Posted by on Mar 11, 2013 in Teaching Strategies |

Submitter Information

Author: Amanda Eymard, Co-Author: Linda Manfrin-Ledet,
Title: Associate Professor
Institution: Nicholls State University College of Nursing and Allied Health
Email: amanda.eymard@nicholls.edu

Competency Category(s)
Evidence-Based Practice, Informatics, Patient-Centered Care, Quality Improvement, Safety, Teamwork and Collaboration

Learner Level(s)
Pre-Licensure BSN

Learner Setting(s)
Classroom, Independent Study

Strategy Type
Test/Evaluation/Assessment Strategies

Learning Objectives

This unfolding case study was designed to provide opportunities for nursing students to make decisions regarding a patient diagnosed with schizophrenia. There are KSA safety questions, teamwork questions (especially involving the use of SBAR), medication questions (including safety), a math problem, a video to illustrate schizophrenia, quality improvement questions, and also theory bursts are included.

Strategy Overview

The strategy is an unfolding case study involving a man diagnosed with schizophrenia. It begins with him encountering the police and evolves as he is transported to the emergency department and then to a psychiatric facility, and ends with his discharge. His family is involved in the patient-centered care scenario. Restraints, medication use, delegation, teamwork, communication, reflection, assessment, and laboratory/diagnostics are all included. It is designed to be an interactive, engaging exercise with students enrolled in a mental health nursing course. Questions and scenarios are posed, and then the next slide provides the answers. Theory bursts are also included.

Submitted Materials
Schizophrenia-Unfolding-Case-Study_2.ppt
Atypical-Antipsychotics-and-Metabolic-article-246.pdf

Additional Materials

Evaluation Description

This unfolding case study is presented in the classroom to senior level nursing students enrolled in a mental health nursing course.  The students are encouraged to participate by answering questions and collaborating regarding their answers. The students responded this semester with much enthusiasm; they were very engaged. They initially struggled with the SBAR activities when asked to notify a physician or other team member. This activity has been identified as a weakness in many new grads and was included in the case study for this very reason. As the case study progressed, the students became more confident with making the phone calls.