engenders more respect for the nursing profession. The ambivalent view of doctors needs to be explored further in relation to students’ professional development. It would seem relevant to attune supervision to the age and gender differences revealed in this study. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:873,
      author={E. Helmich and E. Derksen and M. Prevoo and R. Laan and S. Bolhuis and R. Koopmans},
      year={2010},
      month={07},
      title={Medical students' professional identity development in an early nursing attachment },
      journal={Medical education},
      volume={44},
      number={7},
      pages={674-682},
      note={id: 4912},
      abstract={Medical Education 2010: 44: 674-682 Objectives The importance of early clinical experience for medical training is well documented. However, to our knowledge there are no studies that assess the influence of very early nursing attachments on the professional development and identity construction of medical students. Working as an assistant nurse while training to be a doctor may offer valuable learning experiences, but may also present the student with difficulties with respect to identity and identification issues. The aim of the present study was to describe first-year medical students' perceptions of nurses, doctors and their own future roles as doctors before and after a nursing attachment. Methods A questionnaire containing open questions concerning students' perceptions of nurses, doctors and their own future roles as doctors was administered to all Year 1 medical students ( n = 347) before and directly after a 4-week nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes. We carried out two confirmatory focus group interviews. We analysed the data using qualitative and quantitative content analyses. Results The questionnaire was completed by 316 students (response rate 91%). Before starting the attachment students regarded nurses as empathic, communicative and responsible. After the attachment students reported nurses had more competencies and responsibilities than they had expected. Students' views of doctors were ambivalent. Before and after the attachment, doctors were seen as interested and reliable, but also as arrogant, detached and insensible. However, students maintained positive views of their own future roles as doctors. Students' perceptions were influenced by age, gender and place of attachment. Conclusions An early nursing attachment engenders more respect for the nursing profession. The ambivalent view of doctors needs to be explored further in relation to students' professional development. It would seem relevant to attune supervision to the age and gender differences revealed in this study. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Nurse-Physician Relations -- Evaluation; Professional Role -- Evaluation; Students, Medical -- Psychosocial Factors; Adolescence; Adult; Audiorecording; Content Analysis; Data Analysis Software; Data Analysis, Statistical; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Focus Groups; Funding Source; Human; Interviews; Logistic Regression; Male; Netherlands; Odds Ratio; Questionnaires; Random Assignment; Respect; Sex Factors; Triangulation},
      isbn={0308-0110},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010689649&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Heuer, A. J., Geisler, S., Kamienski, M., Langevin, D., & Maillet, O. J.. (2010). Introducing medical students to the interdisciplinary health care team: piloting a case-based approach . Journal of allied health, 39(2), 76-81.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Medicine in the 21st century requires expanded multidisciplinary problem-solving in order to deliver cost-effective, quality health care, yet many medical schools still educate their students in relative isolation with little interaction or understanding of other health care professionals. To begin to address this issue, the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) School of Health Related Professions and School of Nursing were invited by the New Jersey Medical School to introduce medical students at the New Jersey Medical School to a cross-section of health professions they are likely to encounter. These health professions included medical imaging, dietetics-nutrition, laboratory technology, nursing, physical therapy, physician assistant, respiratory therapy and social work. During a 60-min educational session, a simulated case-based approach heightened medical school students’ awareness of the function and value of interdisciplinary collaboration. Faculty from each of the eight disciplines gave a brief summary of their profession, including their scope-of-practice and academic requirements. At the end of the session, participants were given a brief 12-item survey to evaluate the experience. Though this was only a small, explorative project, survey results suggested that participants increased their understanding of other health professions, including when to refer to and collaborate with these professions. Feedback from this pilot project may be used to optimize future initiatives of this type. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:905,
      author={A. J. Heuer and S. Geisler and M. Kamienski and D. Langevin and J. O'Sullivan Maillet},
      year={2010},
      month={Summer},
      title={Introducing medical students to the interdisciplinary health care team: piloting a case-based approach },
      journal={Journal of allied health},
      volume={39},
      number={2},
      pages={76-81},
      note={id: 4735; JID: 0361603; 2009/02/24 [received]; 2009/12/07 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={Medicine in the 21st century requires expanded multidisciplinary problem-solving in order to deliver cost-effective, quality health care, yet many medical schools still educate their students in relative isolation with little interaction or understanding of other health care professionals. To begin to address this issue, the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) School of Health Related Professions and School of Nursing were invited by the New Jersey Medical School to introduce medical students at the New Jersey Medical School to a cross-section of health professions they are likely to encounter. These health professions included medical imaging, dietetics-nutrition, laboratory technology, nursing, physical therapy, physician assistant, respiratory therapy and social work. During a 60-min educational session, a simulated case-based approach heightened medical school students' awareness of the function and value of interdisciplinary collaboration. Faculty from each of the eight disciplines gave a brief summary of their profession, including their scope-of-practice and academic requirements. At the end of the session, participants were given a brief 12-item survey to evaluate the experience. Though this was only a small, explorative project, survey results suggested that participants increased their understanding of other health professions, including when to refer to and collaborate with these professions. Feedback from this pilot project may be used to optimize future initiatives of this type. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1945-404X; 0090-7421},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hobgood, C., Sherwood, G., Frush, K., Hollar, D., Maynard, L., Foster, B., Sawning, S., Woodyard, D., Durham, C., Wright, M., Taekman, J., & Collaborative, I. P. S. E.. (2010). Teamwork training with nursing and medical students: does the method matter? Results of an interinstitutional, interdisciplinary collaboration . Quality & safety in health care, 19(6), e25.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVES: The authors conducted a randomised controlled trial of four pedagogical methods commonly used to deliver teamwork training and measured the effects of each method on the acquisition of student teamwork knowledge, skills, and attitudes. METHODS: The authors recruited 203 senior nursing students and 235 fourth-year medical students (total N = 438) from two major universities for a 1-day interdisciplinary teamwork training course. All participants received a didactic lecture and then were randomly assigned to one of four educational methods didactic (control), audience response didactic, role play and human patient simulation. Student performance was assessed for teamwork attitudes, knowledge and skills using: (a) a 36-item teamwork attitudes instrument (CHIRP), (b) a 12-item teamwork knowledge test, (c) a 10-item standardised patient (SP) evaluation of student teamwork skills performance and (d) a 20-item modification of items from the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS). RESULTS: All four cohorts demonstrated an improvement in attitudes (F(1,370) = 48.7, p = 0.001) and knowledge (F(1,353) = 87.3, p = 0.001) pre- to post-test. No educational modality appeared superior for attitude (F(3,370) = 0.325, p = 0.808) or knowledge (F(3,353) = 0.382, p = 0.766) acquisition. No modality demonstrated a significant change in teamwork skills (F(3,18) = 2.12, p = 0.134). CONCLUSIONS: Each of the four modalities demonstrated significantly improved teamwork knowledge and attitudes, but no modality was demonstrated to be superior. Institutions should feel free to utilise educational modalities, which are best supported by their resources to deliver interdisciplinary teamwork training. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:830,
      author={C. Hobgood and G. Sherwood and K. Frush and D. Hollar and L. Maynard and B. Foster and S. Sawning and D. Woodyard and C. Durham and M. Wright and J. Taekman and Interprofessional Patient Safety Education Collaborative},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec},
      title={Teamwork training with nursing and medical students: does the method matter? Results of an interinstitutional, interdisciplinary collaboration },
      journal={Quality & safety in health care},
      volume={19},
      number={6},
      pages={e25},
      note={id: 5328; JID: 101136980; 2010/04/27 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVES: The authors conducted a randomised controlled trial of four pedagogical methods commonly used to deliver teamwork training and measured the effects of each method on the acquisition of student teamwork knowledge, skills, and attitudes. METHODS: The authors recruited 203 senior nursing students and 235 fourth-year medical students (total N = 438) from two major universities for a 1-day interdisciplinary teamwork training course. All participants received a didactic lecture and then were randomly assigned to one of four educational methods didactic (control), audience response didactic, role play and human patient simulation. Student performance was assessed for teamwork attitudes, knowledge and skills using: (a) a 36-item teamwork attitudes instrument (CHIRP), (b) a 12-item teamwork knowledge test, (c) a 10-item standardised patient (SP) evaluation of student teamwork skills performance and (d) a 20-item modification of items from the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS). RESULTS: All four cohorts demonstrated an improvement in attitudes (F(1,370) = 48.7, p = 0.001) and knowledge (F(1,353) = 87.3, p = 0.001) pre- to post-test. No educational modality appeared superior for attitude (F(3,370) = 0.325, p = 0.808) or knowledge (F(3,353) = 0.382, p = 0.766) acquisition. No modality demonstrated a significant change in teamwork skills (F(3,18) = 2.12, p = 0.134). CONCLUSIONS: Each of the four modalities demonstrated significantly improved teamwork knowledge and attitudes, but no modality was demonstrated to be superior. Institutions should feel free to utilise educational modalities, which are best supported by their resources to deliver interdisciplinary teamwork training. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cohort Studies; Cooperative Behavior; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Inservice Training/methods; Interdisciplinary Communication; Nursing Staff; Nursing, Team; Questionnaires; Students, Medical},
      isbn={1475-3901; 1475-3898},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Holden, L. M., Watts, D. D., & Walker, P. H.. (2010). Communication and collaboration: it’s about the pharmacists, as well as the physicians and nurses . Quality & safety in health care, 19(3), 169-172.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: Collaboration and communication as dimensions of patient safety climate have been measured in acute care hospital units, and discrepant viewpoints have been documented between different professional groups, particularly between physicians and nurses. In the ambulatory care setting, these groups often work more closely together throughout the day than in acute care settings, thereby enhancing effective collaboration and communication. This study sought to determine if the communication differences that are known to impact patient safety, which are found in acute care, also exist in ambulatory care. METHODS: The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, a 77-item survey of collaboration, communication and safety attitudes, was administered to the primary care staff at four Midwestern military ambulatory care clinics. RESULTS: There were 107 participants consisting of nurses (n=46), nurse practitioners (n=12), pharmacists (n=10) and physicians (n=39), yielding an overall response rate of 65%. All groups rated their peer group higher than other professional groups. The ratings of nurses and physicians were very similar: 85.0% of nurses rated physicians, and 85.7% of physicians rated nurses as high or very high in communication and collaboration. Pharmacists were rated the lowest by each of the other professional groups. Only 60% of pharmacists rated physicians as high or very high. CONCLUSIONS: Collaboration and communication ratings among physicians and nurses appear to be higher in the ambulatory care setting than in the acute care. However, interactions with pharmacists are more problematic, perceived as adversarial. Teamwork training that focuses on specific interactions among professional groups should target these concerns. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:907,
      author={L. M. Holden and D. D. Watts and P. H. Walker},
      year={2010},
      month={Jun},
      title={Communication and collaboration: it's about the pharmacists, as well as the physicians and nurses },
      journal={Quality & safety in health care},
      volume={19},
      number={3},
      pages={169-172},
      note={id: 4761; JID: 101136980; 2010/02/01 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: Collaboration and communication as dimensions of patient safety climate have been measured in acute care hospital units, and discrepant viewpoints have been documented between different professional groups, particularly between physicians and nurses. In the ambulatory care setting, these groups often work more closely together throughout the day than in acute care settings, thereby enhancing effective collaboration and communication. This study sought to determine if the communication differences that are known to impact patient safety, which are found in acute care, also exist in ambulatory care. METHODS: The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, a 77-item survey of collaboration, communication and safety attitudes, was administered to the primary care staff at four Midwestern military ambulatory care clinics. RESULTS: There were 107 participants consisting of nurses (n=46), nurse practitioners (n=12), pharmacists (n=10) and physicians (n=39), yielding an overall response rate of 65%. All groups rated their peer group higher than other professional groups. The ratings of nurses and physicians were very similar: 85.0% of nurses rated physicians, and 85.7% of physicians rated nurses as high or very high in communication and collaboration. Pharmacists were rated the lowest by each of the other professional groups. Only 60% of pharmacists rated physicians as high or very high. CONCLUSIONS: Collaboration and communication ratings among physicians and nurses appear to be higher in the ambulatory care setting than in the acute care. However, interactions with pharmacists are more problematic, perceived as adversarial. Teamwork training that focuses on specific interactions among professional groups should target these concerns. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1475-3901; 1475-3898},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Holt, J., Coates, C., Cotterill, D., Eastburn, S., Laxton, J., Mistry, H., & Young, C.. (2010). Identifying common competences in health and social care: an example of multi-institutional and inter-professional working . Nurse education today, 30(3), 264-270.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Students taking programmes of study leading to registration as a nurse or other health and social care professional, must be assessed in practice to ensure that they are competent in a range of skills. As practice placements become more difficult to source, the use of inter-professional assessment is becoming an increasingly important facet of assessment for students in health and social care. This paper describes an innovate collaborative project across 5 Higher Education Institutions and 16 professional groups to develop maps to assess communication, team working and ethical practice, three essential competences for all health professionals. The process used to develop each competency map is detailed along with discussion of the consultation process with professional statutory and regulatory bodies, practice based and academic staff and service users and carers. The completed project is evidence of successful multi-institutional and inter-professional working to develop assessment processes which accurately and fairly measure capabilities to help students develop into proficient and effective practitioners. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:908,
      author={J. Holt and C. Coates and D. Cotterill and S. Eastburn and J. Laxton and H. Mistry and C. Young},
      year={2010},
      month={Apr},
      title={Identifying common competences in health and social care: an example of multi-institutional and inter-professional working },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={30},
      number={3},
      pages={264-270},
      note={id: 4670; JID: 8511379; 2009/04/07 [received]; 2009/07/30 [revised]; 2009/09/03 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={Students taking programmes of study leading to registration as a nurse or other health and social care professional, must be assessed in practice to ensure that they are competent in a range of skills. As practice placements become more difficult to source, the use of inter-professional assessment is becoming an increasingly important facet of assessment for students in health and social care. This paper describes an innovate collaborative project across 5 Higher Education Institutions and 16 professional groups to develop maps to assess communication, team working and ethical practice, three essential competences for all health professionals. The process used to develop each competency map is detailed along with discussion of the consultation process with professional statutory and regulatory bodies, practice based and academic staff and service users and carers. The completed project is evidence of successful multi-institutional and inter-professional working to develop assessment processes which accurately and fairly measure capabilities to help students develop into proficient and effective practitioners. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1532-2793; 0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kearney, A., Adey, T., Bursey, M., Cooze, L., Dillon, C., Barrett, J., King-Jesso, P., & McCarthy, P.. (2010). Enhancing patient safety through undergraduate inter-professional health education . Healthcare quarterly (Toronto, Ont.), 13 Spec No, 88-93.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article describes the development, implementation and evaluation of an undergraduate inter-professional patient safety education module that resulted from recommendations from the Task Force on Adverse Health Events with a mandate to "examine and evaluate how the health system identifies, evaluates, responds, and communicates" adverse events. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI 2008) Safety Competencies Framework was used for guidance in the curriculum’s development. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:874,
      author={A. Kearney and T. Adey and M. Bursey and L. Cooze and C. Dillon and J. Barrett and P. King-Jesso and P. McCarthy},
      year={2010},
      month={Sep},
      title={Enhancing patient safety through undergraduate inter-professional health education },
      journal={Healthcare quarterly (Toronto, Ont.)},
      volume={13 Spec No},
      pages={88-93},
      note={id: 4987; JID: 101208192; ppublish },
      abstract={This article describes the development, implementation and evaluation of an undergraduate inter-professional patient safety education module that resulted from recommendations from the Task Force on Adverse Health Events with a mandate to "examine and evaluate how the health system identifies, evaluates, responds, and communicates" adverse events. The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI 2008) Safety Competencies Framework was used for guidance in the curriculum's development. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Canada; Curriculum; Education, Medical, Undergraduate; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Professional Competence; Safety Management},
      isbn={1710-2774; 1710-2774},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kenaszchuk, C., Reeves, S., Nicholas, D., & Zwarenstein, M.. (2010). Validity and reliability of a multiple-group measurement scale for interprofessional collaboration . BMC health services research, 10, 83.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Many measurement scales for interprofessional collaboration are developed for one health professional group, typically nurses. Evaluating interprofessional collaborative relationships can benefit from employing a measurement scale suitable for multiple health provider groups, including physicians and other health professionals. To this end, the paper begins development of a new interprofessional collaboration measurement scale designed for use with nurses, physicians, and other professionals practicing in contemporary acute care settings. The paper investigates validity and reliability of data from nurses evaluating interprofessional collaboration of physicians and shows initial results for other rater/target combinations. METHODS: Items from a published scale originally designed for nurses were adapted to a round robin proxy report format appropriate for multiple health provider groups. Registered nurses, physicians, and allied health professionals practicing in inpatient wards/services of 15 community and academic hospitals in Toronto, Canada completed the adapted scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of responses to the adapted scale examined dimensionality, construct and concurrent validity, and reliability of nurses’ response data. Correlations between the adapted scale, the nurse-physician relations subscale of the Nursing Work Index, and the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale were calculated. Differences of mean scores on the Nursing Work Index and the interprofessional collaboration scale were compared between hospitals. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis revealed 3 factors in the adapted interprofessional collaboration scale – labeled Communication, Accommodation, and Isolation – which were subsequently corroborated by confirmatory factor analysis. Nurses’ scale responses about physician collaboration had convergent, discriminant, and concurrent validity, and acceptable reliability. CONCLUSION: The new scale is suitable for use with nurses assessing physicians. The scale may yield valid and reliable data from physicians and others, but measurement equivalence and other properties of the scale should be investigated before it is used with multiple health professional groups. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:909,
      author={C. Kenaszchuk and S. Reeves and D. Nicholas and M. Zwarenstein},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar 30},
      title={Validity and reliability of a multiple-group measurement scale for interprofessional collaboration },
      journal={BMC health services research},
      volume={10},
      pages={83},
      note={id: 4732; JID: 101088677; OID: NLM: PMC2867963; 2009/11/03 [received]; 2010/03/30 [accepted]; 2010/03/30 [aheadofprint]; epublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Many measurement scales for interprofessional collaboration are developed for one health professional group, typically nurses. Evaluating interprofessional collaborative relationships can benefit from employing a measurement scale suitable for multiple health provider groups, including physicians and other health professionals. To this end, the paper begins development of a new interprofessional collaboration measurement scale designed for use with nurses, physicians, and other professionals practicing in contemporary acute care settings. The paper investigates validity and reliability of data from nurses evaluating interprofessional collaboration of physicians and shows initial results for other rater/target combinations. METHODS: Items from a published scale originally designed for nurses were adapted to a round robin proxy report format appropriate for multiple health provider groups. Registered nurses, physicians, and allied health professionals practicing in inpatient wards/services of 15 community and academic hospitals in Toronto, Canada completed the adapted scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of responses to the adapted scale examined dimensionality, construct and concurrent validity, and reliability of nurses' response data. Correlations between the adapted scale, the nurse-physician relations subscale of the Nursing Work Index, and the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale were calculated. Differences of mean scores on the Nursing Work Index and the interprofessional collaboration scale were compared between hospitals. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis revealed 3 factors in the adapted interprofessional collaboration scale - labeled Communication, Accommodation, and Isolation - which were subsequently corroborated by confirmatory factor analysis. Nurses' scale responses about physician collaboration had convergent, discriminant, and concurrent validity, and acceptable reliability. CONCLUSION: The new scale is suitable for use with nurses assessing physicians. The scale may yield valid and reliable data from physicians and others, but measurement equivalence and other properties of the scale should be investigated before it is used with multiple health professional groups. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1472-6963; 1472-6963},
      language={eng}
    }

  • King, G., Shaw, L., Orchard, C. A., & Miller, S.. (2010). The interprofessional socialization and valuing scale: A tool for evaluating the shift toward collaborative care approaches in health care settings . Work (Reading, Mass.), 35(1), 77-85.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for tools by which to evaluate the beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes that underlie interprofessional socialization and collaborative practice in health care settings. METHOD: This paper introduces the Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale (ISVS), a 24-item self-report measure based on concepts in the interprofessional literature concerning shifts in beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes that underlie interprofessional socialization. The ISVS was designed to measure the degree to which transformative learning takes place, as evidenced by changed assumptions and worldviews, enhanced knowledge and skills concerning interprofessional collaborative teamwork, and shifts in values and identities. The scales of the ISVS were determined using principal components analysis. RESULTS: The principal components analysis revealed three scales accounting for approximately 49% of the variance in responses: (a) Self-Perceived Ability to Work with Others, (b) Value in Working with Others, and (c) Comfort in Working with Others. These empirically derived scales showed good fit with the conceptual basis of the measure. CONCLUSION: The ISVS provides insight into the abilities, values, and beliefs underlying socio-cultural aspects of collaborative and authentic interprofessional care in the workplace, and can be used to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education efforts, in house team training, and workshops. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:834,
      author={G. King and L. Shaw and C. A. Orchard and S. Miller},
      year={2010},
      title={The interprofessional socialization and valuing scale: A tool for evaluating the shift toward collaborative care approaches in health care settings },
      journal={Work (Reading, Mass.)},
      volume={35},
      number={1},
      pages={77-85},
      note={id: 5329; LR: 20100928; JID: 9204382; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: There is a need for tools by which to evaluate the beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes that underlie interprofessional socialization and collaborative practice in health care settings. METHOD: This paper introduces the Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale (ISVS), a 24-item self-report measure based on concepts in the interprofessional literature concerning shifts in beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes that underlie interprofessional socialization. The ISVS was designed to measure the degree to which transformative learning takes place, as evidenced by changed assumptions and worldviews, enhanced knowledge and skills concerning interprofessional collaborative teamwork, and shifts in values and identities. The scales of the ISVS were determined using principal components analysis. RESULTS: The principal components analysis revealed three scales accounting for approximately 49% of the variance in responses: (a) Self-Perceived Ability to Work with Others, (b) Value in Working with Others, and (c) Comfort in Working with Others. These empirically derived scales showed good fit with the conceptual basis of the measure. CONCLUSION: The ISVS provides insight into the abilities, values, and beliefs underlying socio-cultural aspects of collaborative and authentic interprofessional care in the workplace, and can be used to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education efforts, in house team training, and workshops. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Canada; Education, Professional; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Patient Care Team; Principal Component Analysis; Questionnaires; Reproducibility of Results; Social Behavior; Social Work/education; Socialization},
      isbn={1875-9270; 1051-9815},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Laird-Fick, H. S., Solomon, D., Jodoin, C., Dwamena, F. C., Alexander, K., Rawsthorne, L., Banker, T., Gourineni, N., Aloka, F., Frankel, R. M., & Smith, R. C.. (2010). Training residents and nurses to work as a patient-centered care team on a medical ward . Patient education and counseling, 2010 Jun 14. [Epub ahead of print].
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: To train medical residents and nurses to work together as a patient-centered care (PCC) team on a medical ward and test its feasibility, nurses’ learning, and patient outcomes. METHOD: Working with administrative leadership, we consolidated residents’ patients on one 32-bed ward. Already training residents in an evidence-based patient-centered method, we now trained 5 nurse leaders similarly, and they then trained all staff nurses. A national consultant visited twice. Specific team-building activities for nurses and residents fostered ward interactions. We used a retrospective pre/post/6-month post-design to evaluate nurses’ knowledge and self-efficacy of patient-centered skills. Patients were assigned non-randomly to our unit or comparison units from our emergency room; using a post-test only design, the primary endpoint was patient satisfaction. RESULTS: 28 trained nurses showed improvement in knowledge (p=0.02) and self-efficacy (p=0.001). 81 treatment patients showed no improvement in satisfaction (p=0.44). CONCLUSION: Training nurses in patient-centered practices were effective. Unique in this country, we also trained nurses and residents together as a PCC team on a medical ward and showed it was feasible and well accepted. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: We provide a template for team training and urge that others explore this important new area and contribute to its further development. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:910,
      author={H. S. Laird-Fick and D. Solomon and C. Jodoin and F. C. Dwamena and K. Alexander and L. Rawsthorne and T. Banker and N. Gourineni and F. Aloka and R. M. Frankel and R. C. Smith},
      year={2010},
      month={Jun 14},
      title={Training residents and nurses to work as a patient-centered care team on a medical ward },
      journal={Patient education and counseling},
      volume={2010 Jun 14. [Epub ahead of print]},
      note={id: 4690; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; JID: 8406280; 2010/01/12 [received]; 2010/05/11 [revised]; 2010/05/16 [accepted]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: To train medical residents and nurses to work together as a patient-centered care (PCC) team on a medical ward and test its feasibility, nurses' learning, and patient outcomes. METHOD: Working with administrative leadership, we consolidated residents' patients on one 32-bed ward. Already training residents in an evidence-based patient-centered method, we now trained 5 nurse leaders similarly, and they then trained all staff nurses. A national consultant visited twice. Specific team-building activities for nurses and residents fostered ward interactions. We used a retrospective pre/post/6-month post-design to evaluate nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy of patient-centered skills. Patients were assigned non-randomly to our unit or comparison units from our emergency room; using a post-test only design, the primary endpoint was patient satisfaction. RESULTS: 28 trained nurses showed improvement in knowledge (p=0.02) and self-efficacy (p=0.001). 81 treatment patients showed no improvement in satisfaction (p=0.44). CONCLUSION: Training nurses in patient-centered practices were effective. Unique in this country, we also trained nurses and residents together as a PCC team on a medical ward and showed it was feasible and well accepted. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: We provide a template for team training and urge that others explore this important new area and contribute to its further development. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1873-5134; 0738-3991},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Leonard, B., Shuhaibar, E. L., & Chen, R.. (2010). Nursing student perceptions of intraprofessional team education using high-fidelity simulation . The Journal of nursing education, 49(11), 628-631.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    High-fidelity simulation in health professional programs helps educators and students meet the challenges of increasingly complex clinical practice settings. Simulation has been used primarily to train nursing students either in interprofessional teams or within their respective nursing training levels. However, students’ experiences of learning alongside others in different levels or years of the nursing program have not been explored. BSN students (N = 48) were placed in intraprofessional teams (i.e., one student from each nursing level) to manage acute pediatric and adult simulation scenarios. Students were instructed to manage the clinical scenario based on their level of clinical competence and education. Following debriefing, students responded to a satisfaction survey regarding their simulation experiences and their perceptions of learning within an intraprofessional nursing team. Project results suggest that intraprofessional educational experiences provide rich learning opportunities for both third-year and fourth-year nursing students. In addition, simulation provides a context within which to support intraprofessional nursing student education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:875,
      author={B. Leonard and E. L. Shuhaibar and R. Chen},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov},
      title={Nursing student perceptions of intraprofessional team education using high-fidelity simulation },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={49},
      number={11},
      pages={628-631},
      note={id: 4909; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 7705432; 2009/07/10 [received]; 2010/02/10 [accepted]; 2010/07/30 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={High-fidelity simulation in health professional programs helps educators and students meet the challenges of increasingly complex clinical practice settings. Simulation has been used primarily to train nursing students either in interprofessional teams or within their respective nursing training levels. However, students' experiences of learning alongside others in different levels or years of the nursing program have not been explored. BSN students (N = 48) were placed in intraprofessional teams (i.e., one student from each nursing level) to manage acute pediatric and adult simulation scenarios. Students were instructed to manage the clinical scenario based on their level of clinical competence and education. Following debriefing, students responded to a satisfaction survey regarding their simulation experiences and their perceptions of learning within an intraprofessional nursing team. Project results suggest that intraprofessional educational experiences provide rich learning opportunities for both third-year and fourth-year nursing students. In addition, simulation provides a context within which to support intraprofessional nursing student education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Attitude to Computers; Clinical Competence; Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Humans; Infant; Interprofessional Relations; Manikins; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Ontario; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Program Evaluation; Role Playing; Self Efficacy; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Macdonald, M. B., Bally, J. M., Ferguson, L. M., Murray, L. B., Fowler-Kerry, S. E., & Anonson, J. M.. (2010). Knowledge of the professional role of others: a key interprofessional competency . Nurse education in practice, 10(4), 238-242.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In this paper, the authors present the results of a study which delineated six key competencies of interprofessional collaborative practice for patient-centred care: communication; strength in one’s professional role; knowledge of professional role of others; leadership; team function; and negotiation for conflict resolution. While all of these competencies are important and require special attention, this paper examines and discusses the competency knowledge of professional role of others and its associated behavioural indicators, especially as these relate to the interprofessional education of nursing students. The identification of these competencies and their behavioural indicators serve two purposes. It forms the basis for the preparation of students, preceptors, and faculty for interprofessional practice, and it develops a tool for assessing student performance in such practice. Consequently, we believe that the utilization of this key competency and its behavioural indicators will contribute to the development of programs that include specific knowledge and skills related to interprofessional nursing education. This will enable educators to support and evaluate students in interprofessional educational experiences more efficiently and effectively. Ultimately, as nursing students practice and become fully functioning practitioners, client care will be optimized. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:876,
      author={M. B. Macdonald and J. M. Bally and L. M. Ferguson and B. Lee Murray and S. E. Fowler-Kerry and J. M. Anonson},
      year={2010},
      month={Jul},
      title={Knowledge of the professional role of others: a key interprofessional competency },
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      volume={10},
      number={4},
      pages={238-242},
      note={id: 4870; CI: Copyright 2009; JID: 101090848; 2008/10/18 [received]; 2009/10/22 [revised]; 2009/11/15 [accepted]; 2010/03/21 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={In this paper, the authors present the results of a study which delineated six key competencies of interprofessional collaborative practice for patient-centred care: communication; strength in one's professional role; knowledge of professional role of others; leadership; team function; and negotiation for conflict resolution. While all of these competencies are important and require special attention, this paper examines and discusses the competency knowledge of professional role of others and its associated behavioural indicators, especially as these relate to the interprofessional education of nursing students. The identification of these competencies and their behavioural indicators serve two purposes. It forms the basis for the preparation of students, preceptors, and faculty for interprofessional practice, and it develops a tool for assessing student performance in such practice. Consequently, we believe that the utilization of this key competency and its behavioural indicators will contribute to the development of programs that include specific knowledge and skills related to interprofessional nursing education. This will enable educators to support and evaluate students in interprofessional educational experiences more efficiently and effectively. Ultimately, as nursing students practice and become fully functioning practitioners, client care will be optimized. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Competency-Based Education/methods; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/methods/organization & administration; Professional Role},
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Mannahan, C. A.. (2010). Different worlds: a cultural perspective on nurse-physician communication . Nursing Clinics of North America, 45(1), 71-79.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Nurses and physicians have a unique opportunity to work together to provide quality patient care. Although numerous studies have documented the value of effective nurse-physician communication on patient outcomes and on nurse and physician satisfaction, communication between many physicians and nurses continues to be poor. A variety of reasons for this disconnect have been identified, including differences in education, role expectations, gender, and approach to practice. Based on the principle that it is more important to understand than to be understood, application of a cultural competence model offers nurses the opportunity to better understand their physician colleagues. Because of the imperative to provide sensitive care to a diverse population, nurses are expected to assess cultural variations when planning care. That same skill can be applied to improving professional relationships with physicians. This article proposes application of a cultural competence model as a framework to assist nurses to better understand physicians with whom they work. With a focus on how culture affects one’s world view, nurses will be encouraged to employ this cultural competence model in their interactions with physicians. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:911,
      author={C. A. Mannahan},
      year={2010},
      month={03},
      title={Different worlds: a cultural perspective on nurse-physician communication },
      journal={Nursing Clinics of North America},
      volume={45},
      number={1},
      pages={71-79},
      note={id: 4715},
      abstract={Nurses and physicians have a unique opportunity to work together to provide quality patient care. Although numerous studies have documented the value of effective nurse-physician communication on patient outcomes and on nurse and physician satisfaction, communication between many physicians and nurses continues to be poor. A variety of reasons for this disconnect have been identified, including differences in education, role expectations, gender, and approach to practice. Based on the principle that it is more important to understand than to be understood, application of a cultural competence model offers nurses the opportunity to better understand their physician colleagues. Because of the imperative to provide sensitive care to a diverse population, nurses are expected to assess cultural variations when planning care. That same skill can be applied to improving professional relationships with physicians. This article proposes application of a cultural competence model as a framework to assist nurses to better understand physicians with whom they work. With a focus on how culture affects one's world view, nurses will be encouraged to employ this cultural competence model in their interactions with physicians. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel -- Ethnology; Cooperative Behavior; Culture; Cultural Competence -- Ethical Issues; Nurse-Physician Relations; Ethics, Professional; Human; Patient Care -- Ethical Issues; Quality of Health Care -- Ethical Issues; United States},
      isbn={0029-6465},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010591924&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Manojlovich, M.. (2010). Nurse/physician communication through a sensemaking lens: shifting the paradigm to improve patient safety . Medical care, 48(11), 941-946.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Physician-nurse communication has been identified as one of the main obstacles to progress in patient safety. Breakdowns in communication between physicians and nurses often result in errors, many of which are preventable. Recent research into nurse/physician communication has borrowed heavily from team literature, tending to study communication as one behavior in a larger cluster of behaviors. The multicluster approach to team research has not provided enough analysis of and attention to communication alone. Research into communication specifically is needed to understand its crucial role in teamwork and safety. A critique of the research literature on nurse/physician communication published since 1992 revealed 3 dominant themes: settings and context, consensus building, and conflict resolution. A fourth implicit theme, the temporal nature of communication, emerged as well. These themes were used to frame a discussion on sensemaking: an iterative process arising from dialogue when 2 or more people share their unique perspectives. As a theoretical model, sensemaking may offer an alternative lens through which to view the phenomenon of nurse/physician communication and advance our understanding of how nurse/physician communication can promote patient safety. Sensemaking may represent a paradigm shift with the potential to affect 2 spheres of influence: clinical practice and health care outcomes. Sensemaking may also hold promise as an intervention because through sensemaking consensus may be built and errors possibly prevented. Engaging in sensemaking may overcome communication barriers without realigning power bases, incorporate contextual influences without drawing attention away from communicators, and inform actions arising from communication. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:877,
      author={M. Manojlovich},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov},
      title={Nurse/physician communication through a sensemaking lens: shifting the paradigm to improve patient safety },
      journal={Medical care},
      volume={48},
      number={11},
      pages={941-946},
      note={id: 4986; JID: 0230027; ppublish },
      abstract={Physician-nurse communication has been identified as one of the main obstacles to progress in patient safety. Breakdowns in communication between physicians and nurses often result in errors, many of which are preventable. Recent research into nurse/physician communication has borrowed heavily from team literature, tending to study communication as one behavior in a larger cluster of behaviors. The multicluster approach to team research has not provided enough analysis of and attention to communication alone. Research into communication specifically is needed to understand its crucial role in teamwork and safety. A critique of the research literature on nurse/physician communication published since 1992 revealed 3 dominant themes: settings and context, consensus building, and conflict resolution. A fourth implicit theme, the temporal nature of communication, emerged as well. These themes were used to frame a discussion on sensemaking: an iterative process arising from dialogue when 2 or more people share their unique perspectives. As a theoretical model, sensemaking may offer an alternative lens through which to view the phenomenon of nurse/physician communication and advance our understanding of how nurse/physician communication can promote patient safety. Sensemaking may represent a paradigm shift with the potential to affect 2 spheres of influence: clinical practice and health care outcomes. Sensemaking may also hold promise as an intervention because through sensemaking consensus may be built and errors possibly prevented. Engaging in sensemaking may overcome communication barriers without realigning power bases, incorporate contextual influences without drawing attention away from communicators, and inform actions arising from communication. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Communication Barriers; Cooperative Behavior; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Physician-Nurse Relations; Risk Management/organization & administration; Safety Management/organization & administration; Total Quality Management/organization & administration; United States},
      isbn={1537-1948; 0025-7079},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Martin-Misener, R., Bryant-Lukosius, D., Harbman, P., Donald, F., Kaasalainen, S., Carter, N., Kilpatrick, K., & DiCenso, A.. (2010). Education of advanced practice nurses in Canada . Nursing leadership, 23 Spec No 2010, 61-84.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In Canada, education programs for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) roles began 40 years ago. NP programs are offered in almost all provinces. Education for the CNS role has occurred through graduate nursing programs generically defined as providing preparation for advanced nursing practice. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe the following: (1) history of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (2) current status of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (3) curriculum issues, (4) interprofessional education, (5) resources for education and (6) continuing education. Although national frameworks defining advanced nursing practice and NP competencies provide some direction for education programs, Canada does not have countrywide standards of education for either the NP or CNS role. Inconsistency in the educational requirements for primary healthcare NPs continues to cause significant problems and interferes with inter-jurisdictional licensing portability. For both CNSs and NPs, there can be a mismatch between a generalized education and specialized practice. The value of interprofessional education in facilitating effective teamwork is emphasized. Recommendations for future directions for advanced practice nursing education are offered. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:836,
      author={R. Martin-Misener and D. Bryant-Lukosius and P. Harbman and F. Donald and S. Kaasalainen and N. Carter and K. Kilpatrick and A. DiCenso},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec},
      title={Education of advanced practice nurses in Canada },
      journal={Nursing leadership},
      volume={23 Spec No 2010},
      pages={61-84},
      note={id: 5317; JID: 101470760; CIN: Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:85-7. PMID: 21478688; ppublish },
      abstract={In Canada, education programs for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) roles began 40 years ago. NP programs are offered in almost all provinces. Education for the CNS role has occurred through graduate nursing programs generically defined as providing preparation for advanced nursing practice. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe the following: (1) history of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (2) current status of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (3) curriculum issues, (4) interprofessional education, (5) resources for education and (6) continuing education. Although national frameworks defining advanced nursing practice and NP competencies provide some direction for education programs, Canada does not have countrywide standards of education for either the NP or CNS role. Inconsistency in the educational requirements for primary healthcare NPs continues to cause significant problems and interferes with inter-jurisdictional licensing portability. For both CNSs and NPs, there can be a mismatch between a generalized education and specialized practice. The value of interprofessional education in facilitating effective teamwork is emphasized. Recommendations for future directions for advanced practice nursing education are offered. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Advanced Practice Nursing/education/trends; Canada; Clinical Competence; Curriculum; Decision Support Techniques; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Educational Measurement; Educational Status; Focus Groups; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Nurse Clinicians/organization & administration; Nurse Practitioners/organization & administration},
      isbn={1910-622X; 1910-622X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McCaffrey, R. G., Hayes, R., Stuart, W., Cassell, A., Farrell, C., Miller-Reyes, C., & Donaldson, A.. (2010). A program to improve communication and collaboration between nurses and medical residents . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 41(4), 172-178.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    A program was implemented for nurses and medical residents to improve communication and collaboration. It has been noted that communication and collaboration between members of the health care team improve patient outcomes and job satisfaction among nurses. Nurses on the unit where medical residents trained attended a 2-hour educational program that reviewed effective communication styles and positive aspects of collaboration, including role-playing examples. Medical residents received a self-learning packet with a posttest that was returned to researchers when completed. Focus groups, including both nurses and medical residents, were held twice a month for 6 months after the educational program. Overall improvements in communication, collaboration, patient outcomes, and job satisfaction were noted from the focus group data. The educational program proved to be successful in improving collaboration and communication between nurses and medical residents, which in turn improved patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:912,
      author={R. G. McCaffrey and R. Hayes and W. Stuart and A. Cassell and C. Farrell and C. Miller-Reyes and A. Donaldson},
      year={2010},
      month={04},
      title={A program to improve communication and collaboration between nurses and medical residents },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={41},
      number={4},
      pages={172-178},
      note={id: 4712},
      abstract={A program was implemented for nurses and medical residents to improve communication and collaboration. It has been noted that communication and collaboration between members of the health care team improve patient outcomes and job satisfaction among nurses. Nurses on the unit where medical residents trained attended a 2-hour educational program that reviewed effective communication styles and positive aspects of collaboration, including role-playing examples. Medical residents received a self-learning packet with a posttest that was returned to researchers when completed. Focus groups, including both nurses and medical residents, were held twice a month for 6 months after the educational program. Overall improvements in communication, collaboration, patient outcomes, and job satisfaction were noted from the focus group data. The educational program proved to be successful in improving collaboration and communication between nurses and medical residents, which in turn improved patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration; Communication; Registered Nurses; Staff Development; Students, Medical; Education Research; Focus Groups; Goals and Objectives; Human; Internship and Residency; Interviews; Job Satisfaction; Nurse-Physician Relations; Outcomes (Health Care); Outcomes of Education; Program Development; Role Playing; Work Environment},
      isbn={0022-0124},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010627478&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Mennenga, H. A., & Smyer, T.. (2010). A model for easily incorporating team-based learning into nursing education . International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 7(1), 14p-14p.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    A sense of urgency exists among nurse educators to determine the best possible teaching strategies to create a rich, engaging learning environment for students. With the calls for transformation, innovation, and excellence in nursing education from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, and the National League for Nursing, educators may determine that current teaching strategies fall short. Team-based learning, an innovative teaching strategy, offers educators a structured, student-centered learning environment and may be effective in teaching necessary skills to students. An overview of how this strategy fosters many of the essential concepts, such as critical thinking, professionalism, communication, and interprofessional teamwork, is presented. Additionally, this article offers a clearly delineated "recipe" for implementing team-based learning in the classroom. This innovative strategy has the potential to transform nursing education and provide a positive teaching and learning environment for both educators and students. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:913,
      author={H. A. Mennenga and T. Smyer},
      year={2010},
      title={A model for easily incorporating team-based learning into nursing education },
      journal={International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship},
      volume={7},
      number={1},
      pages={14p-14p},
      note={id: 4600},
      abstract={A sense of urgency exists among nurse educators to determine the best possible teaching strategies to create a rich, engaging learning environment for students. With the calls for transformation, innovation, and excellence in nursing education from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, and the National League for Nursing, educators may determine that current teaching strategies fall short. Team-based learning, an innovative teaching strategy, offers educators a structured, student-centered learning environment and may be effective in teaching necessary skills to students. An overview of how this strategy fosters many of the essential concepts, such as critical thinking, professionalism, communication, and interprofessional teamwork, is presented. Additionally, this article offers a clearly delineated "recipe" for implementing team-based learning in the classroom. This innovative strategy has the potential to transform nursing education and provide a positive teaching and learning environment for both educators and students. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Learning Methods; Models, Educational; Team Building; Communication Skills; Course Content; Critical Thinking; Faculty, Nursing; Group Processes; Interprofessional Relations; Learning Environment; Outcomes of Education; Professionalism; Program Implementation -- Methods; Student Satisfaction; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010555030&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Mitchell, M., Groves, M., Mitchell, C., & Batkin, J.. (2010). Innovation in learning – An inter-professional approach to improving communication . Nurse education in practice, Jun 17 [Epub ahead of print].
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Inter-professional education (IPE) is recognised as a major way of introducing students in the health professions to the importance of teamwork and communication in the delivery of excellent healthcare. This pilot project evaluated mixed versus single discipline group tutorials of nursing and medical students as a way to promote IPE and understanding of communication. Four tutorial sessions were video-recorded and analysed using a video analysis coding grid. Additional data were drawn from student evaluations and assessment of group participation and were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. The case study as portrayed in the DVD was thought to provide an effective learning tool by both sets of students. Medical students rated the need for mixed group tutorials significantly lower than the nursing students who thought the tutorial activity helped with an appreciation of the importance of communication to effective teamwork. However, medical students in the single discipline group did not understand the nursing role. The resources fostered reflection on student’s own professional role as well as others; however, the importance of communication within the nursing role needs to be recognised by nursing students and curriculum designers. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:914,
      author={M. Mitchell and M. Groves and C. Mitchell and J. Batkin},
      year={2010},
      month={Jun 17},
      title={Innovation in learning - An inter-professional approach to improving communication },
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      volume={Jun 17 [Epub ahead of print]},
      note={id: 4733; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; JID: 101090848; 2009/06/30 [received]; 2010/02/24 [revised]; 2010/05/07 [accepted]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Inter-professional education (IPE) is recognised as a major way of introducing students in the health professions to the importance of teamwork and communication in the delivery of excellent healthcare. This pilot project evaluated mixed versus single discipline group tutorials of nursing and medical students as a way to promote IPE and understanding of communication. Four tutorial sessions were video-recorded and analysed using a video analysis coding grid. Additional data were drawn from student evaluations and assessment of group participation and were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. The case study as portrayed in the DVD was thought to provide an effective learning tool by both sets of students. Medical students rated the need for mixed group tutorials significantly lower than the nursing students who thought the tutorial activity helped with an appreciation of the importance of communication to effective teamwork. However, medical students in the single discipline group did not understand the nursing role. The resources fostered reflection on student's own professional role as well as others; however, the importance of communication within the nursing role needs to be recognised by nursing students and curriculum designers. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • O’Leary, K. J., Ritter, C. D., Wheeler, H., Szekendi, M. K., Brinton, T. S., & Williams, M. V.. (2010). Teamwork on inpatient medical units: assessing attitudes and barriers . Quality & safety in health care, 19(2), 117-121.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Discrepant attitudes about teamwork among nurses and physicians exist in operating rooms and intensive care units. Little is known about teamwork attitudes on general medical services. OBJECTIVE: To assess ratings of teamwork by providers on inpatient medical units and barriers to collaboration. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Nurses, primary hospital physicians and medical subspeciality consultants on four general medical units were surveyed. MEASUREMENTS: Providers rated the quality of communication and collaboration experienced with their own and other disciplines. Providers also rated potential barriers to collaboration. Differences between providers in ratings of collaboration and barriers were tested using analysis of variance. RESULTS: Of 230 eligible providers, 159 (69%) completed the survey. Teamwork ratings of nurses were similarly high across provider types. Ratings of physicians differed considerably by provider type (p

    @article{RefWorks:915,
      author={K. J. O'Leary and C. D. Ritter and H. Wheeler and M. K. Szekendi and T. S. Brinton and M. V. Williams},
      year={2010},
      month={Apr},
      title={Teamwork on inpatient medical units: assessing attitudes and barriers },
      journal={Quality & safety in health care},
      volume={19},
      number={2},
      pages={117-121},
      note={id: 4746; JID: 101136980; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Discrepant attitudes about teamwork among nurses and physicians exist in operating rooms and intensive care units. Little is known about teamwork attitudes on general medical services. OBJECTIVE: To assess ratings of teamwork by providers on inpatient medical units and barriers to collaboration. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Nurses, primary hospital physicians and medical subspeciality consultants on four general medical units were surveyed. MEASUREMENTS: Providers rated the quality of communication and collaboration experienced with their own and other disciplines. Providers also rated potential barriers to collaboration. Differences between providers in ratings of collaboration and barriers were tested using analysis of variance. RESULTS: Of 230 eligible providers, 159 (69%) completed the survey. Teamwork ratings of nurses were similarly high across provider types. Ratings of physicians differed considerably by provider type (p},
      isbn={1475-3901; 1475-3898},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Orchard, C. A.. (2010). Persistent isolationist or collaborator? The nurse’s role in interprofessional collaborative practice . Journal of nursing management, 18(3), 248-257.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The present study explores current understanding about interprofessional collaborative client-centred practice and nursing’s role in this form of care delivery. BACKGROUND: A profession-only focus on nursing practice has been challenged at professional, national governmental and World Health Organization levels stressing for more interprofessional patient-centred collaborative teamwork. EVALUATION: Moving to patient-centred collaborative practice is fraught with barriers. Enablers can result in building trust, power sharing and shared decision-making. Changing current workplace environments requires institutional commitments to support collaborative team development. KEY ISSUE(S): Nurses can become collaborative members of teams through: (1) re-socialize; (2) understanding and articulating nurses roles, knowledge and skills to others; (3) other health providers sharing the same to nurses; (4) identifying where shared roles, knowledge and skills exist; and (5) learning to work in collaborative teams. Nurses must address some fundamental issues about practice that negate collaboration and patient-centred care. CONCLUSIONS: All professionals, including nurses, must move away from a service-oriented delivery to a patient-centred collaborative approach to care. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The values within health organizations need to be underpinned by collaborative interprofessional patient-centred practice. To accomplish this goal, administrators and managers must support assessment of employees and visiting physicians as to their conformance with agency established expectations for such practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:916,
      author={C. A. Orchard},
      year={2010},
      month={Apr},
      title={Persistent isolationist or collaborator? The nurse's role in interprofessional collaborative practice },
      journal={Journal of nursing management},
      volume={18},
      number={3},
      pages={248-257},
      note={id: 4744; JID: 9306050; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: The present study explores current understanding about interprofessional collaborative client-centred practice and nursing's role in this form of care delivery. BACKGROUND: A profession-only focus on nursing practice has been challenged at professional, national governmental and World Health Organization levels stressing for more interprofessional patient-centred collaborative teamwork. EVALUATION: Moving to patient-centred collaborative practice is fraught with barriers. Enablers can result in building trust, power sharing and shared decision-making. Changing current workplace environments requires institutional commitments to support collaborative team development. KEY ISSUE(S): Nurses can become collaborative members of teams through: (1) re-socialize; (2) understanding and articulating nurses roles, knowledge and skills to others; (3) other health providers sharing the same to nurses; (4) identifying where shared roles, knowledge and skills exist; and (5) learning to work in collaborative teams. Nurses must address some fundamental issues about practice that negate collaboration and patient-centred care. CONCLUSIONS: All professionals, including nurses, must move away from a service-oriented delivery to a patient-centred collaborative approach to care. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The values within health organizations need to be underpinned by collaborative interprofessional patient-centred practice. To accomplish this goal, administrators and managers must support assessment of employees and visiting physicians as to their conformance with agency established expectations for such practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2834; 0966-0429},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rabinowitz, M., Johnson, L. E., Mazzapica, D., & O’Leary, J.. (2010). Storytelling effectively translates TeamSTEPPS skills into practice . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 41(11), 486-487.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This column shares the lived experiences of four Master Trainers who used storytelling as the methodology for teaching TeamSTEPPS to interprofessional staff members of a large health system. TeamSTEPPS is an evidence-based program that focuses on skills and behaviors that improve teamwork and communication, which are key to preventing medical errors. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:878,
      author={M. Rabinowitz and L. E. Johnson and D. Mazzapica and J. O'Leary},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov},
      title={Storytelling effectively translates TeamSTEPPS skills into practice },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={41},
      number={11},
      pages={486-487},
      note={id: 4902; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 0262321; ppublish },
      abstract={This column shares the lived experiences of four Master Trainers who used storytelling as the methodology for teaching TeamSTEPPS to interprofessional staff members of a large health system. TeamSTEPPS is an evidence-based program that focuses on skills and behaviors that improve teamwork and communication, which are key to preventing medical errors. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods/organization & administration; Evidence-Based Nursing/education/methods/organization & administration; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Narration; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing, Team/methods},
      isbn={0022-0124; 0022-0124},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Reese, C. E., Jeffries, P. R., & Engum, S. A.. (2010). Learning together: Using simulations to develop nursing and medical student collaboration . Nursing education perspectives, 31(1), 33-37.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Collaborative interdisciplinary learning is a core educational requirement cited by the Institute of Medicine Health Professions Education Report (2003). This descriptive study supports the Nursing Education Simulation Framework for designing simulations used as an interdisciplinary teaching strategy in health professions curricula. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of the framework for the collaborative medical and nursing management of a surgical patient with complications. Simulation design features, student satisfaction, and self-confidence were measured. Results indicate both medical and nursing student groups’perceptions of the design features of the collaborative simulation were positive. Feedback and guided reflection were identified by both student groups as important simulation design features. Data analyzed from the Collaboration Scale suggest that designing simulations that place medical and nursing students together is beneficial for both the medical students and the nursing students. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:917,
      author={C. E. Reese and P. R. Jeffries and S. A. Engum},
      year={2010},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={Learning together: Using simulations to develop nursing and medical student collaboration },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={31},
      number={1},
      pages={33-37},
      note={id: 4646; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={Collaborative interdisciplinary learning is a core educational requirement cited by the Institute of Medicine Health Professions Education Report (2003). This descriptive study supports the Nursing Education Simulation Framework for designing simulations used as an interdisciplinary teaching strategy in health professions curricula. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of the framework for the collaborative medical and nursing management of a surgical patient with complications. Simulation design features, student satisfaction, and self-confidence were measured. Results indicate both medical and nursing student groups'perceptions of the design features of the collaborative simulation were positive. Feedback and guided reflection were identified by both student groups as important simulation design features. Data analyzed from the Collaboration Scale suggest that designing simulations that place medical and nursing students together is beneficial for both the medical students and the nursing students. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Female; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Manikins; Midwestern United States; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Nursing Education Research; Patient Care Team; Professional Role; Program Evaluation; Role Playing; Self Efficacy; Students, Medical/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={1536-5026; 1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rice, K., Zwarenstein, M., Conn, L. G., Kenaszchuk, C., Russell, A., & Reeves, S.. (2010). An intervention to improve interprofessional collaboration and communications: a comparative qualitative study . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 24(4), 350-361.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Interprofessional communication and collaboration are promoted by policymakers as fundamental building blocks for improving patient safety and meeting the demands of increasingly complex care. This paper reports qualitative findings of an interprofessional intervention designed to improve communication and collaboration between different professions in general internal medicine (GIM) hospital wards in Canada. The intervention promoted self-introduction by role and profession to a collaborating colleague in relation to the shared patient, a question or communication regarding the patient, to be followed by an explicit request for feedback from the partner professional. Implementation and uptake of the intervention were evaluated using qualitative methods, including 90 hours of ethnographic observations and interviews collected in both intervention and comparison wards. Documentary data were also collected and analysed. Fieldnotes and interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically. Our findings suggested that the intervention did not produce the anticipated changes in communication and collaboration between health professionals, and allowed us to identify barriers to the implementation of effective collaboration interventions. Despite initially offering verbal support, senior physicians, nurses, and allied health professionals minimally explained the intervention to their junior colleagues and rarely role-modelled or reiterated support for it. Professional resistances as well as the fast paced, interruptive environment reduced opportunities or incentive to enhance restrictive interprofessional relationships. In a healthcare setting where face-to-face spontaneous interprofessional communication is not hostile but is rare and impersonal, the perceived benefits of improvement are insufficient to implement simple and potentially beneficial communication changes, in the face of habit, and absence of continued senior clinician and management support. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:918,
      author={K. Rice and M. Zwarenstein and L. G. Conn and C. Kenaszchuk and A. Russell and S. Reeves},
      year={2010},
      month={07},
      title={An intervention to improve interprofessional collaboration and communications: a comparative qualitative study },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={24},
      number={4},
      pages={350-361},
      note={id: 4713},
      abstract={Interprofessional communication and collaboration are promoted by policymakers as fundamental building blocks for improving patient safety and meeting the demands of increasingly complex care. This paper reports qualitative findings of an interprofessional intervention designed to improve communication and collaboration between different professions in general internal medicine (GIM) hospital wards in Canada. The intervention promoted self-introduction by role and profession to a collaborating colleague in relation to the shared patient, a question or communication regarding the patient, to be followed by an explicit request for feedback from the partner professional. Implementation and uptake of the intervention were evaluated using qualitative methods, including 90 hours of ethnographic observations and interviews collected in both intervention and comparison wards. Documentary data were also collected and analysed. Fieldnotes and interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically. Our findings suggested that the intervention did not produce the anticipated changes in communication and collaboration between health professionals, and allowed us to identify barriers to the implementation of effective collaboration interventions. Despite initially offering verbal support, senior physicians, nurses, and allied health professionals minimally explained the intervention to their junior colleagues and rarely role-modelled or reiterated support for it. Professional resistances as well as the fast paced, interruptive environment reduced opportunities or incentive to enhance restrictive interprofessional relationships. In a healthcare setting where face-to-face spontaneous interprofessional communication is not hostile but is rare and impersonal, the perceived benefits of improvement are insufficient to implement simple and potentially beneficial communication changes, in the face of habit, and absence of continued senior clinician and management support. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010689693&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Robertson, B., Kaplan, B., Atallah, H., Higgins, M., Lewitt, M. J., & Ander, D. S.. (2010). The use of simulation and a modified TeamSTEPPS curriculum for medical and nursing student team training . Simulation in healthcare : Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, 5(6), 332-337.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    INTRODUCTION: We describe our adaptation of the team strategies and tools to enhance performance and patient safety (TeamSTEPPS) for use as an educational intervention for medical and nursing students. We hypothesized that participation in a team training program using the modified TeamSTEPPS program would positively affect knowledge and attitudes toward teamwork skills and their ability to recognize the presence and quality of team skills. METHODS: Two hundred thirteen students participated in a 4-hour team training program that included a lecture followed by small group team training exercises. Nurse/physician pairs facilitated student team activities. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed before and after the educational intervention. Recognition of team skills was assessed using videos. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were found with participant knowledge (P

