Learning Module 15

Using Simulation in Leadership Courses: Providing a Means for Application of Core Concepts

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Introduction

Undergraduate nursing management and/or leadership courses generally provide a thorough coverage of theory and knowledge about nursing leadership and organizations, but there is little or no opportunity for students to apply this content to gain skills and influence attitudes about leadership. Use of leadership simulation scenarios in undergraduate student nursing education is a highly effective method of instruction for use in facilitating the acquisition of skills and attitudes related to quality and safety in nursing leadership and management roles.

This module will provide information and strategies to assist in your planning and development of materials for leadership simulations using the Pre-licensure QSEN competencies.

Objectives

Upon completion of this section, you will be able to:

  • Identify the steps necessary for the creation of a leadership simulation exercise.
  • Develop a leadership simulation exercise using the tools provided in this module.
  • Discuss the role of leadership concepts applied in simulation exercises to promote quality and safety in the healthcare environment.

Contributors

  • Denise Hirst, MSN, RN
  • Shielda Rodgers, PhD, RN

Recognition and Appreciation for collaboration

  • Carol Durham, PhD, MSN,RN
  • Meg Zomorodi, PhD, CNL,RN
  • Julie Jacobson Vann, PhD,MS,BSN
  • Joan Williams, MSN,RN

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Content

Undergraduate nursing leadership courses generally provide a thorough coverage of theories and knowledge related to leadership skills, but there is little or no opportunity for students to apply this content or influence attitudes about leadership. These presentations will provide information and strategies for development of nursing leadership simulations with scenarios, schedule creation and faculty support for teaching the simulation sessions.

Using Simulation in Leadership Courses: Providing a Means for Application of Core Concepts, Part 1

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Using Simulation in Leadership Courses: Providing a Means for Application of Core Concepts, Part 2

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Using Simulation in Leadership Courses: Providing a Means for Application of Core Concepts, Part 3

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Resources

Web Resources

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2011). TeamSTEPPS Instructor Guide: Specialty Scenarios. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from AHRQ Advancing Excellence in Health Care: http://www.ahrq.gov/teamsteppstools/instructor/scenarios/contents.htm

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2011). TeamSTEPPS: National Implementation Curriculum Tools and Materials. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from AHRQ Advancing Excellence in Health Care: http://teamstepps.ahrq.gov/abouttoolsmaterials.htm

The Just Culture Community. (2011). Home Page. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from The Just Culture Community: http://www.justculture.org/default.aspx

Bibliography

Che'Reed, C. L. (2009). Nursing Leadership and Management Simuation Creating Complexity. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5 (1), e17-e21.

Fero LJ. (2010). Critical thinking skills in nursing students: Comparison of simulation-based performance with metrics. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(10), 2182.

Kaddoura, M. (2010) New graduate nurses’ perceptions of the effects of clinical simulation on their critical thinking, learning and confidence, The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 41(11), 506-516.

Kaplan, B. and Ura, D. (2010) Use of multiple patient simulators to enhance prioritizing and delegating skills for senior nursing students, Journal of Nursing Education, 49(7), 371-377.

Reed, C., Lancaster,R. and Musser, D. (2009) Nursing leadership and management simulation creating complexity, Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 5(1), e17-e21. doi:10.1016/j.ecns.2008.09.006

Reigeluth, Charles M. Instructional-design Theories and Models. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1999.

Simones, j., Wilcox, J., Scott, K., Goeden, D., Copley, D., Doetkott, R., and Kippley, M. (2010) collaborative simulation project to teach scope of practice, Journal of Nursing Education, 49(4), 190-197.

Sullivan, D. (2010) Connecting nursing education and practice: A focus on shared goals for quality and safety, Creative Nursing, 16(1), 37-43. Doi:10.1891/1078-4535.16.1.37

Waldner, M. and Olson, J. (2007) Taking the patient to the classroom: Applying theoretical frameworks to simulation in nursing education, International Journal of Education Scholarship, 4(1), 1-14.

Leadership Simulation Tools

Leadership Simulation Exercise Planning Tools:

 

Near Miss Medication Error/Lateral Violence Scenario Tools:

 

Just Culture Scenario Tools:

 

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Discussion

After you have reviewed the module presentations and resources, consider how this material is relevant to your own work and experience. The following is a list of questions for self-reflection or for use in class.

  1. Are we incorporating informal experiential activities in our current leadership course?
  2. What would a leadership simulation experience entail in a curriculum in which there is no course credit for experiential learning in the leadership course? If there is no opportunity for formal simulation exercises in our leadership course, how would we integrate leadership experiential learning into clinical course simulations?
  3. The leadership topics included in this module reflect the leadership skills that we (the authors) have deemed important based on the environmental context that exists in the health care organizations in which the students have practiced. In consideration of the specific needs of your learners, “What topics would we include as the key leadership skills and concepts that a beginning nurse might need to effectively manage care and function within the health care environment?”
  4. Given the recent attention to the “Future of Nursing” and “To Err is Human” reports, consider how implementation of leadership simulations similar to those presented in the module can assist in minimizing errors and enhancing safety as nursing students' transition to practice.

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