    @article{RefWorks:839,
      author={B. Robertson and B. Kaplan and H. Atallah and M. Higgins and M. J. Lewitt and D. S. Ander},
      year={2010},
      month={Dec},
      title={The use of simulation and a modified TeamSTEPPS curriculum for medical and nursing student team training },
      journal={Simulation in healthcare : Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare},
      volume={5},
      number={6},
      pages={332-337},
      note={id: 5302; JID: 101264408; ppublish },
      abstract={INTRODUCTION: We describe our adaptation of the team strategies and tools to enhance performance and patient safety (TeamSTEPPS) for use as an educational intervention for medical and nursing students. We hypothesized that participation in a team training program using the modified TeamSTEPPS program would positively affect knowledge and attitudes toward teamwork skills and their ability to recognize the presence and quality of team skills. METHODS: Two hundred thirteen students participated in a 4-hour team training program that included a lecture followed by small group team training exercises. Nurse/physician pairs facilitated student team activities. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed before and after the educational intervention. Recognition of team skills was assessed using videos. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were found with participant knowledge (P},
      keywords={Chi-Square Distribution; Clinical Competence; Communication; Curriculum; Education, Medical/methods; Education, Nursing/methods; Educational Measurement; Educational Status; Female; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Male; Models, Educational; Patient Care Team; Patient Simulation; Students, Medical; Students, Nursing},
      isbn={1559-713X; 1559-2332},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Salm, T., Greenberg, H., Pitzel, M., & Cripps, D.. (2010). Interprofessional education internships in schools: jump starting change . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 24(3), 251-263.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Placing our practicum students into an interprofessional education (IPE) practicum without prior course work is an unorthodox idea, however, it was discovered that the road to IPE success is not along a single pathway. This multi-case study explores the experience of seven cohorts of pre-service professionals from the faculties of Education, Nursing, Justice Studies, Kinesiology and Health Studies and Social Work who engaged in a 14-week, full-time interprofessional internship in inner-city schools. Findings suggest that this IPE practicum provided a forum for students to develop sophisticated communication skills and more fully respect the scope and breadth of each other’s practice while working towards improving the quality of care for children through interprofessional collaboration. The discussion raises issues related to: the unique challenges of IPE in community-based settings, where lack of mentoring and issues related to "authenticity" emerge; "othering" and the ways in which discourse re-inscribes racist ways of knowing; and the value of co-constructed learning and the need to respond to emerging needs in context rather than in a linear, sequential process. Over two years, it was discovered that a seemingly backward approach to IPE moved our agenda forward in directions we had not anticipated. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:919,
      author={T. Salm and H. Greenberg and M. Pitzel and D. Cripps},
      year={2010},
      month={05},
      title={Interprofessional education internships in schools: jump starting change },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={24},
      number={3},
      pages={251-263},
      note={id: 4722},
      abstract={Placing our practicum students into an interprofessional education (IPE) practicum without prior course work is an unorthodox idea, however, it was discovered that the road to IPE success is not along a single pathway. This multi-case study explores the experience of seven cohorts of pre-service professionals from the faculties of Education, Nursing, Justice Studies, Kinesiology and Health Studies and Social Work who engaged in a 14-week, full-time interprofessional internship in inner-city schools. Findings suggest that this IPE practicum provided a forum for students to develop sophisticated communication skills and more fully respect the scope and breadth of each other's practice while working towards improving the quality of care for children through interprofessional collaboration. The discussion raises issues related to: the unique challenges of IPE in community-based settings, where lack of mentoring and issues related to "authenticity" emerge; "othering" and the ways in which discourse re-inscribes racist ways of knowing; and the value of co-constructed learning and the need to respond to emerging needs in context rather than in a linear, sequential process. Over two years, it was discovered that a seemingly backward approach to IPE moved our agenda forward in directions we had not anticipated. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Interdisciplinary -- Evaluation; Internship and Residency -- Evaluation; Pediatric Care -- Education; Audiorecording; Child; Communication Skills -- Evaluation; Constant Comparative Method; Diaries; Field Notes; Grounded Theory; Human; Interviews; Qualitative Studies; Quality of Health Care -- Evaluation; Questionnaires; Saskatchewan; Videorecording},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010627593&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Simmons, D., & Sherwood, G.. (2010). Neonatal intensive care unit and emergency department nurses’ descriptions of working together: Building team relationships to improve safety . Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America, 22(2), 253-260.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Teamwork is considered a critical factor in delivering high-quality, safe patient care although research on the evidence base of the effectiveness of teamwork and communication across disciplines is scarce. Health care providers have limited educational preparation for the communication and complex care coordination across disciplines required by today’s complex patients. Complex work environments are affected by little understood human factors including the intricacies of human communication and behavior. To understand how nurses view teamwork, this secondary qualitative analysis examined nurses’ perceptions of working in high-performance areas with interdisciplinary teams. Results from 4 focus groups of 18 nurses from a neonatal intensive care unit and emergency department trauma resuscitation teams, revealed 3 themes with descriptive meanings to help understand the complexities of teamwork. These findings illustrate the rewards and challenges for teams working together in the current health care environment. Continuing to investigate teamwork can add to our understanding of what nurses and health professionals need to know about teamwork to help develop evidence-based team training in prelicensure education and in practice settings. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:841,
      author={D. Simmons and G. Sherwood},
      year={2010},
      month={Jun},
      title={Neonatal intensive care unit and emergency department nurses' descriptions of working together: Building team relationships to improve safety },
      journal={Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America},
      volume={22},
      number={2},
      pages={253-260},
      note={id: 5327; CI: Copyright 2010; GR: 1P01HS1154401/HS/AHRQ HHS/United States; JID: 8912620; ppublish },
      abstract={Teamwork is considered a critical factor in delivering high-quality, safe patient care although research on the evidence base of the effectiveness of teamwork and communication across disciplines is scarce. Health care providers have limited educational preparation for the communication and complex care coordination across disciplines required by today's complex patients. Complex work environments are affected by little understood human factors including the intricacies of human communication and behavior. To understand how nurses view teamwork, this secondary qualitative analysis examined nurses' perceptions of working in high-performance areas with interdisciplinary teams. Results from 4 focus groups of 18 nurses from a neonatal intensive care unit and emergency department trauma resuscitation teams, revealed 3 themes with descriptive meanings to help understand the complexities of teamwork. These findings illustrate the rewards and challenges for teams working together in the current health care environment. Continuing to investigate teamwork can add to our understanding of what nurses and health professionals need to know about teamwork to help develop evidence-based team training in prelicensure education and in practice settings. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Academic Medical Centers; Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Communication; Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration; Cooperative Behavior; Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration; Female; Focus Groups; Humans; Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/organization & administration; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration/psychology; Qualitative Research; Resuscitation/nursing; Safety Management/organization & administration; United States},
      isbn={1558-3481; 0899-5885},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Stanley, D., & Latimer, K.. (2010). ‘The Ward’: A simulation game for nursing students . Nurse education in practice, Jun 8 [Epub ahead of print].
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness and suitability of ‘The Ward’ as a simulation game to promote and support students’ understanding of decision making, critical thinking and team work in clinical practice situations. BACKGROUND: Students commonly indicate that there is a ‘gap’ between the theory and practice aspects of their nursing education. Nursing is also a team-based profession requiring collaboration and cooperation that is rarely seem in educational programs. Attempts to address these issues resulted in the development and trial of the simulation game ‘The Ward’. METHODS: A qualitative study using a questionnaire (n = 76) and four focus groups. RESULTS: ‘The Ward’ proved to be well received as a learning tool and was enjoyable and effective in addressing learning issues related to clinical skill practice, ward management, nursing practice knowledge, critical thinking, medication knowledge and leadership. It also offered valuable learning in the areas of team work and decision making. CONCLUSION: ‘The Ward’ was shown to be a very useful simulation exercise that has evaluated well and helped promote the pivotal role of team work for student nurses and bridge the gap between theory and clinical practice in a safe, non-threatening way. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:921,
      author={D. Stanley and K. Latimer},
      year={2010},
      month={Jun 8},
      title={'The Ward': A simulation game for nursing students },
      journal={Nurse education in practice},
      volume={Jun 8 [Epub ahead of print]},
      note={id: 4736; CI: Copyright (c) 2010; JID: 101090848; 2009/08/07 [received]; 2010/04/18 [revised]; 2010/05/08 [accepted]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness and suitability of 'The Ward' as a simulation game to promote and support students' understanding of decision making, critical thinking and team work in clinical practice situations. BACKGROUND: Students commonly indicate that there is a 'gap' between the theory and practice aspects of their nursing education. Nursing is also a team-based profession requiring collaboration and cooperation that is rarely seem in educational programs. Attempts to address these issues resulted in the development and trial of the simulation game 'The Ward'. METHODS: A qualitative study using a questionnaire (n = 76) and four focus groups. RESULTS: 'The Ward' proved to be well received as a learning tool and was enjoyable and effective in addressing learning issues related to clinical skill practice, ward management, nursing practice knowledge, critical thinking, medication knowledge and leadership. It also offered valuable learning in the areas of team work and decision making. CONCLUSION: 'The Ward' was shown to be a very useful simulation exercise that has evaluated well and helped promote the pivotal role of team work for student nurses and bridge the gap between theory and clinical practice in a safe, non-threatening way. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1873-5223; 1471-5953},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Takahashi, S., Brissette, S., & Thorstad, K.. (2010). Different roles, same goal: students learn about interprofessional practice in a clinical setting . Nursing leadership (Toronto, Ont.), 23(1), 32-39.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Shriners Hospitals for Children-Canada has developed an innovative Interprofessional Education Program to help tomorrow’s healthcare professionals gain the skills and knowledge they need to work effectively in teams to provide efficient, collaborative and family-centred care. Undergraduate students in nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy participated in group discussions, seminars by staff members and group presentations. Students reported increased understanding of their own and others’ roles and a more holistic view of patients and families, and demonstrated their ability to work in teams to create collaborative care plans. Facilitating factors were a strong existing interprofessional team, administrative buy-in and support, consistent clinical nurse specialist involvement and strong, enthusiastic students. Challenges included logistics, time taken away from students’ regular clinical time, time required of staff for program planning and implementation, and the difficulty of evaluating effects on patient care. The program shows promise as a way of introducing students to interprofessional practice and giving them a chance to practise their newly acquired skills in a clinical setting. It also has the potential to enhance staff awareness of interprofessional issues and facilitate staff development. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:922,
      author={S. Takahashi and S. Brissette and K. Thorstad},
      year={2010},
      month={Mar},
      title={Different roles, same goal: students learn about interprofessional practice in a clinical setting },
      journal={Nursing leadership (Toronto, Ont.)},
      volume={23},
      number={1},
      pages={32-39},
      note={id: 4740; JID: 101470760; ppublish },
      abstract={The Shriners Hospitals for Children-Canada has developed an innovative Interprofessional Education Program to help tomorrow's healthcare professionals gain the skills and knowledge they need to work effectively in teams to provide efficient, collaborative and family-centred care. Undergraduate students in nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy participated in group discussions, seminars by staff members and group presentations. Students reported increased understanding of their own and others' roles and a more holistic view of patients and families, and demonstrated their ability to work in teams to create collaborative care plans. Facilitating factors were a strong existing interprofessional team, administrative buy-in and support, consistent clinical nurse specialist involvement and strong, enthusiastic students. Challenges included logistics, time taken away from students' regular clinical time, time required of staff for program planning and implementation, and the difficulty of evaluating effects on patient care. The program shows promise as a way of introducing students to interprofessional practice and giving them a chance to practise their newly acquired skills in a clinical setting. It also has the potential to enhance staff awareness of interprofessional issues and facilitate staff development. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Canada; Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Goals; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Nursing Education Research; Occupational Therapy/education; Organizational Objectives; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Physical Therapy (Specialty)/education; Professional Role/psychology; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Students, Health Occupations/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={1910-622X; 1910-622X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Upenieks, V. V., Lee, E. A., Flanagan, M. E., & Doebbeling, B. N.. (2010). Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument (HTVI): developing a tool assessing healthcare team functioning . Journal of advanced nursing, 66(1), 168-176.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study conducted to refine, shorten and validate the Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument. Background. The Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument was developed to assess team vitality of nurses as well as other licensed and unlicensed personnel working as part of healthcare teams in inpatient hospital units. This instrument was necessary for two reasons. First, other commonly used instruments assess characteristics of Registered Nurses or perceptions about and characteristics of the organizations in which they work, but not these factors in combination with critical factors of interdisciplinary team functioning and collaboration. Second, a short tool for repeated, regular measurement of team vitality was needed to track the impact of changes to improve work environments. Method. Revisions to the Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument occurred in two phases. Phase 1 entailed collecting preliminary data and conducting cognitive interviews to refine the initial items. During Phase 2, the factor structure of the Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument was identified and a brief form developed and validated. Data were collected in 2006 and 2007. Findings. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a four-factor solution with the following dimensions: (1) support structures, (2) engagement and empowerment, (3) patient care transitions and (4) team communication. Conclusion. The Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument can contribute both to better management practices and advancing knowledge to promote retention of nurses, and to some extent other healthcare professionals, as well as efforts to transform the acute healthcare work environment. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:863,
      author={V. V. Upenieks and E. A. Lee and M. E. Flanagan and B. N. Doebbeling},
      year={2010},
      month={Nov 24},
      title={Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument (HTVI): developing a tool assessing healthcare team functioning },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={66},
      number={1},
      pages={168-176},
      note={id: 4441; JID: 7609811; aheadofprint },
      abstract={Aim. This paper is a report of a study conducted to refine, shorten and validate the Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument. Background. The Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument was developed to assess team vitality of nurses as well as other licensed and unlicensed personnel working as part of healthcare teams in inpatient hospital units. This instrument was necessary for two reasons. First, other commonly used instruments assess characteristics of Registered Nurses or perceptions about and characteristics of the organizations in which they work, but not these factors in combination with critical factors of interdisciplinary team functioning and collaboration. Second, a short tool for repeated, regular measurement of team vitality was needed to track the impact of changes to improve work environments. Method. Revisions to the Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument occurred in two phases. Phase 1 entailed collecting preliminary data and conducting cognitive interviews to refine the initial items. During Phase 2, the factor structure of the Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument was identified and a brief form developed and validated. Data were collected in 2006 and 2007. Findings. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a four-factor solution with the following dimensions: (1) support structures, (2) engagement and empowerment, (3) patient care transitions and (4) team communication. Conclusion. The Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument can contribute both to better management practices and advancing knowledge to promote retention of nurses, and to some extent other healthcare professionals, as well as efforts to transform the acute healthcare work environment. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2648; 1365-2648},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Weaver, S. J., Rosen, M. A., Salas, E., Baum, K. D., & King, H. B.. (2010). Integrating the science of team training: guidelines for continuing education . The Journal of continuing education in the health professions, 30(4), 208-220.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The provision of high-quality, efficient care results from the coordinated, cooperative efforts of multiple technically competent health care providers working in concert over time, spanning disciplinary and professional boundaries. Accordingly, the role of medical education must include the development of providers who are both expert clinicians and expert team members. However, the competencies underlying effective teamwork are only just beginning to be integrated into medical school curricula and residency programs. Therefore, continuing education (CE) is a vital mechanism for practitioners already in the field to develop the attitudes, behaviors (skills), and cognitive knowledge necessary for highly reliable and effective team performance.The present article provides an overview of more than 30 years of evidence regarding team performance and team training in order to guide, shape, and build CE activities that focus on developing team competencies. Recognizing that even the most comprehensive and well-designed team-oriented CE programs will fail unless they are supported by an organizational and professional culture that values collaborative behavior, ten evidence-based lessons for practice are offered in order to facilitate the use of the science of team-training in efforts to foster continuous quality improvement and enhance patient safety. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:880,
      author={S. J. Weaver and M. A. Rosen and E. Salas and K. D. Baum and H. B. King},
      year={2010},
      month={Fall},
      title={Integrating the science of team training: guidelines for continuing education },
      journal={The Journal of continuing education in the health professions},
      volume={30},
      number={4},
      pages={208-220},
      note={id: 4989; JID: 8805847; ppublish },
      abstract={The provision of high-quality, efficient care results from the coordinated, cooperative efforts of multiple technically competent health care providers working in concert over time, spanning disciplinary and professional boundaries. Accordingly, the role of medical education must include the development of providers who are both expert clinicians and expert team members. However, the competencies underlying effective teamwork are only just beginning to be integrated into medical school curricula and residency programs. Therefore, continuing education (CE) is a vital mechanism for practitioners already in the field to develop the attitudes, behaviors (skills), and cognitive knowledge necessary for highly reliable and effective team performance.The present article provides an overview of more than 30 years of evidence regarding team performance and team training in order to guide, shape, and build CE activities that focus on developing team competencies. Recognizing that even the most comprehensive and well-designed team-oriented CE programs will fail unless they are supported by an organizational and professional culture that values collaborative behavior, ten evidence-based lessons for practice are offered in order to facilitate the use of the science of team-training in efforts to foster continuous quality improvement and enhance patient safety. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration/standards; Evidence-Based Medicine; Guidelines as Topic; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Patient Care Team/organization & administration},
      isbn={1708-8321; 0894-1912},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Welsh, C. A., Flanagan, M. E., & Ebright, P.. (2010). Barriers and facilitators to nursing handoffs: Recommendations for redesign . Nursing outlook, 58(3), 148-154.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    During a handoff, communication errors can lead to adverse events and suboptimal patient care. As a result, many institutions want to redesign their handoff processes, but have little specific guidance from the literature. We examined two approaches to nursing end-of-shift reports both taped and written, to identify specific factors limiting and facilitating such handoffs. Twenty nurses were interviewed using a semistructured format. They were asked about the current reporting process, the limitations, the elements that helped, and ideas for improvement. Analyses revealed that inadequate information, inconsistent quality, limited opportunity to ask questions, equipment malfunction, insufficient time to generate reports, and interruptions, limited handoffs. Facilitators were "pertinent" content, notes and space for notes, face-to-face interaction, and structured form/checklist. Recommendations for redesign are defining content pertinent to the unit, structuring handoffs so that information is received in a standard way, embedding an opportunity for questions into the process, planning for all 3 handoff subprocesses, and conducting peer evaluations and education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:924,
      author={C. A. Welsh and M. E. Flanagan and P. Ebright},
      year={2010},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Barriers and facilitators to nursing handoffs: Recommendations for redesign },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={58},
      number={3},
      pages={148-154},
      note={id: 4627; CI: Copyright 2010; JID: 0401075; 2009/03/02 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={During a handoff, communication errors can lead to adverse events and suboptimal patient care. As a result, many institutions want to redesign their handoff processes, but have little specific guidance from the literature. We examined two approaches to nursing end-of-shift reports both taped and written, to identify specific factors limiting and facilitating such handoffs. Twenty nurses were interviewed using a semistructured format. They were asked about the current reporting process, the limitations, the elements that helped, and ideas for improvement. Analyses revealed that inadequate information, inconsistent quality, limited opportunity to ask questions, equipment malfunction, insufficient time to generate reports, and interruptions, limited handoffs. Facilitators were "pertinent" content, notes and space for notes, face-to-face interaction, and structured form/checklist. Recommendations for redesign are defining content pertinent to the unit, structuring handoffs so that information is received in a standard way, embedding an opportunity for questions into the process, planning for all 3 handoff subprocesses, and conducting peer evaluations and education. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1528-3968; 0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Williams, B., Brown, T., Scholes, R., French, J., & Archer, F.. (2010). Can interdisciplinary clinical DVD simulations transform clinical fieldwork education for paramedic, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and nursing students? . Journal of allied health, 39(1), 3-10.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of DVD simulations in a clinical teaching context, their impact on student learning, and their potential as a supplemental learning option for clinical placements/fieldwork education rotations that might assist in reducing the burden on the health care system. METHODS: Eleven clinical DVD simulations were developed by Monash University academic staff from four academic departments: nursing, occupational therapy, paramedics, and physiotherapy. Undergraduate students (n = 394) from these health science groups viewed the DVD simulations. Student perceptions and attitudes about the clinical relevance of the DVD simulations were assessed on a 7-point Likert-type scale standardized questionnaire (7 indicating the highest satisfaction score). Qualitative data were also collected from three focus groups that involved 24 students, assessing if and how the DVD simulations influenced the clinical fieldwork education placement learning experiences of the students. RESULTS: Overall, students’ responses to the questionnaire indicated that they were satisfied with the DVD simulations with relation to attention (mean 4.25, SD 0.95), learning potential (mean 5.25, SD 1.16), clinical relevance to practice (mean 4.36, SD 0.60), and information-processing quality (mean 5.45, SD 0.23). Qualitative data supported the notions of interdisciplinary teamwork, clinical placements, clinical placement education, and DVD quality evaluation and feedback. CONCLUSION: Students viewed the simulations as being educationally, professionally, and clinically relevant. The cost benefit of using DVD simulations to replace or supplement components of clinical fieldwork education should be investigated further. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:925,
      author={B. Williams and T. Brown and R. Scholes and J. French and F. Archer},
      year={2010},
      month={Spring},
      title={Can interdisciplinary clinical DVD simulations transform clinical fieldwork education for paramedic, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and nursing students? },
      journal={Journal of allied health},
      volume={39},
      number={1},
      pages={3-10},
      note={id: 4747; JID: 0361603; 2008/08/12 [received]; 2009/08/07 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of DVD simulations in a clinical teaching context, their impact on student learning, and their potential as a supplemental learning option for clinical placements/fieldwork education rotations that might assist in reducing the burden on the health care system. METHODS: Eleven clinical DVD simulations were developed by Monash University academic staff from four academic departments: nursing, occupational therapy, paramedics, and physiotherapy. Undergraduate students (n = 394) from these health science groups viewed the DVD simulations. Student perceptions and attitudes about the clinical relevance of the DVD simulations were assessed on a 7-point Likert-type scale standardized questionnaire (7 indicating the highest satisfaction score). Qualitative data were also collected from three focus groups that involved 24 students, assessing if and how the DVD simulations influenced the clinical fieldwork education placement learning experiences of the students. RESULTS: Overall, students' responses to the questionnaire indicated that they were satisfied with the DVD simulations with relation to attention (mean 4.25, SD 0.95), learning potential (mean 5.25, SD 1.16), clinical relevance to practice (mean 4.36, SD 0.60), and information-processing quality (mean 5.45, SD 0.23). Qualitative data supported the notions of interdisciplinary teamwork, clinical placements, clinical placement education, and DVD quality evaluation and feedback. CONCLUSION: Students viewed the simulations as being educationally, professionally, and clinically relevant. The cost benefit of using DVD simulations to replace or supplement components of clinical fieldwork education should be investigated further. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adolescent; Adult; Audiovisual Aids; Cross-Sectional Studies; Education, Nursing; Emergency Medical Technicians/education; Female; Focus Groups; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Male; Occupational Therapy/education; Program Evaluation; Victoria; Young Adult},
      isbn={1945-404X; 0090-7421},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Zavertnik, J. E., Huff, T. A., & Munro, C. L.. (2010). Innovative approach to teaching communication skills to nursing students . Journal of Nursing Education, 49(2), 65-71.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a learner-centered simulation intervention designed to improve the communication skills of preprofessional sophomore nursing students. An innovative teaching strategy in which communication skills are taught to nursing students by using trained actors who served as standardized family members in a clinical learning laboratory setting was evaluated using a two-group posttest design. In addition to current standard education, the intervention group received a formal training session presenting a framework for communication and a 60-minute practice session with the standardized family members. Four domains of communication, introduction, gathering of information, imparting information, and clarifying goals and expectations were evaluated in the control and intervention groups in individual testing sessions with a standardized family member. The intervention group performed better than the control group in all four tested domains related to communication skills, and the difference was statistically significant in the domain of gathering information (p = 0.0257). (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:926,
      author={J. E. Zavertnik and T. A. Huff and C. L. Munro},
      year={2010},
      month={02},
      title={Innovative approach to teaching communication skills to nursing students },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={49},
      number={2},
      pages={65-71},
      note={id: 4602},
      abstract={This study assessed the effectiveness of a learner-centered simulation intervention designed to improve the communication skills of preprofessional sophomore nursing students. An innovative teaching strategy in which communication skills are taught to nursing students by using trained actors who served as standardized family members in a clinical learning laboratory setting was evaluated using a two-group posttest design. In addition to current standard education, the intervention group received a formal training session presenting a framework for communication and a 60-minute practice session with the standardized family members. Four domains of communication, introduction, gathering of information, imparting information, and clarifying goals and expectations were evaluated in the control and intervention groups in individual testing sessions with a standardized family member. The intervention group performed better than the control group in all four tested domains related to communication skills, and the difference was statistically significant in the domain of gathering information (p = 0.0257). (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010550682&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

2009

  • Bambini, D., Washburn, J., & Perkins, R.. (2009). Outcomes of clinical simulation for novice nursing students: communication, confidence, clinical judgment . Nursing Education Perspectives, 30(2), 79-82.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The use of clinical simulation in nursing education provides many opportunities for students to learn and apply theoretical principles of nursing care in a safe environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate simulated clinical experiences as a teaching/learning method to increase the self-efficacy of nursing students during their initial clinical course in a prelicensure program. An integrated, quasi-experimental, repeated measures design was used. A sample of 112 students completed surveys, indicating their confidence in various skills necessary for postpartum and newborn nursing, both before and after the simulation experience. Results indicated that students experienced a significant increase in overall self-efficacy (p

    @article{RefWorks:881,
      author={D. Bambini and J. Washburn and R. Perkins},
      year={2009},
      month={03},
      title={Outcomes of clinical simulation for novice nursing students: communication, confidence, clinical judgment },
      journal={Nursing Education Perspectives},
      volume={30},
      number={2},
      pages={79-82},
      note={id: 3677; JF: Nursing Education Perspectives },
      abstract={The use of clinical simulation in nursing education provides many opportunities for students to learn and apply theoretical principles of nursing care in a safe environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate simulated clinical experiences as a teaching/learning method to increase the self-efficacy of nursing students during their initial clinical course in a prelicensure program. An integrated, quasi-experimental, repeated measures design was used. A sample of 112 students completed surveys, indicating their confidence in various skills necessary for postpartum and newborn nursing, both before and after the simulation experience. Results indicated that students experienced a significant increase in overall self-efficacy (p },
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={English},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010258640&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Beckett, C. D., & Kipnis, G.. (2009). Collaborative communication: integrating SBAR to improve quality/patient safety outcomes . Journal for Healthcare Quality: Promoting Excellence in Healthcare, 31(5), 19-28.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Creating work environments that sustain open and supportive communication positively influence teamwork, staff satisfaction, and improved patient quality and safety. The Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation (SBAR)-collaborative communication evidence-based practice (EBP) study described in this article introduced collaborative communication integrating SBAR communication process in a pediatrics/perinatal services department of a 271-bed community hospital in northern Arizona. EBP processes framed the study. Evaluation methods for intervention effectiveness and study outcomes integrated both quantitative and qualitative strategies. Staff transferred evidence, knowledge, and skills into practice to achieve enhanced communication, collaboration, satisfaction, and patient safety outcomes meeting the study goal. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:845,
      author={C. D. Beckett and G. Kipnis},
      year={2009},
      month={2009},
      title={Collaborative communication: integrating SBAR to improve quality/patient safety outcomes },
      journal={Journal for Healthcare Quality: Promoting Excellence in Healthcare},
      volume={31},
      number={5},
      pages={19-28},
      note={id: 4446},
      abstract={Creating work environments that sustain open and supportive communication positively influence teamwork, staff satisfaction, and improved patient quality and safety. The Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation (SBAR)-collaborative communication evidence-based practice (EBP) study described in this article introduced collaborative communication integrating SBAR communication process in a pediatrics/perinatal services department of a 271-bed community hospital in northern Arizona. EBP processes framed the study. Evaluation methods for intervention effectiveness and study outcomes integrated both quantitative and qualitative strategies. Staff transferred evidence, knowledge, and skills into practice to achieve enhanced communication, collaboration, satisfaction, and patient safety outcomes meeting the study goal. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication -- Methods; Obstetric Service; Pediatric Units; Professional Practice, Evidence-Based; Teamwork -- Education; Arizona; Clinical Effectiveness; Conceptual Framework; Convenience Sample; Grounded Theory; Hospitals, Community -- Arizona; Knowledge Management; Mann-Whitney U Test; Multimethod Studies; Nurse-Physician Relations; Outcomes of Education; Pretest-Posttest Design; Quality Management, Organizational; Questionnaires; Survey Research; T-Tests; Thematic Analysis},
      isbn={1062-2551},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010418889&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Begley, C. M.. (2009). Developing inter-professional learning: tactics, teamwork and talk . Nurse education today, 29(3), 276-283.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    SUMMARY: Teamwork and collaboration between all health professionals results in high quality clinical care, and increased job satisfaction for staff. Encouraging inter-professional learning (IPL) may be advantageous in developing more effective teams. There is little rigorous research in this area, but many small uncontrolled studies do demonstrate positive results. IPL involves structured learning opportunities that enhance problem-solving abilities and conflict resolution. It should be clearly differentiated from shared teaching (or multidisciplinary/multiprofessional learning), where common content is taught to many professions without any intention to develop interaction. To counteract the sometimes negative attitudes in both students and staff, educators need to commence IPL early in the programme, base it in both theoretical and clinical placements and ensure that it is valued and assessed. Difficulties with timetabling and accommodation need to be solved prior to commencement. A facilitator should be employed, and a team of committed lecturers developed, with an emphasis on teamwork and the discouragement of individualism. Opportunities for student interaction and ways of improving group dynamics within non-threatening learning environments should to be sought, and instances of conflict embraced and resolved. Future IPL programmes should be rigorously evaluated and may demonstrate enhanced inter-professional relationships and improved quality of patient/client care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:846,
      author={C. M. Begley},
      year={2009},
      month={Apr},
      title={Developing inter-professional learning: tactics, teamwork and talk },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={29},
      number={3},
      pages={276-283},
      note={id: 4381; JID: 8511379; RF: 79; 2008/09/08 [received]; 2008/09/24 [accepted]; 2009/01/04 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={SUMMARY: Teamwork and collaboration between all health professionals results in high quality clinical care, and increased job satisfaction for staff. Encouraging inter-professional learning (IPL) may be advantageous in developing more effective teams. There is little rigorous research in this area, but many small uncontrolled studies do demonstrate positive results. IPL involves structured learning opportunities that enhance problem-solving abilities and conflict resolution. It should be clearly differentiated from shared teaching (or multidisciplinary/multiprofessional learning), where common content is taught to many professions without any intention to develop interaction. To counteract the sometimes negative attitudes in both students and staff, educators need to commence IPL early in the programme, base it in both theoretical and clinical placements and ensure that it is valued and assessed. Difficulties with timetabling and accommodation need to be solved prior to commencement. A facilitator should be employed, and a team of committed lecturers developed, with an emphasis on teamwork and the discouragement of individualism. Opportunities for student interaction and ways of improving group dynamics within non-threatening learning environments should to be sought, and instances of conflict embraced and resolved. Future IPL programmes should be rigorously evaluated and may demonstrate enhanced inter-professional relationships and improved quality of patient/client care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Education, Nursing; Group Processes; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Socialization; Teaching/methods},
      isbn={1532-2793},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bradley, P., Cooper, S., & Duncan, F.. (2009). A mixed-methods study of interprofessional learning of resuscitation skills . Medical education, 43(9), 912-922.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to identify the effects of interprofessional resuscitation skills teaching on medical and nursing students’ attitudes, leadership, team-working and performance skills. METHODS: Year 2 medical and nursing students learned resuscitation skills in uniprofessional or interprofessional settings, prior to undergoing observational ratings of video-recorded leadership, teamwork and skills performance and subsequent focus group interviews. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was administered pre- and post-intervention and again 3-4 months later. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between interprofessional and uniprofessional teams for leadership, team dynamics or resuscitation tasks performance. Gender, previous interprofessional learning experience, professional background and previous leadership experience had no significant effect. Interview analysis showed broad support for interprofessional education (IPE) matched to clinical reality with perceived benefits for teamwork, communication and improved understanding of roles and perspectives. Concerns included inappropriate role adoption, hierarchy issues, professional identity and the timing of IPE episodes. The RIPLS subscales for professional identity and team-working increased significantly post-intervention for interprofessional groups but returned to pre-test levels by 3-4 months. However, interviews showed interprofessional groups retained a ‘residual positivity’ towards IPE, more so than uniprofessional groups. CONCLUSIONS: An intervention based on common, relevant, shared learning outcomes set in a realistic educational context can work with students who have differing levels of previous IPE and skills training experience. Qualitatively, positive attitudes outlast quantitative changes measured using the RIPLS. Further quantitative and qualitative work is required to examine other domains of learning, the timing of interventions and impact on attitudes towards IPE. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:847,
      author={P. Bradley and S. Cooper and F. Duncan},
      year={2009},
      month={Sep},
      title={A mixed-methods study of interprofessional learning of resuscitation skills },
      journal={Medical education},
      volume={43},
      number={9},
      pages={912-922},
      note={id: 4444; JID: 7605655; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to identify the effects of interprofessional resuscitation skills teaching on medical and nursing students' attitudes, leadership, team-working and performance skills. METHODS: Year 2 medical and nursing students learned resuscitation skills in uniprofessional or interprofessional settings, prior to undergoing observational ratings of video-recorded leadership, teamwork and skills performance and subsequent focus group interviews. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was administered pre- and post-intervention and again 3-4 months later. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between interprofessional and uniprofessional teams for leadership, team dynamics or resuscitation tasks performance. Gender, previous interprofessional learning experience, professional background and previous leadership experience had no significant effect. Interview analysis showed broad support for interprofessional education (IPE) matched to clinical reality with perceived benefits for teamwork, communication and improved understanding of roles and perspectives. Concerns included inappropriate role adoption, hierarchy issues, professional identity and the timing of IPE episodes. The RIPLS subscales for professional identity and team-working increased significantly post-intervention for interprofessional groups but returned to pre-test levels by 3-4 months. However, interviews showed interprofessional groups retained a 'residual positivity' towards IPE, more so than uniprofessional groups. CONCLUSIONS: An intervention based on common, relevant, shared learning outcomes set in a realistic educational context can work with students who have differing levels of previous IPE and skills training experience. Qualitatively, positive attitudes outlast quantitative changes measured using the RIPLS. Further quantitative and qualitative work is required to examine other domains of learning, the timing of interventions and impact on attitudes towards IPE. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1365-2923; 1365-2923},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cameron, A., Rennie, S., DiProspero, L., Langlois, S., Wagner, S., Potvin, M., Dematteo, D., LeBlanc, V., & Reeves, S.. (2009). An introduction to teamwork: findings from an evaluation of an interprofessional education experience for 1000 first-year health science students . Journal of allied health, 38(4), 220-226.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Effective interprofessional collaboration is an important factor in addressing health care needs and priorities. Educators and health care practitioners have argued that interprofessional education (IPE) is necessary to equip students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors to work collaboratively and ultimately deliver enhanced patient/client care. The University of Toronto has implemented an introductory IPE session for approximately 1000 health science students that focuses on teamwork. This session provides students with an opportunity to be sensitized to the client’s perspective and become familiar with roles and perspectives of different professions. A mixed method pre/post research design was developed to examine changes in students’ perceptions and attitudes regarding IPE following their participation in this session. This study also endeavored to explore the pedagogic effectiveness of this large-scale IPE session. Students completed pre and post surveys based on the Interprofessional Attitudes Questionnaire and the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale. A total of 399 surveys were matched for pre/post analysis, and 25 students participated in follow-up focus group interviews. Findings from this study reveal that a significant shift in many indicators occurred after this single intervention. Despite the large numbers of students, which meant a complex range of logistical factors to negotiate, our findings indicated that it is feasible to deliver a successful IPE session to a large cohort of first-year students. We suggest that the findings presented in this report can be of value to other interprofessional groups of course developers. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:822,
      author={A. Cameron and S. Rennie and L. DiProspero and S. Langlois and S. Wagner and M. Potvin and D. Dematteo and V. LeBlanc and S. Reeves},
      year={2009},
      month={Winter},
      title={An introduction to teamwork: findings from an evaluation of an interprofessional education experience for 1000 first-year health science students },
      journal={Journal of allied health},
      volume={38},
      number={4},
      pages={220-226},
      note={id: 5330; JID: 0361603; 2008/09/27 [received]; 2009/05/07 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={Effective interprofessional collaboration is an important factor in addressing health care needs and priorities. Educators and health care practitioners have argued that interprofessional education (IPE) is necessary to equip students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors to work collaboratively and ultimately deliver enhanced patient/client care. The University of Toronto has implemented an introductory IPE session for approximately 1000 health science students that focuses on teamwork. This session provides students with an opportunity to be sensitized to the client's perspective and become familiar with roles and perspectives of different professions. A mixed method pre/post research design was developed to examine changes in students' perceptions and attitudes regarding IPE following their participation in this session. This study also endeavored to explore the pedagogic effectiveness of this large-scale IPE session. Students completed pre and post surveys based on the Interprofessional Attitudes Questionnaire and the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale. A total of 399 surveys were matched for pre/post analysis, and 25 students participated in follow-up focus group interviews. Findings from this study reveal that a significant shift in many indicators occurred after this single intervention. Despite the large numbers of students, which meant a complex range of logistical factors to negotiate, our findings indicated that it is feasible to deliver a successful IPE session to a large cohort of first-year students. We suggest that the findings presented in this report can be of value to other interprofessional groups of course developers. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Allied Health Personnel/education; Cooperative Behavior; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Trust},
      isbn={1945-404X; 0090-7421},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ceppetelli, E., & O’Donnell, J.. (2009). Shadowing a Nurse: An Idea for Enhancing Intraprofessional Education . Academic Physician and Scientist, 7-9.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    “Shadowing a Nurse,” was created in the fall of 2004 as one of Dartmouth Medical School’s enrichment electives for first- and second-year medical students to learn directly about nurses’ roles in health care. The stimulus for this innovation occurred during a problem-based learning discussion among fourth-year medical students. Their knowledge deficit of nursing and the roles nurses play in health care significantly affected their ability to resolve the problem presented. The nurse and physician faculty facilitating the group believed that the hands-on experience of shadowing nurses at the bedside would help medical students recognize and appreciate the roles and unique attributes nursing professionals bring to the health care team. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:900,
      author={E. Ceppetelli and J. O'Donnell},
      year={2009},
      title={Shadowing a Nurse: An Idea for Enhancing Intraprofessional Education },
      journal={Academic Physician and Scientist},
      pages={7-9},
      note={id: 4743},
      abstract={“Shadowing a Nurse,” was created in the fall of 2004 as one of Dartmouth Medical School’s enrichment electives for first- and second-year medical students to learn directly about nurses’ roles in health care. The stimulus for this innovation occurred during a problem-based learning discussion among fourth-year medical students. Their knowledge deficit of nursing and the roles nurses play in health care significantly affected their ability to resolve the problem presented. The nurse and physician faculty facilitating the group believed that the hands-on experience of shadowing nurses at the bedside would help medical students recognize and appreciate the roles and unique attributes nursing professionals bring to the health care team. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Chapman, K. B.. (2009). Improving communication among nurses, patients, and physicians . The American Journal of Nursing, 109(11 Suppl), 21-25.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    With patience, education, and teamwork, we created a system that empowers nurses, engages physicians, and enables patients to take part in discussions that revolve around them. One of the most important lessons we learned in our effort to improve communication is that change takes time. It has been more than two years since we embarked on our journey to transform the care we deliver at the bedside. Multiple tests of change have produced a sustained culture of reliable, patient-centered care in which all caregivers continually strive for optimal communication. The most compelling outcome of our TCAB journey is the change we have seen in our patients. They now ask questions and have come to expect bedside exchanges of information from both nurses and physicians. They like the reports being given at the bedside and enjoy having their nurses and physicians come into the room together to talk to them. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:848,
      author={K. B. Chapman},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov},
      title={Improving communication among nurses, patients, and physicians },
      journal={The American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={109},
      number={11 Suppl},
      pages={21-25},
      note={id: 4337; JID: 0372646; ppublish },
      abstract={With patience, education, and teamwork, we created a system that empowers nurses, engages physicians, and enables patients to take part in discussions that revolve around them. One of the most important lessons we learned in our effort to improve communication is that change takes time. It has been more than two years since we embarked on our journey to transform the care we deliver at the bedside. Multiple tests of change have produced a sustained culture of reliable, patient-centered care in which all caregivers continually strive for optimal communication.
    The most compelling outcome of our TCAB journey is the change we have seen in our patients. They now ask questions and have come to expect bedside exchanges of information from both nurses and physicians. They like the reports being given at the bedside and enjoy having their nurses and physicians come into the room together to talk to them. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Communication; Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration; Guidelines as Topic; Humans; Job Satisfaction; New Hampshire; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Patient Care Planning/organization & administration; Patient Participation/methods/psychology; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Physician-Nurse Relations; Pilot Projects; Professional-Patient Relations; Safety Management/organization & administration; Tape Recording; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1538-7488},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Clark, P. R.. (2009). Teamwork: building healthier workplaces and providing safer patient care . Critical care nursing quarterly, 32(3), 221-231.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A changing healthcare landscape requires nurses to care for more patients with higher acuity during their shift than ever before. These more austere working conditions are leading to increased burnout. In addition, patient safety is not of the quality or level that is required. To build healthier workplaces where safe care is provided, formal teamwork training is recommended. Formal teamwork training programs, such as that provided by the MedTeams group, TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety), or participatory action research programs such as the Healthy Workplace Intervention, have decreased errors in the workplace, increased nurse satisfaction and retention rates, and decreased staff turnover. This article includes necessary determinants of teamwork, brief overviews of team-building programs, and examples of research programs that demonstrate how teamwork brings about healthier workplaces that are safer for patients. Teamwork programs can bring about these positive results when implemented and supported by the hospital system. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:849,
      author={P. R. Clark},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Teamwork: building healthier workplaces and providing safer patient care },
      journal={Critical care nursing quarterly},
      volume={32},
      number={3},
      pages={221-231},
      note={id: 4439; JID: 8704517; RF: 45; ppublish },
      abstract={A changing healthcare landscape requires nurses to care for more patients with higher acuity during their shift than ever before. These more austere working conditions are leading to increased burnout. In addition, patient safety is not of the quality or level that is required. To build healthier workplaces where safe care is provided, formal teamwork training is recommended. Formal teamwork training programs, such as that provided by the MedTeams group, TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety), or participatory action research programs such as the Healthy Workplace Intervention, have decreased errors in the workplace, increased nurse satisfaction and retention rates, and decreased staff turnover. This article includes necessary determinants of teamwork, brief overviews of team-building programs, and examples of research programs that demonstrate how teamwork brings about healthier workplaces that are safer for patients. Teamwork programs can bring about these positive results when implemented and supported by the hospital system. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Critical Care/organization & administration; Humans; Nurse's Role; Nursing Staff/organization & administration; Occupational Health; Organizational Objectives; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Quality of Health Care/organization & administration},
      isbn={1550-5111; 1550-5111},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Corless, I. B., Michel, T. H., Nicholas, M., Jameson, D., Purtilo, R., & Dirkes, A. M.. (2009). Educating health professions students about the issues involved in communicating effectively: a novel approach . The Journal of nursing education, 48(7), 367-373.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Schwartz Center Educational Rounds, the first Schwartz Center Rounds held at an educational institution, emphasize the overall theme of difficult conversations faced by students and professionals with patients, families, and other members of the health care team. Students in the health care professions do not have sufficient opportunities to practice the communication and decision making skills integral to compassionate caregiving. Such practice enhances communication with patients and families, as well as with other members of the interdisciplinary team. This article presents the underlying assumptions for this change-oriented project and describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Rounds for an interdisciplinary group of graduate students during a 4-year period. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:850,
      author={I. B. Corless and T. H. Michel and M. Nicholas and D. Jameson and R. Purtilo and A. M. Dirkes},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul},
      title={Educating health professions students about the issues involved in communicating effectively: a novel approach },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={7},
      pages={367-373},
      note={id: 4283; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={The Schwartz Center Educational Rounds, the first Schwartz Center Rounds held at an educational institution, emphasize the overall theme of difficult conversations faced by students and professionals with patients, families, and other members of the health care team. Students in the health care professions do not have sufficient opportunities to practice the communication and decision making skills integral to compassionate caregiving. Such practice enhances communication with patients and families, as well as with other members of the interdisciplinary team. This article presents the underlying assumptions for this change-oriented project and describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Rounds for an interdisciplinary group of graduate students during a 4-year period. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Continuing/organization & administration; Health Occupations/education; Humans; Interpersonal Relations; Massachusetts; Multilingualism; Nursing Education Research; Organizational Objectives; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care; Professional Competence/standards; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Questionnaires; Social Support},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cox, K. R., Scott, S. D., Hall, L. W., Aud, M. A., Headrick, L. A., & Madsen, R.. (2009). Uncovering differences among health professions trainees exposed to an interprofessional patient safety curriculum . Quality management in health care, 18(3), 182-193.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In response to the Institute of Medicine challenge to improve patient safety and quality of care, an office directing patient safety/quality of care at an academic medical center and faculty from health professions schools collaborated on design, delivery, and evaluation of an interprofessional student curriculum on patient safety, quality, and teamwork. Annually for 6 years, second-year medical students, senior baccalaureate nursing students, second-year masters in health administration students, and junior baccalaureate respiratory therapy students participated. A pre-/postsurvey assessing students’ attitudes about quality, safety, and teamwork was developed and modified to reflect course revisions. Survey items were grouped into 1 of the 6 subscales: human fallibility, disclosure, teamwork/communication, error reporting, systems of care, and curricular time spent with other professionals. At pretest, there were significant professional group differences in all the 6 subscales. At completion, differences in 4 subscales were resolved with the exception of human fallibility (P

    @article{RefWorks:851,
      author={K. R. Cox and S. D. Scott and L. W. Hall and M. A. Aud and L. A. Headrick and R. Madsen},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Uncovering differences among health professions trainees exposed to an interprofessional patient safety curriculum },
      journal={Quality management in health care},
      volume={18},
      number={3},
      pages={182-193},
      note={id: 4246; JID: 9306156; ppublish },
      abstract={In response to the Institute of Medicine challenge to improve patient safety and quality of care, an office directing patient safety/quality of care at an academic medical center and faculty from health professions schools collaborated on design, delivery, and evaluation of an interprofessional student curriculum on patient safety, quality, and teamwork. Annually for 6 years, second-year medical students, senior baccalaureate nursing students, second-year masters in health administration students, and junior baccalaureate respiratory therapy students participated. A pre-/postsurvey assessing students' attitudes about quality, safety, and teamwork was developed and modified to reflect course revisions. Survey items were grouped into 1 of the 6 subscales: human fallibility, disclosure, teamwork/communication, error reporting, systems of care, and curricular time spent with other professionals. At pretest, there were significant professional group differences in all the 6 subscales. At completion, differences in 4 subscales were resolved with the exception of human fallibility (P },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Data Collection; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Quality of Health Care; Safety Management},
      isbn={1063-8628},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dillon, P. M., Noble, K. A., & Kaplan, L.. (2009). Simulation as a means to foster collaborative interdisciplinary education . Nursing education perspectives, 30(2), 87-90.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The purpose of this study was multifaceted: to initiate an interdisciplinary collaborative relationship between nursing and medical students; to determine the usefulness of an interdisciplinary approach using simulations as an educational strategy; and to analyze students’ perceptions of collaboration. A pre/posttest design was used to assess students’ perceptions of interdisciplinary collaboration with a mock code experience using a high-fidelity simulator. Open-ended questions provided another perspective of interdisciplinary collaboration. A convenience sample of fourth-year nursing students and third-year medical students from a large urban university participated in the study. Statistically significant differences (p

    @article{RefWorks:852,
      author={P. M. Dillon and K. A. Noble and L. Kaplan},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Simulation as a means to foster collaborative interdisciplinary education },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={30},
      number={2},
      pages={87-90},
      note={id: 4377; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={The purpose of this study was multifaceted: to initiate an interdisciplinary collaborative relationship between nursing and medical students; to determine the usefulness of an interdisciplinary approach using simulations as an educational strategy; and to analyze students' perceptions of collaboration. A pre/posttest design was used to assess students' perceptions of interdisciplinary collaboration with a mock code experience using a high-fidelity simulator. Open-ended questions provided another perspective of interdisciplinary collaboration. A convenience sample of fourth-year nursing students and third-year medical students from a large urban university participated in the study. Statistically significant differences (p },
      keywords={Adult; Analysis of Variance; Education, Medical, Undergraduate; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Female; Humans; Male; Manikins; Nurse's Role; Physician-Nurse Relations; Program Evaluation; Teaching/methods; United States},
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dobson, R. T., Stevenson, K., Busch, A., Scott, D. J., Henry, C., & Wall, P. A.. (2009). A quality improvement activity to promote interprofessional collaboration among health professions students . American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 73(4), Article 64.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate a classroom-based curriculum designed to promote interprofessional competencies by having undergraduate students from various health professions work together on system-based problems using quality improvement (QI) methods and tools to improve patient-centered care. DESIGN: Students from 4 health care programs (nursing, nutrition, pharmacy, and physical therapy) participated in an interprofessional QI activity. In groups of 6 or 7, students completed pre-intervention and post-intervention reflection tools on attitudes relating to interprofessio nal teams, and a tool designed to evaluate group process. ASSESSMENT: One hundred thirty-four students (76.6%) completed both self-reflection instruments, and 132 (74.2%) completed the post-course group evaluation instrument. Although already high prior to the activity, students’ mean post-intervention reflection scores increased for 12 of 16 items. Post-intervention group evaluation scores reflected a high level of satisfaction with the experience. CONCLUSION: Use of a quality-based case study and QI methodology were an effective approach to enhancing interprofessional experiences among students. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:853,
      author={R. T. Dobson and K. Stevenson and A. Busch and D. J. Scott and C. Henry and P. A. Wall},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul 10},
      title={A quality improvement activity to promote interprofessional collaboration among health professions students },
      journal={American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education},
      volume={73},
      number={4},
      pages={Article 64},
      note={id: 4426; JID: 0372650; OID: NLM: PMC2720360; 2009/02/12 [received]; 2009/05/18 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate a classroom-based curriculum designed to promote interprofessional competencies by having undergraduate students from various health professions work together on system-based problems using quality improvement (QI) methods and tools to improve patient-centered care. DESIGN: Students from 4 health care programs (nursing, nutrition, pharmacy, and physical therapy) participated in an interprofessional QI activity. In groups of 6 or 7, students completed pre-intervention and post-intervention reflection tools on attitudes relating to interprofessio nal teams, and a tool designed to evaluate group process. ASSESSMENT: One hundred thirty-four students (76.6%) completed both self-reflection instruments, and 132 (74.2%) completed the post-course group evaluation instrument. Although already high prior to the activity, students' mean post-intervention reflection scores increased for 12 of 16 items. Post-intervention group evaluation scores reflected a high level of satisfaction with the experience. CONCLUSION: Use of a quality-based case study and QI methodology were an effective approach to enhancing interprofessional experiences among students. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1553-6467; 1553-6467},
      language={eng},
      url={http://www.ajpe.org/aj7304/aj730464/aj730464.pdf}
    }

  • Garber, J. S., Madigan, E. A., Click, E. R., & Fitzpatrick, J. J.. (2009). Attitudes towards collaboration and servant leadership among nurses, physicians and residents . Journal of interprofessional care, 23(4), 331-340.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A descriptive, comparative study was conducted to examine the attitudes of nurses, physicians and residents towards collaboration and to assess their self-perception of servant leadership characteristics. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration and the Barbuto-Wheeler Servant Leadership Questionnaire were utilized for data collection. Registered nurses (RNs) (n = 2,660), physicians (n = 447) and residents (n = 171) in a Southeastern United States health system were surveyed via the intranet; there were 497 responses for analysis. The response rate should be considered and generalizations made with caution regarding the study results. RN scores were higher for both total scores and subscales as compared to physician/resident groups for collaboration and servant leadership. There was a weak positive correlation between collaboration and servant leadership in the RN group and no significant correlation between the variables in the physician/resident group. Findings from this study have implications for nursing and physician education and practice and may serve as a framework for future studies. Representative samples are needed to gain further insight and to guide future research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:883,
      author={J. S. Garber and E. A. Madigan and E. R. Click and J. J. Fitzpatrick},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul},
      title={Attitudes towards collaboration and servant leadership among nurses, physicians and residents },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={23},
      number={4},
      pages={331-340},
      note={id: 4114; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={A descriptive, comparative study was conducted to examine the attitudes of nurses, physicians and residents towards collaboration and to assess their self-perception of servant leadership characteristics. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration and the Barbuto-Wheeler Servant Leadership Questionnaire were utilized for data collection. Registered nurses (RNs) (n = 2,660), physicians (n = 447) and residents (n = 171) in a Southeastern United States health system were surveyed via the intranet; there were 497 responses for analysis. The response rate should be considered and generalizations made with caution regarding the study results. RN scores were higher for both total scores and subscales as compared to physician/resident groups for collaboration and servant leadership. There was a weak positive correlation between collaboration and servant leadership in the RN group and no significant correlation between the variables in the physician/resident group. Findings from this study have implications for nursing and physician education and practice and may serve as a framework for future studies. Representative samples are needed to gain further insight and to guide future research. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Haas, B. A., Sheehan, J. M., Stone, J. A. M., & Hammer-Beem, M. J.. (2009). Application of the Newell Liberal Arts model for interdisciplinary course design and implementation . Journal of Nursing Education, 48(10), 579-582.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Health professions faculty think that interdisciplinary education is critical for students pursuing careers as health care professionals. Initial attempts at interdisciplinary education by simply combining students into groups without adequate curriculum adaptation, preparation, and planning have been ineffective. Applying the liberal arts interdisciplinary model, developed by William Newell, a transdisciplinary faculty team in the College of Health Professions of the University of New England identified the course content, design, and instructional processes necessary to create an interdisciplinary elective course. The eight-step model and how it was applied to the development of an ethics course for seven different health care professional disciplines is presented. The result of this applied design approach was a course that assisted the transition of health care professional students previously accustomed to studying and working within their own discipline to communicate, cooperate, and collaborate across discipline-specific lines. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:854,
      author={B. A. Haas and J. M. Sheehan and J. A. M. Stone and M. J. Hammer-Beem},
      year={2009},
      month={10},
      title={Application of the Newell Liberal Arts model for interdisciplinary course design and implementation },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={48},
      number={10},
      pages={579-582},
      note={id: 4314},
      abstract={Health professions faculty think that interdisciplinary education is critical for students pursuing careers as health care professionals. Initial attempts at interdisciplinary education by simply combining students into groups without adequate curriculum adaptation, preparation, and planning have been ineffective. Applying the liberal arts interdisciplinary model, developed by William Newell, a transdisciplinary faculty team in the College of Health Professions of the University of New England identified the course content, design, and instructional processes necessary to create an interdisciplinary elective course. The eight-step model and how it was applied to the development of an ethics course for seven different health care professional disciplines is presented. The result of this applied design approach was a course that assisted the transition of health care professional students previously accustomed to studying and working within their own discipline to communicate, cooperate, and collaborate across discipline-specific lines. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010441440&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Hall, L. W., Headrick, L. A., Cox, K. R., Deane, K., Gay, J. W., & Brandt, J.. (2009). Linking health professional learners and health care workers on action-based improvement teams . Quality management in health care, 18(3), 194-201.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Medical students, nursing students, and other health care professionals in training were integrated with health care workers on interprofessional quality improvement (QI) teams at our academic health center. Teams received training in QI, accompanied by expert QI mentoring, with dual goals of increasing expertise in improvement while improving care. RESULTS: Eighty-six learners and health system workers participated in 12 improvement teams in 2 years. Upon completion of the training, participants expressed that the program enhanced QI and teamwork skills and increased understanding of other health care professions. At the end of the program, fourth-year medical students showed greater ability to apply QI skills, as measured by the QI Knowledge Assessment Tool than did control students who did not participate in the program (P

    @article{RefWorks:855,
      author={L. W. Hall and L. A. Headrick and K. R. Cox and K. Deane and J. W. Gay and J. Brandt},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Linking health professional learners and health care workers on action-based improvement teams },
      journal={Quality management in health care},
      volume={18},
      number={3},
      pages={194-201},
      note={id: 4249; JID: 9306156; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Medical students, nursing students, and other health care professionals in training were integrated with health care workers on interprofessional quality improvement (QI) teams at our academic health center. Teams received training in QI, accompanied by expert QI mentoring, with dual goals of increasing expertise in improvement while improving care. RESULTS: Eighty-six learners and health system workers participated in 12 improvement teams in 2 years. Upon completion of the training, participants expressed that the program enhanced QI and teamwork skills and increased understanding of other health care professions. At the end of the program, fourth-year medical students showed greater ability to apply QI skills, as measured by the QI Knowledge Assessment Tool than did control students who did not participate in the program (P },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Health Personnel; Humans; Program Evaluation; Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration; Questionnaires; Students, Medical},
      isbn={1063-8628},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hansen, T. B., Jacobsen, F., & Larsen, K.. (2009). Cost effective interprofessional training: an evaluation of a training unit in Denmark . Journal of interprofessional care, 23(3), 234-241.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    In 2004, the first Danish undergraduate interprofessional training unit (ITU) was established at the Regional Hospital Holstebro, inspired by experiences from Sweden. In this unit, medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students are given responsibility, under supervision by trained and motivated personnel, for rehabilitation and care of patients in a subunit of an orthopaedic department. The aim of this study was to see whether the ITU was cost effective in treating patients compared with a conventional orthopaedic ward. One-hundred and thirty-four patients admitted for primary hip or knee replacement surgery were included in the study. All costs were recorded in the ITU and in the conventional ward. Follow-up was done by a quality of life questionnaire three months after the operation. Comparison was done by univariable and multivariable testing of costs and effect. In both, the ITU was more cost effective than the conventional ward. No difference was found in complications and patient-reported quality of life. In conclusion, clinical training can be given to students in an ITU without reducing productivity in a hospital environment if pedagogic principles, clinical tutors and patient logistics all adapt to the challenge of the teaching environment. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:885,
      author={T. B. Hansen and F. Jacobsen and K. Larsen},
      year={2009},
      month={May},
      title={Cost effective interprofessional training: an evaluation of a training unit in Denmark },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={23},
      number={3},
      pages={234-241},
      note={id: 4119; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={In 2004, the first Danish undergraduate interprofessional training unit (ITU) was established at the Regional Hospital Holstebro, inspired by experiences from Sweden. In this unit, medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students are given responsibility, under supervision by trained and motivated personnel, for rehabilitation and care of patients in a subunit of an orthopaedic department. The aim of this study was to see whether the ITU was cost effective in treating patients compared with a conventional orthopaedic ward. One-hundred and thirty-four patients admitted for primary hip or knee replacement surgery were included in the study. All costs were recorded in the ITU and in the conventional ward. Follow-up was done by a quality of life questionnaire three months after the operation. Comparison was done by univariable and multivariable testing of costs and effect. In both, the ITU was more cost effective than the conventional ward. No difference was found in complications and patient-reported quality of life. In conclusion, clinical training can be given to students in an ITU without reducing productivity in a hospital environment if pedagogic principles, clinical tutors and patient logistics all adapt to the challenge of the teaching environment. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Heale, R., Mossey, S., Lafoley, B., & Gorham, R.. (2009). Identification of facilitators and barriers to the role of a mentor in the clinical setting . Journal of interprofessional care, 23(4), 369-379.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Clinical mentors are integral to the education of health care professionals. In Northeastern Ontario, Canada, clinical mentors can take a variety of forms. Examples include preceptors who are employees in a clinical setting working with an individual student for a specific period of time, clinical educators, individuals contracted to take a group of students in acute care settings, and faculty advisors, who facilitate students’ community placements. An internet survey exploring the preparation and support of clinical mentors was delivered to clinical mentors from a variety of health disciplines. Part of the survey was based on the concept of self-efficacy which assessed participants’ confidence levels with the various aspects of the clinical mentor role. Participants also reported on supports and barriers to their role as clinical mentors. Findings indicate that clinical mentors across all the health disciplines are not always confident in the delivery of clinical education, most specifically with adapting teaching style and assisting the student to apply research to practice. Consistency of results of the survey speaks to the potential value for a collaborative, interprofessional approach to the orientation and support of clinical mentors in a variety of health discipline education programs. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:886,
      author={R. Heale and S. Mossey and B. Lafoley and R. Gorham},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul},
      title={Identification of facilitators and barriers to the role of a mentor in the clinical setting },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={23},
      number={4},
      pages={369-379},
      note={id: 4115; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={Clinical mentors are integral to the education of health care professionals. In Northeastern Ontario, Canada, clinical mentors can take a variety of forms. Examples include preceptors who are employees in a clinical setting working with an individual student for a specific period of time, clinical educators, individuals contracted to take a group of students in acute care settings, and faculty advisors, who facilitate students' community placements. An internet survey exploring the preparation and support of clinical mentors was delivered to clinical mentors from a variety of health disciplines. Part of the survey was based on the concept of self-efficacy which assessed participants' confidence levels with the various aspects of the clinical mentor role. Participants also reported on supports and barriers to their role as clinical mentors. Findings indicate that clinical mentors across all the health disciplines are not always confident in the delivery of clinical education, most specifically with adapting teaching style and assisting the student to apply research to practice. Consistency of results of the survey speaks to the potential value for a collaborative, interprofessional approach to the orientation and support of clinical mentors in a variety of health discipline education programs. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ibsen, L., Moss, L., & Pate, M. F. D.. (2009). Learning to be a physician by collaborating with experienced pediatric intensive care unit nurses . AACN advanced critical care, 20(3), 220-225.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Clearly, respectful and collaborative communication between nurses and doctors is essential for safe, effective patient care. This is particularly true for the high-stakes environment of the critical care unit, which provides a unique environment in which to teach and model effective interdisciplinary communication, especially when the experience can occur in a one-to-one patient ratio. As previously stated, nurses in PICUs are responsible for 1 or 2 patients whereas the residents may be responsible for all the patients. Having a “nursing experience” allowed these residents to learn what it is like to balance complex and conflicting patient needs simultaneously. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:856,
      author={L. Ibsen and L. Moss and M. F. D Pate},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={Learning to be a physician by collaborating with experienced pediatric intensive care unit nurses },
      journal={AACN advanced critical care},
      volume={20},
      number={3},
      pages={220-225},
      note={id: 4245; JID: 101269322; ppublish },
      abstract={Clearly, respectful and collaborative communication between nurses and doctors is essential for safe, effective patient care. This is particularly true for the high-stakes environment of the critical care unit, which provides a unique environment in which to teach and model effective interdisciplinary communication, especially when the experience can occur in a one-to-one patient ratio. As previously stated, nurses in PICUs are responsible for 1 or 2 patients whereas the residents may be responsible for all the patients. Having a “nursing experience” allowed these residents to learn what it is like to balance complex and conflicting patient needs simultaneously. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1559-7776},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Jacobsen, F., & Lindqvist, S.. (2009). A two-week stay in an Interprofessional Training Unit changes students’ attitudes to health professionals . Journal of interprofessional care, 23(3), 242-250.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Attitudes amongst health professionals can impact on the effectiveness of teamworking and patient care. Interprofessional education (IPE) is thought to contribute to the development of positive attitudes. An Interprofessional Training Unit (ITU) was set up to create an optimal learning environment for healthcare students. Students’ attitudes were assessed, using a version of the Attitudes to Health Professionals Questionnaire (AHPQ) that had been translated into the students’ native language. This paper describes the process undertaken to obtain a trustworthy translation. One hundred and sixty two students from occupational therapy, physiotherapy, medicine and nursing completed the questionnaire before and after their stay at the ITU. Their responses were analysed in relation to the constructs "caring" and "subservient" from the validated English version of AHPQ. Echoing earlier studies elsewhere, at the beginning students viewed doctors as being the least "caring" and the least "subservient" professional group. Nurses were seen by the students as being the most "caring" and the most "subservient" profession. After the ITU experience students viewed most professions as more "caring" and less "subservient", apart from doctors, who were seen as being more subservient after the ITU experience. This study indicates that an IPE initiative such as the ITU can impact positively on students’ attitudes and that the translated AHPQ can be used to monitor this attitudinal change. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:888,
      author={F. Jacobsen and S. Lindqvist},
      year={2009},
      month={May},
      title={A two-week stay in an Interprofessional Training Unit changes students' attitudes to health professionals },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={23},
      number={3},
      pages={242-250},
      note={id: 4118; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={Attitudes amongst health professionals can impact on the effectiveness of teamworking and patient care. Interprofessional education (IPE) is thought to contribute to the development of positive attitudes. An Interprofessional Training Unit (ITU) was set up to create an optimal learning environment for healthcare students. Students' attitudes were assessed, using a version of the Attitudes to Health Professionals Questionnaire (AHPQ) that had been translated into the students' native language. This paper describes the process undertaken to obtain a trustworthy translation. One hundred and sixty two students from occupational therapy, physiotherapy, medicine and nursing completed the questionnaire before and after their stay at the ITU. Their responses were analysed in relation to the constructs "caring" and "subservient" from the validated English version of AHPQ. Echoing earlier studies elsewhere, at the beginning students viewed doctors as being the least "caring" and the least "subservient" professional group. Nurses were seen by the students as being the most "caring" and the most "subservient" profession. After the ITU experience students viewed most professions as more "caring" and less "subservient", apart from doctors, who were seen as being more subservient after the ITU experience. This study indicates that an IPE initiative such as the ITU can impact positively on students' attitudes and that the translated AHPQ can be used to monitor this attitudinal change. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Jacobsen, F., Fink, A. M., Marcussen, V., Larsen, K., & Hansen, T. B.. (2009). Interprofessional undergraduate clinical learning: results from a three year project in a Danish Interprofessional Training Unit . Journal of interprofessional care, 23(1), 30-40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    On entering higher education students become professionally socialized, and parallel with this, stereotyping takes place, students developing a more positive assessment of their own roles than those of other professions. This difference between the view of their own and other professions can contribute to creating cognitive and social boundaries between professions that hinder sharing of knowledge, which can result in poor cooperation. Interprofessional training can provide students with good clinical expertise in their own profession as well as teach them about other professions encouraging more positive attitudes between the professions. This project has taken place from 2004 to 2007 in a Danish Interprofessional Training Unit manned with students from the professions occupational therapy, physiotherapy, medicine and nursing. As part of an evaluation of the project, four focus group interviews and two in-depth interviews were analysed using the technique of Systematic Text Condensation. Results show that the goals of the Interprofessional Training Unit were fulfilled because the students learned interprofessional teamwork, strengthened their own professional role and worked together in an organization for the benefit of the patient. All this took place in a secure learning environment in which new methods of coordinating and integrating clinical and theoretical interprofessional learning were developed and tested. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:887,
      author={F. Jacobsen and A. M. Fink and V. Marcussen and K. Larsen and T. B. Hansen},
      year={2009},
      month={Jan},
      title={Interprofessional undergraduate clinical learning: results from a three year project in a Danish Interprofessional Training Unit },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={23},
      number={1},
      pages={30-40},
      note={id: 4120; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={On entering higher education students become professionally socialized, and parallel with this, stereotyping takes place, students developing a more positive assessment of their own roles than those of other professions. This difference between the view of their own and other professions can contribute to creating cognitive and social boundaries between professions that hinder sharing of knowledge, which can result in poor cooperation. Interprofessional training can provide students with good clinical expertise in their own profession as well as teach them about other professions encouraging more positive attitudes between the professions. This project has taken place from 2004 to 2007 in a Danish Interprofessional Training Unit manned with students from the professions occupational therapy, physiotherapy, medicine and nursing. As part of an evaluation of the project, four focus group interviews and two in-depth interviews were analysed using the technique of Systematic Text Condensation. Results show that the goals of the Interprofessional Training Unit were fulfilled because the students learned interprofessional teamwork, strengthened their own professional role and worked together in an organization for the benefit of the patient. All this took place in a secure learning environment in which new methods of coordinating and integrating clinical and theoretical interprofessional learning were developed and tested. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Janson, S. L., Cooke, M., McGrath, K. W., Kroon, L. A., Robinson, S., & Baron, R. B.. (2009). Improving chronic care of type 2 diabetes using teams of interprofessional learners . Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 84(11), 1540-1548.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: To improve the care and outcomes of adult patients with type 2 diabetes by teaching interprofessional teams of learners the principles and practices of the Improving Chronic Illness Care Model. METHOD: The study population consisted of 384 adult patients with type 2 diabetes. The study design was a nonrandomized, parallel-group, clinical trial conducted during 18 months in the University of California, San Francisco internal medicine clinics. Interprofessional team care provided by primary care internal medicine residents, nurse practitioner students, and pharmacy students was compared with usual care by internal medicine residents only. Processes of care, clinical status, and health utilization were measured in both patient groups. Learner outcomes also were assessed and compared. RESULTS: At study completion, intervention patients more frequently received assessments of glycosolated hemoglobin (79% versus 67%; P=.01), LDL-C (69% versus 55%; P=.009), blood pressure (86% versus 79%; P=.08), microalbuminuria (40% versus 30%; P=.05), smoking status assessment (43% versus 31%; P=.02), and foot exams (38% versus 20%; P=.0005). Intervention patients had more planned general medicine visits (7.9+/-6.2 versus 6.2+/-5.7; P=.006) than did control patients. Interprofessional learners rated themselves significantly higher on measures of accomplishment, preparation, and success for chronic care than did the usual care learners. CONCLUSIONS: Interprofessional team care by learners was effective in improving quality of care for adult patients with diabetes treated in general medicine clinics. The chronic illness framework resulted in more appropriate health care utilization. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:857,
      author={S. L. Janson and M. Cooke and K. W. McGrath and L. A. Kroon and S. Robinson and R. B. Baron},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov},
      title={Improving chronic care of type 2 diabetes using teams of interprofessional learners },
      journal={Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges},
      volume={84},
      number={11},
      pages={1540-1548},
      note={id: 4442; JID: 8904605; 0 (Cholesterol, LDL); 0 (Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated); ppublish },
      abstract={PURPOSE: To improve the care and outcomes of adult patients with type 2 diabetes by teaching interprofessional teams of learners the principles and practices of the Improving Chronic Illness Care Model. METHOD: The study population consisted of 384 adult patients with type 2 diabetes. The study design was a nonrandomized, parallel-group, clinical trial conducted during 18 months in the University of California, San Francisco internal medicine clinics. Interprofessional team care provided by primary care internal medicine residents, nurse practitioner students, and pharmacy students was compared with usual care by internal medicine residents only. Processes of care, clinical status, and health utilization were measured in both patient groups. Learner outcomes also were assessed and compared. RESULTS: At study completion, intervention patients more frequently received assessments of glycosolated hemoglobin (79% versus 67%; P=.01), LDL-C (69% versus 55%; P=.009), blood pressure (86% versus 79%; P=.08), microalbuminuria (40% versus 30%; P=.05), smoking status assessment (43% versus 31%; P=.02), and foot exams (38% versus 20%; P=.0005). Intervention patients had more planned general medicine visits (7.9+/-6.2 versus 6.2+/-5.7; P=.006) than did control patients. Interprofessional learners rated themselves significantly higher on measures of accomplishment, preparation, and success for chronic care than did the usual care learners. CONCLUSIONS: Interprofessional team care by learners was effective in improving quality of care for adult patients with diabetes treated in general medicine clinics. The chronic illness framework resulted in more appropriate health care utilization. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={California; Cholesterol, LDL/blood; Chronic Disease; Curriculum; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy; Female; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated/analysis; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Learning; Male; Middle Aged; Patient Care Team/standards; Quality of Health Care/standards; Self Care; Treatment Outcome; United States},
      isbn={1938-808X; 1938-808X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kanisin-Overton, G., McCalister, P., Kelly, D., & MacVicar, R.. (2009). The Practice-based Small Group Learning programme: experiences of learners in multi-professional groups . Journal of interprofessional care, 23(3), 262-272.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study describes the experiences of General Practitioners (GPs) and Practice Nurses (PNs) as they came together and engaged in the Practice-based Small Group Learning (PBSGL) programme. Based on principles of adult and small group learning, PBSGL, which was developed in Canada, was used for the first time for the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of multi-professional groups in the UK. The findings detail the main reasons GPs and PNs participated in PBSGL, the nature of interaction and development of cohesion in the groups, factors influencing contribution to discussions, the learning process, and outcomes for learners. Respect shown for different roles and perspectives enabled participants to be open about gaps in their knowledge and to ask questions. A mutual keenness to understand the perspectives of and learn from the other profession emerges as a key ingredient for learners to feel that their learning needs were met. The learning process in the groups came close to transformative learning–there were changes in perspectives, acquisition of new knowledge and increased self-esteem. The appropriateness of the PBSGL approach for the CPD of mixed groups of GPs and PNs is discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:889,
      author={G. Kanisin-Overton and P. McCalister and D. Kelly and R. MacVicar},
      year={2009},
      month={May},
      title={The Practice-based Small Group Learning programme: experiences of learners in multi-professional groups },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={23},
      number={3},
      pages={262-272},
      note={id: 4116; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={This study describes the experiences of General Practitioners (GPs) and Practice Nurses (PNs) as they came together and engaged in the Practice-based Small Group Learning (PBSGL) programme. Based on principles of adult and small group learning, PBSGL, which was developed in Canada, was used for the first time for the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) of multi-professional groups in the UK. The findings detail the main reasons GPs and PNs participated in PBSGL, the nature of interaction and development of cohesion in the groups, factors influencing contribution to discussions, the learning process, and outcomes for learners. Respect shown for different roles and perspectives enabled participants to be open about gaps in their knowledge and to ask questions. A mutual keenness to understand the perspectives of and learn from the other profession emerges as a key ingredient for learners to feel that their learning needs were met. The learning process in the groups came close to transformative learning--there were changes in perspectives, acquisition of new knowledge and increased self-esteem. The appropriateness of the PBSGL approach for the CPD of mixed groups of GPs and PNs is discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kinyon, J., Keith, C. B., & Pistole, M. C.. (2009). A collaborative approach to group experiential learning with undergraduate nursing students . The Journal of nursing education, 48(3), 165-166.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Because many nursing responsibilities are accomplished in groups, undergraduate nursing curricula need to prepare students in the skills required to function effectively in groups. This article describes an interdisciplinary, group experiential learning approach used with baccalaureate nursing students as group participants and graduate counseling psychology students as facilitators. This teaching method provides learning to enhance the knowledge and skills of students preparing for both professions. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:890,
      author={J. Kinyon and C. B. Keith and M. C. Pistole},
      year={2009},
      month={Mar},
      title={A collaborative approach to group experiential learning with undergraduate nursing students },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={3},
      pages={165-166},
      note={id: 4112; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={Because many nursing responsibilities are accomplished in groups, undergraduate nursing curricula need to prepare students in the skills required to function effectively in groups. This article describes an interdisciplinary, group experiential learning approach used with baccalaureate nursing students as group participants and graduate counseling psychology students as facilitators. This teaching method provides learning to enhance the knowledge and skills of students preparing for both professions. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Counseling/education; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Group Processes; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Nursing Education Research; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Problem-Based Learning/organization & administration; Program Evaluation; Psychology, Clinical/education; Questionnaires; Students, Health Occupations/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Levett-Jones, T., & Lathlean, J.. (2009). ‘Don’t rock the boat’: Nursing students’ experiences of conformity and compliance . Nurse education today, 29(3), 342-349.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: This paper profiles a cross national case study that examined nursing students’ experience of belongingness when undertaking clinical placements. The aim of the paper is to present selected findings that focus on the relationship between belongingness, conformity and compliance. BACKGROUND: Literature from the disciplines of psychology, social science and nursing is presented as a background to the study. METHODS: This was a mixed methods case study; in this paper the qualitative phase is described. Eighteen third year nursing students from two universities in Australia and one in the United Kingdom were interviewed and the data thematically analysed. FINDINGS: Three sub themes emerged within the category of conformity and compliance. These included: Don’t rock the boat; getting the RNs offside; and speaking up. Students described how and why they adopted or adapted to the teams’ and institution’s values and norms, rather than challenging them, believing that this would improve their likelihood of acceptance and inclusion by the nursing staff. CONCLUSION: Further research is required to examine the subtle interplay of factors that influence nursing students’ attitudes and behaviours in relation to their need to belong, how conformity and compliance are acculturated in practice, and how students can be empowered to speak out against poor practice to become assertive and confident practitioners. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:892,
      author={T. Levett-Jones and J. Lathlean},
      year={2009},
      month={Apr},
      title={'Don't rock the boat': Nursing students' experiences of conformity and compliance },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={29},
      number={3},
      pages={342-349},
      note={id: 3710; JID: 8511379; 2008/07/13 [received]; 2008/10/11 [revised]; 2008/10/18 [accepted]; 2008/12/03 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: This paper profiles a cross national case study that examined nursing students' experience of belongingness when undertaking clinical placements. The aim of the paper is to present selected findings that focus on the relationship between belongingness, conformity and compliance. BACKGROUND: Literature from the disciplines of psychology, social science and nursing is presented as a background to the study. METHODS: This was a mixed methods case study; in this paper the qualitative phase is described. Eighteen third year nursing students from two universities in Australia and one in the United Kingdom were interviewed and the data thematically analysed. FINDINGS: Three sub themes emerged within the category of conformity and compliance. These included: Don't rock the boat; getting the RNs offside; and speaking up. Students described how and why they adopted or adapted to the teams' and institution's values and norms, rather than challenging them, believing that this would improve their likelihood of acceptance and inclusion by the nursing staff. CONCLUSION: Further research is required to examine the subtle interplay of factors that influence nursing students' attitudes and behaviours in relation to their need to belong, how conformity and compliance are acculturated in practice, and how students can be empowered to speak out against poor practice to become assertive and confident practitioners. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1532-2793},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Mann, K. V., Mcfetridge-Durdle, J., Martin-Misener, R., & et al. (2009). Interprofessional education for students of the health professions: the "Seamless Care" model . Journal of interprofessional care, 23(3), 224-233.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    "Seamless Care" was one of 21 grants awarded by Health Canada to inform policymakers of the effectiveness of interprofessional education in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice among health professionals. The "Seamless Care" model of interprofessional education was designed with input from three Faculties at Dalhousie University (Medicine, Dentistry and Health Professions). The design was grounded in relevant learning theories–Social Cognitive Theory, Self-efficacy, Situated Learning theory and Constructivism. The intervention was informed by principles of active learning, problem-based learning, reflection and role modeling. The primary goal of Seamless Care was to develop students’ interprofessional patient-centred collaborative skills through experiential learning. Fourteen student teams, each including one student from medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry and dental hygiene, learned with, from and about each other while they were mentored in the collaborative care of patients transitioning from acute care to the community. Student teams providing collaborative care assisted patients experiencing a chronic illness to become more active in managing their health through development of self-management and decision-making skills. This paper describes the Seamless Care model of interprofessional education and discusses the theoretical underpinnings of this experiential model of interprofessional education designed to extend classroom-based interprofessional education to the clinical setting. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:893,
      author={K. V. Mann and J. Mcfetridge-Durdle and R. Martin-Misener and et al},
      year={2009},
      month={May},
      title={Interprofessional education for students of the health professions: the "Seamless Care" model },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={23},
      number={3},
      pages={224-233},
      note={id: 4117; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={"Seamless Care" was one of 21 grants awarded by Health Canada to inform policymakers of the effectiveness of interprofessional education in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice among health professionals. The "Seamless Care" model of interprofessional education was designed with input from three Faculties at Dalhousie University (Medicine, Dentistry and Health Professions). The design was grounded in relevant learning theories--Social Cognitive Theory, Self-efficacy, Situated Learning theory and Constructivism. The intervention was informed by principles of active learning, problem-based learning, reflection and role modeling. The primary goal of Seamless Care was to develop students' interprofessional patient-centred collaborative skills through experiential learning. Fourteen student teams, each including one student from medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry and dental hygiene, learned with, from and about each other while they were mentored in the collaborative care of patients transitioning from acute care to the community. Student teams providing collaborative care assisted patients experiencing a chronic illness to become more active in managing their health through development of self-management and decision-making skills. This paper describes the Seamless Care model of interprofessional education and discusses the theoretical underpinnings of this experiential model of interprofessional education designed to extend classroom-based interprofessional education to the clinical setting. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Margalit, R., Thompson, S., Visovsky, C., & et al. (2009). From professional silos to interprofessional education: campuswide focus on quality of care . Quality management in health care, 18(3), 165-173.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVES: The Institute of Medicine called for the integration of interprofessional education (IPE) into health professions curricula, in order to improve health care quality. In response, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a campus wide IPE program, shifting from traditional educational silos to greater collaboration. METHODS: Students (155) and faculty (30) from 6 academic programs (nursing, medicine, public health, allied health, dentistry, and pharmacy) engaged with a university hospital partner to deliver this program. The content addressed principles of IPE, teamwork development and 2 common quality care problems: hospital-acquired infections and communication errors. Pre-/post-surveys, the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale, and the Interprofessional Education Perception Scale, were used for descriptive assessment of student learning. RESULTS: Students demonstrated increased understanding of health care quality and interprofessional teamwork principles and reported positive attitudes toward shared learning. While responses to the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale grew more positive after the program, scores on the Interprofessional Education Perception Scale were more homogeneous. Both students and faculty highly evaluated the experience. CONCLUSION: This program was a first step in preparing individuals for collaborative learning, fostering awareness and enthusiasm for IPE among students and faculty, and demonstrating the feasibility of overcoming common barriers to IPE such as schedule coordination and faculty buy-in. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:894,
      author={R. Margalit and S. Thompson and C. Visovsky and et al},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul-Sep},
      title={From professional silos to interprofessional education: campuswide focus on quality of care },
      journal={Quality management in health care},
      volume={18},
      number={3},
      pages={165-173},
      note={id: 4184; JID: 9306156; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVES: The Institute of Medicine called for the integration of interprofessional education (IPE) into health professions curricula, in order to improve health care quality. In response, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a campus wide IPE program, shifting from traditional educational silos to greater collaboration. METHODS: Students (155) and faculty (30) from 6 academic programs (nursing, medicine, public health, allied health, dentistry, and pharmacy) engaged with a university hospital partner to deliver this program. The content addressed principles of IPE, teamwork development and 2 common quality care problems: hospital-acquired infections and communication errors. Pre-/post-surveys, the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale, and the Interprofessional Education Perception Scale, were used for descriptive assessment of student learning. RESULTS: Students demonstrated increased understanding of health care quality and interprofessional teamwork principles and reported positive attitudes toward shared learning. While responses to the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale grew more positive after the program, scores on the Interprofessional Education Perception Scale were more homogeneous. Both students and faculty highly evaluated the experience. CONCLUSION: This program was a first step in preparing individuals for collaborative learning, fostering awareness and enthusiasm for IPE among students and faculty, and demonstrating the feasibility of overcoming common barriers to IPE such as schedule coordination and faculty buy-in. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1063-8628},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McKeon, L. M., Cunningham, P. D., & Oswaks, J. S. D.. (2009). Improving patient safety: patient-focused, high-reliability team training . Journal of nursing care quality, 24(1), 76-82.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Healthcare systems are recognizing "human factor" flaws that result in adverse outcomes. Nurses work around system failures, although increasing healthcare complexity makes this harder to do without risk of error. Aviation and military organizations achieve ultrasafe outcomes through high-reliability practice. We describe how reliability principles were used to teach nurses to improve patient safety at the front line of care. Outcomes include safety-oriented, teamwork communication competency; reflections on safety culture and clinical leadership are discussed. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:895,
      author={L. M. McKeon and P. D. Cunningham and J. S. D. Oswaks},
      year={2009},
      month={2009 Jan-Mar},
      title={Improving patient safety: patient-focused, high-reliability team training },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={24},
      number={1},
      pages={76-82},
      note={id: 3259; Accession Number: 2010145320. Language: English. Entry Date: 20090213. Revision Date: 20090213. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Education; Patient Safety; Quality Assurance. No. of Refs: 20 ref. NLM UID: 9200672. Email: lmckeon@utmem.edu. },
      abstract={Healthcare systems are recognizing "human factor" flaws that result in adverse outcomes. Nurses work around system failures, although increasing healthcare complexity makes this harder to do without risk of error. Aviation and military organizations achieve ultrasafe outcomes through high-reliability practice. We describe how reliability principles were used to teach nurses to improve patient safety at the front line of care. Outcomes include safety-oriented, teamwork communication competency; reflections on safety culture and clinical leadership are discussed. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Patient Safety -- Education; Registered Nurses -- Education; Teamwork -- Education; Communication; Leadership; Organizational Culture; Quality Improvement; Reliability; Tennessee},
      isbn={1057-3631},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010145320&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Quisling, K. E.. (2009). Resident orientation: nurses create a program to improve care coordination . The American Journal of Nursing, 109(11 Suppl), 26-28.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The resident orientation succeeded in meeting the goals of increased staff satisfaction and improved coordination of care. Surveys of both nurses and residents provided evidence that the informal meetings had a positive effect on nurse–physician communication. In the past, residents and nurses would wait to discuss a difficult or challenging issue with a member of management. Now they are more inclined to go directly to each other, and they receive responses immediately rather than days later. The nursing staff also have become comfortable and confident looking out for the needs of patients and families by making recommendations on patients’ care plans. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:858,
      author={K. E. Quisling},
      year={2009},
      month={Nov},
      title={Resident orientation: nurses create a program to improve care coordination },
      journal={The American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={109},
      number={11 Suppl},
      pages={26-28},
      note={id: 4445; JID: 0372646; ppublish },
      abstract={The resident orientation succeeded in meeting the goals of increased staff satisfaction and improved coordination of care. Surveys of both nurses and residents provided evidence that the informal meetings had a positive effect on nurse–physician communication. In the past, residents and nurses would wait to discuss a difficult or challenging issue with a member of management. Now they are more inclined to go directly to each other, and they receive responses immediately rather than days later. The nursing staff also have become comfortable and confident looking out for the needs of patients and families by making recommendations on patients' care plans. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Chicago; Communication; Continuity of Patient Care; Hospitals, Pediatric; Humans; Inservice Training/organization & administration; Internship and Residency/organization & administration; Medical Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration/psychology; Nurse's Role; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Innovation; Patient Satisfaction; Physician-Nurse Relations; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Safety Management; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1538-7488; 1538-7488},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Roberts, K. T., Robinson, K. M., Stewart, C., & Smith, F.. (2009). An integrated mental health clinical rotation . Journal of Nursing Education, 48(8), 454-459.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The most common site for accessing mental health care is the primary care setting. Yet, primary care nurses are not adequately prepared to treat the complex mental health needs of these patients. Similarly, providers in segregated mental health sites do not adequately address physical health needs. New educational models are needed to better prepare nursing graduates to provide holistic care. The integrated mental health model, which colocates mental health specialists in primary care sites, is designed to do this. This article describes key curricular elements of a successful interprofessional clinical rotation within an integrated mental health team that included the use of case studies, a standardized mental health screening instrument, a quality improvement process, and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Family nurse practitioner and psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner students learned to collaborate with each other and with other members of the interprofessional team to provide holistic care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:859,
      author={K. T. Roberts and K. M. Robinson and C. Stewart and F. Smith},
      year={2009},
      month={08},
      title={An integrated mental health clinical rotation },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={48},
      number={8},
      pages={454-459},
      note={id: 4319},
      abstract={The most common site for accessing mental health care is the primary care setting. Yet, primary care nurses are not adequately prepared to treat the complex mental health needs of these patients. Similarly, providers in segregated mental health sites do not adequately address physical health needs. New educational models are needed to better prepare nursing graduates to provide holistic care. The integrated mental health model, which colocates mental health specialists in primary care sites, is designed to do this. This article describes key curricular elements of a successful interprofessional clinical rotation within an integrated mental health team that included the use of case studies, a standardized mental health screening instrument, a quality improvement process, and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Family nurse practitioner and psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner students learned to collaborate with each other and with other members of the interprofessional team to provide holistic care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Education, Nursing, Graduate -- Administration; Family Nursing -- Administration; Nurse Practitioners -- Administration; Nurse Practitioners -- Education; Nurse Practitioners -- Psychosocial Factors; Primary Health Care -- Administration; Psychiatric Nursing -- Administration; Psychiatric Nursing -- Education; Benchmarking; Curriculum; Faculty, Nursing -- Administration; Holistic Care; Mental Health Services -- Administration; Models, Educational; Multidisciplinary Care Team -- Administration; Organizational Objectives; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Quality Improvement -- Administration},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010378946&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

  • Salas, E., Almeida, S. A., Salisbury, M., & et al. (2009). What are the critical success factors for team training in health care? . Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources, 35(8), 398-405.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Ineffective communication among medical teams is a leading cause of preventable patient harm throughout the health care system. A growing body of literature indicates that medical teamwork improves the quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness of health care delivery, and expectations for teamwork in health care have increased. Yet few health care professions’ curricula include teamwork training, and few medical practices integrate teamwork principles. Because of this knowledge gap, growing numbers of health care systems are requiring staff to participate in formal teamwork training programs. Seven evidence-based, practical, systematic success factors for preparing, implementing, and sustaining a team training and performance improvement initiative were identified. Each success factor is accompanied by tips for deployment and a real-world example of application. SUCCESS FACTORS: (1) Align team training objectives and safety aims with organizational goals, (2) provide organizational support for the team training initiative, (3) get frontline care leaders on board, (4) prepare the environment and trainees for team training, (5) determine required resources and time commitment and ensure their availability, (6) facilitate application of trained teamwork skills on the job; and (7) measure the effectiveness of the team training program. DISCUSSION: Although decades of research in other high-risk organizations have clearly demonstrated that properly designed team training programs can improve team performance, success is highly dependent on organizational factors such as leadership support, learning climate, and commitment to data-driven change. Before engaging in a teamwork training initiative, health care organizations should have a clear understanding of these factors and the strategies for their establishment. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:860,
      author={E. Salas and S. A. Almeida and M. Salisbury and et al},
      year={2009},
      month={Aug},
      title={What are the critical success factors for team training in health care? },
      journal={Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources},
      volume={35},
      number={8},
      pages={398-405},
      note={id: 4224; JID: 101238023; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Ineffective communication among medical teams is a leading cause of preventable patient harm throughout the health care system. A growing body of literature indicates that medical teamwork improves the quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness of health care delivery, and expectations for teamwork in health care have increased. Yet few health care professions' curricula include teamwork training, and few medical practices integrate teamwork principles. Because of this knowledge gap, growing numbers of health care systems are requiring staff to participate in formal teamwork training programs. Seven evidence-based, practical, systematic success factors for preparing, implementing, and sustaining a team training and performance improvement initiative were identified. Each success factor is accompanied by tips for deployment and a real-world example of application. SUCCESS FACTORS: (1) Align team training objectives and safety aims with organizational goals, (2) provide organizational support for the team training initiative, (3) get frontline care leaders on board, (4) prepare the environment and trainees for team training, (5) determine required resources and time commitment and ensure their availability, (6) facilitate application of trained teamwork skills on the job; and (7) measure the effectiveness of the team training program. DISCUSSION: Although decades of research in other high-risk organizations have clearly demonstrated that properly designed team training programs can improve team performance, success is highly dependent on organizational factors such as leadership support, learning climate, and commitment to data-driven change. Before engaging in a teamwork training initiative, health care organizations should have a clear understanding of these factors and the strategies for their establishment. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1553-7250},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Sandahl, S. S.. (2009). Collaborative testing as a learning strategy in nursing education: a review of the literature . Nursing education perspectives, 30(3), 171-175.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nurses are important members of a patient’s interprofessional health care team. A primary goal of nursing education is to prepare nursing professionals who can work collaboratively with other team members for the benefit of the patient. Collaborative learning strategies provide students with opportunities to learn and practice collaboration. Collaborative testing is a collaborative learning strategy used to foster knowledge development, critical thinking in decision-making, and group processing skills. This article reviews the theoretical basis for collaborative learning and research on collaborative testing in nursing education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:861,
      author={S. S. Sandahl},
      year={2009},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Collaborative testing as a learning strategy in nursing education: a review of the literature },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={30},
      number={3},
      pages={171-175},
      note={id: 4371; JID: 101140025; RF: 39; ppublish },
      abstract={Nurses are important members of a patient's interprofessional health care team. A primary goal of nursing education is to prepare nursing professionals who can work collaboratively with other team members for the benefit of the patient. Collaborative learning strategies provide students with opportunities to learn and practice collaboration. Collaborative testing is a collaborative learning strategy used to foster knowledge development, critical thinking in decision-making, and group processing skills. This article reviews the theoretical basis for collaborative learning and research on collaborative testing in nursing education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Educational Measurement/methods; Group Processes; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Education Research; Research Design; Students, Nursing/psychology; Thinking},
      isbn={1536-5026},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Thomas, C. M., Bertram, E., & Johnson, D.. (2009). The SBAR communication technique: teaching nursing students professional communication skills . Nurse educator, 34(4), 176-180.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Joint Commission and Institute for Healthcare Improvement have mandated healthcare organizations to improve professional communication. Nursing students lack experience in communicating with physicians. As a result, recent graduates may not be prepared to meet the demands of professional communication to ensure patient safety. The authors discuss the SBAR (situation, background, assessment, recommendations) communication technique implemented during a 2-day simulation exercise that provided an organized logical sequence and improved communication and prepared graduates for transition to clinical practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:862,
      author={C. M. Thomas and E. Bertram and D. Johnson},
      year={2009},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={The SBAR communication technique: teaching nursing students professional communication skills },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={34},
      number={4},
      pages={176-180},
      note={id: 4373; JID: 7701902; RF: 15; ppublish },
      abstract={The Joint Commission and Institute for Healthcare Improvement have mandated healthcare organizations to improve professional communication. Nursing students lack experience in communicating with physicians. As a result, recent graduates may not be prepared to meet the demands of professional communication to ensure patient safety. The authors discuss the SBAR (situation, background, assessment, recommendations) communication technique implemented during a 2-day simulation exercise that provided an organized logical sequence and improved communication and prepared graduates for transition to clinical practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Abbreviations as Topic; Clinical Protocols; Communication; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Humans; Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations; Medical Errors/prevention & control/psychology; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Assessment; Physician-Nurse Relations; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Professional Competence/standards; Role Playing; Safety; Students, Nursing/psychology; Total Quality Management; United States},
      isbn={1538-9855},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Thompson, S. A., & Tilden, V. P.. (2009). Embracing quality and safety education for the 21st century: building interprofessional education . The Journal of nursing education, 48(12), 698-701.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The education of health professions students is rooted historically in time-honored and silo-bound traditions of pedagogy and content not easily influenced by outside forces. However, the quality chasm work of the Institute of Medicine, Institute of Healthcare Improvement, Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, and other groups has led to a remarkable willingness to change at one academic health sciences university. This article describes one university’s strategies, challenges, and successes in delivering interprofessional educational programs. Four interprofessional learning activities, developed using a plan-do-study-act model and focused on teamwork, quality, and safety, are presented. Challenges and successes encountered are described as well as a curricular framework to enhance sustainability. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:923,
      author={S. A. Thompson and V. P. Tilden},
      year={2009},
      month={Dec},
      title={Embracing quality and safety education for the 21st century: building interprofessional education },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={48},
      number={12},
      pages={698-701},
      note={id: 4662; JID: 7705432; 2009/03/28 [received]; 2009/07/21 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={The education of health professions students is rooted historically in time-honored and silo-bound traditions of pedagogy and content not easily influenced by outside forces. However, the quality chasm work of the Institute of Medicine, Institute of Healthcare Improvement, Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, and other groups has led to a remarkable willingness to change at one academic health sciences university. This article describes one university's strategies, challenges, and successes in delivering interprofessional educational programs. Four interprofessional learning activities, developed using a plan-do-study-act model and focused on teamwork, quality, and safety, are presented. Challenges and successes encountered are described as well as a curricular framework to enhance sustainability. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Allied Health Personnel/education; Competency-Based Education/methods; Education, Medical/methods/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods/organization & administration; Education, Pharmacy/methods/organization & administration; Education, Professional/methods/organization & administration; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Nebraska; Quality of Health Care; Safety Management},
      isbn={0148-4834; 0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Varpio, L., Schryer, C. F., & Lingard, L.. (2009). Routine and adaptive expert strategies for resolving ICT mediated communication problems in the team setting . Medical education, 43(7), 680-687.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    CONTEXT: The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for supporting interprofessional communication is becoming increasingly common in health care. However, little research has explored how ICTs affect interprofessional communication, or how novices are trained to be effective interprofessional ICT users. This study explores the interprofessional communication strategies of nurses and doctors (trainees and experts) when their communications were mediated by a specific ICT: an electronic patient record (EPR). METHODS: A total of 72 doctors and nurses participated in this 8-month study on a paediatric in-patient ward. Eighty hours of non-participant observations and 20 semi-structured interviews were conducted. All data were rendered anonymous prior to analysis. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, one researcher read and analysed all data recursively. As emergent themes were identified, exemplary portions of the data were discussed with three additional researchers to resolve discrepancies and confirm the coding structure. Expertise literatures informed the final analyses. RESULTS: Three interprofessional communication strategies were identified: (i) all participants routinely formulated ‘workarounds’ to circumvent problematic EPR-mediated communications; (ii) workarounds were classifiable as instances of Abandoning, Forcing or Submitting to the EPR, and (iii) novices learned workaround strategies through an informal curriculum, but they did not learn to manage the interprofessional effects of these workarounds. CONCLUSIONS: Trainees relied on workarounds as simplified routines, demonstrating routine expertise. Staff members, demonstrating adaptive expertise, used workarounds as part of a broader network of people and communication tools. Explicit training regarding this network and the ways in which workarounds conceal this network may help trainees develop adaptive expertise. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:879,
      author={L. Varpio and C. F. Schryer and L. Lingard},
      year={2009},
      month={07},
      title={Routine and adaptive expert strategies for resolving ICT mediated communication problems in the team setting },
      journal={Medical education},
      volume={43},
      number={7},
      pages={680-687},
      note={id: 4915},
      abstract={CONTEXT: The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for supporting interprofessional communication is becoming increasingly common in health care. However, little research has explored how ICTs affect interprofessional communication, or how novices are trained to be effective interprofessional ICT users. This study explores the interprofessional communication strategies of nurses and doctors (trainees and experts) when their communications were mediated by a specific ICT: an electronic patient record (EPR). METHODS: A total of 72 doctors and nurses participated in this 8-month study on a paediatric in-patient ward. Eighty hours of non-participant observations and 20 semi-structured interviews were conducted. All data were rendered anonymous prior to analysis. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, one researcher read and analysed all data recursively. As emergent themes were identified, exemplary portions of the data were discussed with three additional researchers to resolve discrepancies and confirm the coding structure. Expertise literatures informed the final analyses. RESULTS: Three interprofessional communication strategies were identified: (i) all participants routinely formulated 'workarounds' to circumvent problematic EPR-mediated communications; (ii) workarounds were classifiable as instances of Abandoning, Forcing or Submitting to the EPR, and (iii) novices learned workaround strategies through an informal curriculum, but they did not learn to manage the interprofessional effects of these workarounds. CONCLUSIONS: Trainees relied on workarounds as simplified routines, demonstrating routine expertise. Staff members, demonstrating adaptive expertise, used workarounds as part of a broader network of people and communication tools. Explicit training regarding this network and the ways in which workarounds conceal this network may help trainees develop adaptive expertise. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Computerized Patient Record -- Utilization; Nurse-Physician Relations -- Evaluation; Pediatric Care -- Education; Child; Grounded Theory; Nonparticipant Observation; Ontario; Purposive Sample; Qualitative Studies; Semi-Structured Interview; Human},
      isbn={0308-0110},
      language={English},
      url={https://auth.lib.unc.edu/ezproxy_auth.php?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010322791&site=ehost-live&scope=site}
    }

2008

  • Ascano-Martin, F.. (2008). Shift report and SBAR: strategies for clinical postconference . Nurse educator, 33(5), 190-191.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Shift report and SBAR are appropriate to use with the group of senior nursing students. Instead of a traditional case study discussion, each student can present his/her patient in a form of a shift report. The student provides report in a professional way. The group then analyzes the report given and provides verbal and written feedback, focusing on the good points and any pertinent patient information that is lacking. At the end of the activity, the instructor gives an index card to students, who are asked to offer constructive feedback about the activity. By repeatedly exposing the students to the same activity (shift report), they are enhancing their communication and organizational skills, which in turn enhances their self-confidence and promotes critical thinking skills. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1379,
      author={F. Ascano-Martin},
      year={2008},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Shift report and SBAR: strategies for clinical postconference },
      journal={Nurse educator},
      volume={33},
      number={5},
      pages={190-191},
      note={id: 2818; PUBM: Print; JID: 7701902; ppublish },
      abstract={Shift report and SBAR are appropriate to use with the group of senior nursing students. Instead of a traditional case study discussion, each student can present his/her patient in a form of a shift report. The student provides report in a professional way. The group then analyzes the report given and provides verbal and written feedback, focusing on the good points and any pertinent patient information that is lacking. At the end of the activity, the instructor gives an index card to students, who are asked to offer constructive feedback about the activity. By repeatedly exposing the students to the same activity (shift report), they are enhancing their communication and organizational skills, which in turn enhances their self-confidence and promotes critical thinking skills. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1538-9855},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Baker, C., Pulling, C., McGraw, R., Dagnone, J. D., Hopkins-Rosseel, D., & Medves, J.. (2008). Simulation in interprofessional education for patient-centred collaborative care . Journal of advanced nursing, 64(4), 372-379.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Aim. This paper is a report of preliminary evaluations of an interprofessional education through simulation project by focusing on learner and teacher reactions to the pilot modules. Background. Approaches to interprofessional education vary widely. Studies indicate, however, that active, experiential learning facilitate it. Patient simulators require learners to incorporate knowing, being and doing in action. A theoretically based competency framework was developed to guide interprofessional education using simulation. The framework includes a typology of shared, complementary and profession-specific competencies. Each competency type is associated with an intraprofessional, multiprofessional, or interprofessional teaching modality and with the professional composition of learner groups. Method. The project is guided by an action research approach in which ongoing evaluation generates knowledge to modify and further develop it. Preliminary evaluations of the first pilot module, cardiac resuscitation rounds, among 101 nursing students, 42 medical students and 70 junior medical residents were conducted in 2005-2007 using a questionnaire with rating scales and open-ended questions. Another 20 medical students, 7 junior residents and 45 nursing students completed a questionnaire based on the Interdisciplinary Education Perception scale. Findings. Simulation-based learning provided students with interprofessional activities they saw as relevant for their future as practitioners. They embraced both the interprofessional and simulation components enthusiastically. Attitudinal scores and responses were consistently positive among both medical and nursing students. Conclusion. Interprofessional education through simulation offers a promising approach to preparing future healthcare professionals for the collaborative models of healthcare delivery being developed internationally.

    @article{RefWorks:1380,
      author={C. Baker and C. Pulling and R. McGraw and J. D. Dagnone and D. Hopkins-Rosseel and J. Medves},
      year={2008},
      month={11/15},
      title={Simulation in interprofessional education for patient-centred collaborative care },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={64},
      number={4},
      pages={372-379},
      note={id: 2867; Accession Number: 2010085501. Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice. No. of Refs: 23 ref. NLM UID: 7609811. },
      abstract={Aim. This paper is a report of preliminary evaluations of an interprofessional education through simulation project by focusing on learner and teacher reactions to the pilot modules. Background. Approaches to interprofessional education vary widely. Studies indicate, however, that active, experiential learning facilitate it. Patient simulators require learners to incorporate knowing, being and doing in action. A theoretically based competency framework was developed to guide interprofessional education using simulation. The framework includes a typology of shared, complementary and profession-specific competencies. Each competency type is associated with an intraprofessional, multiprofessional, or interprofessional teaching modality and with the professional composition of learner groups. Method. The project is guided by an action research approach in which ongoing evaluation generates knowledge to modify and further develop it. Preliminary evaluations of the first pilot module, cardiac resuscitation rounds, among 101 nursing students, 42 medical students and 70 junior medical residents were conducted in 2005-2007 using a questionnaire with rating scales and open-ended questions. Another 20 medical students, 7 junior residents and 45 nursing students completed a questionnaire based on the Interdisciplinary Education Perception scale. Findings. Simulation-based learning provided students with interprofessional activities they saw as relevant for their future as practitioners. They embraced both the interprofessional and simulation components enthusiastically. Attitudinal scores and responses were consistently positive among both medical and nursing students. Conclusion. Interprofessional education through simulation offers a promising approach to preparing future healthcare professionals for the collaborative models of healthcare delivery being developed internationally. },
      isbn={0309-2402},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010085501&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Bandali, K., Parker, K., Mummery, M., & Preece, M.. (2008). Skills integration in a simulated and interprofessional environment: An innovative undergraduate applied health curriculum . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 22(2), 179-189.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The objective of our study was to propose an innovative applied health undergraduate curriculum model that uses simulation and interprofessional education to facilitate students’ integration of both technical and "humanistic" core skills. The model incorporates assessment of student readiness for clinical education and readiness for professional practice in a collaborative, team-based, patient-centred environment. Improving the education of health care professionals is a critical contributor to ultimately improving patient care and outcomes. A review of the current models in health sciences education reveals a scarcity of clinical placements, concerns over students’ preparedness for clinical education, and profession-specific delivery of health care education which fundamentally lacks collaboration and communication amongst professions. These educational shortcomings ultimately impact the delivery and efficacy of health care. Construct validation of clinical readiness will continue through primary research at The Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences. As the new educational model is implemented, its impact will be assessed and documented using specific outcomes measurements. Appropriate modifications to the model will be made to ensure improvement and further applicability to an undergraduate medical curriculum. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1285,
      author={K. Bandali and K. Parker and M. Mummery and M. Preece},
      year={2008},
      month={03},
      title={Skills integration in a simulated and interprofessional environment: An innovative undergraduate applied health curriculum },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={22},
      number={2},
      pages={179-189},
      note={id: 2188; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9205811. },
      abstract={The objective of our study was to propose an innovative applied health undergraduate curriculum model that uses simulation and interprofessional education to facilitate students' integration of both technical and "humanistic" core skills. The model incorporates assessment of student readiness for clinical education and readiness for professional practice in a collaborative, team-based, patient-centred environment. Improving the education of health care professionals is a critical contributor to ultimately improving patient care and outcomes. A review of the current models in health sciences education reveals a scarcity of clinical placements, concerns over students' preparedness for clinical education, and profession-specific delivery of health care education which fundamentally lacks collaboration and communication amongst professions. These educational shortcomings ultimately impact the delivery and efficacy of health care. Construct validation of clinical readiness will continue through primary research at The Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences. As the new educational model is implemented, its impact will be assessed and documented using specific outcomes measurements. Appropriate modifications to the model will be made to ensure improvement and further applicability to an undergraduate medical curriculum. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1141; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009853601&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Berkenstadt, H., Haviv, Y., Tuval, A., Shemesh, Y., Megrill, A., Perry, A., Rubin, O., & Ziv, A.. (2008). Improving handoff communications in critical care: utilizing simulation-based training toward process improvement in managing patient risk . Chest, 134(1), 158-162.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: A patient admitted to the medical step-down unit experienced severe hypoglycemia due to an infusion of a higher-than-ordered insulin dose. The event could have been prevented if the insulin syringe pump was checked during the nursing shift handoff. METHODS: Risk management exploration included direct observations of nursing shift handoffs, which highlighted common deficiencies in the process. This led to the development and implementation of a handoff protocol and the incorporation of handoff training into a simulation-based teamwork and communication workshop. A second round of observations took place 6 to 8 weeks following training. RESULTS: The intervention demonstrated an increase in the incidence of nurses communicating crucial information during handoffs, including patient name, events that had occurred during the previous shift, and treatment goals for the next shift. However, there was no change in the incidence of checking the monitor alarms and the mechanical ventilator. CONCLUSIONS: Simulation-based training can be incorporated into the risk management process and can contribute to patient safety practice.

    @article{RefWorks:1382,
      author={H. Berkenstadt and Y. Haviv and A. Tuval and Y. Shemesh and A. Megrill and A. Perry and O. Rubin and A. Ziv},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul},
      title={Improving handoff communications in critical care: utilizing simulation-based training toward process improvement in managing patient risk },
      journal={Chest},
      volume={134},
      number={1},
      pages={158-162},
      note={id: 2884; PUBM: Print; JID: 0231335; CIN: Chest. 2008 Jul;134(1):9-12. PMID: 18628215; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: A patient admitted to the medical step-down unit experienced severe hypoglycemia due to an infusion of a higher-than-ordered insulin dose. The event could have been prevented if the insulin syringe pump was checked during the nursing shift handoff. METHODS: Risk management exploration included direct observations of nursing shift handoffs, which highlighted common deficiencies in the process. This led to the development and implementation of a handoff protocol and the incorporation of handoff training into a simulation-based teamwork and communication workshop. A second round of observations took place 6 to 8 weeks following training. RESULTS: The intervention demonstrated an increase in the incidence of nurses communicating crucial information during handoffs, including patient name, events that had occurred during the previous shift, and treatment goals for the next shift. However, there was no change in the incidence of checking the monitor alarms and the mechanical ventilator. CONCLUSIONS: Simulation-based training can be incorporated into the risk management process and can contribute to patient safety practice. },
      keywords={Continuity of Patient Care/standards; Critical Care/methods/standards; Hospital Communication Systems/standards; Humans; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Medical Staff, Hospital/education; Outcome Assessment (Health Care)/methods/standards; Patient Care Team/standards; Patient Simulation; Patient Transfer/methods/standards; Retrospective Studies; Risk Management/methods/standards},
      isbn={0012-3692},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Chaboyer, W., McMurray, A., Johnson, J., Hardy, L., Wallis, M., & Chu, F. Y.. (2008). Bedside Handover: Quality Improvement Strategy to "Transform Care at the Bedside" . Journal of nursing care quality.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This quality improvement project implemented bedside handover in nursing. Using Lewin’s 3-Step Model for Change, 3 wards in an Australian hospital changed from verbal reporting in an isolated room to bedside handover. Practice guidelines and a competency standard were developed. The change was received positively by both staff and patients. Staff members reported that bedside handover improved safety, efficiency, teamwork, and the level of support from senior staff members.

    @article{RefWorks:1383,
      author={W. Chaboyer and A. McMurray and J. Johnson and L. Hardy and M. Wallis and F. Y. Chu},
      year={2008},
      month={Oct 16},
      title={Bedside Handover: Quality Improvement Strategy to "Transform Care at the Bedside" },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      note={id: 2813; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 9200672; aheadofprint; SO: J Nurs Care Qual. 2008 Oct 16. },
      abstract={This quality improvement project implemented bedside handover in nursing. Using Lewin's 3-Step Model for Change, 3 wards in an Australian hospital changed from verbal reporting in an isolated room to bedside handover. Practice guidelines and a competency standard were developed. The change was received positively by both staff and patients. Staff members reported that bedside handover improved safety, efficiency, teamwork, and the level of support from senior staff members. },
      isbn={1550-5065},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Chakraborti, C., Boonyasai, R. T., Wright, S. M., & Kern, D. E.. (2008). A systematic review of teamwork training interventions in medical student and resident education . Journal of general internal medicine : official journal of the Society for Research and Education in Primary Care Internal Medicine, 23(6), 846-853.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Teamwork is important for improving care across transitions between providers and for increasing patient safety. OBJECTIVE: This review’s objective was to assess the characteristics and efficacy of published curricula designed to teach teamwork to medical students and house staff. DESIGN: The authors searched MEDLINE, Education Resources Information Center, Excerpta Medica Database, PsychInfo, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Scopus for original data articles published in English between January 1980 and July 2006 that reported descriptions of teamwork training and evaluation results. MEASUREMENTS: Two reviewers independently abstracted information about curricular content (using Baker’s framework of teamwork competencies), educational methods, evaluation design, outcomes measured, and results. RESULTS: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. All curricula employed active learning methods; the majority (77%) included multidisciplinary training. Ten curricula (77%) used an uncontrolled pre/post design and 3 (23%) used controlled pre/post designs. Only 3 curricula (23%) reported outcomes beyond end of program, and only 1 (8%) >6 weeks after program completion. One program evaluated a clinical outcome (patient satisfaction), which was unchanged after the intervention. The median effect size was 0.40 (interquartile range (IQR) 0.29, 0.61) for knowledge, 0.38 (IQR 0.32, 0.41) for attitudes, 0.41 (IQR 0.35, 0.49) for skills and behavior. The relationship between the number of teamwork principles taught and effect size achieved a Spearman’s correlation of .74 (p = .01) for overall effect size and .64 (p = .03) for median skills/behaviors effect size. CONCLUSIONS: Reported curricula employ some sound educational principles and appear to be modestly effective in the short term. Curricula may be more effective when they address more teamwork principles.

    @article{RefWorks:1384,
      author={C. Chakraborti and R. T. Boonyasai and S. M. Wright and D. E. Kern},
      year={2008},
      month={Jun},
      title={A systematic review of teamwork training interventions in medical student and resident education },
      journal={Journal of general internal medicine : official journal of the Society for Research and Education in Primary Care Internal Medicine},
      volume={23},
      number={6},
      pages={846-853},
      note={id: 2776; PUBM: Print-Electronic; GR: 5-T-32-HP10025/United States PHS; GR: T32HL07180/HL/United States NHLBI; JID: 8605834; RF: 46; 2007/06/19 [received]; 2008/03/12 [accepted]; 2007/12/05 [revised]; 2008/04/02 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Teamwork is important for improving care across transitions between providers and for increasing patient safety. OBJECTIVE: This review's objective was to assess the characteristics and efficacy of published curricula designed to teach teamwork to medical students and house staff. DESIGN: The authors searched MEDLINE, Education Resources Information Center, Excerpta Medica Database, PsychInfo, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Scopus for original data articles published in English between January 1980 and July 2006 that reported descriptions of teamwork training and evaluation results. MEASUREMENTS: Two reviewers independently abstracted information about curricular content (using Baker's framework of teamwork competencies), educational methods, evaluation design, outcomes measured, and results. RESULTS: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. All curricula employed active learning methods; the majority (77%) included multidisciplinary training. Ten curricula (77%) used an uncontrolled pre/post design and 3 (23%) used controlled pre/post designs. Only 3 curricula (23%) reported outcomes beyond end of program, and only 1 (8%) >6 weeks after program completion. One program evaluated a clinical outcome (patient satisfaction), which was unchanged after the intervention. The median effect size was 0.40 (interquartile range (IQR) 0.29, 0.61) for knowledge, 0.38 (IQR 0.32, 0.41) for attitudes, 0.41 (IQR 0.35, 0.49) for skills and behavior. The relationship between the number of teamwork principles taught and effect size achieved a Spearman's correlation of .74 (p = .01) for overall effect size and .64 (p = .03) for median skills/behaviors effect size. CONCLUSIONS: Reported curricula employ some sound educational principles and appear to be modestly effective in the short term. Curricula may be more effective when they address more teamwork principles. },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Medical, Graduate/methods; Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods; Educational Measurement; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Patient Care Team; Professional Competence},
      isbn={1525-1497},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Costa, L., & Poe, S. S.. (2008). Nurse-led interdisciplinary teams: challenges and rewards . Journal of nursing care quality, 23(4), 292-295.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Choi and Pak have proposed 8 strategies to enhance multidisciplinary teamwork in health research and services, summarized in the acronym TEAMWORK (team, enthusiasm, accessibility, motivation, workplace, objectives, role, and kinship). These strategies provided a framework within which our interdisciplinary team has circumvented common barriers to effective work. The objective of this commentary is to describe the challenges and rewards encountered by a nurse-led interdisciplinary team while conducting research on a novel method to accomplish medication reconciliation, a quality-focused interdependent care activity. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1385,
      author={L. Costa and S. S. Poe},
      year={2008},
      month={Oct-Dec},
      title={Nurse-led interdisciplinary teams: challenges and rewards },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      volume={23},
      number={4},
      pages={292-295},
      note={id: 2817; PUBM: Print; JID: 9200672; ppublish },
      abstract={Choi and Pak have proposed 8 strategies to enhance multidisciplinary teamwork in health research and services, summarized in the acronym TEAMWORK (team, enthusiasm, accessibility, motivation, workplace, objectives, role, and kinship). These strategies provided a framework within which our interdisciplinary team has circumvented common barriers to effective work. The objective of this commentary is to describe the challenges and rewards encountered by a nurse-led interdisciplinary team while conducting research on a novel method to accomplish medication reconciliation, a quality-focused interdependent care activity. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1550-5065},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Coster, S., Norman, I., Murrells, T., Kitchen, S., Meerabeau, E., Sooboodoo, E., & d’Avray L.. (2008). Interprofessional attitudes amongst undergraduate students in the health professions: A longitudinal questionnaire survey . International journal of nursing studies, 45(11), 1667-1681.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    BACKGROUND: Interprofessional education (IPE) introduced at the beginning of pre-registration training for healthcare professionals attempts to prevent the formation of negative interprofessional attitudes which may hamper future interprofessional collaboration. However, the potential for IPE depends, to some extent, on the readiness of healthcare students to learn together. OBJECTIVES: To measure changes in readiness for interprofessional learning, professional identification, and amount of contact between students of different professional groups; and to examine the influence of professional group, student characteristics and an IPE course on these scores over time. DESIGN: Annual longitudinal panel questionnaire survey at four time-points of pre-registration students (n=1683) drawn from eight healthcare groups from three higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK. RESULTS: The strength of professional identity in all professional groups was high on entry to university but it declined significantly over time for some disciplines. Similarly students’ readiness for interprofessional learning was high at entry but declined significantly over time for all groups, with the exception of nursing students. A small but significant positive relationship between professional identity and readiness for interprofessional learning was maintained over time. There was very minimal contact between students from different disciplines during their professional education programme. Students who reported gaining the least from an IPE course suffered the most dramatic drop in their readiness for interprofessional learning in the following and subsequent years; however, these students also had the lowest expectations of an IPE course on entry to their programme of study. CONCLUSION: The findings provide support for introducing IPE at the start of the healthcare students’ professional education to capitalise on students’ readiness for interprofessional learning and professional identities, which appear to be well formed from the start. However, this study suggests that students who enter with negative attitudes towards interprofessional learning may gain the least from IPE courses and that an unrewarding experience of such courses may further reinforce their negative attitudes.

    @article{RefWorks:1386,
      author={S. Coster and I. Norman and T. Murrells and S. Kitchen and E. Meerabeau and E. Sooboodoo and d'Avray L.},
      year={2008},
      month={11},
      title={Interprofessional attitudes amongst undergraduate students in the health professions: A longitudinal questionnaire survey },
      journal={International journal of nursing studies},
      volume={45},
      number={11},
      pages={1667-1681},
      note={id: 2866; Accession Number: 2010108427. Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Nursing; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. No. of Refs: 52 ref. NLM UID: 0400675. },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Interprofessional education (IPE) introduced at the beginning of pre-registration training for healthcare professionals attempts to prevent the formation of negative interprofessional attitudes which may hamper future interprofessional collaboration. However, the potential for IPE depends, to some extent, on the readiness of healthcare students to learn together. OBJECTIVES: To measure changes in readiness for interprofessional learning, professional identification, and amount of contact between students of different professional groups; and to examine the influence of professional group, student characteristics and an IPE course on these scores over time. DESIGN: Annual longitudinal panel questionnaire survey at four time-points of pre-registration students (n=1683) drawn from eight healthcare groups from three higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK. RESULTS: The strength of professional identity in all professional groups was high on entry to university but it declined significantly over time for some disciplines. Similarly students' readiness for interprofessional learning was high at entry but declined significantly over time for all groups, with the exception of nursing students. A small but significant positive relationship between professional identity and readiness for interprofessional learning was maintained over time. There was very minimal contact between students from different disciplines during their professional education programme. Students who reported gaining the least from an IPE course suffered the most dramatic drop in their readiness for interprofessional learning in the following and subsequent years; however, these students also had the lowest expectations of an IPE course on entry to their programme of study. CONCLUSION: The findings provide support for introducing IPE at the start of the healthcare students' professional education to capitalise on students' readiness for interprofessional learning and professional identities, which appear to be well formed from the start. However, this study suggests that students who enter with negative attitudes towards interprofessional learning may gain the least from IPE courses and that an unrewarding experience of such courses may further reinforce their negative attitudes. },
      isbn={0020-7489},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010108427&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Daley, L. K., Menke, E., Kirkpatrick, B., & Sheets, D.. (2008). Partners in practice: a win-win model for clinical education . Journal of Nursing Education, 47(1), 30-32.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    A program of cognitive apprenticeship focusing on problem solving skills through reflection, discussion, and actions shared between novice and experienced students was developed and piloted in a large baccalaureate nursing program in the midwestern United States. The program paired senior students in a leadership course with instructor-led groups of first-year students in the clinical and laboratory setting. Senior students developed leadership skills associated with best practices including preparation, planning, clear communication, feedback, and change, while gaining a better appreciation of individual learning needs. First-year students gained confidence with their knowledge and skills and were able to refine communications with patients, patients’ families, and staff members and think more critically about patient care issues. Unanticipated benefits included patient, family, and staff recognition and appreciation for a new model for patient care delivery. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1299,
      author={L. K. Daley and E. Menke and B. Kirkpatrick and D. Sheets},
      year={2008},
      title={Partners in practice: a win-win model for clinical education },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Education},
      volume={47},
      number={1},
      pages={30-32},
      note={id: 2170; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080215. Revision Date: 20080328. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 5 ref. NLM UID: 7705432. },
      abstract={A program of cognitive apprenticeship focusing on problem solving skills through reflection, discussion, and actions shared between novice and experienced students was developed and piloted in a large baccalaureate nursing program in the midwestern United States. The program paired senior students in a leadership course with instructor-led groups of first-year students in the clinical and laboratory setting. Senior students developed leadership skills associated with best practices including preparation, planning, clear communication, feedback, and change, while gaining a better appreciation of individual learning needs. First-year students gained confidence with their knowledge and skills and were able to refine communications with patients, patients' families, and staff members and think more critically about patient care issues. Unanticipated benefits included patient, family, and staff recognition and appreciation for a new model for patient care delivery. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Learning Methods; Students, Nursing; Teaching Methods; Collaboration; Conceptual Framework; Education, Clinical; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate; Leadership -- Education; Midwestern United States; Nursing Management -- Education; Problem Solving; Program Evaluation; Program Implementation; Reflection},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=227&accno=2009775912; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009775912&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Delva, D., Jamieson, M., & Lemieux, M.. (2008). Team effectiveness in academic primary health care teams . Journal of interprofessional care, 22(6), 598-611.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Primary health care is undergoing significant organizational change, including the development of interdisciplinary health care teams. Understanding how teams function effectively in primary care will assist training programs in teaching effective interprofessional practices. This study aimed to explore the views of members of primary health care teams regarding what constitutes a team, team effectiveness and the factors that affect team effectiveness in primary care. Focus group consultations from six teams in the Department of Family Medicine at Queen’s University were recorded and transcribed and qualitative analysis was used to identify themes. Twelve themes were identified that related to the impact of dual goals/obligations of education and clinical/patient practice on team relationships and learners; the challenges of determining team membership including nonattendance of allied health professionals except nurses; and facilitators and barriers to effective team function. This study provides insight into some of the challenges of developing effective primary care teams in an academic department of family medicine. Clear goals and attention to teamwork at all levels of collaboration is needed if effective interprofessional education is to be achieved. Future research should clarify how best to support the changes required for increasingly effective teamwork.

    @article{RefWorks:1387,
      author={D. Delva and M. Jamieson and M. Lemieux},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={Team effectiveness in academic primary health care teams },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={22},
      number={6},
      pages={598-611},
      note={id: 2869; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={Primary health care is undergoing significant organizational change, including the development of interdisciplinary health care teams. Understanding how teams function effectively in primary care will assist training programs in teaching effective interprofessional practices. This study aimed to explore the views of members of primary health care teams regarding what constitutes a team, team effectiveness and the factors that affect team effectiveness in primary care. Focus group consultations from six teams in the Department of Family Medicine at Queen's University were recorded and transcribed and qualitative analysis was used to identify themes. Twelve themes were identified that related to the impact of dual goals/obligations of education and clinical/patient practice on team relationships and learners; the challenges of determining team membership including nonattendance of allied health professionals except nurses; and facilitators and barriers to effective team function. This study provides insight into some of the challenges of developing effective primary care teams in an academic department of family medicine. Clear goals and attention to teamwork at all levels of collaboration is needed if effective interprofessional education is to be achieved. Future research should clarify how best to support the changes required for increasingly effective teamwork. },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ferguson, S. L.. (2008). TeamSTEPPS: integrating teamwork principles into adult health/medical-surgical practice . Medsurg nursing : official journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, 17(2), 122-125.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; The article provides information on the Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS). The TeamSTEPPS is developed by a collaboration effort with the Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Health Care Team Coordination Program (HCTCP). It is designed to build teamwork and communication among physicians, nurses and other health care personnel. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1388,
      author={S. L. Ferguson},
      year={2008},
      month={Apr},
      title={TeamSTEPPS: integrating teamwork principles into adult health/medical-surgical practice },
      journal={Medsurg nursing : official journal of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses},
      volume={17},
      number={2},
      pages={122-125},
      note={id: 2770; PUBM: Print; JID: 9300545; ppublish },
      abstract={Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} 
    The article provides information on the Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS). The TeamSTEPPS is developed by a collaboration effort with the Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Health Care Team Coordination Program (HCTCP). It is designed to build teamwork and communication among physicians, nurses and other health care personnel. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Inservice Training/organization & administration; Internal Medicine/education/organization & administration; Interprofessional Relations; Leadership; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Military Nursing/economics/organization & administration; Models, Educational; Models, Nursing; Models, Organizational; Models, Psychological; Organizational Culture; Organizational Objectives; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Perioperative Nursing/education/organization & administration; Safety Management/organization & administration; Social Support; United States},
      isbn={1092-0811},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Fewster-Thuente, L., & Velsor-Friedrich, B.. (2008). Interdisciplinary collaboration for healthcare professionals . Nursing administration quarterly, 32(1), 40-48.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Interdisciplinary collaboration has the capacity to affect both healthcare providers and patients. Research has shown that the lack of communication and collaboration may be responsible for as much as 70% of the adverse events currently reported. The purpose of this article is 2-fold: to examine factors that may influence interdisciplinary collaboration and consequently patient outcomes and to examine the relationship between interdisciplinary collaboration and King’s theory of goal attainment as a theory to support the phenomenon of interdisciplinary collaboration. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1304,
      author={L. Fewster-Thuente and B. Velsor-Friedrich},
      year={2008},
      month={Jan-Mar},
      title={Interdisciplinary collaboration for healthcare professionals },
      journal={Nursing administration quarterly},
      volume={32},
      number={1},
      pages={40-48},
      note={id: 2186; PUBM: Print; JID: 7703976; RF: 40; ppublish },
      abstract={Interdisciplinary collaboration has the capacity to affect both healthcare providers and patients. Research has shown that the lack of communication and collaboration may be responsible for as much as 70% of the adverse events currently reported. The purpose of this article is 2-fold: to examine factors that may influence interdisciplinary collaboration and consequently patient outcomes and to examine the relationship between interdisciplinary collaboration and King's theory of goal attainment as a theory to support the phenomenon of interdisciplinary collaboration. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Authoritarianism; Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Family Characteristics; Goals; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Interprofessional Relations; Nursing Theory; Organizational Culture; Organizational Objectives; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Patient Care Planning/organization & administration; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Power (Psychology); Professional Role/psychology; Psychological Theory; Social Dominance; Time Factors},
      isbn={0363-9568},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hallin, K., Kiessling, A., Waldner, A., & Henriksson, P.. (2008). Active interprofessional education in a patient based setting increases perceived collaborative and professional competence . Medical teacher, 1-7.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Background: Interprofessional competence can be defined as knowledge and understanding of their own and the other team members’ professional roles, comprehension of communication and teamwork and collaboration in taking care of patients. Aim: To evaluate whether students perceived that they had achieved interprofessional competence after participating in clinical teamwork training. Method: Six hundred and sixteen students from four undergraduate educational programs-medicine, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy-participated in an interprofessional course at a clinical education ward. The students filled out pre and post questionnaires (96% response rate). Results: All student groups increased their perceived interprofessional competence. Occupational therapy and medical students had the greatest achievements. All student groups perceived improved knowledge of the other three professions’ work (p = 0.000000) and assessed that the course had contributed to the understanding of the importance of communication and teamwork to patient care (effect size 1.0; p = 0.00002). The medical students had the greatest gain (p = 0.00093). All student groups perceived that the clarity of their own professional role had increased significantly (p = 0.00003). Occupational therapy students had the greatest gain (p = 0.000014). Conclusions: Active patient based learning by working together in a real ward context seemed to be an effective means to increase collaborative and professional competence.

    @article{RefWorks:1389,
      author={K. Hallin and A. Kiessling and A. Waldner and P. Henriksson},
      year={2008},
      month={Oct 20},
      title={Active interprofessional education in a patient based setting increases perceived collaborative and professional competence },
      journal={Medical teacher},
      pages={1-7},
      note={id: 2875; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 7909593; aheadofprint; SO: Med Teach. 2008 Oct 20:1-7. },
      abstract={Background: Interprofessional competence can be defined as knowledge and understanding of their own and the other team members' professional roles, comprehension of communication and teamwork and collaboration in taking care of patients. Aim: To evaluate whether students perceived that they had achieved interprofessional competence after participating in clinical teamwork training. Method: Six hundred and sixteen students from four undergraduate educational programs-medicine, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy-participated in an interprofessional course at a clinical education ward. The students filled out pre and post questionnaires (96% response rate). Results: All student groups increased their perceived interprofessional competence. Occupational therapy and medical students had the greatest achievements. All student groups perceived improved knowledge of the other three professions' work (p = 0.000000) and assessed that the course had contributed to the understanding of the importance of communication and teamwork to patient care (effect size 1.0; p = 0.00002). The medical students had the greatest gain (p = 0.00093). All student groups perceived that the clarity of their own professional role had increased significantly (p = 0.00003). Occupational therapy students had the greatest gain (p = 0.000014). Conclusions: Active patient based learning by working together in a real ward context seemed to be an effective means to increase collaborative and professional competence. },
      isbn={1466-187X},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Ho, K., Jarvis-Selinger, S., Borduas, F., Frank, B., Hall, P., Handfield-Jones, R., Hardwick, D. F., Lockyer, J., Sinclair, D., Lauscher, H. N., Ferdinands, L., MacLeod, A., Robitaille, M. A., & Rouleau, M.. (2008). Making interprofessional education work: the strategic roles of the academy . Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 83(10), 934-940.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Faculties (i.e., schools) of medicine along with their sister health discipline faculties can be important organizational vehicles to promote, cultivate, and direct interprofessional education (IPE). The authors present information they gathered in 2007 about five Canadian IPE programs to identify key factors facilitating transformational change within institutional settings toward successful IPE, including (1) how successful programs start, (2) the ways successful programs influence academia to bias toward change, and (3) the ways academia supports and perpetuates the success of programs. Initially, they examine evidence regarding key factors that facilitate IPE implementation, which include (1) common vision, values, and goal sharing, (2) opportunities for collaborative work in practice and learning, (3) professional development of faculty members, (4) individuals who are champions of IPE in practice and in organizational leadership, and (5) attention to sustainability. Subsequently, they review literature-based insights regarding barriers and challenges in IPE that must be addressed for success, including barriers and challenges (1) between professional practices, (2) between academia and the professions, and (3) between individuals and faculty members; they also discuss the social context of the participants and institutions. The authors conclude by recommending what is needed for institutions to entrench IPE into core education at three levels: micro (what individuals in the faculty can do); meso (what a faculty can promote); and macro (how academic institutions can exert its influence in the health education and practice system).

    @article{RefWorks:1390,
      author={K. Ho and S. Jarvis-Selinger and F. Borduas and B. Frank and P. Hall and R. Handfield-Jones and D. F. Hardwick and J. Lockyer and D. Sinclair and H. N. Lauscher and L. Ferdinands and A. MacLeod and M. A. Robitaille and M. Rouleau},
      year={2008},
      month={Oct},
      title={Making interprofessional education work: the strategic roles of the academy },
      journal={Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges},
      volume={83},
      number={10},
      pages={934-940},
      note={id: 2837; PUBM: Print; JID: 8904605; RF: 28; ppublish },
      abstract={Faculties (i.e., schools) of medicine along with their sister health discipline faculties can be important organizational vehicles to promote, cultivate, and direct interprofessional education (IPE). The authors present information they gathered in 2007 about five Canadian IPE programs to identify key factors facilitating transformational change within institutional settings toward successful IPE, including (1) how successful programs start, (2) the ways successful programs influence academia to bias toward change, and (3) the ways academia supports and perpetuates the success of programs. Initially, they examine evidence regarding key factors that facilitate IPE implementation, which include (1) common vision, values, and goal sharing, (2) opportunities for collaborative work in practice and learning, (3) professional development of faculty members, (4) individuals who are champions of IPE in practice and in organizational leadership, and (5) attention to sustainability. Subsequently, they review literature-based insights regarding barriers and challenges in IPE that must be addressed for success, including barriers and challenges (1) between professional practices, (2) between academia and the professions, and (3) between individuals and faculty members; they also discuss the social context of the participants and institutions. The authors conclude by recommending what is needed for institutions to entrench IPE into core education at three levels: micro (what individuals in the faculty can do); meso (what a faculty can promote); and macro (how academic institutions can exert its influence in the health education and practice system). },
      keywords={Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration; Canada; Clinical Competence; Education, Medical, Graduate/methods; Education, Professional/organization & administration; Faculty, Medical/organization & administration; Female; Health Occupations/education; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Professional Competence; Total Quality Management},
      isbn={1938-808X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Jansen, L.. (2008). Collaborative and interdisciplinary health care teams: ready or not? . Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 24(4), 218-227.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Collaborative team-based practice within an interdisciplinary health service environment is an important consideration for the nursing profession. Policy directions suggest that collaborative professional skills can address complex client needs within a framework of primary health care and social accountability for health service quality, cost, and access. The pursuit of collaborative and interdisciplinary care is generally agreed to be a worthy goal. However, implementation methodologies and outcomes related to collaborative and interdisciplinary care remain elusive within a rapidly changing health care environment. This article provides a critical analysis of the multiple historical, political, economic, and social professionalization challenges associated with the achievement of collaborative team-based practice. The author argues that it is not feasible to implement broad-based team structures at the present time. Considerable effort would be required to prepare disciplines to function as a team and to address fragmented services, equitable service funding, and procurement of resources to sustain team efforts. Strategic and influential use of power and knowledge may support the efforts of nurse leaders in practice, education, research, and administration to effect change for the development of collaborative and interdisciplinary practice.

    @article{RefWorks:1391,
      author={L. Jansen},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={Collaborative and interdisciplinary health care teams: ready or not? },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={24},
      number={4},
      pages={218-227},
      note={id: 2882; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511298; 2006/09/23 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Collaborative team-based practice within an interdisciplinary health service environment is an important consideration for the nursing profession. Policy directions suggest that collaborative professional skills can address complex client needs within a framework of primary health care and social accountability for health service quality, cost, and access. The pursuit of collaborative and interdisciplinary care is generally agreed to be a worthy goal. However, implementation methodologies and outcomes related to collaborative and interdisciplinary care remain elusive within a rapidly changing health care environment. This article provides a critical analysis of the multiple historical, political, economic, and social professionalization challenges associated with the achievement of collaborative team-based practice. The author argues that it is not feasible to implement broad-based team structures at the present time. Considerable effort would be required to prepare disciplines to function as a team and to address fragmented services, equitable service funding, and procurement of resources to sustain team efforts. Strategic and influential use of power and knowledge may support the efforts of nurse leaders in practice, education, research, and administration to effect change for the development of collaborative and interdisciplinary practice. },
      keywords={Canada; Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration; Health Plan Implementation; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Leadership; Nursing Staff/organization & administration; Organizational Innovation; Patient Care Team/organization & administration},
      isbn={1532-8481},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Jr, B. D. C., & Daugherty, S. R.. (2008). Interprofessional conflict and medical errors: results of a national multi-specialty survey of hospital residents in the US . Journal of interprofessional care, 22(6), 573-586.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Clear communication is considered the sine qua non of effective teamwork. Breakdowns in communication resulting from interprofessional conflict are believed to potentiate errors in the care of patients, although there is little supportive empirical evidence. In 1999, we surveyed a national, multi-specialty sample of 6,106 residents (64.2% response rate). Three questions inquired about "serious conflict" with another staff member. Residents were also asked whether they had made a "significant medical error" (SME) during their current year of training, and whether this resulted in an "adverse patient outcome" (APO). Just over 20% (n = 722) reported "serious conflict" with another staff member. Ten percent involved another resident, 8.3% supervisory faculty, and 8.9% nursing staff. Of the 2,813 residents reporting no conflict with other professional colleagues, 669, or 23.8%, recorded having made an SME, with 3.4% APOs. By contrast, the 523 residents who reported conflict with at least one other professional had 36.4% SMEs and 8.3% APOs. For the 187 reporting conflict with two or more other professionals, the SME rate was 51%, with 16% APOs. The empirical association between interprofessional conflict and medical errors is both alarming and intriguing, although the exact nature of this relationship cannot currently be determined from these data. Several theoretical constructs are advanced to assist our thinking about this complex issue.

    @article{RefWorks:1381,
      author={D. C. Baldwin Jr and S. R. Daugherty},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={Interprofessional conflict and medical errors: results of a national multi-specialty survey of hospital residents in the US },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={22},
      number={6},
      pages={573-586},
      note={id: 2750; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={Clear communication is considered the sine qua non of effective teamwork. Breakdowns in communication resulting from interprofessional conflict are believed to potentiate errors in the care of patients, although there is little supportive empirical evidence. In 1999, we surveyed a national, multi-specialty sample of 6,106 residents (64.2% response rate). Three questions inquired about "serious conflict" with another staff member. Residents were also asked whether they had made a "significant medical error" (SME) during their current year of training, and whether this resulted in an "adverse patient outcome" (APO). Just over 20% (n = 722) reported "serious conflict" with another staff member. Ten percent involved another resident, 8.3% supervisory faculty, and 8.9% nursing staff. Of the 2,813 residents reporting no conflict with other professional colleagues, 669, or 23.8%, recorded having made an SME, with 3.4% APOs. By contrast, the 523 residents who reported conflict with at least one other professional had 36.4% SMEs and 8.3% APOs. For the 187 reporting conflict with two or more other professionals, the SME rate was 51%, with 16% APOs. The empirical association between interprofessional conflict and medical errors is both alarming and intriguing, although the exact nature of this relationship cannot currently be determined from these data. Several theoretical constructs are advanced to assist our thinking about this complex issue. },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kearney, A. J.. (2008). Facilitating interprofessional education and practice . The Canadian nurse, 104(3), 22-26.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Collaborative patient-centred care has the potential to address serious issues in the Canadian health-care system such as those related to increasing complexity of care; patient safety and access; and recruitment and retention of health human resources. This approach involves teams of health professionals working together to provide more coordinated and comprehensive care to clients. It places priority on the preferences of the patient and fosters respect for the skills and perspectives of all health-care providers. Interprofessional education at the undergraduate, graduate and practice levels is essential for facilitating the transition to team-based care. The author presents the rationale for collaborative care and describes an interprofessional education project at Memorial University of Newfoundland that is preparing students and health professionals for this groundbreaking change in practice.

    @article{RefWorks:1392,
      author={A. J. Kearney},
      year={2008},
      month={Mar},
      title={Facilitating interprofessional education and practice },
      journal={The Canadian nurse},
      volume={104},
      number={3},
      pages={22-26},
      note={id: 2306; PUBM: Print; JID: 0405504; RF: 10; ppublish },
      abstract={Collaborative patient-centred care has the potential to address serious issues in the Canadian health-care system such as those related to increasing complexity of care; patient safety and access; and recruitment and retention of health human resources. This approach involves teams of health professionals working together to provide more coordinated and comprehensive care to clients. It places priority on the preferences of the patient and fosters respect for the skills and perspectives of all health-care providers. Interprofessional education at the undergraduate, graduate and practice levels is essential for facilitating the transition to team-based care. The author presents the rationale for collaborative care and describes an interprofessional education project at Memorial University of Newfoundland that is preparing students and health professionals for this groundbreaking change in practice. },
      keywords={Clinical Competence; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Pharmacy/organization & administration; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Newfoundland and Labrador; Organizational Objectives; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Social Work/education},
      isbn={0008-4581},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Krautscheid, L. C.. (2008). Improving communication among healthcare providers: preparing student nurses for practice . International journal of nursing education scholarship, 5, Article40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Communication errors are identified by the Joint Commission as the primary root cause of sentinel events across all categories. In addition, improving the effectiveness of communication among healthcare providers is listed as one of the Joint Commission’s 2008 National Patient Safety Goals. Nursing programs are expected to graduate practice-ready nurses who demonstrate quality and safety in patient care, which includes interdisciplinary communication. Through objectively structured clinical assessment simulations, faculty evaluate each nursing student’s ability to perform many aspects of care, including the ability to communicate effectively with physicians via telephone in an emergent situation. This quality improvement project reports the results of a three-year review of undergraduate student nurse performance (n = 285) related to effective clinical communication. Changes in teaching-learning strategies, implementation of a standardized communication tool, and clinical enhancements which resulted in improved student competency, will be presented. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:891,
      author={L. C. Krautscheid},
      year={2008},
      title={Improving communication among healthcare providers: preparing student nurses for practice },
      journal={International journal of nursing education scholarship},
      volume={5},
      pages={Article40},
      note={id: 4110; JID: 101214977; 2008/10/21 [epublish]; ppublish },
      abstract={Communication errors are identified by the Joint Commission as the primary root cause of sentinel events across all categories. In addition, improving the effectiveness of communication among healthcare providers is listed as one of the Joint Commission's 2008 National Patient Safety Goals. Nursing programs are expected to graduate practice-ready nurses who demonstrate quality and safety in patient care, which includes interdisciplinary communication. Through objectively structured clinical assessment simulations, faculty evaluate each nursing student's ability to perform many aspects of care, including the ability to communicate effectively with physicians via telephone in an emergent situation. This quality improvement project reports the results of a three-year review of undergraduate student nurse performance (n = 285) related to effective clinical communication. Changes in teaching-learning strategies, implementation of a standardized communication tool, and clinical enhancements which resulted in improved student competency, will be presented. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence/standards; Communication; Curriculum; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Educational Measurement; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Internal Medicine/education; Interprofessional Relations; Medical Errors/methods/nursing/prevention & control/psychology; Needs Assessment/organization & administration; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Assessment; Nursing Education Research; Perioperative Nursing/education; Program Development; Program Evaluation; Role Playing; Students, Nursing/psychology; Thinking; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1548-923X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kvarnström, S.. (2008). Difficulties in collaboration: A critical incident study of interprofessional healthcare teamwork . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 22(2), 191-203.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The challenge for members of interprofessional teams is to manage the team processes that occur in all teamwork while simultaneously managing their individual professional identities. The aim of this study was to identify and describe difficulties perceived by health professionals in interprofessional teamwork. Utterances on verbal actions and resolutions were also explored to enable a discussion of the implications for interprofessional learning. Individual interviews using a Critical Incident Technique were performed with 18 Swedish professionals working in healthcare teams, and examined with qualitative content analysis. The main findings show difficulties related to the team dynamic that arose when team members acted towards one another as representatives of their professions, difficulties that occurred when the members’ various knowledge contributions interacted in the team, and difficulties related to the influence of the surrounding organization. The perceived consequences of the difficulties, beyond individual consequences, were restrictions on the use of collaborative resources to arrive at a holistic view of the patient’s problem, and barriers to providing patient care and service in the desired manner. This paper also discusses how experiences of managing difficulties entailed various forms of interprofessional learning situations. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1322,
      author={S. Kvarnström},
      year={2008},
      month={03},
      title={Difficulties in collaboration: A critical incident study of interprofessional healthcare teamwork },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={22},
      number={2},
      pages={191-203},
      note={id: 2189; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9205811. },
      abstract={The challenge for members of interprofessional teams is to manage the team processes that occur in all teamwork while simultaneously managing their individual professional identities. The aim of this study was to identify and describe difficulties perceived by health professionals in interprofessional teamwork. Utterances on verbal actions and resolutions were also explored to enable a discussion of the implications for interprofessional learning. Individual interviews using a Critical Incident Technique were performed with 18 Swedish professionals working in healthcare teams, and examined with qualitative content analysis. The main findings show difficulties related to the team dynamic that arose when team members acted towards one another as representatives of their professions, difficulties that occurred when the members' various knowledge contributions interacted in the team, and difficulties related to the influence of the surrounding organization. The perceived consequences of the difficulties, beyond individual consequences, were restrictions on the use of collaborative resources to arrive at a holistic view of the patient's problem, and barriers to providing patient care and service in the desired manner. This paper also discusses how experiences of managing difficulties entailed various forms of interprofessional learning situations. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1141; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009853602&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • McConaughey, E.. (2008). Crew resource management in healthcare: the evolution of teamwork training and MedTeams . The Journal of perinatal & neonatal nursing, 22(2), 96-104.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The crew resource management training program was developed by the aviation industry in response to critical and fatal errors by the flight team. This article examines the evolution and application of crew resource management to the healthcare industry. The goal of this evolution was to increase patient safety through better communication and teamwork. To accomplish this goal, teamwork training programs, such as MedTeams, are being introduced to healthcare professionals. Clinical studies have yet to show conclusive results of these training programs. Further studies are ongoing and necessary.

    @article{RefWorks:1394,
      author={E. McConaughey},
      year={2008},
      month={Apr-Jun},
      title={Crew resource management in healthcare: the evolution of teamwork training and MedTeams },
      journal={The Journal of perinatal & neonatal nursing},
      volume={22},
      number={2},
      pages={96-104},
      note={id: 2771; PUBM: Print; JID: 8801387; RF: 49; ppublish },
      abstract={The crew resource management training program was developed by the aviation industry in response to critical and fatal errors by the flight team. This article examines the evolution and application of crew resource management to the healthcare industry. The goal of this evolution was to increase patient safety through better communication and teamwork. To accomplish this goal, teamwork training programs, such as MedTeams, are being introduced to healthcare professionals. Clinical studies have yet to show conclusive results of these training programs. Further studies are ongoing and necessary. },
      keywords={Communication; Female; Humans; Inservice Training/methods; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Obstetrical Nursing/education; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient Simulation; Pregnancy; Safety Management/methods; United States},
      isbn={0893-2190},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McKeon, L. M., Cunningham, P. D., & Oswaks, D. J. S.. (2008). Improving Patient Safety: Patient-Focused, High-Reliability Team Training . Journal of nursing care quality.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Healthcare systems are recognizing "human factor" flaws that result in adverse outcomes. Nurses work around system failures, although increasing healthcare complexity makes this harder to do without risk of error. Aviation and military organizations achieve ultrasafe outcomes through highreliability practice. We describe how reliability principles were used to teach nurses to improve patient safety at the front line of care. Outcomes include safety-oriented, teamwork communication competency; reflections on safety culture and clinical leadership are discussed.

    @article{RefWorks:1395,
      author={L. M. McKeon and P. D. Cunningham and J. S. Detty Oswaks},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug 25},
      title={Improving Patient Safety: Patient-Focused, High-Reliability Team Training },
      journal={Journal of nursing care quality},
      note={id: 2760; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 9200672; aheadofprint; SO: J Nurs Care Qual. 2008 Aug 25. },
      abstract={Healthcare systems are recognizing "human factor" flaws that result in adverse outcomes. Nurses work around system failures, although increasing healthcare complexity makes this harder to do without risk of error. Aviation and military organizations achieve ultrasafe outcomes through highreliability practice. We describe how reliability principles were used to teach nurses to improve patient safety at the front line of care. Outcomes include safety-oriented, teamwork communication competency; reflections on safety culture and clinical leadership are discussed. },
      isbn={1550-5065},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Messmer, P. R.. (2008). Enhancing nurse-physician collaboration using pediatric simulation . Journal of continuing education in nursing, 39(7), 319-327.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of nurse-physician collaboration during simulation training. METHODS: A human patient simulator (HPS) of three mock codes with life-threatening scenarios in children, an understudied population, was used. A set of standardized measures and observational techniques were used to determine levels of nurse-physician collaboration and interaction on multiple dimensions found to improve patient outcomes. RESULTS: High levels of group cohesion (GC) and collaboration and satisfaction with patient care decisions (CSPCD) were identified among both physicians and nurses. The male respondents, regardless of discipline, had significantly higher GC scores (p = .029) and significantly higher CSPCD scores (p = .005) than the female respondents. Although the nurses and physicians self-reported good collaboration following the scenarios, analysis of the videotapes revealed that collaboration improved over time. CONCLUSION: The results of this study hold promise for this critical area of science that seeks to improve the outcomes of patients who experience life-threatening events.

    @article{RefWorks:1396,
      author={P. R. Messmer},
      year={2008},
      month={Jul},
      title={Enhancing nurse-physician collaboration using pediatric simulation },
      journal={Journal of continuing education in nursing},
      volume={39},
      number={7},
      pages={319-327},
      note={id: 2883; PUBM: Print; JID: 0262321; ppublish },
      abstract={PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of nurse-physician collaboration during simulation training. METHODS: A human patient simulator (HPS) of three mock codes with life-threatening scenarios in children, an understudied population, was used. A set of standardized measures and observational techniques were used to determine levels of nurse-physician collaboration and interaction on multiple dimensions found to improve patient outcomes. RESULTS: High levels of group cohesion (GC) and collaboration and satisfaction with patient care decisions (CSPCD) were identified among both physicians and nurses. The male respondents, regardless of discipline, had significantly higher GC scores (p = .029) and significantly higher CSPCD scores (p = .005) than the female respondents. Although the nurses and physicians self-reported good collaboration following the scenarios, analysis of the videotapes revealed that collaboration improved over time. CONCLUSION: The results of this study hold promise for this critical area of science that seeks to improve the outcomes of patients who experience life-threatening events. },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Aviation; Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education/nursing/psychology; Child; Clinical Competence; Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Female; Heart Arrest/therapy; Humans; Male; Manikins; Medical Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/psychology; Pediatric Nursing/education; Pediatrics/education; Physician-Nurse Relations; Questionnaires; Safety Management; Southeastern United States; Videotape Recording},
      isbn={0022-0124},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Nelson, G. A., King, M. L., & Brodine, S.. (2008). Nurse-physician collaboration on medical-surgical units . MEDSURG Nursing, 17(1), 35-40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is viewed as a critical factor in delivering quality patient care. The purpose of this study was to describe nurse-physician perceptions of collaboration relationship on general medical-surgical units. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1342,
      author={G. A. Nelson and M. L. King and S. Brodine},
      year={2008},
      month={02},
      title={Nurse-physician collaboration on medical-surgical units },
      journal={MEDSURG Nursing},
      volume={17},
      number={1},
      pages={35-40},
      note={id: 2247; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080411. Publication Type: journal article; questionnaire/scale; research; tables/charts. Commentary: Connelly LM. Research roundtable. Research considerations: power analysis and effect size. MEDSURG NURS 2008 Feb; 17(1): 41-2 (commentary) . Journal Subset: Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Perioperative Care. Instrumentation: Collaborative Practice Scale-Nurses; Collaborative Practice Scale-Physicians. No. of Refs: 29 ref. NLM UID: 9300545. },
      abstract={Interdisciplinary collaboration is viewed as a critical factor in delivering quality patient care. The purpose of this study was to describe nurse-physician perceptions of collaboration relationship on general medical-surgical units. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration; Joint Practice; Medical-Surgical Nursing; Nurse Attitudes; Nurse-Physician Relations; Physician Attitudes; Adult; Aged; California; Certification; Coefficient Alpha; Conceptual Framework; Conflict Management; Construct Validity; Convenience Sample; Data Analysis Software; Descriptive Statistics; Educational Status; Factor Analysis; Female; Internal Consistency; Job Experience; Male; Middle Age; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Nursing Units; P-Value; Power; Power Analysis; Questionnaires; Registered Nurses; Scales; Summated Rating Scaling; Surveys; Univariate Statistics},
      isbn={1092-0811},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009820273&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Nelson, D. P., & Polst, G.. (2008). An interdisciplinary team approach to evidence-based improvement in family-centered care . Critical care nursing quarterly, 31(2), 110-118.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Family-centered care has become an integral part of total patient care in today’s healthcare setting. Meeting family needs can be challenging for staff nurses already overwhelmed with escalating patient acuity and ever-increasing technical and documentation burdens. In the year 2000, an Interdisciplinary team in a tertiary hospital in the midwest employed a collaborative process to design and pioneer an award-winning nursing role in family-centered care. This article describes the methods used by this hospital to meet the ever-increasing challenge of family needs integrated into holistic patient care.

    @article{RefWorks:1397,
      author={D. P. Nelson and G. Polst},
      year={2008},
      month={Apr-Jun},
      title={An interdisciplinary team approach to evidence-based improvement in family-centered care },
      journal={Critical care nursing quarterly},
      volume={31},
      number={2},
      pages={110-118},
      note={id: 2782; PUBM: Print; JID: 8704517; ppublish },
      abstract={Family-centered care has become an integral part of total patient care in today's healthcare setting. Meeting family needs can be challenging for staff nurses already overwhelmed with escalating patient acuity and ever-increasing technical and documentation burdens. In the year 2000, an Interdisciplinary team in a tertiary hospital in the midwest employed a collaborative process to design and pioneer an award-winning nursing role in family-centered care. This article describes the methods used by this hospital to meet the ever-increasing challenge of family needs integrated into holistic patient care. },
      keywords={Adult; Cooperative Behavior; Critical Care/organization & administration/psychology; Evidence-Based Medicine; Family/psychology; Family Nursing/organization & administration; Humans; Midwestern United States; Needs Assessment; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Evaluation Research; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Professional-Family Relations; Program Evaluation; Social Support; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={0887-9303},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Nisbet, G., Hendry, G. D., Rolls, G., & Field, M. J.. (2008). Interprofessional learning for pre-qualification health care students: An outcomes-based evaluation . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 22(1), 57-68.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Within health, it is widely acknowledged that a collaborative, team-oriented approach to care is required to ensure patient safety and quality of service delivery. A pre-qualification interprofessional learning experience should provide an ideal opportunity for students to gain the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes to enable them to work as part of a patient-centred interprofessional team. In this article we report a multidimensional evaluation of a pre-qualification interprofessional learning (IPL) program. The program brings together senior year students from various health care professions on clinical placement in the same service area of a hospital to take part in shared, structured learning experiences centred on interprofessional teamwork. We used a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate the IPL program. Results indicate that students’ understanding of the roles of other team members was enhanced, and students and supervisors perceived the program to be of value for student learning. Measured changes in attitude were limited. Unexpected findings emerged in relation to role responsibilities within teams and attitudes towards doctors. We conclude that such programs have the potential to expand students’ understanding of the contributions made by other professionals/colleagues to effective patient care, although challenges persist in overcoming pre-existing role stereotypes. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1343,
      author={G. Nisbet and G. D. Hendry and G. Rolls and M. J. Field},
      year={2008},
      title={Interprofessional learning for pre-qualification health care students: An outcomes-based evaluation },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={22},
      number={1},
      pages={57-68},
      note={id: 2190; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9205811. },
      abstract={Within health, it is widely acknowledged that a collaborative, team-oriented approach to care is required to ensure patient safety and quality of service delivery. A pre-qualification interprofessional learning experience should provide an ideal opportunity for students to gain the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes to enable them to work as part of a patient-centred interprofessional team. In this article we report a multidimensional evaluation of a pre-qualification interprofessional learning (IPL) program. The program brings together senior year students from various health care professions on clinical placement in the same service area of a hospital to take part in shared, structured learning experiences centred on interprofessional teamwork. We used a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate the IPL program. Results indicate that students' understanding of the roles of other team members was enhanced, and students and supervisors perceived the program to be of value for student learning. Measured changes in attitude were limited. Unexpected findings emerged in relation to role responsibilities within teams and attitudes towards doctors. We conclude that such programs have the potential to expand students' understanding of the contributions made by other professionals/colleagues to effective patient care, although challenges persist in overcoming pre-existing role stereotypes. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1141; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009770670&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Ouwens, M., Hulscher, M., Akkermans, R., Hermens, R., Grol, R., & Wollersheim, H.. (2008). The Team Climate Inventory: application in hospital teams and methodological considerations . Quality & Safety in Health Care, 17(4), 275-280.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    OBJECTIVE: To test the validity, reliability and discriminating capacity of an instrument to assess team climate, the Team Climate Inventory (TCI), in a sample of Dutch hospital teams. The TCI is based on a four-factor theory of team climate for innovation. DESIGN: Validation study. SETTING: Hospital teams in The Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: 424 healthcare professionals; 355 nurses working in 22 nursing teams and 69 nurses and doctors working in 14 quality-improvement teams. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, Pearson’s product moment correlations, internal homogeneity of the TCI scales based on Cronbach alpha, and the TCI capability to discriminate between two types of healthcare teams, namely nursing teams and quality-improvement teams. RESULTS: The validity test revealed the TCI’s five-factor structure and moderate data fit. The Cronbach alphas of the five scales showed acceptable reliabilities. The TCI discriminated between nursing teams and quality-improvement teams. The mean scores of quality-improvement teams were all significantly higher than those of the nursing teams. CONCLUSION: Patient care teams are essential for high-quality patient care, and team climate is an important characteristic of successful teams. This study shows that the TCI is a valid, reliable and discriminating self-report measure of team climate in hospital teams. The TCI can be used as a quality-improvement tool or in quality-of-care research.

    @article{RefWorks:1398,
      author={M. Ouwens and M. Hulscher and R. Akkermans and R. Hermens and R. Grol and H. Wollersheim},
      year={2008},
      month={08},
      title={The Team Climate Inventory: application in hospital teams and methodological considerations },
      journal={Quality & Safety in Health Care},
      volume={17},
      number={4},
      pages={275-280},
      note={id: 2830; Accession Number: 2010009778. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080926. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Blind Peer Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Health Services Administration; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Patient Safety; Quality Assurance. Instrumentation: Team Climate Inventory (TCI). Grant Information: Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands. No. of Refs: 32 ref. },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: To test the validity, reliability and discriminating capacity of an instrument to assess team climate, the Team Climate Inventory (TCI), in a sample of Dutch hospital teams. The TCI is based on a four-factor theory of team climate for innovation. DESIGN: Validation study. SETTING: Hospital teams in The Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: 424 healthcare professionals; 355 nurses working in 22 nursing teams and 69 nurses and doctors working in 14 quality-improvement teams. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, Pearson's product moment correlations, internal homogeneity of the TCI scales based on Cronbach alpha, and the TCI capability to discriminate between two types of healthcare teams, namely nursing teams and quality-improvement teams. RESULTS: The validity test revealed the TCI's five-factor structure and moderate data fit. The Cronbach alphas of the five scales showed acceptable reliabilities. The TCI discriminated between nursing teams and quality-improvement teams. The mean scores of quality-improvement teams were all significantly higher than those of the nursing teams. CONCLUSION: Patient care teams are essential for high-quality patient care, and team climate is an important characteristic of successful teams. This study shows that the TCI is a valid, reliable and discriminating self-report measure of team climate in hospital teams. The TCI can be used as a quality-improvement tool or in quality-of-care research. },
      keywords={Hospitals -- Netherlands; Teamwork -- Evaluation; Work Environment; Chi Square Test; Coefficient Alpha; Construct Validity; Correlational Studies; Factor Analysis; Funding Source; Internal Consistency; Multidisciplinary Care Team -- Classification; Netherlands; Nurses; Pearson's Correlation Coefficient; Physicians; Psychometrics; Quality Improvement; Questionnaires; Reliability; Scales; Self Report; Validation Studies},
      isbn={1475-3898},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2010009778&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Pollard, K. C.. (2008). Non-formal learning and interprofessional collaboration in health and social care: the influence of the quality of staff interaction on student learning about collaborative behaviour in practice placements . Learning in Health & Social Care, 7(1), 12-26.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    This paper reports findings from a qualitative study exploring pre-qualifying health and social care students’ experiences of interprofessional learning and working in practice placement settings. The author argues that processes of non-formal learning and unconscious role modelling in these environments are key to students’ developing collaborative skills. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a quota sample of 52 students from 10 health and social care professions. Data were analysed thematically. The nature of interprofessional collaboration varied across different settings, with students encountering a more disparate range of professions and agencies in community and social work settings than in acute healthcare settings. Most students appeared to have been exposed to examples of both effective and poor collaborative working. Although many students characterized interprofessional collaboration in placement settings as ‘good’, this assessment often conflicted with their description of behaviour that could be considered to constitute suboptimal collaborative practice. Students perceived the quality of interprofessional interaction to depend mainly on interpersonal communication, showing little awareness of how organizational systems influence collaboration. The findings show that some staff in placement settings experienced problems when working with colleagues from other disciplines, and indicate that consequently, through processes of non-formal learning and unconscious role modelling, some students may have learned inappropriate behaviours with regard to interprofessional working. Although students were not necessarily expected to appreciate the importance of appropriate organizational systems for the establishment and maintenance of effective interprofessional collaboration, it appeared that staff members might also not be aware of these issues. The author argues that staff in placement settings need to understand and model the relevant capacities in order to provide students with appropriate learning opportunities in this regard. It appears that qualified staff need support to develop their own collaborative practice, so that they are able effectively to support students’ interprofessional learning and working in practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1345,
      author={K. C. Pollard},
      year={2008},
      month={03},
      title={Non-formal learning and interprofessional collaboration in health and social care: the influence of the quality of staff interaction on student learning about collaborative behaviour in practice placements },
      journal={Learning in Health & Social Care},
      volume={7},
      number={1},
      pages={12-26},
      note={id: 2174; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080321. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Nursing Education. No. of Refs: 60 ref. NLM UID: 101130963. },
      abstract={This paper reports findings from a qualitative study exploring pre-qualifying health and social care students' experiences of interprofessional learning and working in practice placement settings. The author argues that processes of non-formal learning and unconscious role modelling in these environments are key to students' developing collaborative skills. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a quota sample of 52 students from 10 health and social care professions. Data were analysed thematically. The nature of interprofessional collaboration varied across different settings, with students encountering a more disparate range of professions and agencies in community and social work settings than in acute healthcare settings. Most students appeared to have been exposed to examples of both effective and poor collaborative working. Although many students characterized interprofessional collaboration in placement settings as 'good', this assessment often conflicted with their description of behaviour that could be considered to constitute suboptimal collaborative practice. Students perceived the quality of interprofessional interaction to depend mainly on interpersonal communication, showing little awareness of how organizational systems influence collaboration. The findings show that some staff in placement settings experienced problems when working with colleagues from other disciplines, and indicate that consequently, through processes of non-formal learning and unconscious role modelling, some students may have learned inappropriate behaviours with regard to interprofessional working. Although students were not necessarily expected to appreciate the importance of appropriate organizational systems for the establishment and maintenance of effective interprofessional collaboration, it appeared that staff members might also not be aware of these issues. The author argues that staff in placement settings need to understand and model the relevant capacities in order to provide students with appropriate learning opportunities in this regard. It appears that qualified staff need support to develop their own collaborative practice, so that they are able effectively to support students' interprofessional learning and working in practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration -- Education; Education, Clinical; Education, Health Sciences; Interprofessional Relations -- Education; Role Models; Student Attitudes; Audiorecording; Case Studies; Communication; Diaries; Interpersonal Relations; Interrater Reliability; Interview Guides; Organizational Culture; Qualitative Studies; Quota Sample; Semi-Structured Interview; Students, Nursing; Students, Physical Therapy; Students, Radiologic Technology; Students, Social Work; Thematic Analysis; United Kingdom},
      isbn={1473-6853},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=2783&accno=2009779099; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009779099&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Posel, N., Fleiszer, D., Wiseman, J., Birlean, C., Margison, J., Faremo, S., Clausen, C., & Bateman, D.. (2008). Using electronic cases to teach healthcare professionals and students about interprofessionalism . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 22(1), 111-114.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Using an e-case application, healthcare professionals in a workshop integrated their uni-professional perspectives into a “blueprint” that was validated and formed the basis of an interprofessional care plan. The workshop highlighted the utility of this process and emphasized the benefits of developing an interdependent, interprofessional approach to patient and family care. It demonstrated that the e-case was an effective interprofessional teaching activity. Workshop facilitators have subsequently received requests for additional e-case based workshops, two of which are now in the planning stages. An abridged version of the e-case was used at a student interprofessional conference. Additional student initiatives are planned. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1346,
      author={N. Posel and D. Fleiszer and J. Wiseman and C. Birlean and J. Margison and S. Faremo and C. Clausen and D. Bateman},
      year={2008},
      title={Using electronic cases to teach healthcare professionals and students about interprofessionalism },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={22},
      number={1},
      pages={111-114},
      note={id: 2192; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9205811. },
      abstract={Using an e-case application, healthcare professionals in a workshop integrated their uni-professional perspectives into a “blueprint” that was validated and formed the basis of an interprofessional care plan. The workshop highlighted the utility of this process and emphasized the benefits of developing an interdependent, interprofessional approach to patient and family care. It demonstrated that the e-case was an effective interprofessional teaching activity. Workshop facilitators have subsequently received requests for additional e-case based workshops, two of which are now in the planning stages. An abridged version of the e-case was used at a student interprofessional conference. Additional student initiatives are planned. (Source: Publisher) },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1141; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009770659&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Pullon, S.. (2008). Competence, respect and trust: Key features of successful interprofessional nurse-doctor relationships . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 22(2), 133-147.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Professional relationships between doctors and nurses have often been seen as problematic, a barrier to effective collaborative practice, yet little is known about the intrinsic nature of such relationships in the primary care context. This study set out to explore roles of, and relationships between, nurses and doctors currently working in New Zealand primary care settings. Using a qualitative methodology, data were collected using in-depth interviews with 18 individual nurses and doctors working in primary care settings in Wellington, New Zealand. Doctors’ and nurses’ perceptions of their own and each others’ roles, and the perceived relationships between individuals from both disciplinary groups were explored, using principles of naturalistic enquiry in a mixed method of analysis. The study findings indicate that effective interprofessional relationships between individual doctors and nurses can, and often do, exist in New Zealand primary care settings, although they are not universal. The identification and separation of vocational and business roles, and the development of professional identity, form the basis for a theory of trust development in nurse-doctor interprofessional relationships in New Zealand primary care. Professional identity is related to demonstration of professional competence, in turn related to development of mutual interprofessional respect and enduring interprofessional trust. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1348,
      author={S. Pullon},
      year={2008},
      month={03},
      title={Competence, respect and trust: Key features of successful interprofessional nurse-doctor relationships },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={22},
      number={2},
      pages={133-147},
      note={id: 2187; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9205811. },
      abstract={Professional relationships between doctors and nurses have often been seen as problematic, a barrier to effective collaborative practice, yet little is known about the intrinsic nature of such relationships in the primary care context. This study set out to explore roles of, and relationships between, nurses and doctors currently working in New Zealand primary care settings. Using a qualitative methodology, data were collected using in-depth interviews with 18 individual nurses and doctors working in primary care settings in Wellington, New Zealand. Doctors' and nurses' perceptions of their own and each others' roles, and the perceived relationships between individuals from both disciplinary groups were explored, using principles of naturalistic enquiry in a mixed method of analysis. The study findings indicate that effective interprofessional relationships between individual doctors and nurses can, and often do, exist in New Zealand primary care settings, although they are not universal. The identification and separation of vocational and business roles, and the development of professional identity, form the basis for a theory of trust development in nurse-doctor interprofessional relationships in New Zealand primary care. Professional identity is related to demonstration of professional competence, in turn related to development of mutual interprofessional respect and enduring interprofessional trust. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1141; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009853598&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Pulman, A., Scammell, J., & Martin, M.. (2008). Enabling interprofessional education: The role of technology to enhance learning . Nurse education today.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Interprofessional education (IPE) in health and social care undergraduate education is a key governmental driver [DOH, 2001. Working Together, Learning Together. A Framework for Lifelong Learning in the NHS. HMSO, London]. In the UK, IPE has been advocated and developed as a means to encourage effective collaboration in order to improve public sector services [Barr, H., Ross, F., 2006. Mainstreaming interprofessional education in the United Kingdom: a position paper. Journal of Interprofessional Care 20 (2), 96-104]. An IPE curriculum was introduced at the School of Health & Social Care for undergraduate students (n=600) from a variety of health and social care disciplines. As a part of this process, there was a demand for ways to allow students and staff to interact and collaborate through learning resources at different locations and times in order to learn interprofessionally. Blended learning was the chosen approach leading to the development of a simulated web-based community learning resource – Wessex Bay. This paper considers the development of Wessex Bay from technical and pedagogical perspectives. The curricular context for the development is considered and the role of simulation in meeting educational needs is explored. The technical development is outlined followed by an overview of an evaluation of its use in the first two years of the IPE programme. Conclusions are drawn around the strengths and limitations of this approach, including a consideration of further opportunities for developmental work.

    @article{RefWorks:1399,
      author={A. Pulman and J. Scammell and M. Martin},
      year={2008},
      month={Oct 7},
      title={Enabling interprofessional education: The role of technology to enhance learning },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      note={id: 2815; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 8511379; 2008/04/15 [received]; 2008/08/11 [revised]; 2008/08/13 [accepted]; aheadofprint; SO: Nurse Educ Today. 2008 Oct 7. },
      abstract={Interprofessional education (IPE) in health and social care undergraduate education is a key governmental driver [DOH, 2001. Working Together, Learning Together. A Framework for Lifelong Learning in the NHS. HMSO, London]. In the UK, IPE has been advocated and developed as a means to encourage effective collaboration in order to improve public sector services [Barr, H., Ross, F., 2006. Mainstreaming interprofessional education in the United Kingdom: a position paper. Journal of Interprofessional Care 20 (2), 96-104]. An IPE curriculum was introduced at the School of Health & Social Care for undergraduate students (n=600) from a variety of health and social care disciplines. As a part of this process, there was a demand for ways to allow students and staff to interact and collaborate through learning resources at different locations and times in order to learn interprofessionally. Blended learning was the chosen approach leading to the development of a simulated web-based community learning resource - Wessex Bay. This paper considers the development of Wessex Bay from technical and pedagogical perspectives. The curricular context for the development is considered and the role of simulation in meeting educational needs is explored. The technical development is outlined followed by an overview of an evaluation of its use in the first two years of the IPE programme. Conclusions are drawn around the strengths and limitations of this approach, including a consideration of further opportunities for developmental work. },
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Reeves, S., Zwarenstein, M., Goldman, J., Barr, H., Freeth, D., Hammick, M., & Koppel, I.. (2008). Interprofessional education: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes . Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (1)(1), CD002213.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Patient care is a complex activity which demands that health and social care professionals work together in an effective manner. The evidence suggests, however, that these professionals do not collaborate well together. Interprofessional education (IPE) offers a possible way to improve collaboration and patient care. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of IPE interventions compared to education interventions in which the same health and social care professionals learn separately from one another; and to assess the effectiveness of IPE interventions compared to no education intervention. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group specialised register, MEDLINE and CINAHL, for the years 1999 to 2006. We also handsearched the Journal of Interprofessional Care (1999 to 2006), reference lists of the six included studies and leading IPE books, IPE conference proceedings, and websites of IPE organisations. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before and after (CBA) studies and interrupted time series (ITS) studies of IPE interventions that reported objectively measured or self reported (validated instrument) patient/client and/or healthcare process outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of potentially relevant studies, and extracted data from, and assessed study quality of, included studies. A meta-analysis of study outcomes was not possible given the small number of included studies and the heterogeneity in methodological designs and outcome measures. Consequently, the results are presented in a narrative format. MAIN RESULTS: We included six studies (four RCTs and two CBA studies). Four of these studies indicated that IPE produced positive outcomes in the following areas: emergency department culture and patient satisfaction; collaborative team behaviour and reduction of clinical error rates for emergency department teams; management of care delivered to domestic violence victims; and mental health practitioner competencies related to the delivery of patient care. In addition, two of the six studies reported mixed outcomes (positive and neutral) and two studies reported that the IPE interventions had no impact on either professional practice or patient care. AUTHORS’ CONCLUSIONS: This updated review found six studies that met the inclusion criteria, in contrast to our first review that found no eligible studies. Although these studies reported some positive outcomes, due to the small number of studies, the heterogeneity of interventions, and the methodological limitations, it is not possible to draw generalisable inferences about the key elements of IPE and its effectiveness. More rigorous IPE studies (i.e. those employing RCTs, CBA or ITS designs with rigorous randomisation procedures, better allocation concealment, larger sample sizes, and more appropriate control groups) are needed to provide better evidence of the impact of IPE on professional practice and healthcare outcomes. These studies should also include data collection strategies that provide insight into how IPE affects changes in health care processes and patient outcomes.

    @article{RefWorks:1351,
      author={S. Reeves and M. Zwarenstein and J. Goldman and H. Barr and D. Freeth and M. Hammick and I. Koppel},
      year={2008},
      month={Jan 23},
      title={Interprofessional education: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes },
      journal={Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)},
      volume={(1)},
      number={1},
      pages={CD002213},
      note={id: 2309; PUBM: Electronic; DEP: 20080123; JID: 100909747; RF: 83; epublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Patient care is a complex activity which demands that health and social care professionals work together in an effective manner. The evidence suggests, however, that these professionals do not collaborate well together. Interprofessional education (IPE) offers a possible way to improve collaboration and patient care. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of IPE interventions compared to education interventions in which the same health and social care professionals learn separately from one another; and to assess the effectiveness of IPE interventions compared to no education intervention. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group specialised register, MEDLINE and CINAHL, for the years 1999 to 2006. We also handsearched the Journal of Interprofessional Care (1999 to 2006), reference lists of the six included studies and leading IPE books, IPE conference proceedings, and websites of IPE organisations. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before and after (CBA) studies and interrupted time series (ITS) studies of IPE interventions that reported objectively measured or self reported (validated instrument) patient/client and/or healthcare process outcomes. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of potentially relevant studies, and extracted data from, and assessed study quality of, included studies. A meta-analysis of study outcomes was not possible given the small number of included studies and the heterogeneity in methodological designs and outcome measures. Consequently, the results are presented in a narrative format. MAIN RESULTS: We included six studies (four RCTs and two CBA studies). Four of these studies indicated that IPE produced positive outcomes in the following areas: emergency department culture and patient satisfaction; collaborative team behaviour and reduction of clinical error rates for emergency department teams; management of care delivered to domestic violence victims; and mental health practitioner competencies related to the delivery of patient care. In addition, two of the six studies reported mixed outcomes (positive and neutral) and two studies reported that the IPE interventions had no impact on either professional practice or patient care. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This updated review found six studies that met the inclusion criteria, in contrast to our first review that found no eligible studies. Although these studies reported some positive outcomes, due to the small number of studies, the heterogeneity of interventions, and the methodological limitations, it is not possible to draw generalisable inferences about the key elements of IPE and its effectiveness. More rigorous IPE studies (i.e. those employing RCTs, CBA or ITS designs with rigorous randomisation procedures, better allocation concealment, larger sample sizes, and more appropriate control groups) are needed to provide better evidence of the impact of IPE on professional practice and healthcare outcomes. These studies should also include data collection strategies that provide insight into how IPE affects changes in health care processes and patient outcomes. },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Patient Care Team; Professional Practice; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Treatment Outcome},
      isbn={1469-493X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Rosenstein, A. H., & O’Daniel, M.. (2008). A survey of the impact of disruptive behaviors and communication defects on patient safety . Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources, 34(8), 464-471.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: A recent survey was conducted to assess the significance of disruptive behaviors and their effect on communication and collaboration and impact on patient care. SURVEY: VHA West Coast administered a 22-question survey instrument–Nurse-Physician: Impact of Disruptive Behavior on Patient Care–to a convenience sample. Of the 388 member hospitals (in four VHA regions) invited, 102 hospitals participated in the survey (26% response rate). Results from surveys received from January 2004 though March 2007 are represented. Of the 4,530 participants, 2,846 listed their titles as nurses, 944 as physicians, 40 as administrative executives, and 700 as "other." RESULTS: A total of 77% of the respondents reported that they had witnessed disruptive behavior in physicians–88% of the nurses and 51% of the physicians. Sixty-five percent of the respondents reported witnessing disruptive behavior in nurses at their hospitals–73% of the nurses and 48% of the physicians. Sixty-seven percent of the respondents agreed that disruptive behaviors were linked with adverse events; the result for medical errors was 71%, and patient mortality, 27%. DISCUSSION: The results from the survey show that disruptive behaviors lead to potentially preventable adverse events, errors, compromises in safety and quality, and patient mortality. Strategies to address disruptive behaviors should (1) prevent disruptive events from occurring, (2) deal with events in real time to prevent staff or patient harm, and (3) initiate postevent review, actions, and follow-up. RECOMMENDATIONS: Twelve recommendations–including recognition and awareness, policies and procedures, incident reporting, education and training, communication tools, discussion forums, and intervention strategies–address what hospitals and other organizations can do now to address disruptive behaviors. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:896,
      author={A. H. Rosenstein and M. O'Daniel},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={A survey of the impact of disruptive behaviors and communication defects on patient safety },
      journal={Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources},
      volume={34},
      number={8},
      pages={464-471},
      note={id: 3256; JID: 101238023; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: A recent survey was conducted to assess the significance of disruptive behaviors and their effect on communication and collaboration and impact on patient care. SURVEY: VHA West Coast administered a 22-question survey instrument--Nurse-Physician: Impact of Disruptive Behavior on Patient Care--to a convenience sample. Of the 388 member hospitals (in four VHA regions) invited, 102 hospitals participated in the survey (26% response rate). Results from surveys received from January 2004 though March 2007 are represented. Of the 4,530 participants, 2,846 listed their titles as nurses, 944 as physicians, 40 as administrative executives, and 700 as "other." RESULTS: A total of 77% of the respondents reported that they had witnessed disruptive behavior in physicians--88% of the nurses and 51% of the physicians. Sixty-five percent of the respondents reported witnessing disruptive behavior in nurses at their hospitals--73% of the nurses and 48% of the physicians. Sixty-seven percent of the respondents agreed that disruptive behaviors were linked with adverse events; the result for medical errors was 71%, and patient mortality, 27%. DISCUSSION: The results from the survey show that disruptive behaviors lead to potentially preventable adverse events, errors, compromises in safety and quality, and patient mortality. Strategies to address disruptive behaviors should (1) prevent disruptive events from occurring, (2) deal with events in real time to prevent staff or patient harm, and (3) initiate postevent review, actions, and follow-up. RECOMMENDATIONS: Twelve recommendations--including recognition and awareness, policies and procedures, incident reporting, education and training, communication tools, discussion forums, and intervention strategies--address what hospitals and other organizations can do now to address disruptive behaviors. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Agonistic Behavior; Health Care Surveys; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Interprofessional Relations; Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology; Patient Care/standards; Physicians/psychology; Safety Management; United States},
      isbn={1553-7250},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Salas, E., Wilson, K. A., Murphy, C. E., King, H., & Salisbury, M.. (2008). Communicating, coordinating, and cooperating when lives depend on it: tips for teamwork . Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources, 34(6), 333-341.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: In health care, others’ lives depend on the team operating at a level beyond the sum of its individual parts. A framework (a heuristic) represents a three-pronged approach to teamwork in health care that entails communication, coordination, and cooperation. These fundamental requirements of teamwork represent the constant interaction that team members undertake to become an effective team. Guidelines, tips, and examples show how the framework can be applied to establishing and enabling teams to provide safe, reliable care. GUIDELINES: The guidelines are as follows: (1) Support precise and accurate communication through a closed-loop communication protocol; (2) diagnose communication errors as you would any illness–Examine the team and look for symptoms, then treat the symptoms through team learning and self-correction; (3) recognize functional expertise by identifying and publicizing topical experts to evenly distribute work load and increase accuracy; (4) institute frequent practice opportunities to keep team skills in good shape because poorly honed skills will limit performance; (5) refine the team’s shared mental models (SMMs) by pre-planning to build its implicit coordination skills, adaptability, and flexibility; (6) shape adaptive expertise by fostering a deep understanding of the task to increase team effectiveness; (7) build team orientation by taking steps to increase trust and cohesion to lower stress levels and increase satisfaction, commitment, and collective efficacy; and (8) prepare the team by providing learning opportunities for new competencies that will expose members to feedback and increase the team’s overall efficacy. CONCLUSION: Although not a comprehensive list, the guidelines and tips represent the most essential requirements for effective teamwork.

    @article{RefWorks:1401,
      author={E. Salas and K. A. Wilson and C. E. Murphy and H. King and M. Salisbury},
      year={2008},
      month={Jun},
      title={Communicating, coordinating, and cooperating when lives depend on it: tips for teamwork },
      journal={Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources},
      volume={34},
      number={6},
      pages={333-341},
      note={id: 2303; PUBM: Print; JID: 101238023; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: In health care, others' lives depend on the team operating at a level beyond the sum of its individual parts. A framework (a heuristic) represents a three-pronged approach to teamwork in health care that entails communication, coordination, and cooperation. These fundamental requirements of teamwork represent the constant interaction that team members undertake to become an effective team. Guidelines, tips, and examples show how the framework can be applied to establishing and enabling teams to provide safe, reliable care. GUIDELINES: The guidelines are as follows: (1) Support precise and accurate communication through a closed-loop communication protocol; (2) diagnose communication errors as you would any illness--Examine the team and look for symptoms, then treat the symptoms through team learning and self-correction; (3) recognize functional expertise by identifying and publicizing topical experts to evenly distribute work load and increase accuracy; (4) institute frequent practice opportunities to keep team skills in good shape because poorly honed skills will limit performance; (5) refine the team's shared mental models (SMMs) by pre-planning to build its implicit coordination skills, adaptability, and flexibility; (6) shape adaptive expertise by fostering a deep understanding of the task to increase team effectiveness; (7) build team orientation by taking steps to increase trust and cohesion to lower stress levels and increase satisfaction, commitment, and collective efficacy; and (8) prepare the team by providing learning opportunities for new competencies that will expose members to feedback and increase the team's overall efficacy. CONCLUSION: Although not a comprehensive list, the guidelines and tips represent the most essential requirements for effective teamwork. },
      isbn={1553-7250},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Salas, E., Cooke, N. J., & Rosen, M. A.. (2008). On teams, teamwork, and team performance: discoveries and developments . Human factors, 50(3), 540-547.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVE: We highlight some of the key discoveries and developments in the area of team performance over the past 50 years, especially as reflected in the pages of Human Factors. BACKGROUND: Teams increasingly have become a way of life in many organizations, and research has kept up with the pace. METHOD: We have characterized progress in the field in terms of eight discoveries and five challenges. RESULTS: Discoveries pertain to the importance of shared cognition, the measurement of shared cognition, advances in team training, the use of synthetic task environments for research, factors influencing team effectiveness, models of team effectiveness, a multidisciplinary perspective, and training and technological interventions designed to improve team effectiveness. Challenges that are faced in the coming decades include an increased emphasis on team cognition; reconfigurable, adaptive teams; multicultural influences; and the need for naturalistic study and better measurement. CONCLUSION: Work in human factors has contributed significantly to the science and practice of teams, teamwork, and team performance. Future work must keep pace with the increasing use of teams in organizations. APPLICATION: The science of teams contributes to team effectiveness in the same way that the science of individual performance contributes to individual effectiveness.

    @article{RefWorks:1400,
      author={E. Salas and N. J. Cooke and M. A. Rosen},
      year={2008},
      month={Jun},
      title={On teams, teamwork, and team performance: discoveries and developments },
      journal={Human factors},
      volume={50},
      number={3},
      pages={540-547},
      note={id: 2723; PUBM: Print; JID: 0374660; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVE: We highlight some of the key discoveries and developments in the area of team performance over the past 50 years, especially as reflected in the pages of Human Factors. BACKGROUND: Teams increasingly have become a way of life in many organizations, and research has kept up with the pace. METHOD: We have characterized progress in the field in terms of eight discoveries and five challenges. RESULTS: Discoveries pertain to the importance of shared cognition, the measurement of shared cognition, advances in team training, the use of synthetic task environments for research, factors influencing team effectiveness, models of team effectiveness, a multidisciplinary perspective, and training and technological interventions designed to improve team effectiveness. Challenges that are faced in the coming decades include an increased emphasis on team cognition; reconfigurable, adaptive teams; multicultural influences; and the need for naturalistic study and better measurement. CONCLUSION: Work in human factors has contributed significantly to the science and practice of teams, teamwork, and team performance. Future work must keep pace with the increasing use of teams in organizations. APPLICATION: The science of teams contributes to team effectiveness in the same way that the science of individual performance contributes to individual effectiveness. },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Human Engineering; Research},
      isbn={0018-7208},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Sehgal, N. L., Fox, M., Vidyarthi, A. R., Sharpe, B. A., Gearhart, S., Bookwalter, T., Barker, J., Alldredge, B. K., Blegen, M. A., Wachter, R. M., & for Project, T. T. O. P. S. (.. (2008). A Multidisciplinary Teamwork Training Program: The Triad for Optimal Patient Safety (TOPS) Experience . Journal of general internal medicine : official journal of the Society for Research and Education in Primary Care Internal Medicine.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    INTRODUCTION: Communication and teamwork failures are a common cause of adverse events. Residency programs, with a mandate to teach systems-based practice, are particularly challenged to address these important skills. AIM: To develop a multidisciplinary teamwork training program focused on teaching teamwork behaviors and communication skills. SETTING: Internal medicine residents, hospitalists, nurses, pharmacists, and all other staff on a designated inpatient medical unit at an academic medical center. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: We developed a 4-h teamwork training program as part of the Triad for Optimal Patient Safety (TOPS) project. Teaching strategies combined didactic presentation, facilitated discussion using a safety trigger video, and small-group scenario-based exercises to practice effective communication skills and team behaviors. Development, planning, implementation, delivery, and evaluation of TOPS Training was conducted by a multidisciplinary team. PROGRAM EVALUATION: We received 203 evaluations with a mean overall rating for the training of 4.49 +/- 0.79 on a 1-5 scale. Participants rated the multidisciplinary educational setting highly at 4.59 +/- 0.68. DISCUSSION: We developed a multidisciplinary teamwork training program that was highly rated by all participating disciplines. The key was creating a shared forum to learn about and discuss interdisciplinary communication and teamwork.

    @article{RefWorks:1402,
      author={N. L. Sehgal and M. Fox and A. R. Vidyarthi and B. A. Sharpe and S. Gearhart and T. Bookwalter and J. Barker and B. K. Alldredge and M. A. Blegen and R. M. Wachter and The Triad for Optimal Patient Safety (TOPS) Project},
      year={2008},
      month={Oct 2},
      title={A Multidisciplinary Teamwork Training Program: The Triad for Optimal Patient Safety (TOPS) Experience },
      journal={Journal of general internal medicine : official journal of the Society for Research and Education in Primary Care Internal Medicine},
      note={id: 2754; PUBM: Print-Electronic; JID: 8605834; 2008/02/19 [received]; 2008/08/13 [accepted]; 2008/08/07 [revised]; 2008/10/02 [aheadofprint]; aheadofprint; SO: J Gen Intern Med. 2008 Oct 2. },
      abstract={INTRODUCTION: Communication and teamwork failures are a common cause of adverse events. Residency programs, with a mandate to teach systems-based practice, are particularly challenged to address these important skills. AIM: To develop a multidisciplinary teamwork training program focused on teaching teamwork behaviors and communication skills. SETTING: Internal medicine residents, hospitalists, nurses, pharmacists, and all other staff on a designated inpatient medical unit at an academic medical center. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: We developed a 4-h teamwork training program as part of the Triad for Optimal Patient Safety (TOPS) project. Teaching strategies combined didactic presentation, facilitated discussion using a safety trigger video, and small-group scenario-based exercises to practice effective communication skills and team behaviors. Development, planning, implementation, delivery, and evaluation of TOPS Training was conducted by a multidisciplinary team. PROGRAM EVALUATION: We received 203 evaluations with a mean overall rating for the training of 4.49 +/- 0.79 on a 1-5 scale. Participants rated the multidisciplinary educational setting highly at 4.59 +/- 0.68. DISCUSSION: We developed a multidisciplinary teamwork training program that was highly rated by all participating disciplines. The key was creating a shared forum to learn about and discuss interdisciplinary communication and teamwork. },
      isbn={1525-1497},
      language={ENG}
    }

  • Selle, K. M., Salamon, K., Boarman, R., & Sauer, J.. (2008). Providing interprofessional learning through interdisciplinary collaboration: The role of "modelling" . Journal of Interprofessional Care, 22(1), 85-92.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Faculty from four disciplines at a small Liberal Arts College in an American Midwestern city collaborated on an interdisciplinary pre-service project. Students in nursing, physical therapy, social work and special education voluntarily participated in one of two group methods of teaching. The purpose of this study was to examine whether students learn interprofessional teaming more effectively from (i) discussion of research, faculty modeling and role-playing, or from (ii) discussion of research and role-playing. Results from the evaluation suggested both groups benefited from discussions and role-playing related to interprofessional team meetings. A significant difference between students who observed faculty modeling and those who did not was found. The paper discusses the importance of preparing college students for interprofessional collaboration in light of current research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1356,
      author={K. M. Selle and K. Salamon and R. Boarman and J. Sauer},
      year={2008},
      title={Providing interprofessional learning through interdisciplinary collaboration: The role of "modelling" },
      journal={Journal of Interprofessional Care},
      volume={22},
      number={1},
      pages={85-92},
      note={id: 2191; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9205811. },
      abstract={Faculty from four disciplines at a small Liberal Arts College in an American Midwestern city collaborated on an interdisciplinary pre-service project. Students in nursing, physical therapy, social work and special education voluntarily participated in one of two group methods of teaching. The purpose of this study was to examine whether students learn interprofessional teaming more effectively from (i) discussion of research, faculty modeling and role-playing, or from (ii) discussion of research and role-playing. Results from the evaluation suggested both groups benefited from discussions and role-playing related to interprofessional team meetings. A significant difference between students who observed faculty modeling and those who did not was found. The paper discusses the importance of preparing college students for interprofessional collaboration in light of current research. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1141; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009770671&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Vogwill, V., & Reeves, S.. (2008). Challenges of information exchange between nurses and physicians in multidisciplinary team meetings . Journal of interprofessional care, 22(6), 664-667.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This paper reports a study which examined the nature of multidisciplinary team meetings, termed ‘‘bullet rounds’’, in a general internal medicine (GIM) unit at a large teaching hospital in Canada. In this GIM unit, clinical practice was managed using a team-based structure of four teams organized around the resident physicians or interns, who rotated every eight or nine weeks. Bullet rounds comprised representatives from medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, social work, and pharmacy. The goal of the daily rounds was the interprofessional planning and management of each GIM patient’s treatment and discharge plan. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:897,
      author={V. Vogwill and S. Reeves},
      year={2008},
      month={Dec},
      title={Challenges of information exchange between nurses and physicians in multidisciplinary team meetings },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={22},
      number={6},
      pages={664-667},
      note={id: 4121; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={This paper reports a study which examined the nature of multidisciplinary team meetings, termed ‘‘bullet rounds’’, in a general internal medicine (GIM) unit at a large teaching hospital in Canada. In this GIM unit, clinical practice was managed using a team-based structure of four teams organized around the resident physicians or interns, who rotated every eight or nine weeks. Bullet rounds comprised representatives from medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, social work, and pharmacy. The goal of the daily rounds was the interprofessional planning and management of each GIM patient’s treatment and discharge plan. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Group Processes; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Ontario; Physician-Nurse Relations; Research},
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ward, J., Schaal, M., Sullivan, J., Bowen, M. E., Erdmann, J. B., & Hojat, M.. (2008). The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration: a study with undergraduate nursing students . Journal of interprofessional care, 22(4), 375-386.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAPNC) was administered to 333 undergraduate nursing students. The underlying factors, item-total score correlations and reliability of the JSAPNC were examined. A significant correlation was observed between scores of the JSAPNC and the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (r = 0.38). It was hypothesized that: (1) Women would score higher than men on the JSAPNC, (2) Scores on the JSAPNC would increase as students progress in their nursing education, (3) Scores on the JSAPNC would be higher for students with work experiences in health care, and (4) Scores on the JSAPNC would be higher for those with a higher level of education prior to nursing school. Hypotheses 1, 3 and 4 were confirmed at a conventional statistical level of significance (p

    @article{RefWorks:1403,
      author={J. Ward and M. Schaal and J. Sullivan and M. E. Bowen and J. B. Erdmann and M. Hojat},
      year={2008},
      month={Aug},
      title={The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration: a study with undergraduate nursing students },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={22},
      number={4},
      pages={375-386},
      note={id: 2877; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAPNC) was administered to 333 undergraduate nursing students. The underlying factors, item-total score correlations and reliability of the JSAPNC were examined. A significant correlation was observed between scores of the JSAPNC and the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (r = 0.38). It was hypothesized that: (1) Women would score higher than men on the JSAPNC, (2) Scores on the JSAPNC would increase as students progress in their nursing education, (3) Scores on the JSAPNC would be higher for students with work experiences in health care, and (4) Scores on the JSAPNC would be higher for those with a higher level of education prior to nursing school. Hypotheses 1, 3 and 4 were confirmed at a conventional statistical level of significance (p },
      isbn={1469-9567},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Weaver, T. E.. (2008). Enhancing multiple disciplinary teamwork . Nursing outlook, 56(3), 108-114.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Multiple disciplinary research provides an opportunity to bring together investigators across disciplines to provide new views and develop innovative approaches to important questions. Through this shared experience, novel paradigms are formed, original frameworks are developed, and new language is generated. Integral to the successful construction of effective cross-disciplinary teams is the recognition of antecedent factors that affect the development of the team such as intrapersonal, social, physical environmental, organizational, and institutional influences. Team functioning is enhanced with well-developed behavioral, affective, interpersonal, and intellectual processes. Outcomes of effective multiple disciplinary research teams include novel ideas, integrative models, new training programs, institutional change, and innovative policies that can also influence the degree to which antecedents and processes contribute to team performance. Ongoing evaluation of team functioning and achievement of designated outcomes ensures the continued development of the multiple disciplinary team and confirmation of this approach as important to the advancement of science.

    @article{RefWorks:1404,
      author={T. E. Weaver},
      year={2008},
      month={05},
      title={Enhancing multiple disciplinary teamwork },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={56},
      number={3},
      pages={108-114},
      note={id: 2748; Accession Number: 2009954940. Language: English. Entry Date: 20080801. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. NLM UID: 0401075. },
      abstract={Multiple disciplinary research provides an opportunity to bring together investigators across disciplines to provide new views and develop innovative approaches to important questions. Through this shared experience, novel paradigms are formed, original frameworks are developed, and new language is generated. Integral to the successful construction of effective cross-disciplinary teams is the recognition of antecedent factors that affect the development of the team such as intrapersonal, social, physical environmental, organizational, and institutional influences. Team functioning is enhanced with well-developed behavioral, affective, interpersonal, and intellectual processes. Outcomes of effective multiple disciplinary research teams include novel ideas, integrative models, new training programs, institutional change, and innovative policies that can also influence the degree to which antecedents and processes contribute to team performance. Ongoing evaluation of team functioning and achievement of designated outcomes ensures the continued development of the multiple disciplinary team and confirmation of this approach as important to the advancement of science. },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Interprofessional Relations; Multidisciplinary Care Team -- Administration; Research, Nursing; Teamwork; Attitude of Health Personnel; Communication; Communication Barriers; Decision Making, Organizational; Group Processes; Health Facility Environment; Health Knowledge; Models, Psychological; Motivation; Nursing Models, Theoretical; Outcome Assessment -- Administration; Personality; Process Assessment (Health Care) -- Administration; Professional Role; Study Design; Trust},
      isbn={0029-6554},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009954940&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Xyrichis, A., & Ream, E.. (2008). Teamwork: a concept analysis . Journal of advanced nursing, 61(2), 232-241.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of teamwork. BACKGROUND: Teamwork is seen as an important facilitator in delivering quality healthcare services internationally. However, research studies of teamwork in health care are criticized for lacking a basic conceptual understanding of what this concept represents. A universal definition for healthcare settings and professionals is missing from published literature. METHOD: Walker and Avant’s approach was used to guide this concept analysis. Literature searches used bibliographic databases (Medline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest CSA), internet search engines (GoogleScholar), and hand searches. Literature published between 1976 and 2006 was reviewed but only material in English was included. FINDINGS: Based on the analysis undertaken, teamwork is proposed as a dynamic process involving two or more healthcare professionals with complementary backgrounds and skills, sharing common health goals and exercising concerted physical and mental effort in assessing, planning, or evaluating patient care. This is accomplished through interdependent collaboration, open communication and shared decision-making, and generates value-added patient, organizational and staff outcomes. CONCLUSION: Praising the value of teamwork without a common understanding of what this concept represents endangers both research into this way of working and its effective utilization in practice. The proposed definition helps reconcile discrepancies between how this concept is understood by nurses and doctors, as well as allied health professionals. A common understanding can facilitate communication in educational, research and clinical settings and is imperative for improving clarity and validity of future research. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1377,
      author={A. Xyrichis and E. Ream},
      year={2008},
      month={Jan},
      title={Teamwork: a concept analysis },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={61},
      number={2},
      pages={232-241},
      note={id: 2179; PUBM: Print; JID: 7609811; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of teamwork. BACKGROUND: Teamwork is seen as an important facilitator in delivering quality healthcare services internationally. However, research studies of teamwork in health care are criticized for lacking a basic conceptual understanding of what this concept represents. A universal definition for healthcare settings and professionals is missing from published literature. METHOD: Walker and Avant's approach was used to guide this concept analysis. Literature searches used bibliographic databases (Medline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest CSA), internet search engines (GoogleScholar), and hand searches. Literature published between 1976 and 2006 was reviewed but only material in English was included. FINDINGS: Based on the analysis undertaken, teamwork is proposed as a dynamic process involving two or more healthcare professionals with complementary backgrounds and skills, sharing common health goals and exercising concerted physical and mental effort in assessing, planning, or evaluating patient care. This is accomplished through interdependent collaboration, open communication and shared decision-making, and generates value-added patient, organizational and staff outcomes. CONCLUSION: Praising the value of teamwork without a common understanding of what this concept represents endangers both research into this way of working and its effective utilization in practice. The proposed definition helps reconcile discrepancies between how this concept is understood by nurses and doctors, as well as allied health professionals. A common understanding can facilitate communication in educational, research and clinical settings and is imperative for improving clarity and validity of future research. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0309-2402},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Xyrichis, A., & Lowton, K.. (2008). What fosters or prevents interprofessional teamworking in primary and community care? A literature review . International journal of nursing studies, 45(1), 140-153.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    BACKGROUND: The increase in prevalence of long-term conditions in Western societies, with the subsequent need for non-acute quality patient healthcare, has brought the issue of collaboration between health professionals to the fore. Within primary care, it has been suggested that multidisciplinary teamworking is essential to develop an integrated approach to promoting and maintaining the health of the population whilst improving service effectiveness. Although it is becoming widely accepted that no single discipline can provide complete care for patients with a long-term condition, in practice, interprofessional working is not always achieved. OBJECTIVES: This review aimed to explore the factors that inhibit or facilitate interprofessional teamworking in primary and community care settings, in order to inform development of multidisciplinary working at the turn of the century. DESIGN: A comprehensive search of the literature was undertaken using a variety of approaches to identify appropriate literature for inclusion in the study. The selected articles used both qualitative and quantitative research methods. FINDINGS: Following a thematic analysis of the literature, two main themes emerged that had an impact on interprofessional teamworking: team structure and team processes. Within these two themes, six categories were identified: team premises; team size and composition; organisational support; team meetings; clear goals and objectives; and audit. The complex nature of interprofessional teamworking in primary care meant that despite teamwork being an efficient and productive way of achieving goals and results, several barriers exist that hinder its potential from becoming fully exploited; implications and recommendations for practice are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: These findings can inform development of current best practice, although further research needs to be conducted into multidisciplinary teamworking at both the team and organisation level, to ensure that enhancement and maintenance of teamwork leads to an improved quality of healthcare provision. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1376,
      author={A. Xyrichis and K. Lowton},
      year={2008},
      title={What fosters or prevents interprofessional teamworking in primary and community care? A literature review },
      journal={International journal of nursing studies},
      volume={45},
      number={1},
      pages={140-153},
      note={id: 2175; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080314. Publication Type: journal article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Nursing; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. No. of Refs: 60 ref. NLM UID: 0400675. },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: The increase in prevalence of long-term conditions in Western societies, with the subsequent need for non-acute quality patient healthcare, has brought the issue of collaboration between health professionals to the fore. Within primary care, it has been suggested that multidisciplinary teamworking is essential to develop an integrated approach to promoting and maintaining the health of the population whilst improving service effectiveness. Although it is becoming widely accepted that no single discipline can provide complete care for patients with a long-term condition, in practice, interprofessional working is not always achieved. OBJECTIVES: This review aimed to explore the factors that inhibit or facilitate interprofessional teamworking in primary and community care settings, in order to inform development of multidisciplinary working at the turn of the century. DESIGN: A comprehensive search of the literature was undertaken using a variety of approaches to identify appropriate literature for inclusion in the study. The selected articles used both qualitative and quantitative research methods. FINDINGS: Following a thematic analysis of the literature, two main themes emerged that had an impact on interprofessional teamworking: team structure and team processes. Within these two themes, six categories were identified: team premises; team size and composition; organisational support; team meetings; clear goals and objectives; and audit. The complex nature of interprofessional teamworking in primary care meant that despite teamwork being an efficient and productive way of achieving goals and results, several barriers exist that hinder its potential from becoming fully exploited; implications and recommendations for practice are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: These findings can inform development of current best practice, although further research needs to be conducted into multidisciplinary teamworking at both the team and organisation level, to ensure that enhancement and maintenance of teamwork leads to an improved quality of healthcare provision. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Community Health Services; Interprofessional Relations; Primary Health Care; Teamwork; CINAHL Database; Collaboration; Embase; Medline; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Qualitative Studies; Quantitative Studies; Thematic Analysis},
      isbn={0020-7489},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009762152&site=ehost-live}
    }

2007 Jan-Mar

  • Gerardi, D., & Fontaine, D. K.. (2007 Jan-Mar). Creating a healthy workplace. True collaboration: envisioning new ways of working together . AACN Advanced critical care, 18(1), 10-14.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released its Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments in 2005. Through literature review and focus groups, 6 key components emerged as essential for the creation of a healthy work environment. True collaboration, one of the six, is the focus of this article. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1309,
      author={D. Gerardi and D. K. Fontaine},
      year={2007 Jan-Mar},
      title={Creating a healthy workplace. True collaboration: envisioning new ways of working together },
      journal={AACN Advanced critical care},
      volume={18},
      number={1},
      pages={10-14},
      note={id: 1159; SO: AACN Advanced Critical Care (AACN ADV CRIT CARE), 2007 Jan-Mar; 18 (1): 10-4 (16 ref); AN: 2009539447 },
      abstract={
    The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses released its Standards for
    Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments in 2005. Through literature
    review and focus groups, 6 key components emerged as essential for the
    creation of a healthy work environment. True collaboration, one of the six, is
    the focus of this article. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

2007

  • Barnsteiner, J. H., Disch, J. M., Hall, L., Mayer, D., & Moore, S. M.. (2007). Promoting interprofessional education . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 144-150.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The work of the Institute of Medicine and others has clearly demonstrated that when healthcare professionals understand each others’ roles and are able to communicate and work effectively together, patients are more likely to receive safe, quality care. Currently, there are few opportunities to bring faculty and students in pre-licensure programs from multiple disciplines together for the purpose of learning together about each others’ roles, and practicing collaboration and teamwork. Designing and implementing interprofessional education offerings is challenging. Course scheduling, faculty interest and expertise in interprofessional education (IPE), a culture of IPE among faculty and students, and institutional policies for sharing course credit among schools are just a few of the challenges. This article explores the concept of IPE, and how faculty in schools of nursing might take the lead to work with colleagues in other health profession schools to prepare graduates to understand each others’ roles, and the importance of teamwork, communication, and collaboration to the delivery of high quality, safe patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1286,
      author={J. H. Barnsteiner and J. M. Disch and L. Hall and D. Mayer and S. M. Moore},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Promoting interprofessional education },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={144-150},
      note={id: 1090; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/05 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={The work of the Institute of Medicine and others has clearly demonstrated that when healthcare professionals understand each others' roles and are able to communicate and work effectively together, patients are more likely to receive safe, quality care. Currently, there are few opportunities to bring faculty and students in pre-licensure programs from multiple disciplines together for the purpose of learning together about each others' roles, and practicing collaboration and teamwork. Designing and implementing interprofessional education offerings is challenging. Course scheduling, faculty interest and expertise in interprofessional education (IPE), a culture of IPE among faculty and students, and institutional policies for sharing course credit among schools are just a few of the challenges. This article explores the concept of IPE, and how faculty in schools of nursing might take the lead to work with colleagues in other health profession schools to prepare graduates to understand each others' roles, and the importance of teamwork, communication, and collaboration to the delivery of high quality, safe patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bradbury-Jones, C., Sambrook, S., & Irvine, F.. (2007). The meaning of empowerment for nursing students: a critical incident study . Journal of advanced nursing, 59(4), 342-351.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study to explore the meaning of empowerment for nursing students in relation to their clinical practice experiences. BACKGROUND: Empowerment and power are well-researched areas of nursing practice, particularly in relation to Registered Nurses. Furthermore, several studies have considered the experiences of nursing students in terms of nursing culture and socialization. However, few researchers have focused specifically on nursing student empowerment. METHOD: The critical incident technique was used and anonymous data were collected between November 2005 and January 2006. One hundred and nine written critical incidents were provided by 66 nursing students relating to empowering and disempowering experiences in clinical practice. The data were content analysed. FINDINGS: Nursing students experience both empowerment and disempowerment in clinical placements, centring on three issues: learning in practice, team membership and power. Continuity of placement, the presence of a mentor and time underpinned empowering experiences whereas their absence had a disempowering effect. CONCLUSION: The consequences of nursing student empowerment are high self-esteem, motivation for learning and positive regard for placement. Supportive mentors play a pivotal role in the empowerment of nursing students and it is essential for the nursing profession that they are supported to undertake their mentorship role. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1289,
      author={C. Bradbury-Jones and S. Sambrook and F. Irvine},
      year={2007},
      month={Aug},
      title={The meaning of empowerment for nursing students: a critical incident study },
      journal={Journal of advanced nursing},
      volume={59},
      number={4},
      pages={342-351},
      note={id: 1403; PUBM: Print-Electronic; DEP: 20070603; JID: 7609811; 2007/06/03 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: This paper is a report of a study to explore the meaning of empowerment for nursing students in relation to their clinical practice experiences. BACKGROUND: Empowerment and power are well-researched areas of nursing practice, particularly in relation to Registered Nurses. Furthermore, several studies have considered the experiences of nursing students in terms of nursing culture and socialization. However, few researchers have focused specifically on nursing student empowerment. METHOD: The critical incident technique was used and anonymous data were collected between November 2005 and January 2006. One hundred and nine written critical incidents were provided by 66 nursing students relating to empowering and disempowering experiences in clinical practice. The data were content analysed. FINDINGS: Nursing students experience both empowerment and disempowerment in clinical placements, centring on three issues: learning in practice, team membership and power. Continuity of placement, the presence of a mentor and time underpinned empowering experiences whereas their absence had a disempowering effect. CONCLUSION: The consequences of nursing student empowerment are high self-esteem, motivation for learning and positive regard for placement. Supportive mentors play a pivotal role in the empowerment of nursing students and it is essential for the nursing profession that they are supported to undertake their mentorship role. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0309-2402},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Buerhaus, P. I., Donelan, K., Ulrich, B. T., Norman, L., DesRoches, C., & Dittus, R.. (2007). Impact of the nurse shortage on hospital patient care: comparative perspectives . Health affairs, 26(3), 853-862.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    National surveys of registered nurses, physicians, and hospital executives document considerable concern about the U.S. nurse shortage. Substantial proportions of respondents perceived negative impacts on care processes, hospital capacity, nursing practice, and the Institute of Medicine’s six aims for improving health care systems. There were also many areas of divergent opinion within and among these groups, including the impact of the shortage on safety and early detection of patient complications. These divergences in perceptions could be important barriers to resolving the current nurse shortage and improving the quality and safety of patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1290,
      author={P. I. Buerhaus and K. Donelan and B. T. Ulrich and L. Norman and C. DesRoches and R. Dittus},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Impact of the nurse shortage on hospital patient care: comparative perspectives },
      journal={Health affairs},
      volume={26},
      number={3},
      pages={853-862},
      note={id: 1043; PUBM: Print; JID: 8303128; ppublish },
      abstract={National surveys of registered nurses, physicians, and hospital executives document considerable concern about the U.S. nurse shortage. Substantial proportions of respondents perceived negative impacts on care processes, hospital capacity, nursing practice, and the Institute of Medicine's six aims for improving health care systems. There were also many areas of divergent opinion within and among these groups, including the impact of the shortage on safety and early detection of patient complications. These divergences in perceptions could be important barriers to resolving the current nurse shortage and improving the quality and safety of patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1544-5208},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cadell, S., Bosma, H., Johnston, M., Porterfield, P., Cline, L., Silva, D. J., Fraser, J., & Boston, P.. (2007). Practising interprofessional teamwork from the first day of class: a model for an interprofessional palliative care course . Journal of palliative care, 23(4), 273-279.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Providing care to the dying requires an interprofessional team to attend to complex needs that extend beyond the physical care of the patient. This article presents a model of education by describing an interprofessional palliative care course that brings together students from various health professions to provide an opportunity for learning and practice on a palliative care team. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1292,
      author={S. Cadell and H. Bosma and M. Johnston and P. Porterfield and L. Cline and J. Da Silva and J. Fraser and P. Boston},
      year={2007},
      month={12},
      title={Practising interprofessional teamwork from the first day of class: a model for an interprofessional palliative care course },
      journal={Journal of palliative care},
      volume={23},
      number={4},
      pages={273-279},
      note={id: 2176; Language: English. Entry Date: 20080229. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Canada; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Hospice/Palliative Care. No. of Refs: 23 ref. NLM UID: 8610345. },
      abstract={Providing care to the dying requires an interprofessional team to attend to complex needs that extend beyond the physical care of the patient. This article presents a model of education by describing an interprofessional palliative care course that brings together students from various health professions to provide an opportunity for learning and practice on a palliative care team. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Education, Interdisciplinary; Interprofessional Relations; Palliative Care -- Education; Teamwork; Curriculum; Students, Medical; Students, Nursing; Students, Pharmacy; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={0825-8597},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=549&accno=2009757267; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009757267&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Christie, C., Jr, S. A. R., & Bednarzyk, M.. (2007). Transdisciplinary assignments in graduate health education as a model for future collaboration . Journal of allied health, 36(2), 67-71.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Transdisciplinary health care continues to be at the forefront of patient treatment in the medical arena, in part due to escalating health care costs, an increasing aging population, and the development of multiple chronic diseases. Gaining the knowledge, experience, and principles associated with transdisciplinary teamwork to successfully prepare for modern-day practice is therefore essential for individuals of various health care professions. This report describes an assignment developed and implemented to facilitate professional interaction between graduate physical therapy, nutrition, and nursing students. The objectives of this assignment were to determine through student evaluation the effects of a transdisciplinary experience on students’ understanding of the role of another discipline and students’ communication skills across disciplines. When evaluating the assignment, students most often remarked that they developed a greater understanding of the roles of the included disciplines and reported a significant increase in communication skills. However, some students did not concur that this assignment was effective due to the scheduling conflicts and lack of teamwork that can occur during a collaborative project. The students’ reports of their experiences in completing the assignment provide valuable insights for implementing and/or updating a preparatory transdisciplinary education component in other settings. Additional research can focus on the challenges faced by the majority of the students venturing into actual health care or "real-world" settings for comparative studies. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1295,
      author={C. Christie and A. R. Smith Jr and M. Bednarzyk},
      year={2007},
      month={Summer},
      title={Transdisciplinary assignments in graduate health education as a model for future collaboration },
      journal={Journal of allied health},
      volume={36},
      number={2},
      pages={67-71},
      note={id: 2181; PUBM: Print; JID: 0361603; ppublish },
      abstract={Transdisciplinary health care continues to be at the forefront of patient treatment in the medical arena, in part due to escalating health care costs, an increasing aging population, and the development of multiple chronic diseases. Gaining the knowledge, experience, and principles associated with transdisciplinary teamwork to successfully prepare for modern-day practice is therefore essential for individuals of various health care professions. This report describes an assignment developed and implemented to facilitate professional interaction between graduate physical therapy, nutrition, and nursing students. The objectives of this assignment were to determine through student evaluation the effects of a transdisciplinary experience on students' understanding of the role of another discipline and students' communication skills across disciplines. When evaluating the assignment, students most often remarked that they developed a greater understanding of the roles of the included disciplines and reported a significant increase in communication skills. However, some students did not concur that this assignment was effective due to the scheduling conflicts and lack of teamwork that can occur during a collaborative project. The students' reports of their experiences in completing the assignment provide valuable insights for implementing and/or updating a preparatory transdisciplinary education component in other settings. Additional research can focus on the challenges faced by the majority of the students venturing into actual health care or "real-world" settings for comparative studies. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Allied Health Occupations/education; Education, Graduate/standards/trends; Education, Nursing, Graduate; Florida; Group Processes; Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Educational; Nutritional Sciences/education; Patient Care Team; Physical Therapy (Specialty)/education; Program Evaluation; Students, Health Occupations},
      isbn={0090-7421},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Constantino, R. E.. (2007). A transdisciplinary team acting on evidence through analyses of moot malpractice cases . Dimensions of critical care nursing : DCCN, 26(4), 150-155.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A transdiciplinary team is crucial for healthcare systems to act based on evidence in responding to the global demand of the business of caring and patient safety. The purpose of this paper is to outline a transdisciplinary team led by nurses that examines linkages between moot malpractice cases filed against a healthcare system and to the quality of the healthcare system’s ecology, caregiver, and patient safety outcomes. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1296,
      author={R. E. Constantino},
      year={2007},
      month={Jul-Aug},
      title={A transdisciplinary team acting on evidence through analyses of moot malpractice cases },
      journal={Dimensions of critical care nursing : DCCN},
      volume={26},
      number={4},
      pages={150-155},
      note={id: 1415; PUBM: Print; JID: 8211489; ppublish },
      abstract={A transdiciplinary team is crucial for healthcare systems to act based on evidence in responding to the global demand of the business of caring and patient safety. The purpose of this paper is to outline a transdisciplinary team led by nurses that examines linkages between moot malpractice cases filed against a healthcare system and to the quality of the healthcare system's ecology, caregiver, and patient safety outcomes. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={0730-4625},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Cronenwett, L., Sherwood, G., Barnsteiner, J., Disch, J., Johnson, J., Mitchell, P., Sullivan, D. T., & Warren, J.. (2007). Quality and safety education for nurses . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 122-131.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) addresses the challenge of preparing nurses with the competencies necessary to continuously improve the quality and safety of the health care systems in which they work. The QSEN faculty members adapted the Institute of Medicine competencies for nursing (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics), proposing definitions that could describe essential features of what it means to be a competent and respected nurse. Using the competency definitions, the authors propose statements of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) for each competency that should be developed during pre-licensure nursing education. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) faculty and advisory board members invite the profession to comment on the competencies and their definitions and on whether the KSAs for pre-licensure education are appropriate goals for students preparing for basic practice as a registered nurse. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1297,
      author={L. Cronenwett and G. Sherwood and J. Barnsteiner and J. Disch and J. Johnson and P. Mitchell and D. T. Sullivan and J. Warren},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Quality and safety education for nurses },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={122-131},
      note={id: 1093; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/02 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) addresses the challenge of preparing nurses with the competencies necessary to continuously improve the quality and safety of the health care systems in which they work. The QSEN faculty members adapted the Institute of Medicine competencies for nursing (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics), proposing definitions that could describe essential features of what it means to be a competent and respected nurse. Using the competency definitions, the authors propose statements of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) for each competency that should be developed during pre-licensure nursing education. Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) faculty and advisory board members invite the profession to comment on the competencies and their definitions and on whether the KSAs for pre-licensure education are appropriate goals for students preparing for basic practice as a registered nurse. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Curran, V. R., Sharpe, D., & Forristall, J.. (2007). Attitudes of health sciences faculty members towards interprofessional teamwork and education . Medical education, 41(9), 892-896.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Objectives Faculty attitudes are believed to be a barrier to successful implementation of interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives within academic health sciences settings. The purpose of this study was to examine specific attributes of faculty members, which might relate to attitudes towards IPE and interprofessional teamwork. Methods A survey was distributed to all faculty members in the medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work programmes at our institution. Respondents were asked to rate their attitudes towards interprofessional health care teams, IPE and interprofessional learning in an academic setting using scales adopted from the peer-reviewed literature. Information on the characteristics of the respondents was also collected, including data on gender, prior experience with IPE, age and years of practice experience. Results A total response rate of 63.0% was achieved. Medicine faculty members reported significantly lower mean scores (P

    @article{RefWorks:1298,
      author={V. R. Curran and D. Sharpe and J. Forristall},
      year={2007},
      month={09},
      title={Attitudes of health sciences faculty members towards interprofessional teamwork and education },
      journal={Medical education},
      volume={41},
      number={9},
      pages={892-896},
      note={id: 1392; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. No. of Refs: 5 ref. NLM UID: 7605655. },
      abstract={Objectives Faculty attitudes are believed to be a barrier to successful implementation of interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives within academic health sciences settings. The purpose of this study was to examine specific attributes of faculty members, which might relate to attitudes towards IPE and interprofessional teamwork. Methods A survey was distributed to all faculty members in the medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work programmes at our institution. Respondents were asked to rate their attitudes towards interprofessional health care teams, IPE and interprofessional learning in an academic setting using scales adopted from the peer-reviewed literature. Information on the characteristics of the respondents was also collected, including data on gender, prior experience with IPE, age and years of practice experience. Results A total response rate of 63.0% was achieved. Medicine faculty members reported significantly lower mean scores (P }
    }

  • Day, L., & Smith, E. L.. (2007). Integrating quality and safety content into clinical teaching in the acute care setting . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 138-143.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Teaching the highest quality and safest practice has long been a goal of faculty members in pre-licensure nursing education programs. This article will describe innovative approaches to integrating quality and safety content into existing clinical practica. The core competencies identified by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses project-patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics-serve as the framework for the teaching/learning exercises. The strategies described require a shift in attention rather than changes in course content and can be included in any clinical rotation in an acute care setting. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1301,
      author={L. Day and E. L. Smith},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Integrating quality and safety content into clinical teaching in the acute care setting },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={138-143},
      note={id: 1091; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/03 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Teaching the highest quality and safest practice has long been a goal of faculty members in pre-licensure nursing education programs. This article will describe innovative approaches to integrating quality and safety content into existing clinical practica. The core competencies identified by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses project-patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics-serve as the framework for the teaching/learning exercises. The strategies described require a shift in attention rather than changes in course content and can be included in any clinical rotation in an acute care setting. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Dayton, E., & Henriksen, K.. (2007). Communication failure: basic components, contributing factors, and the call for structure . Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety, 33(1), 34-47.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Communication is a taken-for-granted human activity that is recognized as important once it has failed. Communication failures are a major contributor to adverse events in health care. BASIC COMMUNICATION COMPONENTS AND PROCESSES: The components and processes of communication converge in an intricate manner, creating opportunities for misunderstanding along the way. When a patient’s safety is at risk, providers should speak up (that is, initiate a message) to draw attention to the situation before harm is caused. They should also clearly explain (encode) and understand (decode) each other’s diagnosis and recommendations to ensure well coordinated delivery of care. INDIVIDUAL, GROUP, AND ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS: Beyond basic dyadic communication exchanges, an intricate web of individual, group, and organizational factors–more specifically, cognitive workload, implicit assumptions, authority gradients, diffusion of responsibility, and transitions of care–complicate communication. THE CALL FOR STRUCTURE: More structured and explicitly designed forms of communication have been recommended to reduce ambiguity, enhance clarity, and send an unequivocal signal, when needed, that a different action is required. Read-backs, Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation, critical assertions, briefings, and debriefings are seeing increasing use in health care. CODA: Although structured forms of communication have good potential to enhance clarity, they are not fail-safe. Providers need to be sensitive to unexpected consequences regarding their use. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1302,
      author={E. Dayton and K. Henriksen},
      year={2007},
      month={Jan},
      title={Communication failure: basic components, contributing factors, and the call for structure },
      journal={Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety},
      volume={33},
      number={1},
      pages={34-47},
      note={id: 852; PUBM: Print; JID: 101238023; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Communication is a taken-for-granted human activity that is recognized as important once it has failed. Communication failures are a major contributor to adverse events in health care. BASIC COMMUNICATION COMPONENTS AND PROCESSES: The components and processes of communication converge in an intricate manner, creating opportunities for misunderstanding along the way. When a patient's safety is at risk, providers should speak up (that is, initiate a message) to draw attention to the situation before harm is caused. They should also clearly explain (encode) and understand (decode) each other's diagnosis and recommendations to ensure well coordinated delivery of care. INDIVIDUAL, GROUP, AND ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS: Beyond basic dyadic communication exchanges, an intricate web of individual, group, and organizational factors--more specifically, cognitive workload, implicit assumptions, authority gradients, diffusion of responsibility, and transitions of care--complicate communication. THE CALL FOR STRUCTURE: More structured and explicitly designed forms of communication have been recommended to reduce ambiguity, enhance clarity, and send an unequivocal signal, when needed, that a different action is required. Read-backs, Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation, critical assertions, briefings, and debriefings are seeing increasing use in health care. CODA: Although structured forms of communication have good potential to enhance clarity, they are not fail-safe. Providers need to be sensitive to unexpected consequences regarding their use. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Health Services Administration; Humans; Quality Assurance, Health Care/methods},
      isbn={1553-7250},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Finkelman, A. W., & Kenner, C.. (2007). Teaching IOM: Implications of the Institute of Medicine reports for nursing education . Silver Spring, MD: American Nurses Association.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Teaching IOM focuses on the core competencies derived from the IOM reports on quality and health care and how to use these reports in the classroom. The companion CD-ROM provides additional material for incorporating content into curricula and teaching-learning experiences. It includes PowerPoint presentations with notes on the book’s five major topics; healthcare safety, healthcare quality, public health safety and quality, healthcare diversity, and linkage between research and evidence-based practice. The content is appropriate for graduate or undergraduate students. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @book{RefWorks:1305,
      author={A. W. Finkelman and C. Kenner},
      year={2007},
      title={Teaching IOM: Implications of the Institute of Medicine reports for nursing education },
      publisher={American Nurses Association},
      address={Silver Spring, MD},
      note={id: 1040},
      abstract={Teaching IOM focuses on the core competencies derived from the IOM reports on quality and health care and how to use these reports in the classroom. The companion CD-ROM provides additional material for incorporating content into curricula and teaching-learning experiences. It includes PowerPoint presentations with notes on the book's five major topics; healthcare safety, healthcare quality, public health safety and quality, healthcare diversity, and linkage between research and evidence-based practice. The content is appropriate for graduate or undergraduate students. (Source: QSEN Team) }
    }

  • Hylin, U., Nyholm, H., Mattiasson, A. C., & Ponzer, S.. (2007). Interprofessional training in clinical practice on a training ward for healthcare students: A two-year follow-up . Journal of interprofessional care, 21(3), 277-288.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This follow-up study describes the former students’ lasting impressions of a two-week interprofessional course on a training ward aimed at enhancing the understanding of the roles of other professions and the importance of communication for teamwork and for patient care as well as providing an opportunity for profession-specific training. A questionnaire with both closed and open-ended questions was sent to 633 former students two years after the course and 348 (55%) responded. The course was rated as very good and most of the former students had lasting and positive impressions. Ninety-two percent of respondents encouraged teamwork in their present work and 90% wanted to retain the course. The qualitative analysis of the open-ended questions resulted in five categories describing students’ perceptions: professional role development, working in teams, tutoring, patient care and future aspects of the course and real world practice. Our results suggest that interprofessional training during undergraduate education provides lasting impressions that may promote teamwork in students’ future occupational life. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1316,
      author={U. Hylin and H. Nyholm and A. C. Mattiasson and S. Ponzer},
      year={2007},
      month={Jun},
      title={Interprofessional training in clinical practice on a training ward for healthcare students: A two-year follow-up },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={21},
      number={3},
      pages={277-288},
      note={id: 1097; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={This follow-up study describes the former students' lasting impressions of a two-week interprofessional course on a training ward aimed at enhancing the understanding of the roles of other professions and the importance of communication for teamwork and for patient care as well as providing an opportunity for profession-specific training. A questionnaire with both closed and open-ended questions was sent to 633 former students two years after the course and 348 (55%) responded. The course was rated as very good and most of the former students had lasting and positive impressions. Ninety-two percent of respondents encouraged teamwork in their present work and 90% wanted to retain the course. The qualitative analysis of the open-ended questions resulted in five categories describing students' perceptions: professional role development, working in teams, tutoring, patient care and future aspects of the course and real world practice. Our results suggest that interprofessional training during undergraduate education provides lasting impressions that may promote teamwork in students' future occupational life. (Source: PubMed) },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kalisch, B. J., Curley, M., & Stefanov, S.. (2007). An intervention to enhance nursing staff teamwork and engagement . Journal of Nursing Administration, 37(2), 77-84.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Numerous studies have concluded that work group teamwork leads to higher staff job satisfaction, increased patient safety, improved quality of care, and greater patient satisfaction. Although there have been studies on the impact of multidisciplinary teamwork in healthcare, the teamwork among nursing staff on a patient care unit has received very little attention from researchers. In this study, an intervention to enhance teamwork and staff engagement was tested on a medical unit in an acute care hospital. The results showed that the intervention resulted in a significantly lower patient fall rate, staff ratings of improved teamwork on the unit, and lower staff turnover and vacancy rates. Patient satisfaction ratings approached, but did not reach, statistical significance.

    @article{RefWorks:1321,
      author={B. J. Kalisch and M. Curley and S. Stefanov},
      year={2007},
      month={02},
      title={An intervention to enhance nursing staff teamwork and engagement },
      journal={Journal of Nursing Administration},
      volume={37},
      number={2},
      pages={77-84},
      note={id: 1371; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070615. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Administration. Instrumentation: Professional Research Consultants Patient Satisfaction Survey Tool. No. of Refs: 51 ref. PMID: 17273028 NLM UID: 1263116. },
      abstract={Numerous studies have concluded that work group teamwork leads to higher staff job satisfaction, increased patient safety, improved quality of care, and greater patient satisfaction. Although there have been studies on the impact of multidisciplinary teamwork in healthcare, the teamwork among nursing staff on a patient care unit has received very little attention from researchers. In this study, an intervention to enhance teamwork and staff engagement was tested on a medical unit in an acute care hospital. The results showed that the intervention resulted in a significantly lower patient fall rate, staff ratings of improved teamwork on the unit, and lower staff turnover and vacancy rates. Patient satisfaction ratings approached, but did not reach, statistical significance. },
      keywords={Clerical Personnel--Psychosocial Factors; Nurse Attitudes; Nursing Assistants--Psychosocial Factors; Nursing Staff, Hospital--Psychosocial Factors; Teamwork; Accidental Falls; Chi Square Test; Clerical Personnel--Administration; Clerical Personnel--Education; Coefficient Alpha; Decision Making, Organizational; Descriptive Statistics; Focus Groups; Health Services Needs and Demand; Hospitals, Community; Internal Consistency; Interviews; Job Satisfaction; Nursing Assistants--Administration; Nursing Assistants--Education; Nursing Staff, Hospital--Administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital--Education; Oncologic Nursing--Administration; Organizational Objectives; P-Value; Patient Satisfaction; Personnel Turnover; Power; Qualitative Studies; Quality Assurance--Methods; Questionnaires; Scales; Staff Development; T-Tests; Thematic Analysis}
    }

  • Lefebvre, H., Pelchat, D., & Levert, M. J.. (2007). Interdisciplinary family intervention program: a partnership among health professionals, traumatic brain injury patients, and caregiving relatives . Journal of trauma nursing : The official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses, 14(2), 100-113.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Throughout the delivery of care after traumatic brain injury, the type of relationship that develops between the family and the professionals has a major effect on the day-by-day adjustment of traumatic brain injury individuals and their relatives. Seventeen health professionals from different disciplines working with the traumatic brain injury clientele at different stages of the continuum of trauma care underwent training in the form of e-learning to apply the Interdisciplinary Family Intervention Program, or PRIFAM. The study methodology was mixed: participants’ evaluation of the PRIFAM training was assessed through a quantitative questionnaire, whereas their experience and learning were documented in semiguided, qualitative interviews conducted before and after training. The results show that the training stimulated personal and professional reflective thought in participants and fostered the forging of an interdisciplinary partnership. The training had a positive impact on communication between professionals and with the families and helped to develop a sense of self-efficacy among health professionals. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1327,
      author={H. Lefebvre and D. Pelchat and M. J. Levert},
      year={2007},
      month={Apr-Jun},
      title={Interdisciplinary family intervention program: a partnership among health professionals, traumatic brain injury patients, and caregiving relatives },
      journal={Journal of trauma nursing : The official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses},
      volume={14},
      number={2},
      pages={100-113},
      note={id: 2116; PUBM: Print; JID: 9512997; ppublish },
      abstract={Throughout the delivery of care after traumatic brain injury, the type of relationship that develops between the family and the professionals has a major effect on the day-by-day adjustment of traumatic brain injury individuals and their relatives. Seventeen health professionals from different disciplines working with the traumatic brain injury clientele at different stages of the continuum of trauma care underwent training in the form of e-learning to apply the Interdisciplinary Family Intervention Program, or PRIFAM. The study methodology was mixed: participants' evaluation of the PRIFAM training was assessed through a quantitative questionnaire, whereas their experience and learning were documented in semiguided, qualitative interviews conducted before and after training. The results show that the training stimulated personal and professional reflective thought in participants and fostered the forging of an interdisciplinary partnership. The training had a positive impact on communication between professionals and with the families and helped to develop a sense of self-efficacy among health professionals. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Brain Injuries/psychology/rehabilitation; Clinical Competence; Communication; Computer-Assisted Instruction; Cooperative Behavior; Family/psychology; Humans; Inservice Training/organization & administration; Middle Aged; Models, Psychological; Nursing Methodology Research; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Patient-Centered Care; Personnel, Hospital/education/psychology; Professional-Family Relations; Professional-Patient Relations; Program Evaluation; Qualitative Research; Questionnaires; Self Efficacy; Social Support},
      isbn={1078-7496},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lidskog, M., Lofmark, A., & Ahlstrom, G.. (2007). Interprofessional education on a training ward for older people: students’ conceptions of nurses, occupational therapists and social workers . Journal of interprofessional care, 21(4), 387-399.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Collaboration between professionals in health and social care is essential to meet the needs of the patient. The collaboration is dependent on knowledge and understanding of each other’s roles. One means of improving communication and collaboration among professionals is interprofessional education. The aim of this study was to describe the variation in how students in nursing, occupational therapy and social work perceived their own and the other professions. Over a three-week period two interviews were conducted with each of 16 students who were on an interprofessional training ward for older people in a municipal setting in Sweden. A phenomenographical approach was used in the analysis of the interviews. The findings showed great variation in how the students perceived the professions, from simplistic in terms of tasks to a more complex conception in terms of knowledge, responsibility and values. Differences in the ways professions were described concerning their professional stance towards the patients were especially accentuated. The findings indicate that the students need opportunities for reflection on and scrutiny of each other’s beliefs and knowledge. The influence of interprofessional education involving reflection on the different health-care professions needs to be explored in future research.

    @article{RefWorks:1329,
      author={M. Lidskog and A. Lofmark and G. Ahlstrom},
      year={2007},
      month={Aug},
      title={Interprofessional education on a training ward for older people: students' conceptions of nurses, occupational therapists and social workers },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={21},
      number={4},
      pages={387-399},
      note={id: 1387; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={Collaboration between professionals in health and social care is essential to meet the needs of the patient. The collaboration is dependent on knowledge and understanding of each other's roles. One means of improving communication and collaboration among professionals is interprofessional education. The aim of this study was to describe the variation in how students in nursing, occupational therapy and social work perceived their own and the other professions. Over a three-week period two interviews were conducted with each of 16 students who were on an interprofessional training ward for older people in a municipal setting in Sweden. A phenomenographical approach was used in the analysis of the interviews. The findings showed great variation in how the students perceived the professions, from simplistic in terms of tasks to a more complex conception in terms of knowledge, responsibility and values. Differences in the ways professions were described concerning their professional stance towards the patients were especially accentuated. The findings indicate that the students need opportunities for reflection on and scrutiny of each other's beliefs and knowledge. The influence of interprofessional education involving reflection on the different health-care professions needs to be explored in future research. },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Clerkship/organization & administration; Female; Geriatrics; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Male; Middle Aged; Nurses; Occupational Therapy; Social Work; Students, Health Occupations/psychology; Sweden},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Manojlovich, M., & DeCicco, B.. (2007). Healthy work environments, nurse-physician communication, and patients’ outcomes . American Journal of Critical Care : An official publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 16(6), 536-543.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Adverse events and serious errors are common in critical care. Although factors in the work environment are important predictors of adverse outcomes for patients, communication between nurses and physicians may be the most significant factor associated with excess hospital mortality in critical care settings. OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationships between nurses’ perceptions of their practice environment, nurse-physician communication, and selected patients’ outcomes. METHODS: A nonexperimental, descriptive design was used, and all nurses (N=866) working in 25 intensive care units in southeastern Michigan were surveyed. The Conditions for Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II and the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index were used to measure characteristics of the work environment; the ICU Nurse-Physician Questionnaire was used to measure nurse-physician communication. Nurses self-rated the frequency of ventilator-associated pneumonia, catheter-related sepsis, and medication errors in patients under their care. RESULTS: A total of 462 nurses (53%) responded. According to multilevel modeling, both practice environment scales accounted for 47% of the variance in nurse-physician communication scores (P=.001). Nurse-physician communication was predictive of nurse-assessed medication errors only (R2=0.11). Neither environment scale was predictive of any of the patient outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy work environments are important for nurse-physician communication. In intensive care units, characteristics of the work environment did not vary enough to be significantly predictive of outcomes, suggesting that even in various types of critical care units, characteristics of the work environment may be more similar than different. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1333,
      author={M. Manojlovich and B. DeCicco},
      year={2007},
      month={Nov},
      title={Healthy work environments, nurse-physician communication, and patients' outcomes },
      journal={American Journal of Critical Care : An official publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses},
      volume={16},
      number={6},
      pages={536-543},
      note={id: 2183; PUBM: Print; JID: 9211547; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Adverse events and serious errors are common in critical care. Although factors in the work environment are important predictors of adverse outcomes for patients, communication between nurses and physicians may be the most significant factor associated with excess hospital mortality in critical care settings. OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationships between nurses' perceptions of their practice environment, nurse-physician communication, and selected patients' outcomes. METHODS: A nonexperimental, descriptive design was used, and all nurses (N=866) working in 25 intensive care units in southeastern Michigan were surveyed. The Conditions for Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II and the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index were used to measure characteristics of the work environment; the ICU Nurse-Physician Questionnaire was used to measure nurse-physician communication. Nurses self-rated the frequency of ventilator-associated pneumonia, catheter-related sepsis, and medication errors in patients under their care. RESULTS: A total of 462 nurses (53%) responded. According to multilevel modeling, both practice environment scales accounted for 47% of the variance in nurse-physician communication scores (P=.001). Nurse-physician communication was predictive of nurse-assessed medication errors only (R2=0.11). Neither environment scale was predictive of any of the patient outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy work environments are important for nurse-physician communication. In intensive care units, characteristics of the work environment did not vary enough to be significantly predictive of outcomes, suggesting that even in various types of critical care units, characteristics of the work environment may be more similar than different. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Catheterization/adverse effects; Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Health Care Surveys; Humans; Intensive Care Units/organization & administration; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Michigan; Middle Aged; Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care); Physician-Nurse Relations; Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/epidemiology; Questionnaires; Sepsis/epidemiology; Workplace/standards},
      isbn={1062-3264},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McCallin, A., & Bamford, A.. (2007). Interdisciplinary teamwork: is the influence of emotional intelligence fully appreciated? . Journal of nursing management, 15(4), 386-391.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    AIM: The purpose of this study is to discuss how emotional intelligence affects interdisciplinary team effectiveness. Some findings from a larger study on interdisciplinary teamworking are discussed. BACKGROUND: Teams are often evaluated for complementary skill mix and expertise that are integrated for specialist service delivery. Interactional skills and emotional intelligence also affect team behaviour and performance. An effective team needs both emotional intelligence and expertise, including technical, clinical, social and interactional skills, so that teamwork becomes greater or lesser than the whole, depending on how well individuals work together. KEY ISSUES: Team diversity, individuality and personality differences, and interprofessional safety are analysed to raise awareness for nurse managers of the complexity of interdisciplinary working relationships. CONCLUSION: If nursing input into interdisciplinary work is to be maximized, nurse managers might consider the role of emotional intelligence in influencing team effectiveness, the quality of client care, staff retention and job satisfaction. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1335,
      author={A. McCallin and A. Bamford},
      year={2007},
      month={May},
      title={Interdisciplinary teamwork: is the influence of emotional intelligence fully appreciated? },
      journal={Journal of nursing management},
      volume={15},
      number={4},
      pages={386-391},
      note={id: 2182; PUBM: Print; JID: 9306050; RF: 33; ppublish },
      abstract={AIM: The purpose of this study is to discuss how emotional intelligence affects interdisciplinary team effectiveness. Some findings from a larger study on interdisciplinary teamworking are discussed. BACKGROUND: Teams are often evaluated for complementary skill mix and expertise that are integrated for specialist service delivery. Interactional skills and emotional intelligence also affect team behaviour and performance. An effective team needs both emotional intelligence and expertise, including technical, clinical, social and interactional skills, so that teamwork becomes greater or lesser than the whole, depending on how well individuals work together. KEY ISSUES: Team diversity, individuality and personality differences, and interprofessional safety are analysed to raise awareness for nurse managers of the complexity of interdisciplinary working relationships. CONCLUSION: If nursing input into interdisciplinary work is to be maximized, nurse managers might consider the role of emotional intelligence in influencing team effectiveness, the quality of client care, staff retention and job satisfaction. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Emotions; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Individuality; Intelligence; Interprofessional Relations; Job Satisfaction; Leadership; New Zealand; Nursing Methodology Research; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Personality; Personnel Turnover; Personnel, Hospital/psychology; Problem Solving; Psychological Theory; Safety; Stereotyping},
      isbn={0966-0429},
      language={eng}
    }

  • McFadyen, A. K., Maclaren, W. M., & Webster, V. S.. (2007). The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS): an alternative remodelled sub-scale structure and its reliability . Journal of interprofessional care, 21(4), 433-443.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The original 4 sub-scale version of the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was published by Luecht et al. (1990, Journal of Allied Health, 181 – 191). There appears however to be a lack of evidence of the stability of the original instrument and of the test-retest reliability of the items and sub-scales when used with undergraduates. Given that during its development only 143 subjects completed the questionnaire which contained 18 items the generalizability of the instrument should perhaps have been investigated further. The Interprofessional Learning Group (IPL) at Glasgow Caledonian University has been using both the IEPS and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) (Parsell & Bligh, 1999, Medical Education, 33, 95 – 100) to monitor changes in attitudes and perceptions of undergraduate students from eight different health and social care programmes. This paper reports the development of an alternative sub-scale model for the IEPS based on a sample of 308 students. Various aspects of the reliability of this revised model based on a subsequent data set of 247 students are also reported. This revised model appears to be stable for use with undergraduate students yielding Cronbach Alpha values for two of the sub-scales greater than 0.80 and test-retest weighted kappa values for items being fair to moderate.

    @article{RefWorks:1336,
      author={A. K. McFadyen and W. M. Maclaren and V. S. Webster},
      year={2007},
      month={Aug},
      title={The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS): an alternative remodelled sub-scale structure and its reliability },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={21},
      number={4},
      pages={433-443},
      note={id: 1385; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={The original 4 sub-scale version of the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was published by Luecht et al. (1990, Journal of Allied Health, 181 - 191). There appears however to be a lack of evidence of the stability of the original instrument and of the test-retest reliability of the items and sub-scales when used with undergraduates. Given that during its development only 143 subjects completed the questionnaire which contained 18 items the generalizability of the instrument should perhaps have been investigated further. The Interprofessional Learning Group (IPL) at Glasgow Caledonian University has been using both the IEPS and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) (Parsell & Bligh, 1999, Medical Education, 33, 95 - 100) to monitor changes in attitudes and perceptions of undergraduate students from eight different health and social care programmes. This paper reports the development of an alternative sub-scale model for the IEPS based on a sample of 308 students. Various aspects of the reliability of this revised model based on a subsequent data set of 247 students are also reported. This revised model appears to be stable for use with undergraduate students yielding Cronbach Alpha values for two of the sub-scales greater than 0.80 and test-retest weighted kappa values for items being fair to moderate. },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Perception; Psychometrics; Questionnaires; Reproducibility of Results},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Miers, M. E., Clarke, B. A., Pollard, K. C., Rickaby, C. E., Thomas, J., & Turtle, A.. (2007). Online interprofessional learning: The student experience . Journal of interprofessional care, 21(5), 529-542.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Health and social care students in a faculty in the United Kingdom learn together in an interprofessional module through online discussion boards. The module assessment encourages engagement with technology and with group members through peer review. An evaluation of student experience of the module gathered data from 48 students participating in 10 online groups. Analysis of contributions to discussion boards, and transcripts of interviews with 20 students revealed differing levels of participation between individuals and groups. Many students were apprehensive about the technology and there were different views about the advantages and disadvantages of online learning. Students interacted in a supportive manner. Group leadership was seen as associated with maintaining motivation to complete work on time. Students reported benefiting from the peer review process but were uncomfortable with critiquing each other’s work. Sensitivity about group process may have inhibited the level of critical debate. Nevertheless the module brought together students from different professions and different sites. Examples of sharing professional knowledge demonstrated successful interprofessional collaboration online.

    @article{RefWorks:1339,
      author={M. E. Miers and B. A. Clarke and K. C. Pollard and C. E. Rickaby and J. Thomas and A. Turtle},
      year={2007},
      month={Oct},
      title={Online interprofessional learning: The student experience },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={21},
      number={5},
      pages={529-542},
      note={id: 1381; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={Health and social care students in a faculty in the United Kingdom learn together in an interprofessional module through online discussion boards. The module assessment encourages engagement with technology and with group members through peer review. An evaluation of student experience of the module gathered data from 48 students participating in 10 online groups. Analysis of contributions to discussion boards, and transcripts of interviews with 20 students revealed differing levels of participation between individuals and groups. Many students were apprehensive about the technology and there were different views about the advantages and disadvantages of online learning. Students interacted in a supportive manner. Group leadership was seen as associated with maintaining motivation to complete work on time. Students reported benefiting from the peer review process but were uncomfortable with critiquing each other's work. Sensitivity about group process may have inhibited the level of critical debate. Nevertheless the module brought together students from different professions and different sites. Examples of sharing professional knowledge demonstrated successful interprofessional collaboration online. },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Morris, A. H., & Faulk, D.. (2007). Perspective transformation: enhancing the development of professionalism in RN-to-BSN students . The Journal of nursing education, 46(10), 445-451.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The purpose of this research was to examine whether there are resultant behavioral changes in professionalism for returning adult RN-to-BSN students and to identify teaching-learning activities that stimulate transformative learning. Mezirow’s adult learning theory served as a theoretical guide for the study. A convenience sample of students enrolled in a RN-to-BSN completion program during 2 academic years was surveyed using the core standards from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s essentials of baccalaureate nursing education. A total of 26 learning activities were identified as creating cognitive dissonance (conflict of values). Changes in professional behavior 3 months postgraduation included increased collaboration with the health care team, increased patient advocacy, and increased confidence in the role as a teacher of patients and families. The findings indicate that planning learning activities in nursing curricula can foster perspective transformation in professionalism. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1340,
      author={A. H. Morris and D. Faulk},
      year={2007},
      month={Oct},
      title={Perspective transformation: enhancing the development of professionalism in RN-to-BSN students },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={46},
      number={10},
      pages={445-451},
      note={id: 2185; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={The purpose of this research was to examine whether there are resultant behavioral changes in professionalism for returning adult RN-to-BSN students and to identify teaching-learning activities that stimulate transformative learning. Mezirow's adult learning theory served as a theoretical guide for the study. A convenience sample of students enrolled in a RN-to-BSN completion program during 2 academic years was surveyed using the core standards from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's essentials of baccalaureate nursing education. A total of 26 learning activities were identified as creating cognitive dissonance (conflict of values). Changes in professional behavior 3 months postgraduation included increased collaboration with the health care team, increased patient advocacy, and increased confidence in the role as a teacher of patients and families. The findings indicate that planning learning activities in nursing curricula can foster perspective transformation in professionalism. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Cognitive Dissonance; Cooperative Behavior; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Professional, Retraining/organization & administration; Guidelines as Topic; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Educational; Nurse's Role/psychology; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Patient Advocacy; Patient Education as Topic; Professional Competence/standards; Qualitative Research; Questionnaires; Self Efficacy; Social Identification; Social Values; Socialization; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Neill, M., Hayward, K. S., & Peterson, T.. (2007). Students’ perceptions of the interprofessional team in practice through the application of servant leadership principles . Journal of interprofessional care, 21(4), 425-432.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study examined students’ perceptions of interprofessional practice within a framework of servant leadership principles, applied in the care of rural older adults utilizing a service learning model. Mobile wellness services were provided through the Idaho State University Senior Health Mobile project in a collaborative team approach in the community-based setting. Students from varied health professional programs were placed in teams for the provision of wellness care, with communication among team members facilitated by a health professions faculty member serving as field coordinator. The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was used to measure students’ perceptions of interprofessional practice using a pretest post-test research design. Multivariate analysis was performed revealing a significant pretest to post-test effect on students’ perceptions as measured by factors inherent in the IEPS and deemed essential to effective interprofessional practice. Univariate analysis revealed a significant change in students’ perception of professional competence and autonomy, actual cooperation and resource sharing within and across professions, and an understanding of the value and contributions of other professionals from pretest to post-test.

    @article{RefWorks:1341,
      author={M. Neill and K. S. Hayward and T. Peterson},
      year={2007},
      month={Aug},
      title={Students' perceptions of the interprofessional team in practice through the application of servant leadership principles },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={21},
      number={4},
      pages={425-432},
      note={id: 1386; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={This study examined students' perceptions of interprofessional practice within a framework of servant leadership principles, applied in the care of rural older adults utilizing a service learning model. Mobile wellness services were provided through the Idaho State University Senior Health Mobile project in a collaborative team approach in the community-based setting. Students from varied health professional programs were placed in teams for the provision of wellness care, with communication among team members facilitated by a health professions faculty member serving as field coordinator. The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was used to measure students' perceptions of interprofessional practice using a pretest post-test research design. Multivariate analysis was performed revealing a significant pretest to post-test effect on students' perceptions as measured by factors inherent in the IEPS and deemed essential to effective interprofessional practice. Univariate analysis revealed a significant change in students' perception of professional competence and autonomy, actual cooperation and resource sharing within and across professions, and an understanding of the value and contributions of other professionals from pretest to post-test. },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Geriatrics; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Leadership; Perception; Rural Health Services/organization & administration; Students, Health Occupations/psychology},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • on the of Organizations, J. C. A. H.. (2007). Front line of defense : the role of nurses in preventing sentinel events (2nd ed.). Oakbrook Terrace, IL: Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Written especially for nurses in all disciplines and health care settings, this book focuses on the hands-on role nurses play in the delivery of care and their unique opportunity and responsibility to identify potential sentinel events. Topics include preventing medication and transfusion errors, as well as preventing suicide, falls, and treatment delays. New chapters address wrong-site surgery perinatal injuries or death, and injuries or death due to criminal events. Learn how to: better recognize the root causes of specific sentinel events; identify strategies to prevent sentinel events from occurring; and overcome obstacles in the areas of staffing, training, culture of safety, and communication among the health care team. (Source: Publisher)

    @book{RefWorks:1319,
      author={Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations},
      year={2007},
      title={Front line of defense : the role of nurses in preventing sentinel events },
      publisher={Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations},
      address={Oakbrook Terrace, IL},
      edition={2nd},
      note={id: 2263},
      abstract={Written especially for nurses in all disciplines and health care settings, this book focuses on the hands-on role nurses play in the delivery of care and their unique opportunity and responsibility to identify potential sentinel events. Topics include preventing medication and transfusion errors, as well as preventing suicide, falls, and treatment delays. New chapters address wrong-site surgery perinatal injuries or death, and injuries or death due to criminal events. Learn how to: better recognize the root causes of specific sentinel events; identify strategies to prevent sentinel events from occurring; and overcome obstacles in the areas of staffing, training, culture of safety, and communication among the health care team. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Reeves, S., Goldman, J., & Oandasan, I.. (2007). Key factors in planning and implementing interprofessional education in health care settings . Journal of allied health, 36(4), 231-235.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is regarded by many health care practitioners (i.e., nurses, occupational therapists, physicians), educators, and policy makers as an important activity to enhance the quality of teamwork and patient care. While the focus on developing an evidence basis for IPE has demonstrated the potential value of IPE for improving collaboration and patient outcomes, exploration of key concepts that underpin IPE has been overlooked. In this commentary, we aim to begin addressing this oversight by identifying and discussing key conceptual factors that are critical for the planning and implementation of IPE. We draw upon our prior IPE curricula development and research experiences, as well as the published literature, to argue that seven interconnecting learner-focused, faculty-focused, and organization-focused factors are key to the successful planning and implementation of IPE. We also argue that IPE planners need to be cognizant of all seven factors and how they interact with one another to help ensure they maximize success in their work. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1350,
      author={S. Reeves and J. Goldman and I. Oandasan},
      year={2007},
      month={Winter},
      title={Key factors in planning and implementing interprofessional education in health care settings },
      journal={Journal of allied health},
      volume={36},
      number={4},
      pages={231-235},
      note={id: 2178; PUBM: Print; JID: 0361603; ppublish },
      abstract={Interprofessional education (IPE) is regarded by many health care practitioners (i.e., nurses, occupational therapists, physicians), educators, and policy makers as an important activity to enhance the quality of teamwork and patient care. While the focus on developing an evidence basis for IPE has demonstrated the potential value of IPE for improving collaboration and patient outcomes, exploration of key concepts that underpin IPE has been overlooked. In this commentary, we aim to begin addressing this oversight by identifying and discussing key conceptual factors that are critical for the planning and implementation of IPE. We draw upon our prior IPE curricula development and research experiences, as well as the published literature, to argue that seven interconnecting learner-focused, faculty-focused, and organization-focused factors are key to the successful planning and implementation of IPE. We also argue that IPE planners need to be cognizant of all seven factors and how they interact with one another to help ensure they maximize success in their work. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Professional/organization & administration; Health Facilities; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Ontario; Program Development/methods},
      isbn={0090-7421},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Sherwood, G., & Drenkard, K.. (2007). Quality and safety curricula in nursing education: Matching practice realities . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 151-155.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Health care delivery settings are redesigning in the wake of staggering reports of severe quality and safety issues. Sweeping changes underway in health care to address quality and safety outcomes lend urgency to the call to transform nursing curricula so new graduate competencies more closely match practice needs. Emerging views of quality and safety and related competencies as applied in practice have corresponding implications for the redesign of nursing education programs. Nurse executives and nurse educators are called to address the need for faculty development through strategic partnerships. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1358,
      author={G. Sherwood and K. Drenkard},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Quality and safety curricula in nursing education: Matching practice realities },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={151-155},
      note={id: 1089; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/03 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Health care delivery settings are redesigning in the wake of staggering reports of severe quality and safety issues. Sweeping changes underway in health care to address quality and safety outcomes lend urgency to the call to transform nursing curricula so new graduate competencies more closely match practice needs. Emerging views of quality and safety and related competencies as applied in practice have corresponding implications for the redesign of nursing education programs. Nurse executives and nurse educators are called to address the need for faculty development through strategic partnerships. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Shorthall, R.. (2007). Preventing adverse events . Emergency Nurse, 15(3), 26-28.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Roseanne Shorthall reflects on a potentially adverse event that occurred when she was a nursing student to demonstrate how communication failures can hamper patient care. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1360,
      author={R. Shorthall},
      year={2007},
      month={06},
      title={Preventing adverse events },
      journal={Emergency Nurse},
      volume={15},
      number={3},
      pages={26-28},
      note={id: 2265; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070914. Publication Type: journal article; case study. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Emergency Care; Patient Safety. No. of Refs: 22 ref. NLM UID: 9208913. },
      abstract={Roseanne Shorthall reflects on a potentially adverse event that occurred when she was a nursing student to demonstrate how communication failures can hamper patient care. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Adverse Health Care Event -- Prevention and Control; Decision Making, Clinical; Emergency Nursing; Head Injuries -- Nursing; Nursing Assessment; Patient Advocacy; Students, Nursing; Communication; Diagnosis, Differential; Glasgow Coma Scale -- Utilization; Intraprofessional Relations; Judgment; Stereotyping},
      isbn={1354-5752},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1038&accno=2009608627; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009608627&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Smith, E. L., Cronenwett, L., & Sherwood, G.. (2007). Current assessments of quality and safety education in nursing . Nursing outlook, 55(3), 132-137.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Concerns about the quality and safety of health care have changed practice expectations and created a mandate for change in the preparation of health care professionals. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses project team conducted a survey to assess current levels of integration of quality and safety content in pre-licensure nursing curricula. Views of 195 nursing program leaders are presented, including information about satisfaction with faculty expertise and student competency development related to 6 domains that define quality and safety content: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. With competency definitions as the sole reference point, survey respondents indicated that quality and safety content was embedded in current curricula, and they were generally satisfied that students were developing the desired competencies. These data are contrasted with work reported elsewhere in this issue of Nursing Outlook and readers are invited to consider a variety of interpretations of the differences. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1363,
      author={E. L. Smith and L. Cronenwett and G. Sherwood},
      year={2007},
      month={May-Jun},
      title={Current assessments of quality and safety education in nursing },
      journal={Nursing outlook},
      volume={55},
      number={3},
      pages={132-137},
      note={id: 1092; PUBM: Print; JID: 0401075; 2006/11/05 [received]; ppublish },
      abstract={Concerns about the quality and safety of health care have changed practice expectations and created a mandate for change in the preparation of health care professionals. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses project team conducted a survey to assess current levels of integration of quality and safety content in pre-licensure nursing curricula. Views of 195 nursing program leaders are presented, including information about satisfaction with faculty expertise and student competency development related to 6 domains that define quality and safety content: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. With competency definitions as the sole reference point, survey respondents indicated that quality and safety content was embedded in current curricula, and they were generally satisfied that students were developing the desired competencies. These data are contrasted with work reported elsewhere in this issue of Nursing Outlook and readers are invited to consider a variety of interpretations of the differences. (Source:PubMed) },
      isbn={0029-6554},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Solheim, K., McElmurry, B. J., & Kim, M. J.. (2007). Multidisciplinary teamwork in US primary health care . Social science & medicine, 65(3), 622-634.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Primary health care (PHC) is a systems perspective for examining the provision of essential health care for all. A multidisciplinary collaborative approach to health care delivery is associated with effective delivery and care providers’ enrichment. Yet data regarding multidisciplinary practice within PHC are limited. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative descriptive study was to better understand team-based PHC practice in the US. Aims included (a) describing nursing faculty involvement in PHC, (b) analyzing ways that multidisciplinary work was enacted, and (c) recommending strategies for multidisciplinary PHC practice. After institutional review board (IRB) protocol approval, data collection occurred by: (a) surveying faculty/staff in a Midwestern nursing college (N=94) about their PHC practice, and (b) interviewing a purposive sample of nursing faculty/staff identified with PHC (n=10) and their health professional collaborators (n=10). Survey results (28% return rate) were summarized, interview notes were transcribed, and a systematic process of content analysis applied. Study findings show team practice is valued because health issues are complex, requiring different types of expertise; and because teams foster comprehensive care and improved resource use. Mission, membership attributes, and leadership influence teamwork. Though PHC is not a common term, nurses and their collaborators readily associated their practice with a PHC ethos. PHC practice requires understanding community complexity and engaging with community, family, and individual viewpoints. Though supports exist for PHC in the US, participants identified discord between their view of population needs and the health care system. The following interpretations arise from this study: PHC does not explicitly frame health care activity in the US, though some practitioners are committed to its ethics; and, teamwork within PHC is associated with better health care and rewarding professional experience. Nurses integrate PHC in multiple roles and are experts at aspects of PHC teamwork. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1364,
      author={K. Solheim and B. J. McElmurry and M. J. Kim},
      year={2007},
      month={08},
      title={Multidisciplinary teamwork in US primary health care },
      journal={Social science & medicine},
      volume={65},
      number={3},
      pages={622-634},
      note={id: 1397; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Allied Health; Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Europe; Expert Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed. Special Interest: Social Work. Grant Information: NIH Grant #T32 NOP 7079. No. of Refs: 27 ref. NLM UID: 8303205. },
      abstract={Primary health care (PHC) is a systems perspective for examining the provision of essential health care for all. A multidisciplinary collaborative approach to health care delivery is associated with effective delivery and care providers’ enrichment. Yet data regarding multidisciplinary practice within PHC are limited. The purpose of this exploratory qualitative descriptive study was to better understand team-based PHC practice in the US. Aims included (a) describing nursing faculty involvement in PHC, (b) analyzing ways that multidisciplinary work was enacted, and (c) recommending strategies for multidisciplinary PHC practice. After institutional review board (IRB) protocol approval, data collection occurred by: (a) surveying faculty/staff in a Midwestern nursing college (N=94) about their PHC practice, and (b) interviewing a purposive sample of nursing faculty/staff identified with PHC (n=10) and their health professional collaborators (n=10). Survey results (28% return rate) were summarized, interview notes were transcribed, and a systematic process of content analysis applied. Study findings show team practice is valued because health issues are complex, requiring different types of expertise; and because teams foster comprehensive care and improved resource use. Mission, membership attributes, and leadership influence teamwork. Though PHC is not a common term, nurses and their collaborators readily associated their practice with a PHC ethos. PHC practice requires understanding community complexity and engaging with community, family, and individual viewpoints. Though supports exist for PHC in the US, participants identified discord between their view of population needs and the health care system. The following interpretations arise from this study: PHC does not explicitly frame health care activity in the US, though some practitioners are committed to its ethics; and, teamwork within PHC is associated with better health care and rewarding professional experience. Nurses integrate PHC in multiple roles and are experts at aspects of PHC teamwork. (Source: Publisher) }
    }

  • Stein-Parbury, J., & Liaschenko, J.. (2007). Understanding collaboration between nurses and physicians as knowledge at work . American Journal of Critical Care : An Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 16(5), 470-7; quiz 478.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Collaboration between nurses and physicians is linked to positive outcomes for patients, especially in the intensive care unit. However, effective collaboration poses challenges because of traditional barriers such as sex and class differences, hierarchical organizational structures in health-care, and physicians’ belief that they are the final arbiter of clinical decisions. OBJECTIVE: To further analyze the results of an investigation on how intensive care unit culture, expressed through everyday practices, affected the care of patients who became confused. METHODS: A model of the types of knowledge (case, patient, and person) used in clinical work was used to analyze the breakdown in collaboration detected in the original study. RESULTS: Breakdown of collaboration occurred because of the types of knowledge used by physicians and nurses. Certain types of knowledge were privileged even when not applicable to the clinical problem, whereas other types were dismissed even when applicable. CONCLUSION: Viewing collaboration through the conceptual lens of knowledge use reveals new insights. Collaboration broke down in the specific context of caring for patients with confusion because the use of case knowledge, rather than patient knowledge, was prominent in the intensive care unit culture.

    @article{RefWorks:1365,
      author={J. Stein-Parbury and J. Liaschenko},
      year={2007},
      month={Sep},
      title={Understanding collaboration between nurses and physicians as knowledge at work },
      journal={American Journal of Critical Care : An Official Publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses},
      volume={16},
      number={5},
      pages={470-7; quiz 478},
      note={id: 1401; PUBM: Print; JID: 9211547; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Collaboration between nurses and physicians is linked to positive outcomes for patients, especially in the intensive care unit. However, effective collaboration poses challenges because of traditional barriers such as sex and class differences, hierarchical organizational structures in health-care, and physicians' belief that they are the final arbiter of clinical decisions. OBJECTIVE: To further analyze the results of an investigation on how intensive care unit culture, expressed through everyday practices, affected the care of patients who became confused. METHODS: A model of the types of knowledge (case, patient, and person) used in clinical work was used to analyze the breakdown in collaboration detected in the original study. RESULTS: Breakdown of collaboration occurred because of the types of knowledge used by physicians and nurses. Certain types of knowledge were privileged even when not applicable to the clinical problem, whereas other types were dismissed even when applicable. CONCLUSION: Viewing collaboration through the conceptual lens of knowledge use reveals new insights. Collaboration broke down in the specific context of caring for patients with confusion because the use of case knowledge, rather than patient knowledge, was prominent in the intensive care unit culture. },
      isbn={1062-3264},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Stephens, J., Abbott-Brailey, H., & Pearson, P.. (2007). "It’s a funny old game". Football as an educational metaphor within induction to practice-based interprofessional learning . Journal of interprofessional care, 21(4), 375-385.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The Common Learning Programme in the North East of England (CLPNE) sought to introduce interprofessional education into the practice setting for pre-registration health and social care students. Students, clinical educators/mentors, and facilitators met within groups over a period of 3 – 6 weeks to explore interprofessional working and learning together. This paper evaluates the use of a game, the Football Stadium, to stimulate participants’ exploration of practice-based interprofessional working and learning at CLPNE induction sessions. Data consisting of verbal and written feedback from students and clinical educators/mentors, and field notes from facilitators covering 22 CLPNE pilot sites (February 2003 – July 2005) was supplemented by researcher observation at 12 sites. Two themes emerged from the data: the use of the Football Stadium as an "ice-breaker" at team induction and, the use of the Football Stadium as a vehicle to facilitate reflective learning. Key issues included personal identity and role within a novice–expert continuum, creating and developing the team environment and, enhancing and developing learning communities. Although recognized as requiring careful, sensitive facilitation, the Football Stadium is a simple means to present learning opportunities for interprofessional education within a non-threatening learning environment that facilitates active participation.

    @article{RefWorks:1366,
      author={J. Stephens and H. Abbott-Brailey and P. Pearson},
      year={2007},
      month={Aug},
      title={"It's a funny old game". Football as an educational metaphor within induction to practice-based interprofessional learning },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={21},
      number={4},
      pages={375-385},
      note={id: 1388; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={The Common Learning Programme in the North East of England (CLPNE) sought to introduce interprofessional education into the practice setting for pre-registration health and social care students. Students, clinical educators/mentors, and facilitators met within groups over a period of 3 - 6 weeks to explore interprofessional working and learning together. This paper evaluates the use of a game, the Football Stadium, to stimulate participants' exploration of practice-based interprofessional working and learning at CLPNE induction sessions. Data consisting of verbal and written feedback from students and clinical educators/mentors, and field notes from facilitators covering 22 CLPNE pilot sites (February 2003 - July 2005) was supplemented by researcher observation at 12 sites. Two themes emerged from the data: the use of the Football Stadium as an "ice-breaker" at team induction and, the use of the Football Stadium as a vehicle to facilitate reflective learning. Key issues included personal identity and role within a novice--expert continuum, creating and developing the team environment and, enhancing and developing learning communities. Although recognized as requiring careful, sensitive facilitation, the Football Stadium is a simple means to present learning opportunities for interprofessional education within a non-threatening learning environment that facilitates active participation. },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Group Processes; Health Personnel/education; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Soccer},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Sterchi, L. S.. (2007). Perceptions that affect physician-nurse collaboration in the perioperative setting . AORN Journal, 86(1), 45.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    PHYSICIAN-NURSE COLLABORATION is crucial for safe patient care, particularly in the complex setting of the surgical arena. IN THIS STUDY, the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration was used to measure physicians’ and nurses’ perceptions and attitudes toward collaboration in the surgical setting and to determine whether there were differences in these perceptions based on gender, nursing specialty, or length of experience. RESULTS SHOWED THAT NURSES had a more positive attitude toward collaboration than did physicians. Differences in attitudes based on gender could not be determined, and nursing specialty was not a significant factor. Length of experience, however, proved to have an interesting influence. AORN J 86 (July 2007) 45-57. (c) AORN, Inc, 2007.

    @article{RefWorks:1367,
      author={L. S. Sterchi},
      year={2007},
      month={07},
      title={Perceptions that affect physician-nurse collaboration in the perioperative setting },
      journal={AORN Journal},
      volume={86},
      number={1},
      pages={45},
      note={id: 1398; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070914. Publication Type: journal article; questionnaire/scale; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Perioperative Care. Instrumentation: Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration. No. of Refs: 36 ref. PMID: 17621446 NLM UID: 0372403. },
      abstract={PHYSICIAN-NURSE COLLABORATION is crucial for safe patient care, particularly in the complex setting of the surgical arena. IN THIS STUDY, the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration was used to measure physicians' and nurses' perceptions and attitudes toward collaboration in the surgical setting and to determine whether there were differences in these perceptions based on gender, nursing specialty, or length of experience. RESULTS SHOWED THAT NURSES had a more positive attitude toward collaboration than did physicians. Differences in attitudes based on gender could not be determined, and nursing specialty was not a significant factor. Length of experience, however, proved to have an interesting influence. AORN J 86 (July 2007) 45-57. (c) AORN, Inc, 2007. },
      keywords={Nurse Attitudes; Nurse-Patient Relations; Perioperative Nursing; Physician Attitudes; Surgeons; Analysis of Variance; Attitude Measures; Convenience Sample; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Hospitals; Male; Midwestern United States; Operating Rooms; Organizations, Nonprofit; Scales; Sex Factors; Summated Rating Scaling; Surveys; T-Tests}
    }

  • Storch, J. L., & Kenny, N.. (2007). Shared moral work of nurses and physicians . Nursing ethics, 14(4), 478-491.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Physicians and nurses need to sustain their unique strengths and work in true collaboration, recognizing their interdependence and the complementarity of their knowledge, skills and perspectives, as well as their common moral commitments. In this article, challenges often faced by both nurses and physicians in working collaboratively are explored with a focus on the ways in which each profession’s preparation for practice has differed over time, including shifts in knowledge development and codes of ethics guiding their practice. A call for envisioning their practice as shared moral work as well as practical strategies to begin that work are offered as a basis for reflection towards enhanced nurse-physician relationships.

    @article{RefWorks:1369,
      author={J. L. Storch and N. Kenny},
      year={2007},
      title={Shared moral work of nurses and physicians },
      journal={Nursing ethics},
      volume={14},
      number={4},
      pages={478-491},
      note={id: 1399; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070914. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. No. of Refs: 81 ref. PMID: 17562727 NLM UID: 9433357. },
      abstract={Physicians and nurses need to sustain their unique strengths and work in true collaboration, recognizing their interdependence and the complementarity of their knowledge, skills and perspectives, as well as their common moral commitments. In this article, challenges often faced by both nurses and physicians in working collaboratively are explored with a focus on the ways in which each profession's preparation for practice has differed over time, including shifts in knowledge development and codes of ethics guiding their practice. A call for envisioning their practice as shared moral work as well as practical strategies to begin that work are offered as a basis for reflection towards enhanced nurse-physician relationships. },
      keywords={Collaboration; Nurse-Physician Relations; Ethics, Medical; Ethics, Nursing; Medicine; Morals; Nursing as a Profession; Professionalism; Teamwork}
    }

  • Thomas, S.. (2007). Nurse-physician collaboration: a comparison of the attitudes of nurses and physicians in the medical-surgical patient care setting . MEDSURG Nursing, 16(2), 87.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Past literature reveals the multiple dimensions of the nurse-physician relationship. The current study was conducted within medical-surgical units of a major medical center in the South to determine attitudes of nurses and physicians regarding their collaboration. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1372,
      author={S. Thomas},
      year={2007},
      month={04},
      title={Nurse-physician collaboration: a comparison of the attitudes of nurses and physicians in the medical-surgical patient care setting },
      journal={MEDSURG Nursing},
      volume={16},
      number={2},
      pages={87},
      note={id: 2173; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070629. Revision Date: 20071207. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Commentary: Rieck S. Critique of 'nurse-physician collaboration: a comparison of the attitudes of nurses and physicians in the medical-surgical patient care setting'. MEDSURG NURS 2007 Apr; 16(2): 119-21 (commentary) . Journal Subset: Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Perioperative Care. Instrumentation: Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration. No. of Refs: 17 ref. NLM UID: 9300545. },
      abstract={Past literature reveals the multiple dimensions of the nurse-physician relationship. The current study was conducted within medical-surgical units of a major medical center in the South to determine attitudes of nurses and physicians regarding their collaboration. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Collaboration; Medical-Surgical Nursing; Nurse Attitudes; Nurse-Physician Relations; Physician Attitudes; Adult; Attitude Measures; Comparative Studies; Convenience Sample; Descriptive Research; Descriptive Statistics; Educational Status; Female; Job Experience; Magnet Hospitals; Male; North Carolina; Nursing Units; P-Value; Professional Autonomy; Prospective Studies; Scales; Summated Rating Scaling; Teamwork},
      isbn={1092-0811},
      url={http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2009574302&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Thompson, D. E.. (2007). Interprofessionalism in health care: Communication with the patient’s identified family . Journal of interprofessional care, 21(5), 561-563.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Communication with the patient’s identified family is one of the most important and ongoing service to be provided by the inter-professional team in health care. Placing this importent service within the context of "attachment, security and trust" should help professional team members to learn how to configure patient’s families into the circle of health care collaboration. The communication offered to the patient and patient’s family is the most important aspect to inter-professionalism within health care. Breakdowns in this communication of trust can have drastic effects with long standing emotional impact.

    @article{RefWorks:1373,
      author={D. E. Thompson},
      year={2007},
      month={Oct},
      title={Interprofessionalism in health care: Communication with the patient's identified family },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={21},
      number={5},
      pages={561-563},
      note={id: 1379; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={Communication with the patient's identified family is one of the most important and ongoing service to be provided by the inter-professional team in health care. Placing this importent service within the context of "attachment, security and trust" should help professional team members to learn how to configure patient's families into the circle of health care collaboration. The communication offered to the patient and patient's family is the most important aspect to inter-professionalism within health care. Breakdowns in this communication of trust can have drastic effects with long standing emotional impact. },
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Zwarenstein, M., Reeves, S., Russell, A., Kenaszchuk, C., Conn, G. L., Miller, K. L., Lingard, L., & Thorpe, K. E.. (2007). Structuring communication relationships for interprofessional teamwork (SCRIPT): a cluster randomized controlled trial . Trials, 8(1), 23.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite a burgeoning interest in using interprofessional approaches to promote effective collaboration in health care, systematic reviews find scant evidence of benefit. This protocol describes the first cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) to design and evaluate an intervention intended to improve interprofessional collaborative communication and patient-centred care. Objectives The objective is to evaluate the effects of a four-component, hospital-based staff communication protocol designed to promote collaborative communication between healthcare professionals and enhance patient-centred care. METHODS: The study is a multi-centre mixed-methods cluster randomized controlled trial involving twenty clinical teaching teams (CTTs) in general internal medicine (GIM) divisions of five Toronto tertiary-care hospitals. CTTs will be randomly assigned either to receive an intervention designed to improve interprofessional collaborative communication, or to continue usual communication practices. Non-participant naturalistic observation, shadowing, and semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted to explore existing patterns of interprofessional collaboration in the CTTs, and to support intervention development. Interviews and shadowing will continue during intervention delivery in order to document interactions between the intervention settings and adopters, and changes in interprofessional communication. The primary outcome is the rate of unplanned hospital readmission. Secondary outcomes are length of stay (LOS); adherence to evidence-based prescription drug therapy; patients’ satisfaction with care; self-report surveys of CTT staff perceptions of interprofessional collaboration; and frequency of calls to paging devices. Outcomes will be compared on an intention-to-treat basis using adjustment methods appropriate for data from a cluster randomized design. DISCUSSION: Pre-intervention qualitative analysis revealed that a substantial amount of interprofessional interaction lacks key core elements of collaborative communication such as self-introduction, description of professional role, and solicitation of other professional perspectives. Incorporating these findings, a four-component intervention was designed with a goal of creating a culture of communication in which the fundamentals of collaboration become a routine part of interprofessional interactions during unstructured work periods on GIM wards. Trial Registration: Registered with National Institutes of Health as NCT00466297.

    @article{RefWorks:1378,
      author={M. Zwarenstein and S. Reeves and A. Russell and C. Kenaszchuk and L. Gotlib Conn and K. L. Miller and L. Lingard and K. E. Thorpe},
      year={2007},
      month={Sep 18},
      title={Structuring communication relationships for interprofessional teamwork (SCRIPT): a cluster randomized controlled trial },
      journal={Trials},
      volume={8},
      number={1},
      pages={23},
      note={id: 1389; PUBM: Print-Electronic; DEP: 20070918; JID: 101263253; 2007/06/22 [received]; 2007/09/18 [accepted]; 2007/09/18 [aheadofprint]; aheadofprint },
      abstract={ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite a burgeoning interest in using interprofessional approaches to promote effective collaboration in health care, systematic reviews find scant evidence of benefit. This protocol describes the first cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) to design and evaluate an intervention intended to improve interprofessional collaborative communication and patient-centred care. Objectives The objective is to evaluate the effects of a four-component, hospital-based staff communication protocol designed to promote collaborative communication between healthcare professionals and enhance patient-centred care. METHODS: The study is a multi-centre mixed-methods cluster randomized controlled trial involving twenty clinical teaching teams (CTTs) in general internal medicine (GIM) divisions of five Toronto tertiary-care hospitals. CTTs will be randomly assigned either to receive an intervention designed to improve interprofessional collaborative communication, or to continue usual communication practices. Non-participant naturalistic observation, shadowing, and semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted to explore existing patterns of interprofessional collaboration in the CTTs, and to support intervention development. Interviews and shadowing will continue during intervention delivery in order to document interactions between the intervention settings and adopters, and changes in interprofessional communication. The primary outcome is the rate of unplanned hospital readmission. Secondary outcomes are length of stay (LOS); adherence to evidence-based prescription drug therapy; patients' satisfaction with care; self-report surveys of CTT staff perceptions of interprofessional collaboration; and frequency of calls to paging devices. Outcomes will be compared on an intention-to-treat basis using adjustment methods appropriate for data from a cluster randomized design. DISCUSSION: Pre-intervention qualitative analysis revealed that a substantial amount of interprofessional interaction lacks key core elements of collaborative communication such as self-introduction, description of professional role, and solicitation of other professional perspectives. Incorporating these findings, a four-component intervention was designed with a goal of creating a culture of communication in which the fundamentals of collaboration become a routine part of interprofessional interactions during unstructured work periods on GIM wards. Trial Registration: Registered with National Institutes of Health as NCT00466297. },
      isbn={1745-6215},
      language={ENG}
    }

2006

  • Apker, J., Propp, K. M., Ford, W. S. Z., & Hofmeister, N.. (2006). Collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination: professional nurse communication skill sets in health care team interactions . Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 22(3), 180-189.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study explored how nurses communicate professionalism in interactions with members of their health care teams. Extant research show that effective team communication is a vital aspect of a positive nursing practice environment, a setting that has been linked to enhanced patient outcomes. Although communication principles are emphasized in nursing education as an important component of professional nursing practice, actual nurse interaction skills in team-based health care delivery remain understudied. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts with 50 participants at a large tertiary hospital revealed four communicative skill sets exemplified by nursing professionals: collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination. Study findings highlight specific communicative behaviors associated with each skill set that exemplify nurse professionalism to members of health care teams. Theoretical and pragmatic conclusions are drawn regarding the communicative responsibilities of professional nurses in health care teams. Specific interaction techniques that nurses could use in nurse-team communication are then offered for use in baccalaureate curriculum and organizational in-service education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1283,
      author={J. Apker and K. M. Propp and W. S. Z. Ford and N. Hofmeister},
      year={2006},
      month={05//2006 May-Jun},
      title={Collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination: professional nurse communication skill sets in health care team interactions },
      journal={Journal of professional nursing : official journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing},
      volume={22},
      number={3},
      pages={180-189},
      note={id: 335; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060811. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Education. Grant Information: Bronson Healthcare Group. No. of Refs: 29 ref. PMID: 16759961 NLM UID: 8511298. Email: julie.apker@wmich.edu. },
      abstract={This study explored how nurses communicate professionalism in interactions with members of their health care teams. Extant research show that effective team communication is a vital aspect of a positive nursing practice environment, a setting that has been linked to enhanced patient outcomes. Although communication principles are emphasized in nursing education as an important component of professional nursing practice, actual nurse interaction skills in team-based health care delivery remain understudied. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts with 50 participants at a large tertiary hospital revealed four communicative skill sets exemplified by nursing professionals: collaboration, credibility, compassion, and coordination. Study findings highlight specific communicative behaviors associated with each skill set that exemplify nurse professionalism to members of health care teams. Theoretical and pragmatic conclusions are drawn regarding the communicative responsibilities of professional nurses in health care teams. Specific interaction techniques that nurses could use in nurse-team communication are then offered for use in baccalaureate curriculum and organizational in-service education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration; Communication Skills; Interprofessional Relations; Professionalism; Teamwork; Adult; Audiorecording; Constant Comparative Method; Convenience Sample; Descriptive Statistics; Female; Field Notes; Focus Groups; Funding Source; Grounded Theory; Hospital Units; Interview Guides; Leadership; Male; Midwestern United States; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Nonverbal Communication; Nurse Attitudes; Observational Methods; Qualitative Studies; Semi-Structured Interview},
      isbn={8755-7223}
    }

  • Gassert, C. A., Peay, W. J., & Mitchell, J. A.. (2006). A model of interprofessional informatics education . Studies in health technology and informatics, 122, 149-152.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    An emphasis on patient safety and an administrative mandate to have information systems in place in most health care agencies in the USA by 2014 has put pressure on nursing informatics programs to increase the number of graduates. At the same time a need for change in health professions education was emphasized at an educational summit sponsored by the Institute of Medicine. Interprofessional education (IPE) will help to provide needed educational reform in informatics and is defined as planned occasions when two or more professions learn from each other and about each other in a structured manner. This paper discusses an evolving interprofessional (IPE) model of informatics education that has been developed at the University of Utah. Because of interprofessional collaboration, faculty, students, and support staff from both the medical and nursing informatics programs moved into a suite on the fifth floor of a state-of-art technology-rich health sciences education building. The co-located space has enabled the informatics programs to increase activities that promote interprofessional education. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1308,
      author={C. A. Gassert and W. J. Peay and J. A. Mitchell},
      year={2006},
      title={A model of interprofessional informatics education },
      journal={Studies in health technology and informatics},
      volume={122},
      pages={149-152},
      note={id: 848; PUBM: Print; JID: 9214582; ppublish },
      abstract={An emphasis on patient safety and an administrative mandate to have information systems in place in most health care agencies in the USA by 2014 has put pressure on nursing informatics programs to increase the number of graduates. At the same time a need for change in health professions education was emphasized at an educational summit sponsored by the Institute of Medicine. Interprofessional education (IPE) will help to provide needed educational reform in informatics and is defined as planned occasions when two or more professions learn from each other and about each other in a structured manner. This paper discusses an evolving interprofessional (IPE) model of informatics education that has been developed at the University of Utah. Because of interprofessional collaboration, faculty, students, and support staff from both the medical and nursing informatics programs moved into a suite on the fifth floor of a state-of-art technology-rich health sciences education building. The co-located space has enabled the informatics programs to increase activities that promote interprofessional education. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Humans; Models, Organizational; Nursing Informatics/education; Patient Care Team; Utah},
      isbn={0926-9630},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Haig, K. M., Sutton, S., & Whittington, J.. (2006). SBAR: a shared mental model for improving communication between clinicians . Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety, 32(3), 167-175.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: The importance of sharing a common mental model in communication prompted efforts to spread the use of the SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation) tool at OSF St. Joseph Medical Center, Bloomington, Illinois. CASE STUDY: An elderly patient was on warfarin sodium (Coumadin) 2.5 mg daily. The nurse received a call from the lab regarding an elevated international normalized ratio (INR) but did not write down the results (she was providing care to another patient). On the basis of the previous lab cumulative summary, the physician increased the warfarin dose for the patient; a dangerously high INR resulted. ACTIONS TAKEN: The medical center initiated a collaborative to implement the use of the SBAR communication tool. Education was incorporated into team resource management training and general orientation. Tools included SBAR pocket cards for clinicians and laminated SBAR "cheat sheets" posted at each phone. SBAR became the communication methodology from leadership to the microsystem in all forms of reporting. DISCUSSION: Staff adapted quickly to the use of SBAR, although hesitancy was noted in providing the "recommendation" to physicians. Medical staff were encouraged to listen for the SBAR components and encourage staff to share their recommendation if not initially provided. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1311,
      author={K. M. Haig and S. Sutton and J. Whittington},
      year={2006},
      month={Mar},
      title={SBAR: a shared mental model for improving communication between clinicians },
      journal={Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety},
      volume={32},
      number={3},
      pages={167-175},
      note={id: 1158; PUBM: Print; JID: 101238023; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: The importance of sharing a common mental model in communication prompted efforts to spread the use of the SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation) tool at OSF St. Joseph Medical Center, Bloomington, Illinois. CASE STUDY: An elderly patient was on warfarin sodium (Coumadin) 2.5 mg daily. The nurse received a call from the lab regarding an elevated international normalized ratio (INR) but did not write down the results (she was providing care to another patient). On the basis of the previous lab cumulative summary, the physician increased the warfarin dose for the patient; a dangerously high INR resulted. ACTIONS TAKEN: The medical center initiated a collaborative to implement the use of the SBAR communication tool. Education was incorporated into team resource management training and general orientation. Tools included SBAR pocket cards for clinicians and laminated SBAR "cheat sheets" posted at each phone. SBAR became the communication methodology from leadership to the microsystem in all forms of reporting. DISCUSSION: Staff adapted quickly to the use of SBAR, although hesitancy was noted in providing the "recommendation" to physicians. Medical staff were encouraged to listen for the SBAR components and encourage staff to share their recommendation if not initially provided. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Hospitals, Community; Humans; Illinois; Interdisciplinary Communication; Medical Staff, Hospital; Medication Errors/prevention & control; Organizational Case Studies; Organizational Objectives; Safety Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1553-7250},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Hamilton, P., Gemeinhardt, G., Mancuso, P., Sahlin, C. L., & Ivy, L.. (2006). SBAR and nurse-physician communication: pilot testing an educational intervention… Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation . Nursing administration quarterly, 30(3), 295-299.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Poor communication in hospitals leads to medical errors and adverse events, which can jeopardize patient safety and threaten nurse retention. SBAR was introduced in 2004 as a tool to improve communication primarily between nurses and physicians in hospitals. SBAR stands for Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation and is a helpful framework for organizing information that must be communicated rapidly and concisely. In less than 2 years, SBAR has entered healthcare vernacular and is now considered "best practice" for use in rapid transmission of information in hospitals. However, there is very little evidence as to the effect of SBAR on quality of communication between nurses and physicians and even less evidence of its impact on patient outcomes. SBAR is typically introduced in hospitals using some form of classroom training. The study described here was a pilot test to assess the effect of classroom-only SBAR training and to lay the foundation for a subsequent full-scale test of SBAR’s efficacy and effectiveness. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1313,
      author={P. Hamilton and G. Gemeinhardt and P. Mancuso and C. L. Sahlin and L. Ivy},
      year={2006},
      month={07//2006 Jul-Sep},
      title={SBAR and nurse-physician communication: pilot testing an educational intervention... Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation },
      journal={Nursing administration quarterly},
      volume={30},
      number={3},
      pages={295-299},
      note={id: 390; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060929. Publication Type: journal article; abstract; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Nursing Administration; Nursing Education; Patient Safety. Instrumentation: Survey on communication and patient safety (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality). No. of Refs: 5 ref. NLM UID: 7703976. },
      abstract={Poor communication in hospitals leads to medical errors and adverse events, which can jeopardize patient safety and threaten nurse retention. SBAR was introduced in 2004 as a tool to improve communication primarily between nurses and physicians in hospitals. SBAR stands for Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation and is a helpful framework for organizing information that must be communicated rapidly and concisely. In less than 2 years, SBAR has entered healthcare vernacular and is now considered "best practice" for use in rapid transmission of information in hospitals. However, there is very little evidence as to the effect of SBAR on quality of communication between nurses and physicians and even less evidence of its impact on patient outcomes. SBAR is typically introduced in hospitals using some form of classroom training. The study described here was a pilot test to assess the effect of classroom-only SBAR training and to lay the foundation for a subsequent full-scale test of SBAR's efficacy and effectiveness. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Communication Skills Training; Nurse-Physician Relations; Students, Post-RN; Convenience Sample; Descriptive Statistics; Education, Post-RN; Effect Size; Nurses--Education; Pretest-Posttest Design; Questionnaires; Southwestern United States; Teaching Methods},
      isbn={0363-9568}
    }

  • Holden, J.. (2006). How can we improve the nursing work environment? . MCN.The American journal of maternal and child nursing, 31(1), 34-38.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    It has been suggested by many recently that the nursing work environment needs to be altered to make it more responsive to both nurse and patient needs. One essential aspect of this change would be to increase patient safety. This article suggests that to improve patient safety as well as satisfaction of nurses, the culture of the nursing organization should be transformed into one of a "learning organization." Using this model of an organization, every member of the nursing organization would be encouraged to reach his or her greatest potential, the welfare of the team would become paramount, and a shared vision of where the organization needs to go would emerge, thus maximizing productivity, safety, and job satisfaction for all healthcare team members. This transformation could mean that the terms "Nursing Organizations" and "Learning Organizations" would not have to be oxymorons. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1315,
      author={J. Holden},
      year={2006},
      month={Jan-Feb},
      title={How can we improve the nursing work environment? },
      journal={MCN.The American journal of maternal and child nursing},
      volume={31},
      number={1},
      pages={34-38},
      note={id: 382; PUBM: Print; JID: 7605941; RF: 12; ppublish },
      abstract={It has been suggested by many recently that the nursing work environment needs to be altered to make it more responsive to both nurse and patient needs. One essential aspect of this change would be to increase patient safety. This article suggests that to improve patient safety as well as satisfaction of nurses, the culture of the nursing organization should be transformed into one of a "learning organization." Using this model of an organization, every member of the nursing organization would be encouraged to reach his or her greatest potential, the welfare of the team would become paramount, and a shared vision of where the organization needs to go would emerge, thus maximizing productivity, safety, and job satisfaction for all healthcare team members. This transformation could mean that the terms "Nursing Organizations" and "Learning Organizations" would not have to be oxymorons. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Efficiency, Organizational; Goals; Health Facility Environment/organization & administration; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Institute of Medicine (U.S.); Job Satisfaction; Learning; Models, Organizational; Nursing Staff/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Culture; Organizational Objectives; Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration; Philosophy, Nursing; Safety Management/organization & administration; Systems Analysis; Thinking; Total Quality Management/organization & administration; United States; Workplace/organization & administration/psychology},
      isbn={0361-929X},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Johnson, A. W., Potthoff, S. J., Carranza, L., Swenson, H. M., Platt, C. R., & Rathbun, J. R.. (2006). CLARION: a novel interprofessional approach to health care education . Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 81(3), 252-256.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The authors describe the development and impact of CLARION, a student-run organization at the University of Minnesota founded in 2001 and dedicated to furthering interprofessional education for health professions students. CLARION’s student founders recognized that three recent reports from the Institute of Medicine will fuel significant changes in health professions education. Moreover, they deduced that targeted, interprofessional education in the preclinical years could provide fundamental skills and understanding needed to make today’s patient care safer and more effective. By engaging health care professionals and faculty, CLARION creates and conducts extracurricular, interprofessional experiences for students that are reflective of the six IOM aims for health care. Student members are from four separate schools of the university’s academic health center: medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health. The organization’s capstone event, the Interprofessional Case Competition, challenges interprofessional teams of students to compete in conducting and presenting a root cause analysis of a fictitious sentinel event. The interprofessional organizational structure of the CLARION board models the kind of interprofessional equality needed to effectively solve problems in the health care system. The interaction among students from different health professions has led them to many new understandings about health care and the realization that many fundamental biases about other professions are firmly rooted in students before they enter the workplace. CLARION has enabled continued professional development of students, faculty, and practitioners, leading individual students to enhanced understanding of the health care system. It is a grassroots catalyst that has prompted faculty to reexamine traditional health professions curricula and look for ways to integrate more interprofessional opportunities into it. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1318,
      author={A. W. Johnson and S. J. Potthoff and L. Carranza and H. M. Swenson and C. R. Platt and J. R. Rathbun},
      year={2006},
      month={Mar},
      title={CLARION: a novel interprofessional approach to health care education },
      journal={Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges},
      volume={81},
      number={3},
      pages={252-256},
      note={id: 424; PUBM: Print; JID: 8904605; ppublish },
      abstract={The authors describe the development and impact of CLARION, a student-run organization at the University of Minnesota founded in 2001 and dedicated to furthering interprofessional education for health professions students. CLARION's student founders recognized that three recent reports from the Institute of Medicine will fuel significant changes in health professions education. Moreover, they deduced that targeted, interprofessional education in the preclinical years could provide fundamental skills and understanding needed to make today's patient care safer and more effective. By engaging health care professionals and faculty, CLARION creates and conducts extracurricular, interprofessional experiences for students that are reflective of the six IOM aims for health care. Student members are from four separate schools of the university's academic health center: medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health. The organization's capstone event, the Interprofessional Case Competition, challenges interprofessional teams of students to compete in conducting and presenting a root cause analysis of a fictitious sentinel event. The interprofessional organizational structure of the CLARION board models the kind of interprofessional equality needed to effectively solve problems in the health care system. The interaction among students from different health professions has led them to many new understandings about health care and the realization that many fundamental biases about other professions are firmly rooted in students before they enter the workplace. CLARION has enabled continued professional development of students, faculty, and practitioners, leading individual students to enhanced understanding of the health care system. It is a grassroots catalyst that has prompted faculty to reexamine traditional health professions curricula and look for ways to integrate more interprofessional opportunities into it. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Curriculum; Education, Medical/trends; Education, Nursing; Education, Pharmacy; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Minnesota; Organizational Innovation; Public Health; Quality of Health Care; Schools, Medical; Students, Medical},
      isbn={1040-2446},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kyrkjebo, J. M., Brattebo, G., & Smith-Strom, H.. (2006). Improving patient safety by using interprofessional simulation training in health professional education . Journal of interprofessional care, 20(5), 507-516.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Modern medicine is complex. Reports and surveys demonstrate that patient safety is a major problem. Health educators focus on professional knowledge and less on how to improve patient care and safety. The ability to act as part of a team, fostering communication, co-operation and leadership is seldom found in health education. This paper reports the findings from pilot testing a simulated training program in interprofessional student teams. Four teams each comprising one medical, nursing, and intensive nursing student (n = 12), were exposed to two simulation scenarios twice. Focus groups were used to evaluate the program. The findings suggest that the students were satisfied with the program, but some of the videos and simulation exercises could be more realistic and more in accordance with each other. Generally they wanted more interprofessional team training, and had learned a lot about their own team performance, personal reactions and lack of certain competencies. Involving students in interprofessional team training seem to be more likely to enhance their learning process. The students’ struggles with roles, competence and team skills underline the need for more focus on combining professional knowledge learning with team training. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1323,
      author={J. M. Kyrkjebo and G. Brattebo and H. Smith-Strom},
      year={2006},
      month={Oct},
      title={Improving patient safety by using interprofessional simulation training in health professional education },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={20},
      number={5},
      pages={507-516},
      note={id: 1459; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={Modern medicine is complex. Reports and surveys demonstrate that patient safety is a major problem. Health educators focus on professional knowledge and less on how to improve patient care and safety. The ability to act as part of a team, fostering communication, co-operation and leadership is seldom found in health education. This paper reports the findings from pilot testing a simulated training program in interprofessional student teams. Four teams each comprising one medical, nursing, and intensive nursing student (n = 12), were exposed to two simulation scenarios twice. Focus groups were used to evaluate the program. The findings suggest that the students were satisfied with the program, but some of the videos and simulation exercises could be more realistic and more in accordance with each other. Generally they wanted more interprofessional team training, and had learned a lot about their own team performance, personal reactions and lack of certain competencies. Involving students in interprofessional team training seem to be more likely to enhance their learning process. The students' struggles with roles, competence and team skills underline the need for more focus on combining professional knowledge learning with team training. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Medical, Graduate/methods; Education, Nursing, Graduate/methods; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Patient Simulation; Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration; Safety Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ladden, M. D., Bednash, G., Stevens, D. P., & Moore, G. T.. (2006). Educating interprofessional learners for quality, safety and systems improvement . Journal of interprofessional care, 20, 497-505.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Most health professionals in training, as well as those in practice, lack the knowledge and skills they need to play an effective role in systems improvement. Until very recently, these competencies were not included in formal (or informal) educational curricula. Interprofessional collaboration – another core competency needed for successful systems improvement – is also inadequately taught and learned. Achieving Competence Today (ACT) was designed as a new model for interprofessional education for quality, safety and health systems improvement. The core of ACT is a four-module active learning course during which learners from different disciplines work together to develop a Quality Improvement Project to address a quality or safety problem in their own practice system. In this paper we describe the ACT program and curriculum model, discuss our strategies for maximizing ACT’s interprofessional potential, and make recommendations for the future. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1325,
      author={M. D. Ladden and G. Bednash and D. P. Stevens and G. T. Moore},
      year={2006},
      title={Educating interprofessional learners for quality, safety and systems improvement },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={20},
      pages={497-505},
      note={id: 1018; Entry Date: In Process. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. NLM UID: 9205811.; 5 },
      abstract={Most health professionals in training, as well as those in practice, lack the knowledge and skills they need to play an effective role in systems improvement. Until very recently, these competencies were not included in formal (or informal) educational curricula. Interprofessional collaboration - another core competency needed for successful systems improvement - is also inadequately taught and learned. Achieving Competence Today (ACT) was designed as a new model for interprofessional education for quality, safety and health systems improvement. The core of ACT is a four-module active learning course during which learners from different disciplines work together to develop a Quality Improvement Project to address a quality or safety problem in their own practice system. In this paper we describe the ACT program and curriculum model, discuss our strategies for maximizing ACT's interprofessional potential, and make recommendations for the future. (Source:PubMed) }
    }

  • McKeon, L. M., Oswaks, J. D., & Cunningham, P. D.. (2006). Safeguarding patients: complexity science, high reliability organizations, and implications for team training in healthcare . Clinical nurse specialist: The Journal for advanced nursing practice, 20(6), 298-306.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Serious events within healthcare occur daily exposing the failure of the system to safeguard patient and providers. The complex nature of healthcare contributes to myriad ambiguities affecting quality nursing care and patient outcomes. Leaders in healthcare organizations are looking outside the industry for ways to improve care because of the slow rates of improvement in patient safety and insufficient application of evidenced-based research in practice. Military and aviation industry strategies are recognized by clinicians in high-risk care settings such as the operating room, emergency departments, and intensive care units as having great potential to create safe and effective systems of care. Complexity science forms the basis for high reliability teams to recognize even the most minor variances in expected outcomes and take strong action to prevent serious error from occurring. Cultural and system barriers to achieving high reliability performance within healthcare and implications for team training are discussed. (Source:PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1337,
      author={L. M. McKeon and J. D. Oswaks and P. D. Cunningham},
      year={2006},
      month={11},
      title={Safeguarding patients: complexity science, high reliability organizations, and implications for team training in healthcare },
      journal={Clinical nurse specialist: The Journal for advanced nursing practice},
      volume={20},
      number={6},
      pages={298-306},
      note={id: 1164; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070119. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; exam questions; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Patient Safety; Quality Assurance. No. of Refs: 43 ref. PMID: 17149021 NLM UID: 8709115. Email: lmckeon@utmem.edu. },
      abstract={Serious events within healthcare occur daily exposing the failure of the system to safeguard patient and providers. The complex nature of healthcare contributes to myriad ambiguities affecting quality nursing care and patient outcomes. Leaders in healthcare organizations are looking outside the industry for ways to improve care because of the slow rates of improvement in patient safety and insufficient application of evidenced-based research in practice. Military and aviation industry strategies are recognized by clinicians in high-risk care settings such as the operating room, emergency departments, and intensive care units as having great potential to create safe and effective systems of care. Complexity science forms the basis for high reliability teams to recognize even the most minor variances in expected outcomes and take strong action to prevent serious error from occurring. Cultural and system barriers to achieving high reliability performance within healthcare and implications for team training are discussed. (Source:PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration; Education, Interdisciplinary; Health Care Errors--Prevention and Control; Models, Theoretical; Organizational Culture; Organizational Theory; Patient Safety; Professional Development; Quality Improvement; Reliability; Teamwork; Adaptation, Psychological; Clinical Nurse Specialists; Communication; Education, Continuing (Credit); Interprofessional Relations; Nursing Role; Power; Success}
    }

  • Posey, L., & Pintz, C.. (2006). Online teaching strategies to improve collaboration among nursing students . Nurse education today, 26(8), 680-687.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Collaborative problem-solving is an essential competency for nurses and all health professionals. This paper compares the design characteristics and educational benefits of three online-teaching strategies that nurse educators can use to build the critical thinking and social skills needed for effective collaboration: computer supported collaborative learning, case-based facilitated discussion, and cognitive flexibility hypermedia. These strategies support a critical instructional outcome required for effective collaboration: the ability to examine, assess, and synthesize multiple perspectives to resolve illstructured problems (i.e., problems for which there is no clear-cut solution). Descriptions, examples, and guidelines for implementing each strategy are provided. By integrating these strategies into their online courses, nurse educators can prepare nurses to work effectively with others to solve complex problems in clinical practice and the broader health-care system. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1347,
      author={L. Posey and C. Pintz},
      year={2006},
      month={Dec},
      title={Online teaching strategies to improve collaboration among nursing students },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={26},
      number={8},
      pages={680-687},
      note={id: 1157; PUBM: Print-Electronic; DEP: 20061018; JID: 8511379; RF: 27; 2006/06/29 [received]; 2006/07/20 [accepted]; 2006/10/18 [aheadofprint]; ppublish },
      abstract={Collaborative problem-solving is an essential competency for nurses and all health professionals. This paper compares the design characteristics and educational benefits of three online-teaching strategies that nurse educators can use to build the critical thinking and social skills needed for effective collaboration: computer supported collaborative learning, case-based facilitated discussion, and cognitive flexibility hypermedia. These strategies support a critical instructional outcome required for effective collaboration: the ability to examine, assess, and synthesize multiple perspectives to resolve illstructured problems (i.e., problems for which there is no clear-cut solution). Descriptions, examples, and guidelines for implementing each strategy are provided. By integrating these strategies into their online courses, nurse educators can prepare nurses to work effectively with others to solve complex problems in clinical practice and the broader health-care system. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence/standards; Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods; Cooperative Behavior; Decision Making; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods; Group Processes; Guidelines; Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; Health Services Needs and Demand; Humans; Knowledge; Models, Educational; Nursing Education Research; Online Systems/organization & administration; Problem Solving; Problem-Based Learning/methods; Psychology, Educational; Students, Nursing/psychology; Teaching/methods; Thinking},
      isbn={0260-6917},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Puntillo, K. A., & McAdam, J. L.. (2006). Communication between physicians and nurses as a target for improving end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: challenges and opportunities for moving forward . Critical care medicine, 34(11 Suppl), S332-40.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Our objective was to discuss obstacles and barriers to effective communication and collaboration regarding end-of-life issues between intensive care unit nurses and physicians. To evaluate practical interventions for improving communication and collaboration, we undertook a systematic literature review. An increase in shared decision making can result from a better understanding and respect for the perspectives and burdens felt by other caregivers. Intensive care unit nurses value their contributions to end-of-life decision making and want to have a more active role. Increased collaboration and communication can result in more appropriate care and increased physician/nurse, patient, and family satisfaction. Recommendations for improvement in communication between intensive care unit physicians and nurses include use of joint grand rounds, patient care seminars, and interprofessional dialogues. Communication interventions such as use of daily rounds forms, communication training, and a collaborative practice model have shown positive results. When communication is clear and constructive and practice is truly collaborative, the end-of-life care provided to intensive care unit patients and families by satisfied and engaged professionals will improve markedly. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1349,
      author={K. A. Puntillo and J. L. McAdam},
      year={2006},
      month={Nov},
      title={Communication between physicians and nurses as a target for improving end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: challenges and opportunities for moving forward },
      journal={Critical care medicine},
      volume={34},
      number={11 Suppl},
      pages={S332-40},
      note={id: 1162; PUBM: Print; JID: 0355501; RF: 57; ppublish },
      abstract={Our objective was to discuss obstacles and barriers to effective communication and collaboration regarding end-of-life issues between intensive care unit nurses and physicians. To evaluate practical interventions for improving communication and collaboration, we undertook a systematic literature review. An increase in shared decision making can result from a better understanding and respect for the perspectives and burdens felt by other caregivers. Intensive care unit nurses value their contributions to end-of-life decision making and want to have a more active role. Increased collaboration and communication can result in more appropriate care and increased physician/nurse, patient, and family satisfaction. Recommendations for improvement in communication between intensive care unit physicians and nurses include use of joint grand rounds, patient care seminars, and interprofessional dialogues. Communication interventions such as use of daily rounds forms, communication training, and a collaborative practice model have shown positive results. When communication is clear and constructive and practice is truly collaborative, the end-of-life care provided to intensive care unit patients and families by satisfied and engaged professionals will improve markedly. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Decision Making; Family; Humans; Intensive Care Units/organization & administration; Interdisciplinary Communication; Medical Staff, Hospital/organization & administration; Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration; Quality of Health Care/organization & administration; Terminal Care/organization & administration},
      isbn={0090-3493},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Russell, L., Nyhof-Young, J., Abosh, B., & Robinson, S.. (2006). An exploratory analysis of an interprofessional learning environment in two hospital clinical teaching units . Journal of interprofessional care, 20, 29-39.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    An analysis of a teaching environment with regard to interprofessional practice was done using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Medical, nursing and other health professional staff and students from two hospital units (medical and surgical) completed two surveys. The students were also interviewed. Staff differed in survey results among disciplines, with nurses and other health professionals having a more positive view of interprofessional collaboration than physicians. Student interviews supported our hypothesis that little formal or informal interprofessional education occurred during clinical rotations. Students had little understanding of the nature of collaborative behavior, and appeared to learn their discipline’s attitudes and practices through tacit observation of staff behaviors. This appears to reinforce disciplinary stereotypes, and may be a significant barrier to the development of collaborative practice. These results have implications for the design of interprofessional curriculum in clinical practicums. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1354,
      author={L. Russell and J. Nyhof-Young and B. Abosh and S. Robinson},
      year={2006},
      title={An exploratory analysis of an interprofessional learning environment in two hospital clinical teaching units },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={20},
      pages={29-39},
      note={id: 975; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060811. Publication Type: journal article; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Instrumentation: Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale (Heinemann et al); Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (Baggs). No. of Refs: 20 ref. PMID: 16581637 NLM UID: 9205811. Email: l.russell@utoronto.ca.; 1 },
      abstract={An analysis of a teaching environment with regard to interprofessional practice was done using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Medical, nursing and other health professional staff and students from two hospital units (medical and surgical) completed two surveys. The students were also interviewed. Staff differed in survey results among disciplines, with nurses and other health professionals having a more positive view of interprofessional collaboration than physicians. Student interviews supported our hypothesis that little formal or informal interprofessional education occurred during clinical rotations. Students had little understanding of the nature of collaborative behavior, and appeared to learn their discipline's attitudes and practices through tacit observation of staff behaviors. This appears to reinforce disciplinary stereotypes, and may be a significant barrier to the development of collaborative practice. These results have implications for the design of interprofessional curriculum in clinical practicums. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Interdisciplinary; Learning Environment; Audiorecording; Communication; Confidence Intervals; Convenience Sample; Data Analysis Software; Data Analysis, Statistical; Decision Making, Clinical; Descriptive Statistics; Exploratory Research; Grounded Theory; Interprofessional Relations; Leadership; Research Instruments; Scales; Semi-Structured Interview; Survey Research; Teamwork}
    }

  • Sievers, B., & Wolf, S.. (2006). Achieving clinical nurse specialist competencies and outcomes through interdisciplinary education . Clinical nurse specialist CNS, 20(2), 75-80.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Without formal education, many healthcare professionals fail to develop interdisciplinary team skills; however, when students are socialized to interdisciplinary practice through academic clinical learning experiences, effective collaboration skills can be developed. Increasingly, educational environments are challenged to include clinical experiences for students that teach and model interdisciplinary collaboration. PURPOSE: The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to create an interdisciplinary educational experience for clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students and postgraduate physicians. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT: The interdisciplinary learning experience, supported by an educational grant, provided an interdisciplinary cohort of learners an opportunity to engage in a clinically focused learning experience. The interdisciplinary cohort consisted of CNS students and physicians in various stages of postgraduate training. The clinical experience selected was a quality improvement initiative in which the students were introduced to the concepts and tools of quality improvement. During this 1-month clinical experience, students applied the new skills by implementing a quality improvement project focusing on medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting. The CNS core competencies and outcomes were used to shape the experience for the CNS students. OUTCOME: The CNS students exhibited 5 of the 7 essential characteristics of the CNS (leadership, collaboration, consultation skills, ethical conduct, and professional attributes) while demonstrating competencies and fulfilling performance expectations. During this learning experience, the CNS students focused on competencies and outcomes in the organizational sphere of influence. Multiple facilitating factors and barriers were identified. CONCLUSION: This interdisciplinary clinical experience in a quality improvement initiative provided valuable opportunities for CNS students to develop essential CNS characteristics and to explore practice competencies in the area of systems. IMPLICATIONS: Interdisciplinary clinical experiences offer students opportunities to develop needed collaboration and communication skills. Educators should create interdisciplinary educational experiences for students to better prepare them for their roles in a clinical setting. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1361,
      author={B. Sievers and S. Wolf},
      year={2006},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Achieving clinical nurse specialist competencies and outcomes through interdisciplinary education },
      journal={Clinical nurse specialist CNS},
      volume={20},
      number={2},
      pages={75-80},
      note={id: 2266; PUBM: Print; JID: 8709115; ppublish },
      abstract={Without formal education, many healthcare professionals fail to develop interdisciplinary team skills; however, when students are socialized to interdisciplinary practice through academic clinical learning experiences, effective collaboration skills can be developed. Increasingly, educational environments are challenged to include clinical experiences for students that teach and model interdisciplinary collaboration. PURPOSE: The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to create an interdisciplinary educational experience for clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students and postgraduate physicians. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT: The interdisciplinary learning experience, supported by an educational grant, provided an interdisciplinary cohort of learners an opportunity to engage in a clinically focused learning experience. The interdisciplinary cohort consisted of CNS students and physicians in various stages of postgraduate training. The clinical experience selected was a quality improvement initiative in which the students were introduced to the concepts and tools of quality improvement. During this 1-month clinical experience, students applied the new skills by implementing a quality improvement project focusing on medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting. The CNS core competencies and outcomes were used to shape the experience for the CNS students. OUTCOME: The CNS students exhibited 5 of the 7 essential characteristics of the CNS (leadership, collaboration, consultation skills, ethical conduct, and professional attributes) while demonstrating competencies and fulfilling performance expectations. During this learning experience, the CNS students focused on competencies and outcomes in the organizational sphere of influence. Multiple facilitating factors and barriers were identified. CONCLUSION: This interdisciplinary clinical experience in a quality improvement initiative provided valuable opportunities for CNS students to develop essential CNS characteristics and to explore practice competencies in the area of systems. IMPLICATIONS: Interdisciplinary clinical experiences offer students opportunities to develop needed collaboration and communication skills. Educators should create interdisciplinary educational experiences for students to better prepare them for their roles in a clinical setting. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Ambulatory Care/organization & administration; Attitude of Health Personnel; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum; Drug Therapy/nursing/standards; Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Goals; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Leadership; Models, Educational; Nurse Clinicians/education/psychology; Nurse's Role; Nursing Education Research; Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)/organization & administration; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Professional Competence/standards; Program Evaluation; Socialization; Systems Analysis; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={0887-6274},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Thornby, D.. (2006). Beginning the journey to skilled communication . AACN Advanced critical care, 17, 266-271.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Intimidating behavior and deficient interpersonal skills create a culture of silence, where there can be a breakdown in team communications and an inability to collaborate and achieve high-quality outcomes. A study from VitalSmarts (Provo, Utah), Silence Kills: The Seven Crucial Conversations for Healthcare, described 7 crucial conversations healthcare professionals struggle with that contribute to patient harm and unacceptable error rates. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses’ first standard (from AACN Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments: A Journey to Excellence), skilled communication, states: "Nurses must be as proficient in communication skills as they are in clinical skills." Once it is accepted that being competent in skilled communication is essential to excellent patient care, it then takes skill development and added courage to hold crucial conversations and address difficult situations. The first step begins with a self-assessment to determine current effectiveness as a communicator and manager of conflict and to realize opportunities for growth. Three key strategies to begin the development of skilled communication include: (1) understanding the importance of a climate of safety, (2) acknowledging one’s mental stories, and (3) realizing that the only people we control are ourselves. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1374,
      author={D. Thornby},
      year={2006},
      month={07},
      title={Beginning the journey to skilled communication },
      journal={AACN Advanced critical care},
      volume={17},
      pages={266-271},
      note={id: 1042; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060922. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Advanced Nursing Practice; Critical Care. No. of Refs: 8 ref. PMID: 16931922 NLM UID: 101269322. Email: dthornby@mcvh-vcu.edu.; 3 },
      abstract={Intimidating behavior and deficient interpersonal skills create a culture of silence, where there can be a breakdown in team communications and an inability to collaborate and achieve high-quality outcomes. A study from VitalSmarts (Provo, Utah), Silence Kills: The Seven Crucial Conversations for Healthcare, described 7 crucial conversations healthcare professionals struggle with that contribute to patient harm and unacceptable error rates. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses' first standard (from AACN Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments: A Journey to Excellence), skilled communication, states: "Nurses must be as proficient in communication skills as they are in clinical skills." Once it is accepted that being competent in skilled communication is essential to excellent patient care, it then takes skill development and added courage to hold crucial conversations and address difficult situations. The first step begins with a self-assessment to determine current effectiveness as a communicator and manager of conflict and to realize opportunities for growth. Three key strategies to begin the development of skilled communication include: (1) understanding the importance of a climate of safety, (2) acknowledging one's mental stories, and (3) realizing that the only people we control are ourselves. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication Skills; Communication Skills Training; Interpersonal Relations; Conflict (Psychology); Conversation; Mental Processes; Nurses; Work Environment}
    }

  • Varkey, P., Reller, M. K., Smith, A., Ponto, J., & Osborn, M.. (2006). An experiential interdisciplinary quality improvement education initiative . American journal of medical quality, 21(5), 317-322.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Seven learners, including 2 preventive medicine fellows, 2 family medicine residents, 1 internal medicine resident, and 2 master’s-level nursing students participated in an experiential 4-week quality improvement rotation at a major academic medical center. Together they worked on a quality improvement project that resulted in enhanced medication reconciliation in a preventive medicine clinic. Learner knowledge measured on the QI Knowledge Application Tool increased from an average of 2.33 before the start of the rotation to 3.43 (P = .043) by the end of the rotation. At the conclusion, all learners said they were confident or very confident that they could make a change to improve health care in a local setting. Although this pilot supports the feasibility and potential benefits of interdisciplinary quality improvement education, further research is necessary to explore strategies to implement the same on a larger scale, and to examine the impact on patient outcomes. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1375,
      author={P. Varkey and M. K. Reller and A. Smith and J. Ponto and M. Osborn},
      year={2006},
      title={An experiential interdisciplinary quality improvement education initiative },
      journal={American journal of medical quality},
      volume={21},
      number={5},
      pages={317-322},
      note={id: 1166; Language: English. Entry Date: 20070511. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; pictorial; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Health Services Administration; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Quality Assurance. Instrumentation: QI Knowledge Application Tool. Grant Information: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. No. of Refs: 22 ref. PMID: 16973948 NLM UID: 9300756. },
      abstract={Seven learners, including 2 preventive medicine fellows, 2 family medicine residents, 1 internal medicine resident, and 2 master's-level nursing students participated in an experiential 4-week quality improvement rotation at a major academic medical center. Together they worked on a quality improvement project that resulted in enhanced medication reconciliation in a preventive medicine clinic. Learner knowledge measured on the QI Knowledge Application Tool increased from an average of 2.33 before the start of the rotation to 3.43 (P = .043) by the end of the rotation. At the conclusion, all learners said they were confident or very confident that they could make a change to improve health care in a local setting. Although this pilot supports the feasibility and potential benefits of interdisciplinary quality improvement education, further research is necessary to explore strategies to implement the same on a larger scale, and to examine the impact on patient outcomes. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Health Personnel--Education; Medication Errors--Prevention and Control; Quality Assurance; Attitude to Health; Education, Continuing (Credit); Funding Source; Pilot Studies; Research Instruments; Root Cause Analysis; United States}
    }

2005

  • Arford, P. H.. (2005). Nurse-physician communication: an organizational accountability . Nursing economic$, 23(2), 72-7, 55.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Dysfunctional nurse-physician communication has been linked to medication errors, patient injuries, and patient deaths. The organization is accountable for providing a context that supports effective nurse-physician communication. Organizational strategies to create such a context are synthesized from the structural, human resource, political, and cultural frameworks of organizational behavior. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1284,
      author={P. H. Arford},
      year={2005},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Nurse-physician communication: an organizational accountability },
      journal={Nursing economic$},
      volume={23},
      number={2},
      pages={72-7, 55},
      note={id: 167; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8404213; RF: 31; ppublish },
      abstract={Dysfunctional nurse-physician communication has been linked to medication errors, patient injuries, and patient deaths. The organization is accountable for providing a context that supports effective nurse-physician communication. Organizational strategies to create such a context are synthesized from the structural, human resource, political, and cultural frameworks of organizational behavior. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Communication; Conflict (Psychology); Cooperative Behavior; Efficiency, Organizational; Feedback; Goals; Health Facility Environment/organization & administration; Humans; Models, Organizational; Models, Psychological; Organizational Culture; Organizational Innovation; Organizational Objectives; Organizational Policy; Physician-Nurse Relations; Politics; Power (Psychology); Professional Autonomy; Professional Role; Safety Management/organization & administration; Social Responsibility; Social Support},
      isbn={0746-1739 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Bender, D. G., & Buckner, S. K.. (2005). Interdisciplinary patient care skills module . The Journal of nursing education, 44(6), 291-292.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The literature suggests that an interdisciplinary team model may offer the best opportunity for hospitals to decrease health care expenditures, while still maintaining high-quality patient care. (Cantrell et al., 2001) An interdisciplinary approach coordinates care, so services are provided at a level that adequately addresses patient needs without wasting time and energy due to costly overlap of services. This results in the delivery of comprehensive, patient-centered care (National League for Nursing, 1998). This article describes an interdisciplinary module that involved entry-level nursing, physical therapist, and occupational therapist students. The module’s primary objective was to provide an opportunity for students to experience working together to meet a patient’s needs. Involving nursing, physical therapist, and occupational therapist students in a hands-on, interdisciplinary learning experience at the start of their educations achieved the secondary objective of emphasizing the value our programs place on teamwork in patient care. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1287,
      author={D. G. Bender and S. K. Buckner},
      year={2005},
      month={Jun},
      title={Interdisciplinary patient care skills module },
      journal={The Journal of nursing education},
      volume={44},
      number={6},
      pages={291-292},
      note={id: 164; PUBM: Print; JID: 7705432; ppublish },
      abstract={The literature suggests that an interdisciplinary team model may offer the best opportunity for hospitals to decrease health care expenditures, while still maintaining high-quality patient care. (Cantrell et al., 2001) An interdisciplinary approach coordinates care, so services are provided at a level that adequately addresses patient needs without wasting time and energy due to costly overlap of services. This results in the delivery of comprehensive, patient-centered care (National League for Nursing, 1998). This article describes an interdisciplinary module that involved entry-level nursing, physical therapist, and occupational therapist students. The module’s primary objective was to provide an opportunity for students to experience working together to meet a patient’s needs. Involving nursing, physical therapist, and occupational therapist students in a hands-on, interdisciplinary learning experience at the start of their educations achieved the secondary objective of emphasizing the value our programs place on teamwork in patient care. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Clinical Competence/standards; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Professional/organization & administration; Humans; Nursing Education Research; Occupational Therapy/education; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Physical Therapy (Specialty)/education; Professional Role; Questionnaires; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0148-4834 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • D’Amour, D., Ferrada-Videla, M., Rodriguez, L. S. M., & Beaulieu, M.. (2005). The conceptual basis for interprofessional collaboration: core concepts and theoretical frameworks . Journal of interprofessional care, 19, 116-131.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Interprofessional collaboration is a key factor in initiatives designed to increase the effectiveness of health services currently offered to the public. It is important that the concept of collaboration be well understood, because although the increasingly complex health problems faced by health professionals are creating more interdependencies among them, we still have limited knowledge of the complexity of interprofessional relationships. The goal of this literature review was to identify conceptual frameworks that could improve our understanding of this important aspect of health organizations. To this end, we have identified and taken into consideration: (A) the various definitions proposed in the literature and the various concepts associated with collaboration, and (B) the various theoretical frameworks of collaboration. Our results demonstrate that: (1) the concept of collaboration is commonly defined through five underlying concepts: sharing, partnership, power, interdependency and process; (2) the most complete models of collaboration seem to be those based on a strong theoretical background, either in organizational theory or in organizational sociology and on empirical data; (3) there is a significant amount of diversity in the way the various authors conceptualized collaboration and in the factors influencing collaboration; (4) these frameworks do not establish clear links between the elements in the models and the outputs; and (5) the literature does not provide a serious attempt to determine how patients could be integrated into the health care team, despite the fact that patients are recognized as the ultimate justification for providing collaborative care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1300,
      author={D. D'Amour and M. Ferrada-Videla and L. S. M. Rodriguez and M. Beaulieu},
      year={2005},
      month={05//},
      title={The conceptual basis for interprofessional collaboration: core concepts and theoretical frameworks },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={19},
      pages={116-131},
      note={id: 266; Language: English. Entry Date: 20051028. Publication Type: journal article; research; systematic review; tables/charts. Supplement Title: Supplement 1. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Evidence-Based Practice. No. of Refs: 73 ref. NLM UID: 9205811. Email: danielle.damour@umontreal.ca. },
      abstract={Interprofessional collaboration is a key factor in initiatives designed to increase the effectiveness of health services currently offered to the public. It is important that the concept of collaboration be well understood, because although the increasingly complex health problems faced by health professionals are creating more interdependencies among them, we still have limited knowledge of the complexity of interprofessional relationships. The goal of this literature review was to identify conceptual frameworks that could improve our understanding of this important aspect of health organizations. To this end, we have identified and taken into consideration: (A) the various definitions proposed in the literature and the various concepts associated with collaboration, and (B) the various theoretical frameworks of collaboration. Our results demonstrate that: (1) the concept of collaboration is commonly defined through five underlying concepts: sharing, partnership, power, interdependency and process; (2) the most complete models of collaboration seem to be those based on a strong theoretical background, either in organizational theory or in organizational sociology and on empirical data; (3) there is a significant amount of diversity in the way the various authors conceptualized collaboration and in the factors influencing collaboration; (4) these frameworks do not establish clear links between the elements in the models and the outputs; and (5) the literature does not provide a serious attempt to determine how patients could be integrated into the health care team, despite the fact that patients are recognized as the ultimate justification for providing collaborative care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Interdisciplinary--Trends; Interprofessional Relations; Collaboration; Conceptual Framework; Patient Centered Care; Teamwork},
      isbn={1356-1820}
    }

  • DiMeglio, K., Padula, C., Piatek, C., Korber, S., Barrett, A., Ducharme, M., Lucas, S., Piermont, N., Joyal, E., DeNicola, V., & Corry, K.. (2005). Group cohesion and nurse satisfaction: examination of a team-building approach . The Journal of nursing administration, 35(3), 110-120.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a team-building intervention on group cohesion, nurse satisfaction, and turnover rates. BACKGROUND: Creating an environment that supports and retains nurses represents a formidable challenge for nursing leaders. Research related to strategies that positively impact the culture in which nurses practice, thus potentially improving nurse satisfaction and reducing turnover, is critically needed. METHODS: Registered nurses (RNs) employed on inpatient units in a 247-bed, private acute care Magnet teaching hospital participated in this quasi experimental preintervention and postintervention design. The RN-RN interaction subscale from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators Adapted Index of Work Satisfaction, the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators Adapted Index of Job Enjoyment, the Group Cohesion Scale, and a facilitator-developed measure were completed preimplementation and postimplementation of unit-tailored intervention strategies, which took place over a 12-month period. Turnover rates were collected 6 month preintervention and postintervention. RESULTS: Improvement in group cohesion, RN-RN interaction, job enjoyment, and turnover was demonstrated. CONCLUSION: Targeted, unit-based strategies can be an effective means of reducing turnover rates and improving group cohesion and nurse satisfaction. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1303,
      author={K. DiMeglio and C. Padula and C. Piatek and S. Korber and A. Barrett and M. Ducharme and S. Lucas and N. Piermont and E. Joyal and V. DeNicola and K. Corry},
      year={2005},
      month={Mar},
      title={Group cohesion and nurse satisfaction: examination of a team-building approach },
      journal={The Journal of nursing administration},
      volume={35},
      number={3},
      pages={110-120},
      note={id: 171; PUBM: Print; JID: 1263116; ppublish },
      abstract={OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a team-building intervention on group cohesion, nurse satisfaction, and turnover rates. BACKGROUND: Creating an environment that supports and retains nurses represents a formidable challenge for nursing leaders. Research related to strategies that positively impact the culture in which nurses practice, thus potentially improving nurse satisfaction and reducing turnover, is critically needed. METHODS: Registered nurses (RNs) employed on inpatient units in a 247-bed, private acute care Magnet teaching hospital participated in this quasi experimental preintervention and postintervention design. The RN-RN interaction subscale from the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators Adapted Index of Work Satisfaction, the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators Adapted Index of Job Enjoyment, the Group Cohesion Scale, and a facilitator-developed measure were completed preimplementation and postimplementation of unit-tailored intervention strategies, which took place over a 12-month period. Turnover rates were collected 6 month preintervention and postintervention. RESULTS: Improvement in group cohesion, RN-RN interaction, job enjoyment, and turnover was demonstrated. CONCLUSION: Targeted, unit-based strategies can be an effective means of reducing turnover rates and improving group cohesion and nurse satisfaction. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adult; Attitude of Health Personnel; Burnout, Professional/prevention & control/psychology; Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Focus Groups; Health Facility Environment/organization & administration; Hospital Units/organization & administration; Hospitals, Private; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Job Satisfaction; Leadership; Longitudinal Studies; Morale; Nurse Administrators/organization & administration/psychology; Nurse's Role; Nursing Evaluation Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Staff, Hospital/education/organization & administration/psychology; Organizational Culture; Personnel Loyalty; Personnel Turnover/statistics & numerical data; Quality Indicators, Health Care; Questionnaires; Rhode Island; Social Identification},
      isbn={0002-0443 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Gardner, D. B.. (2005). Ten lessons in collaboration . Online journal of issues in nursing, 10(1), 15p-15p.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Collaboration is a substantive idea repeatedly discussed in health care circles. The benefits are well validated. Yet collaboration is seldom practiced. So what is the problem? The lack of a shared definition is one barrier. Additionally, the complexity of collaboration and the skills required to facilitate the process are formidable. Much of the literature on collaboration describes what it should look like as an outcome, but little is written describing how to approach the developmental process of collaboration. In an attempt to remedy the all too familiar riddle of matching ends with means, this article offers key lessons to bridge the discourse on collaboration with the practice of collaboration. These lessons can benefit clinical nurse managers and all nurses who operate in an organizational setting that requires complex problem solving. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1307,
      author={D. B. Gardner},
      year={2005},
      title={Ten lessons in collaboration },
      journal={Online journal of issues in nursing},
      volume={10},
      number={1},
      pages={15p-15p},
      note={id: 222; Language: English. Entry Date: 20050429. Revision Date: 20050506. Publication Type: journal article; anecdote; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online; Peer Reviewed; USA. No. of Refs: 41 ref. NLM UID: 9806525. Email: dgardner@cc.nih.gov. },
      abstract={Collaboration is a substantive idea repeatedly discussed in health care circles. The benefits are well validated. Yet collaboration is seldom practiced. So what is the problem? The lack of a shared definition is one barrier. Additionally, the complexity of collaboration and the skills required to facilitate the process are formidable. Much of the literature on collaboration describes what it should look like as an outcome, but little is written describing how to approach the developmental process of collaboration. In an attempt to remedy the all too familiar riddle of matching ends with means, this article offers key lessons to bridge the discourse on collaboration with the practice of collaboration. These lessons can benefit clinical nurse managers and all nurses who operate in an organizational setting that requires complex problem solving. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration--Methods; Interprofessional Relations; Nurse Managers; Communication; Conflict Management; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Nurse-Physician Relations; Outcomes (Health Care); Personal Values; Teamwork},
      isbn={1091-3734},
      url={http://www.nursingworld.org/ojin/topic26/tpc26_1.htm}
    }

  • Hall, P.. (2005). Interprofessional teamwork: professional cultures as barriers . Journal of interprofessional care, 19, 188-196.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Each health care profession has a different culture which includes values, beliefs, attitudes, customs and behaviours. Professional cultures evolved as the different professions developed, reflecting historic factors, as well as social class and gender issues. Educational experiences and the socialization process that occur during the training of each health professional reinforce the common values, problem-solving approaches and language/jargon of each profession. Increasing specialization has lead to even further immersion of the learners into the knowledge and culture of their own professional group. These professional cultures contribute to the challenges of effective interprofessional teamwork. Insight into the educational, systemic and personal factors which contribute to the culture of the professions can help guide the development of innovative educational methodologies to improve interprofessional collaborative practice. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1312,
      author={P. Hall},
      year={2005},
      month={05//},
      title={Interprofessional teamwork: professional cultures as barriers },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={19},
      pages={188-196},
      note={id: 216; Language: English. Entry Date: 20051028. Publication Type: journal article. Supplement Title: Supplement 1. Journal Subset: Biomedical; Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. No. of Refs: 45 ref. NLM UID: 9205811. Email: phall@scohs.on.ca. },
      abstract={Each health care profession has a different culture which includes values, beliefs, attitudes, customs and behaviours. Professional cultures evolved as the different professions developed, reflecting historic factors, as well as social class and gender issues. Educational experiences and the socialization process that occur during the training of each health professional reinforce the common values, problem-solving approaches and language/jargon of each profession. Increasing specialization has lead to even further immersion of the learners into the knowledge and culture of their own professional group. These professional cultures contribute to the challenges of effective interprofessional teamwork. Insight into the educational, systemic and personal factors which contribute to the culture of the professions can help guide the development of innovative educational methodologies to improve interprofessional collaborative practice. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration; Culture; Interprofessional Relations; Teamwork; Conflict Management; Cultural Values; Education, Interdisciplinary--Trends},
      isbn={1356-1820}
    }

  • Ironside, P. M.. (2005). Working together, creating excellence: the experiences of nursing teachers, students, and clinicians . Nursing education perspectives, 26(2), 78-85.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study, conducted to inform the development and implementation of the National League for Nursing Centers of Excellence in Nursing Education Program, provides a hermeneutical analysis of the common experiences and shared meanings of excellence as described by nursing students, teachers, and clinicians. Findings highlight how excellence resides in students and teachers working and learning together through enacting new pedagogies. Two themes are reported: "Working Together: Creating New Partnerships Between and Among Teachers and Students" and "Learning Together: Creating Excellence and Shaping the Future of Nursing Education Through Enacting New Pedagogies". (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1317,
      author={P. M. Ironside},
      year={2005},
      month={Mar-Apr},
      title={Working together, creating excellence: the experiences of nursing teachers, students, and clinicians },
      journal={Nursing education perspectives},
      volume={26},
      number={2},
      pages={78-85},
      note={id: 166; PUBM: Print; JID: 101140025; ppublish },
      abstract={This study, conducted to inform the development and implementation of the National League for Nursing Centers of Excellence in Nursing Education Program, provides a hermeneutical analysis of the common experiences and shared meanings of excellence as described by nursing students, teachers, and clinicians. Findings highlight how excellence resides in students and teachers working and learning together through enacting new pedagogies. Two themes are reported: "Working Together: Creating New Partnerships Between and Among Teachers and Students" and "Learning Together: Creating Excellence and Shaping the Future of Nursing Education Through Enacting New Pedagogies". (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Cooperative Behavior; Curriculum/standards; Education, Nursing, Associate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration; Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration; Faculty, Nursing; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Educational; Nursing Education Research; Nursing Methodology Research; Nursing Staff/psychology; Organizational Innovation; Philosophy, Nursing; Questionnaires; Schools, Nursing/organization & administration; Societies, Nursing/organization & administration; Students, Nursing/psychology; United States},
      isbn={1536-5026 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Kyrkjebo, J. M., & Hage, I.. (2005). What we know and what they do: nursing students’ experiences of improvement knowledge in clinical practice . Nurse education today, 25(3), 167-175.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Nations around the world face mounting problems in health care, including rising costs, challenges to accessing services, and wide variations in safety and quality. Several reports and surveys have clearly demonstrated that adverse events and errors pose serious threats to patient safety. It has become obvious that future health professionals will need to address such problems in the quality of patient care. This article discuss a research study examining improvement knowledge in clinical practice as experienced by nursing students with respect to a patient-centred perspective, knowledge of health-care processes, the handling of adverse events, cross-professional collaboration, and the development of new knowledge. Six focus groups were conducted, comprising a total of 27 second-year students. The resulting discourses were recorded, coded and analysed. The findings indicate a deficiency in improvement knowledge in clinical practice, and a gap between what students learn about patient care and what they observe. In addition the findings suggest that there is a need to change the culture in health care and health professional education, and to develop learning models that encourage reflection, openness, and scrutiny of underlying individual and organizational values and assumptions in health care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1324,
      author={J. M. Kyrkjebo and I. Hage},
      year={2005},
      month={Apr},
      title={What we know and what they do: nursing students' experiences of improvement knowledge in clinical practice },
      journal={Nurse education today},
      volume={25},
      number={3},
      pages={167-175},
      note={id: 170; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511379; 2004/02/18 [received]; 2004/11/17 [accepted]; ppublish },
      abstract={Nations around the world face mounting problems in health care, including rising costs, challenges to accessing services, and wide variations in safety and quality. Several reports and surveys have clearly demonstrated that adverse events and errors pose serious threats to patient safety. It has become obvious that future health professionals will need to address such problems in the quality of patient care. This article discuss a research study examining improvement knowledge in clinical practice as experienced by nursing students with respect to a patient-centred perspective, knowledge of health-care processes, the handling of adverse events, cross-professional collaboration, and the development of new knowledge. Six focus groups were conducted, comprising a total of 27 second-year students. The resulting discourses were recorded, coded and analysed. The findings indicate a deficiency in improvement knowledge in clinical practice, and a gap between what students learn about patient care and what they observe. In addition the findings suggest that there is a need to change the culture in health care and health professional education, and to develop learning models that encourage reflection, openness, and scrutiny of underlying individual and organizational values and assumptions in health care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Education, Nursing; Female; Focus Groups; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Learning; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Norway; Nursing Process; Patient-Centered Care; Quality Assurance, Health Care},
      isbn={0260-6917 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Lindeke, L. L., & Sieckert, A. M.. (2005). Nurse-physician workplace collaboration . Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 10(1), 11p-11p.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    Maximizing nurse-physician collaboration holds promise for improving patient care and creating satisfying work roles. The purpose of this article is to describe strategies that will facilitate effective nurse-physician collaboration. First the nature and the benefits of collaborative communication will be reviewed. This review will be followed by a discussion of self-development, team-development, and communication-development strategies that can enhance nurse-physician collaboration. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1330,
      author={L. L. Lindeke and A. M. Sieckert},
      year={2005},
      title={Nurse-physician workplace collaboration },
      journal={Online Journal of Issues in Nursing},
      volume={10},
      number={1},
      pages={11p-11p},
      note={id: 2262; Language: English. Entry Date: 20050429. Revision Date: 20060331. Publication Type: journal article. Commentary: Eddins J. Articles of interest. [Commentary on] Nurse-physician workplace collaboration. J ASSOC VASC ACCESS 2005 Winter; 10(4): 169-70 (commentary) . Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online; Peer Reviewed; USA. No. of Refs: 35 ref. NLM UID: 9806525. Email: linde001@umn.edu. },
      abstract={Maximizing nurse-physician collaboration holds promise for improving patient care and creating satisfying work roles. The purpose of this article is to describe strategies that will facilitate effective nurse-physician collaboration. First the nature and the benefits of collaborative communication will be reviewed. This review will be followed by a discussion of self-development, team-development, and communication-development strategies that can enhance nurse-physician collaboration. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Collaboration; Nurse-Physician Relations; Work Environment; Burnout, Professional; Communication; Conflict Management; Facility Design and Construction; Fatigue; Professional Development; Professional Role; Team Building; Teamwork},
      isbn={1091-3734},
      url={Publisher URL: www.cinahl.com/cgi-bin/refsvc?jid=1331&accno=2005074959; http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=c8h&AN=2005074959&site=ehost-live}
    }

  • Lingard, L., Espin, S., Rubin, B., Whyte, S., Colmenares, M., Baker, G. R., Doran, D., Grober, E., Orser, B., Bohnen, J., & Reznick, R.. (2005). Getting teams to talk: development and pilot implementation of a checklist to promote interprofessional communication in the OR . Quality & safety in health care, 14(5), 340-346.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Pilot studies of complex interventions such as a team checklist are an essential precursor to evaluating how these interventions affect quality and safety of care. We conducted a pilot implementation of a preoperative team communication checklist. The objectives of the study were to assess the feasibility of the checklist (that is, team members’ willingness and ability to incorporate it into their work processes); to describe how the checklist tool was used by operating room (OR) teams; and to describe perceived functions of the checklist discussions. METHODS: A checklist prototype was developed and OR team members were asked to implement it before 18 surgical procedures. A research assistant was present to prompt the participants, if necessary, to initiate each checklist discussion. Trained observers recorded ethnographic field notes and 11 brief feedback interviews were conducted. Observation and interview data were analyzed for trends. RESULTS: The checklist was implemented by the OR team in all 18 study cases. The rate of team participation was 100% (33 vascular surgery team members). The checklist discussions lasted 1-6 minutes (mean 3.5) and most commonly took place in the OR before the patient’s arrival. Perceived functions of the checklist discussions included provision of detailed case related information, confirmation of details, articulation of concerns or ambiguities, team building, education, and decision making. Participants consistently valued the checklist discussions. The most significant barrier to undertaking the team checklist was variability in team members’ preoperative workflow patterns, which sometimes presented a challenge to bringing the entire team together. CONCLUSIONS: The preoperative team checklist shows promise as a feasible and efficient tool that promotes information exchange and team cohesion. Further research is needed to determine the sustainability and generalizability of the checklist intervention, to fully integrate the checklist routine into workflow patterns, and to measure its impact on patient safety. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1331,
      author={L. Lingard and S. Espin and B. Rubin and S. Whyte and M. Colmenares and G. R. Baker and D. Doran and E. Grober and B. Orser and J. Bohnen and R. Reznick},
      year={2005},
      month={Oct},
      title={Getting teams to talk: development and pilot implementation of a checklist to promote interprofessional communication in the OR },
      journal={Quality & safety in health care},
      volume={14},
      number={5},
      pages={340-346},
      note={id: 162; PUBM: Print; JID: 101136980; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Pilot studies of complex interventions such as a team checklist are an essential precursor to evaluating how these interventions affect quality and safety of care. We conducted a pilot implementation of a preoperative team communication checklist. The objectives of the study were to assess the feasibility of the checklist (that is, team members' willingness and ability to incorporate it into their work processes); to describe how the checklist tool was used by operating room (OR) teams; and to describe perceived functions of the checklist discussions. METHODS: A checklist prototype was developed and OR team members were asked to implement it before 18 surgical procedures. A research assistant was present to prompt the participants, if necessary, to initiate each checklist discussion. Trained observers recorded ethnographic field notes and 11 brief feedback interviews were conducted. Observation and interview data were analyzed for trends. RESULTS: The checklist was implemented by the OR team in all 18 study cases. The rate of team participation was 100% (33 vascular surgery team members). The checklist discussions lasted 1-6 minutes (mean 3.5) and most commonly took place in the OR before the patient's arrival. Perceived functions of the checklist discussions included provision of detailed case related information, confirmation of details, articulation of concerns or ambiguities, team building, education, and decision making. Participants consistently valued the checklist discussions. The most significant barrier to undertaking the team checklist was variability in team members' preoperative workflow patterns, which sometimes presented a challenge to bringing the entire team together. CONCLUSIONS: The preoperative team checklist shows promise as a feasible and efficient tool that promotes information exchange and team cohesion. Further research is needed to determine the sustainability and generalizability of the checklist intervention, to fully integrate the checklist routine into workflow patterns, and to measure its impact on patient safety. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Feasibility Studies; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Interviews; Operating Rooms/manpower; Patient Care Team; Pilot Projects; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Safety Management; Time Factors; Vascular Surgical Procedures/manpower},
      isbn={1475-3901 (Electronic)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Maxfield, D., Grenny, J., & McMillan, R.. (2005). Silence Kills: The Seven Crucial Conversations for Healthcare .
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) commissioned VitalSmarts to conduct a study exploring communication difficulties experienced by health care personnel that may contribute to medical error. Areas of concern include broken rules, mistakes, lack of support, incompetence, poor teamwork, disrespect, and micromanagement. (Source: Publisher)

    @techreport{RefWorks:1334,
      author={D. Maxfield and J. Grenny and R. McMillan},
      year={2005},
      title={Silence Kills: The Seven Crucial Conversations for Healthcare },
      note={id: 1041},
      abstract={The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) commissioned VitalSmarts to conduct a study exploring communication difficulties experienced by health care personnel that may contribute to medical error. Areas of concern include broken rules, mistakes, lack of support, incompetence, poor teamwork, disrespect, and micromanagement. (Source: Publisher) },
      url={http://www.aacn.org/aacn/pubpolcy.nsf/Files/SilenceKills/$file/SilenceKills.pdf}
    }

  • Mickan, S. M., & Rodger, S. A.. (2005). Effective health care teams: a model of six characteristics developed from shared perceptions . Journal of interprofessional care, 19(4), 358-370.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This study into understanding health care teams began with listening to participants’ teamwork experiences. It unfolded through a dialectic of iterations, analyses and critique towards a simplified model comprising six key characteristics of effective teams. Using the complementary theoretical perspectives of personal construct theory and inductive theory building, three research methods were used to collect a range of participant perspectives. A purposive sample of 39 strategic informants participated in repertory grid interviews and clarification questionnaires. A further 202 health care practitioners completed a purpose designed Teamwork in Healthcare Inventory. All responses were transformed through three iterations of interactive data collection, analysis, reflection and interpretation. Unstructured participant perspectives were qualitatively categorised and analysed into hierarchies to determine comparative contributions to effective teamwork. Complex inter-relationships between conceptual categories were investigated to identify four interdependent emerging themes. Finally, a dynamic model of teamwork in health care organisations emerged that has functional utility for health care practitioners. This Healthy Teams Model can be utilised in conjunction with a Reflective Analysis and Team Building Guide to facilitate team members to critically evaluate and enhance their team functioning. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1338,
      author={S. M. Mickan and S. A. Rodger},
      year={2005},
      month={Aug},
      title={Effective health care teams: a model of six characteristics developed from shared perceptions },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={19},
      number={4},
      pages={358-370},
      note={id: 157; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={This study into understanding health care teams began with listening to participants' teamwork experiences. It unfolded through a dialectic of iterations, analyses and critique towards a simplified model comprising six key characteristics of effective teams. Using the complementary theoretical perspectives of personal construct theory and inductive theory building, three research methods were used to collect a range of participant perspectives. A purposive sample of 39 strategic informants participated in repertory grid interviews and clarification questionnaires. A further 202 health care practitioners completed a purpose designed Teamwork in Healthcare Inventory. All responses were transformed through three iterations of interactive data collection, analysis, reflection and interpretation. Unstructured participant perspectives were qualitatively categorised and analysed into hierarchies to determine comparative contributions to effective teamwork. Complex inter-relationships between conceptual categories were investigated to identify four interdependent emerging themes. Finally, a dynamic model of teamwork in health care organisations emerged that has functional utility for health care practitioners. This Healthy Teams Model can be utilised in conjunction with a Reflective Analysis and Team Building Guide to facilitate team members to critically evaluate and enhance their team functioning. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Organizational; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
      isbn={1356-1820 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Philippon, D. J., Pimlott, J. F., King, S., Day, R. A., & Cox, C.. (2005). Preparing health science students to be effective health care team members: the InterProfessional Initiative at the University of Alberta . Journal of interprofessional care, 19(3), 195-206.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The InterProfessional Initiative at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, provides learning strategies to be effective health care team members for over 800 undergraduate students in 14 health professions. This paper traces the evolution of the initiative over the past decade and describes future directions. Particular attention is given to the administrative and academic structures and processes required to launch, develop and sustain an initiative of this scale in a major research-intensive university. The paper concludes by reviewing the evaluative work underway and reflecting on the key success factors. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1344,
      author={D. J. Philippon and J. F. Pimlott and S. King and R. A. Day and C. Cox},
      year={2005},
      month={Jun},
      title={Preparing health science students to be effective health care team members: the InterProfessional Initiative at the University of Alberta },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={19},
      number={3},
      pages={195-206},
      note={id: 163; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={The InterProfessional Initiative at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, provides learning strategies to be effective health care team members for over 800 undergraduate students in 14 health professions. This paper traces the evolution of the initiative over the past decade and describes future directions. Particular attention is given to the administrative and academic structures and processes required to launch, develop and sustain an initiative of this scale in a major research-intensive university. The paper concludes by reviewing the evaluative work underway and reflecting on the key success factors. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Canada; Educational Measurement/methods; Health Occupations/education; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Educational; Patient Care Team; Program Development/methods; Program Evaluation/methods; Teaching/methods},
      isbn={1356-1820 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Ross, A., King, N., & Firth, J.. (2005). Interprofessional relationships and collaborative working: encouraging reflective practice . Online journal of issues in nursing, 10(1), 12.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    A challenge for those involved in the education and professional development of health and social care practitioners is to find ways of encouraging and enabling them to critically reflect upon complex collaborative situations and consider how they might improve interprofessional relationships. To meet this challenge, we piloted and developed a reflective exercise derived from methods used in personal construct psychology (Hargreaves,1979; Salmon,1994), which has proved to be useful in three overlapping areas; research, professional development, and classroom teaching. To illustrate the technique, this paper presents a case study of one district nurse who used the method to help her examine complex interprofessional relationships when providing long-term community care. The reflective technique (which uses arrow-shaped cards displayed on large visual layouts) was found to provide a rich description of the individual’s relationships. By employing the visual displays the district nurse was able to explore the meanings of professional identity and roles in terms of professional relationships, and to consider her intentions and actions within a complex multidisciplinary situation. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1352,
      author={A. Ross and N. King and J. Firth},
      year={2005},
      title={Interprofessional relationships and collaborative working: encouraging reflective practice },
      journal={Online journal of issues in nursing},
      volume={10},
      number={1},
      pages={12},
      note={id: 310; Language: English. Entry Date: 20050429. Revision Date: 20050506. Publication Type: journal article; case study; research; tables/charts. Journal Subset: Double Blind Peer Reviewed; Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Nursing; Online; Peer Reviewed; USA. No. of Refs: 22 ref. NLM UID: 9806525. },
      abstract={A challenge for those involved in the education and professional development of health and social care practitioners is to find ways of encouraging and enabling them to critically reflect upon complex collaborative situations and consider how they might improve interprofessional relationships. To meet this challenge, we piloted and developed a reflective exercise derived from methods used in personal construct psychology (Hargreaves,1979; Salmon,1994), which has proved to be useful in three overlapping areas; research, professional development, and classroom teaching. To illustrate the technique, this paper presents a case study of one district nurse who used the method to help her examine complex interprofessional relationships when providing long-term community care. The reflective technique (which uses arrow-shaped cards displayed on large visual layouts) was found to provide a rich description of the individual's relationships. By employing the visual displays the district nurse was able to explore the meanings of professional identity and roles in terms of professional relationships, and to consider her intentions and actions within a complex multidisciplinary situation. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Collaboration--Methods; Interprofessional Relations; Reflection; Adult; Community Health Nursing; England; Female; Interviews; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Phenomenological Research; Problem Solving; Professional Development; Professional Role; Research; Teaching; Thematic Analysis},
      isbn={1091-3734},
      url={http://www.nursingworld.org/ojin/topic26/tpc26_3.htm}
    }

  • Smetzer, J. L., & Cohen, M. R.. (2005). Intimidation: practitioners speak up about this unresolved problem . Joint Commission journal on quality & patient safety, 31(1), 594-599.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    A 2003–2004 Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) survey of more than 2,000 health care providers from hospitals (1,565 nurses, 354 pharmacists, 176 others) confirmed that intimidating behaviors continue to be far from isolated events in health care—and are not necessarily limited to a few difficult physicians, or for that matter, to physicians alone. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @article{RefWorks:1362,
      author={J. L. Smetzer and M. R. Cohen},
      year={2005},
      month={10},
      title={Intimidation: practitioners speak up about this unresolved problem },
      journal={Joint Commission journal on quality & patient safety},
      volume={31},
      number={1},
      pages={594-599},
      note={id: 1002; Language: English. Entry Date: 20060217. Publication Type: journal article; research. Journal Subset: Editorial Board Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Health Services Administration; Peer Reviewed; USA. Special Interest: Patient Safety; Quality Assurance. No. of Refs: 12 ref. NLM UID: 101238023. Email: jsmetzer@ismp.org.; 0 },
      abstract={A 2003–2004 Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) survey of more than 2,000 health care providers from hospitals (1,565 nurses, 354 pharmacists, 176 others) confirmed that intimidating behaviors continue to be far from isolated events in health care—and are not necessarily limited to a few difficult physicians, or for that matter, to physicians alone. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      keywords={Interprofessional Relations; Professional Misconduct; Verbal Abuse; Attitude of Health Personnel; Committees; Communication; Conflict Management; Convenience Sample; Ethics; Female; Job Experience; Male; Nurses; Patient Safety; Pharmacists; Physicians; Supervisors and Supervision; Surveys}
    }

  • Tamura, Y., Bontje, P., Nakata, Y., Ishikawa, Y., & Tsuda, N.. (2005). Can one eat collaboration? Menus as metaphors of interprofessional collaboration . Journal of interprofessional care, 19(3), 215-222.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The turn of the century has seen a sudden upsurge in publications and initiatives around the development of interprofessional collaboration in Japan. In Japanese, the term ‘team-treatment’ is generally used to mean interprofessional collaboration, but hitherto there have been no generally accepted definitions and conceptualizations of the term, nor are there guidelines as to how it may be implemented in practice. In order to facilitate understanding of the different modes of interprofessional collaboration and issues in practice, we introduced the use of menus as metaphors for interprofessional collaboration in a class of first year students of nursing. There were two 90-minute classes available for exploring this topic. Through the use of a metaphor the students demonstrated they were able to conceptualize interprofessional collaboration, identify the value of nurses working together with other professionals and issues involved in making team-treatment work. The purpose of this paper is to share the experience of using metaphors as a teaching/learning strategy, including reflection on the successes and some limitations of what, for us, was an interesting educational innovation. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1370,
      author={Y. Tamura and P. Bontje and Y. Nakata and Y. Ishikawa and N. Tsuda},
      year={2005},
      month={Jun},
      title={Can one eat collaboration? Menus as metaphors of interprofessional collaboration },
      journal={Journal of interprofessional care},
      volume={19},
      number={3},
      pages={215-222},
      note={id: 1079; PUBM: Print; JID: 9205811; ppublish },
      abstract={The turn of the century has seen a sudden upsurge in publications and initiatives around the development of interprofessional collaboration in Japan. In Japanese, the term 'team-treatment' is generally used to mean interprofessional collaboration, but hitherto there have been no generally accepted definitions and conceptualizations of the term, nor are there guidelines as to how it may be implemented in practice. In order to facilitate understanding of the different modes of interprofessional collaboration and issues in practice, we introduced the use of menus as metaphors for interprofessional collaboration in a class of first year students of nursing. There were two 90-minute classes available for exploring this topic. Through the use of a metaphor the students demonstrated they were able to conceptualize interprofessional collaboration, identify the value of nurses working together with other professionals and issues involved in making team-treatment work. The purpose of this paper is to share the experience of using metaphors as a teaching/learning strategy, including reflection on the successes and some limitations of what, for us, was an interesting educational innovation. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Japan; Metaphor; Patient Care Team; Students, Nursing; Teaching/methods},
      isbn={1356-1820},
      language={eng}
    }

2004

  • Burke, M., Boal, J., & Mitchell, R.. (2004). A new look at the old. Communicating for better care: improving nurse-physician communication . American Journal of Nursing, 104(12), 40-48.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Effective nurse–physician communication is essential to care, especially that of older adults, who often have comorbidities that can lead to frequent moves between care settings. This article examines the current state of nurse–physician communication and presents suggestions on how to improve it, including developing relationships, defining communication strategies, and packaging information for clarity. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1291,
      author={M. Burke and J. Boal and R. Mitchell},
      year={2004},
      month={12},
      title={A new look at the old. Communicating for better care: improving nurse-physician communication },
      journal={American Journal of Nursing},
      volume={104},
      number={12},
      pages={40-48},
      note={id: 853; Language: English. Entry Date: 20050128. Publication Type: journal article; CEU; exam questions; pictorial. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. No. of Refs: 12 ref. NLM UID: 0372646. Email: Marina.Burke@msnyuhealth.org. },
      abstract={Effective nurse--physician communication is essential to care, especially that of older adults, who often have comorbidities that can lead to frequent moves between care settings. This article examines the current state of nurse--physician communication and presents suggestions on how to improve it, including developing relationships, defining communication strategies, and packaging information for clarity. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Communication; Nurse-Physician Relations; Collaboration; Education, Continuing (Credit); Home Nursing, Professional; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Physicians}
    }

  • Leonard, M., Graham, S., & Bonacum, D.. (2004). The human factor: the critical importance of effective teamwork and communication in providing safe care . Quality & safety in health care, 13, i85-90.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Effective communication and teamwork is essential for the delivery of high quality, safe patient care. Communication failures are an extremely common cause of inadvertent patient harm. The complexity of medical care, coupled with the inherent limitations of human performance, make it critically important that clinicians have standardised communication tools, create an environment in which individuals can speak up and express concerns, and share common "critical language" to alert team members to unsafe situations. All too frequently, effective communication is situation or personality dependent. Other high reliability domains, such as commercial aviation, have shown that the adoption of standardised tools and behaviours is a very effective strategy in enhancing teamwork and reducing risk. We describe our ongoing patient safety implementation using this approach within Kaiser Permanente, a non-profit American healthcare system providing care for 8.3 million patients. We describe specific clinical experience in the application of surgical briefings, properties of high reliability perinatal care, the value of critical event training and simulation, and benefits of a standardised communication process in the care of patients transferred from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities. Additionally, lessons learned as to effective techniques in achieving cultural change, evidence of improving the quality of the work environment, practice transfer strategies, critical success factors, and the evolving methods of demonstrating the benefit of such work are described. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1328,
      author={M. Leonard and S. Graham and D. Bonacum},
      year={2004},
      month={10//},
      title={The human factor: the critical importance of effective teamwork and communication in providing safe care },
      journal={Quality & safety in health care},
      volume={13},
      pages={i85-90},
      note={id: 223; Language: English. Entry Date: 20050527. Publication Type: journal article; tables/charts. Supplement Title: Suppl 1. Journal Subset: Blind Peer Reviewed; Expert Peer Reviewed; Health Services Administration; Online/Print; Peer Reviewed; UK & Ireland. Special Interest: Patient Safety; Quality Assurance. No. of Refs: 9 ref. Email: mmleonard@att.net. },
      abstract={Effective communication and teamwork is essential for the delivery of high quality, safe patient care. Communication failures are an extremely common cause of inadvertent patient harm. The complexity of medical care, coupled with the inherent limitations of human performance, make it critically important that clinicians have standardised communication tools, create an environment in which individuals can speak up and express concerns, and share common "critical language" to alert team members to unsafe situations. All too frequently, effective communication is situation or personality dependent. Other high reliability domains, such as commercial aviation, have shown that the adoption of standardised tools and behaviours is a very effective strategy in enhancing teamwork and reducing risk. We describe our ongoing patient safety implementation using this approach within Kaiser Permanente, a non-profit American healthcare system providing care for 8.3 million patients. We describe specific clinical experience in the application of surgical briefings, properties of high reliability perinatal care, the value of critical event training and simulation, and benefits of a standardised communication process in the care of patients transferred from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities. Additionally, lessons learned as to effective techniques in achieving cultural change, evidence of improving the quality of the work environment, practice transfer strategies, critical success factors, and the evolving methods of demonstrating the benefit of such work are described. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Multidisciplinary Care Team; Patient Safety; Diffusion of Innovation; Health Maintenance Organizations--Administration; Quality Assurance; Treatment Errors--Prevention and Control; United States},
      isbn={1475-3898}
    }

  • Lingard, L., Espin, S., Whyte, S., Regehr, G., Baker, G. R., Reznick, R., Bohnen, J., Orser, B., Doran, D., & Grober, E.. (2004). Communication failures in the operating room: an observational classification of recurrent types and effects . Quality & safety in health care, 13(5), 330-334.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    BACKGROUND: Ineffective team communication is frequently at the root of medical error. The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of communication failures in the operating room (OR) and to classify their effects. This study was part of a larger project to develop a team checklist to improve communication in the OR. METHODS: Trained observers recorded 90 hours of observation during 48 surgical procedures. Ninety four team members participated from anesthesia (16 staff, 6 fellows, 3 residents), surgery (14 staff, 8 fellows, 13 residents, 3 clerks), and nursing (31 staff). Field notes recording procedurally relevant communication events were analysed using a framework which considered the content, audience, purpose, and occasion of a communication exchange. A communication failure was defined as an event that was flawed in one or more of these dimensions. RESULTS: 421 communication events were noted, of which 129 were categorized as communication failures. Failure types included "occasion" (45.7% of instances) where timing was poor; "content" (35.7%) where information was missing or inaccurate, "purpose" (24.0%) where issues were not resolved, and "audience" (20.9%) where key individuals were excluded. 36.4% of failures resulted in visible effects on system processes including inefficiency, team tension, resource waste, workaround, delay, patient inconvenience and procedural error. CONCLUSION: Communication failures in the OR exhibited a common set of problems. They occurred in approximately 30% of team exchanges and a third of these resulted in effects which jeopardized patient safety by increasing cognitive load, interrupting routine, and increasing tension in the OR. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1332,
      author={L. Lingard and S. Espin and S. Whyte and G. Regehr and G. R. Baker and R. Reznick and J. Bohnen and B. Orser and D. Doran and E. Grober},
      year={2004},
      month={Oct},
      title={Communication failures in the operating room: an observational classification of recurrent types and effects },
      journal={Quality & safety in health care},
      volume={13},
      number={5},
      pages={330-334},
      note={id: 160; PUBM: Print; JID: 101136980; CIN: Qual Saf Health Care. 2004 Oct;13(5):327. PMID: 15465932; ppublish },
      abstract={BACKGROUND: Ineffective team communication is frequently at the root of medical error. The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of communication failures in the operating room (OR) and to classify their effects. This study was part of a larger project to develop a team checklist to improve communication in the OR. METHODS: Trained observers recorded 90 hours of observation during 48 surgical procedures. Ninety four team members participated from anesthesia (16 staff, 6 fellows, 3 residents), surgery (14 staff, 8 fellows, 13 residents, 3 clerks), and nursing (31 staff). Field notes recording procedurally relevant communication events were analysed using a framework which considered the content, audience, purpose, and occasion of a communication exchange. A communication failure was defined as an event that was flawed in one or more of these dimensions. RESULTS: 421 communication events were noted, of which 129 were categorized as communication failures. Failure types included "occasion" (45.7% of instances) where timing was poor; "content" (35.7%) where information was missing or inaccurate, "purpose" (24.0%) where issues were not resolved, and "audience" (20.9%) where key individuals were excluded. 36.4% of failures resulted in visible effects on system processes including inefficiency, team tension, resource waste, workaround, delay, patient inconvenience and procedural error. CONCLUSION: Communication failures in the OR exhibited a common set of problems. They occurred in approximately 30% of team exchanges and a third of these resulted in effects which jeopardized patient safety by increasing cognitive load, interrupting routine, and increasing tension in the OR. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Anesthesia Department, Hospital/standards; Communication Barriers; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Observation; Operating Rooms/standards; Patient Care Team/standards; Problem Solving; Quality Indicators, Health Care; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Safety; Sentinel Surveillance; Surgery Department, Hospital/standards; Surgical Procedures, Operative/classification/standards; Systems Analysis; Vascular Surgical Procedures/standards},
      isbn={1475-3898 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

2003

  • Bianchi-Sand, S.. (2003). It takes a team to prevent errors . The American journal of nursing, 103(12), 89-90.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    This article details the necessity of better communication amongst health care providers to mitigate medical errors. Programs such as crew resource management (CRM) training could promote teamwork and collaboration thus increasing the likelihood of preventing errors. (Source: QSEN Team)

    @article{RefWorks:1288,
      author={S. Bianchi-Sand},
      year={2003},
      month={Dec},
      title={It takes a team to prevent errors },
      journal={The American journal of nursing},
      volume={103},
      number={12},
      pages={89-90},
      note={id: 174; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 0372646; ppublish },
      abstract={This article details the necessity of better communication amongst health care providers to mitigate medical errors. Programs such as crew resource management (CRM) training could promote teamwork and collaboration thus increasing the likelihood of preventing errors. (Source: QSEN Team) },
      keywords={Humans; Interdisciplinary Communication; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Patient Care Team},
      isbn={0002-936X (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Caramanica, L., Cousino, J. A., & Petersen, S.. (2003). Four elements of a successful quality program. Alignment, collaboration, evidence-based practice, and excellence . Nursing administration quarterly, 27(4), 336-343.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The nurse’s role in quality improvement and assurance is well established, but this is particularly true as hospitals engage in a culture of patient safety and view quality-related activities as important "safety checks." The role of the nurse in ensuring quality related to patient care and safety cannot be overstated. The achievement of quality and safety in patient care is the result of caregivers doing the right thing the right way the first time. Nurses serve as a critical link to the best quality health care organizations have to offer. This article describes four elements of a successful quality program in a large tertiary health care setting (alignment, collaboration, evidence-based practice, and excellence) and makes the connection between quality and safety in the provision of exemplary patient care. Three examples are provided that show how nurses and other members of the health care team grouped together as a governing council for quality (Performance Improvement Council) and at the bedside as direct caregivers in ensuring patient safety and quality patient care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1293,
      author={L. Caramanica and J. A. Cousino and S. Petersen},
      year={2003},
      month={Oct-Dec},
      title={Four elements of a successful quality program. Alignment, collaboration, evidence-based practice, and excellence },
      journal={Nursing administration quarterly},
      volume={27},
      number={4},
      pages={336-343},
      note={id: 378; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 7703976; ppublish },
      abstract={The nurse's role in quality improvement and assurance is well established, but this is particularly true as hospitals engage in a culture of patient safety and view quality-related activities as important "safety checks." The role of the nurse in ensuring quality related to patient care and safety cannot be overstated. The achievement of quality and safety in patient care is the result of caregivers doing the right thing the right way the first time. Nurses serve as a critical link to the best quality health care organizations have to offer. This article describes four elements of a successful quality program in a large tertiary health care setting (alignment, collaboration, evidence-based practice, and excellence) and makes the connection between quality and safety in the provision of exemplary patient care. Three examples are provided that show how nurses and other members of the health care team grouped together as a governing council for quality (Performance Improvement Council) and at the bedside as direct caregivers in ensuring patient safety and quality patient care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Connecticut; Cooperative Behavior; Evidence-Based Medicine; Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over; Hospitals, Teaching; Humans; Needs Assessment; Nurse's Role; Nursing Audit/organization & administration; Nursing Service, Hospital/standards; Organizational Culture; Quality Assurance, Health Care/organization & administration; Total Quality Management/organization & administration},
      isbn={0363-9568},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Greiner, A. C., Knebel, E., & of on the Summitt, I. M. C. H. P. E.. (2003). Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality . Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract] [Download PDF]

    On June 17-18, 2002 over 150 leaders and experts from health professions education, regulation, policy, advocacy, quality, and industry attended the Health Professions Education Summit to discuss and help the committee develop strategies for restructuring clinical education to be consistent with the principles of the 21st-century health system. The report says that doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other health professionals are not being adequately prepared to provide the highest quality and safest medical care possible, and there is insufficient assessment of their ongoing proficiency. Educators and accreditation, licensing and certification organizations should ensure that students and working professionals develop and maintain proficiency in five core areas: delivering patient-centered care, working as part of interdisciplinary teams, practicing evidence-based medicine, focusing on quality improvement and using information technology. (Source: Publisher)

    @book{RefWorks:1310,
      author={A. C. Greiner and E. Knebel and Institute of Medicine Committee on the Health Professions Education Summitt},
      year={2003},
      title={Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality },
      publisher={National Academies Press},
      address={Washington, D.C.},
      note={id: 389},
      abstract={On June 17-18, 2002 over 150 leaders and experts from health professions education, regulation, policy, advocacy, quality, and industry attended the Health Professions Education Summit to discuss and help the committee develop strategies for restructuring clinical education to be consistent with the principles of the 21st-century health system. The report says that doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other health professionals are not being adequately prepared to provide the highest quality and safest medical care possible, and there is insufficient assessment of their ongoing proficiency. Educators and accreditation, licensing and certification organizations should ensure that students and working professionals develop and maintain proficiency in five core areas: delivering patient-centered care, working as part of interdisciplinary teams, practicing evidence-based medicine, focusing on quality improvement and using information technology. (Source: Publisher) },
      url={http://www.nap.edu/catalog/10681.html}
    }

  • Kaissi, A., Johnson, T., & Kirschbaum, M. S.. (2003). Measuring teamwork and patient safety attitudes of high-risk areas . Nursing economic$, 21(5), 211-8, 207.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Patient care leaders recognize that substantial reductions in health care errors will not come until more attention is given to human solutions, such as improving teamwork in health care teams. The authors introduce a short, valid, and reliable instrument to measure teamwork and patient safety attitudes in hospital high-risk areas, namely the emergency department, the operating room, and the intensive care unit. The instrument was tested among nurses in four hospitals and the results showed that the nurses favored the team approach, while recognizing that teamwork in their departments is not very advanced and that communication with some key team members is problematic. This situation seems ideal for the design of a team training intervention in these settings. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1320,
      author={A. Kaissi and T. Johnson and M. S. Kirschbaum},
      year={2003},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Measuring teamwork and patient safety attitudes of high-risk areas },
      journal={Nursing economic$},
      volume={21},
      number={5},
      pages={211-8, 207},
      note={id: 177; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 8404213; ppublish },
      abstract={Patient care leaders recognize that substantial reductions in health care errors will not come until more attention is given to human solutions, such as improving teamwork in health care teams. The authors introduce a short, valid, and reliable instrument to measure teamwork and patient safety attitudes in hospital high-risk areas, namely the emergency department, the operating room, and the intensive care unit. The instrument was tested among nurses in four hospitals and the results showed that the nurses favored the team approach, while recognizing that teamwork in their departments is not very advanced and that communication with some key team members is problematic. This situation seems ideal for the design of a team training intervention in these settings. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Humans; Medical Errors; Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Questionnaires; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Risk Factors},
      isbn={0746-1739 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Thomas, E. J., Sherwood, G. D., & Helmreich, R. L.. (2003). Lessons from aviation: teamwork to improve patient safety . Nursing economic$, 21(5), 241-243.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Medical errors may contribute to as many as 44,000 to 98,000 deaths per year. Effective teamwork may serve to avoid and manage error and also address increasing staff shortages, the growing need for cost reduction, and increasing patient expectations. The Institute of Medicine and others have encouraged health care providers to look to the aviation industry because of its long history of measuring and improving teamwork to prevent and mitigate errors. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1371,
      author={E. J. Thomas and G. D. Sherwood and R. L. Helmreich},
      year={2003},
      month={Sep-Oct},
      title={Lessons from aviation: teamwork to improve patient safety },
      journal={Nursing economic$},
      volume={21},
      number={5},
      pages={241-243},
      note={id: 176; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 8404213; OTO: NASA; ppublish },
      abstract={Medical errors may contribute to as many as 44,000 to 98,000 deaths per year. Effective teamwork may serve to avoid and manage error and also address increasing staff shortages, the growing need for cost reduction, and increasing patient expectations. The Institute of Medicine and others have encouraged health care providers to look to the aviation industry because of its long history of measuring and improving teamwork to prevent and mitigate errors. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Humans; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Safety; Non-programmatic},
      isbn={0746-1739 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

2002

  • Sherwood, G., Thomas, E., Bennett, D. S., & Lewis, P.. (2002). A teamwork model to promote patient safety in critical care . Critical care nursing clinics of North America, 14(4), 333-340.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    To create a safe health care system, providers must understand teamwork as a complementary relationship of interdependence. Continuing efforts to adopt the aviation model will enable health care providers to examine the role of human performance factors related to fatigue, leadership, and communication among all providers. The aviation model provides a basis for designing teamwork programs to reduce error and introduces human factor principles and key skills to be learned. Health care providers need explicit instruction in communication and teamwork rather than learning by trial and error, which can instill unintended values, attitudes, and behaviors. The growing research base continues to examine the problem of health care safety and to test the most effective team training approaches. What is the most effective pattern and timing of communication among providers? What system level changes are needed in the critical care area to improve communication through teamwork and thus create a safer health care system? What are potential points of error in the daily operation that could be alleviated through effective teamwork? Continuing to test the model will ultimately change patient safety. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1359,
      author={G. Sherwood and E. Thomas and D. S. Bennett and P. Lewis},
      year={2002},
      month={Dec},
      title={A teamwork model to promote patient safety in critical care },
      journal={Critical care nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={14},
      number={4},
      pages={333-340},
      note={id: 179; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 8912620; ppublish },
      abstract={To create a safe health care system, providers must understand teamwork as a complementary relationship of interdependence. Continuing efforts to adopt the aviation model will enable health care providers to examine the role of human performance factors related to fatigue, leadership, and communication among all providers. The aviation model provides a basis for designing teamwork programs to reduce error and introduces human factor principles and key skills to be learned. Health care providers need explicit instruction in communication and teamwork rather than learning by trial and error, which can instill unintended values, attitudes, and behaviors. The growing research base continues to examine the problem of health care safety and to test the most effective team training approaches. What is the most effective pattern and timing of communication among providers? What system level changes are needed in the critical care area to improve communication through teamwork and thus create a safer health care system? What are potential points of error in the daily operation that could be alleviated through effective teamwork? Continuing to test the model will ultimately change patient safety. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Critical Care/standards; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Models, Organizational; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Safety Management/organization & administration; Total Quality Management/methods; United States},
      isbn={0899-5885 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

2001

  • Firth-Cozens, J.. (2001). Cultures for improving patient safety through learning: the role of teamwork . Quality in health care : QHC, 10 Suppl 2, ii26-31.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Improvements in patient safety result primarily from organisational and individual learning. This paper discusses the learning that can take place within organisations and the cultural change necessary to encourage it. It focuses on teams and team leaders as potentially powerful forces for bringing about the management of patient safety and better quality of care. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1306,
      author={J. Firth-Cozens},
      year={2001},
      month={Dec},
      title={Cultures for improving patient safety through learning: the role of teamwork },
      journal={Quality in health care : QHC},
      volume={10 Suppl 2},
      pages={ii26-31},
      note={id: 180; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 9209948; RF: 76; ppublish },
      abstract={Improvements in patient safety result primarily from organisational and individual learning. This paper discusses the learning that can take place within organisations and the cultural change necessary to encourage it. It focuses on teams and team leaders as potentially powerful forces for bringing about the management of patient safety and better quality of care. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Cooperative Behavior; Decision Making, Organizational; Great Britain; Humans; Institutional Management Teams; Learning; Medical Errors/prevention & control; Organizational Culture; Patient Care/standards; Safety Management; Social Responsibility; Staff Development; State Medicine/organization & administration/standards},
      isbn={0963-8172 (Print)},
      language={eng}
    }

1999

  • Hammond, K., Bandak, A., & Williams, M.. (1999). Nurse, physician, and consumer role responsibility perceived by health care providers . Holistic nursing practice, 13(2), 28-37.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The article describes a study that addressed perceptions of unilateral and egalitarian role functions for nurses, physicians, and consumers in a long-term, 345-bed psychiatric facility in the western United States. Findings indicated that physicians desired to retain authority for health care decisions and that nurses, social workers, and hospital administrators preferred collaborative practice. Support for shared responsibility increased among psychiatric technicians with years of experience. Experience did not alter the attitudes of physicians, occupational therapists, and recreational therapists for physician dominance. With experience, nurses increased their belief in nurse responsibility. Despite evidence for collaborative decision making, results of this study indicate that attitudes of health care providers may prevent this tenet from being actualized. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1314,
      author={K. Hammond and A. Bandak and M. Williams},
      year={1999},
      month={Jan},
      title={Nurse, physician, and consumer role responsibility perceived by health care providers },
      journal={Holistic nursing practice},
      volume={13},
      number={2},
      pages={28-37},
      note={id: 380; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 8702105; ppublish },
      abstract={The article describes a study that addressed perceptions of unilateral and egalitarian role functions for nurses, physicians, and consumers in a long-term, 345-bed psychiatric facility in the western United States. Findings indicated that physicians desired to retain authority for health care decisions and that nurses, social workers, and hospital administrators preferred collaborative practice. Support for shared responsibility increased among psychiatric technicians with years of experience. Experience did not alter the attitudes of physicians, occupational therapists, and recreational therapists for physician dominance. With experience, nurses increased their belief in nurse responsibility. Despite evidence for collaborative decision making, results of this study indicate that attitudes of health care providers may prevent this tenet from being actualized. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Chronic Disease; Cooperative Behavior; Female; Humans; Job Description; Male; Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology; Mental Disorders/psychology; Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology; Patient Participation; Physician's Role; Psychiatric Nursing; Questionnaires},
      isbn={0887-9311},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Larson, E.. (1999). The impact of physician-nurse interaction on patient care . Holistic nursing practice, 13(2), 38-46.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    The perceptions of physicians and nurses vary in a number of respects, including the extent to which collaboration and joint decision making are valued, the definition of what constitutes adequate and appropriate interprofessional communication, the quality of nurse-physician interactions, and the understanding of respective areas of responsibility as well as patient goals. Reasons for these differences have been attributed to gender, historical origins of the two professions, and disparities between physicians and nurses with regard to socioeconomic status, education, and socialization. Failure of physicians and nurses to interact in a coordinated and positive fashion results in unhealthy work environments and poor patient outcomes. Both professions must examine their will to improve interprofessional interactions. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1326,
      author={E. Larson},
      year={1999},
      month={Jan},
      title={The impact of physician-nurse interaction on patient care },
      journal={Holistic nursing practice},
      volume={13},
      number={2},
      pages={38-46},
      note={id: 383; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8702105; RF: 34; ppublish },
      abstract={The perceptions of physicians and nurses vary in a number of respects, including the extent to which collaboration and joint decision making are valued, the definition of what constitutes adequate and appropriate interprofessional communication, the quality of nurse-physician interactions, and the understanding of respective areas of responsibility as well as patient goals. Reasons for these differences have been attributed to gender, historical origins of the two professions, and disparities between physicians and nurses with regard to socioeconomic status, education, and socialization. Failure of physicians and nurses to interact in a coordinated and positive fashion results in unhealthy work environments and poor patient outcomes. Both professions must examine their will to improve interprofessional interactions. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Communication; Cooperative Behavior; Humans; Job Description; Patient Care/psychology; Physician-Nurse Relations; Quality of Health Care},
      isbn={0887-9311},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Schofield, R. F., & Amodeo, M.. (1999). Interdisciplinary teams in health care and human services settings: are they effective? . Health & social work, 24(3), 210-219.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Empirical evidence for the efficacy of interdisciplinary teams is essential in the current context of managed care. Because careful assessment of the interdisciplinary team has important implications for patients and health care professionals, as well as employers, the authors read over 2,200 abstracts and analyzed 224 articles from four databases in eight health-related fields. Articles were grouped by the type of analysis engaged in by their authors (descriptive, process-focused, empirical, or outcome), by methodology (none, general research, or quantitative), and by domains of interest (patient care, personnel, or management). Findings indicate significant weaknesses in terminology and research content. Directions for future research that would help ascertain the contribution of the interdisciplinary team are outlined. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1355,
      author={R. F. Schofield and M. Amodeo},
      year={1999},
      month={Aug},
      title={Interdisciplinary teams in health care and human services settings: are they effective? },
      journal={Health & social work},
      volume={24},
      number={3},
      pages={210-219},
      note={id: 386; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7611528; RF: 37; ppublish },
      abstract={Empirical evidence for the efficacy of interdisciplinary teams is essential in the current context of managed care. Because careful assessment of the interdisciplinary team has important implications for patients and health care professionals, as well as employers, the authors read over 2,200 abstracts and analyzed 224 articles from four databases in eight health-related fields. Articles were grouped by the type of analysis engaged in by their authors (descriptive, process-focused, empirical, or outcome), by methodology (none, general research, or quantitative), and by domains of interest (patient care, personnel, or management). Findings indicate significant weaknesses in terminology and research content. Directions for future research that would help ascertain the contribution of the interdisciplinary team are outlined. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Adolescent; Adolescent Health Services/organization & administration; Evaluation Studies; Humans; Managed Care Programs/organization & administration; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Research},
      isbn={0360-7283},
      language={eng}
    }

  • Sternas, K. A., O’Hare, P., Lehman, K., & Milligan, R.. (1999). Nursing and medical student teaming for service learning in partnership with the community: an emerging holistic model for interdisciplinary education and practice . Holistic nursing practice, 13(2), 66-77.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    To meet the health needs of communities today, health professionals need to be trained in working with persons from various cultural backgrounds, practicing disease prevention and health promotion in community-based settings, and working in teams with other professionals. The article focuses on interdisciplinary teaming for education and practice. In this model, medical and nursing students partner with communities to plan and deliver health promotion education programs and activities. Four service learning projects providing collaborative teaming opportunities as part of the Health Professions Schools in Service to the Nation Program are described. Interdisciplinary service learning has benefits for the community, students, and faculty and will prepare nurses and physicians to have a positive impact on care through future interdisciplinary collaboration in community-based settings. (Source: PubMed)

    @article{RefWorks:1368,
      author={K. A. Sternas and P. O'Hare and K. Lehman and R. Milligan},
      year={1999},
      month={Jan},
      title={Nursing and medical student teaming for service learning in partnership with the community: an emerging holistic model for interdisciplinary education and practice },
      journal={Holistic nursing practice},
      volume={13},
      number={2},
      pages={66-77},
      note={id: 388; LR: 20061115; PUBM: Print; JID: 8702105; ppublish },
      abstract={To meet the health needs of communities today, health professionals need to be trained in working with persons from various cultural backgrounds, practicing disease prevention and health promotion in community-based settings, and working in teams with other professionals. The article focuses on interdisciplinary teaming for education and practice. In this model, medical and nursing students partner with communities to plan and deliver health promotion education programs and activities. Four service learning projects providing collaborative teaming opportunities as part of the Health Professions Schools in Service to the Nation Program are described. Interdisciplinary service learning has benefits for the community, students, and faculty and will prepare nurses and physicians to have a positive impact on care through future interdisciplinary collaboration in community-based settings. (Source: PubMed) },
      keywords={Community Health Nursing/education; Community Medicine/education; Community-Institutional Relations; Cooperative Behavior; Holistic Health; Humans; Interprofessional Relations; Models, Educational; Models, Organizational; Patient Care Team/organization & administration; Students, Medical/psychology; Students, Nursing/psychology},
      isbn={0887-9311},
      language={eng}
    }

1997

  • Shannon, S. E.. (1997). The roots of interdisciplinary conflict around ethical issues . Critical care nursing clinics of North America, 9(1), 13-28.
    [BibTeX] [Abstract]

    Interdisciplinary conflict around ethical issues is an important problem. This article addresses some of the myths and stereotypes that hamper collaboration and suggests five reasons for interdisciplinary conflicts around care of the critically-ill patient that stem from professional training and socialization. These include differences in clinical judgment style, differences in calculating and valuing patient survival, differences in information from the patient and family, differences in perceptions of potential legal repercussions, and different views of patient advocacy and patient autonomy. The author concludes by making suggestions for changes in education and practice. (Source: Publisher)

    @article{RefWorks:1357,
      author={S. E. Shannon},
      year={1997},
      month={03},
      title={The roots of interdisciplinary conflict around ethical issues },
      journal={Critical care nursing clinics of North America},
      volume={9},
      number={1},
      pages={13-28},
      note={id: 1003; Language: English. Entry Date: 19970601. Publication Type: journal article. Journal Subset: Core Nursing; Nursing; Peer Reviewed; USA. No. of Refs: 55 ref. PMID: 9136341 NLM UID: 8912620.; 1 },
      abstract={Interdisciplinary conflict around ethical issues is an important problem. This article addresses some of the myths and stereotypes that hamper collaboration and suggests five reasons for interdisciplinary conflicts around care of the critically-ill patient that stem from professional training and socialization. These include differences in clinical judgment style, differences in calculating and valuing patient survival, differences in information from the patient and family, differences in perceptions of potential legal repercussions, and different views of patient advocacy and patient autonomy. The author concludes by making suggestions for changes in education and practice. (Source: Publisher) },
      keywords={Attitude of Health Personnel; Decision Making, Ethical; Decision Making, Clinical; Interprofessional Relations; Physicians; Conflict (Psychology); Nurses; Critical Care--Psychosocial Factors; Critical Care Nursing; Social Workers; Patient Autonomy; Patient Advocacy; Socialization; Stereotyping; Prognosis; Liability, Legal; Collaboration; Sex Factors; Conflict Management}
    }